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Worldly

Author: Vox

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We live in a confusing time, bombarded every day with news from around the world that can be hard to follow, or fully understand. Let Worldly be your guide. Every Thursday, senior writer Zack Beauchamp, senior foreign editor Jennifer Williams, and staff defense writer Alex Ward give you the history and context you need to make sense of the moment and navigate the world around you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

201 Episodes
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Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the political implications of the ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe in India, where cases are skyrocketing, overwhelming the country’s health care system. They look at how much Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government is to blame for the crisis and the degree to which it’s creating political problems for Modi both at home and abroad. In the second half, they talk about the recent local election in West Bengal, how it does and doesn’t relate to the Covid-19 outbreak, and the complex story it tells about the direction of Indian politics right now. References: Here’s Zack’s piece for Vox on the West Bengal elections. Vox’s Jen Kirby and Umair Irfan wrote about what more the world could do to help India. And this is Alex’s Vox story on what seemed like a looming India crisis last year. The New Yorker had an excellent piece on India under Modi back in 2019. The Diplomat reports on Modi’s political predicament. The Associated Press notes how India’s outbreak is ruining Modi’s image. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow us: Vox.com Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex are joined by special guest Julia Belluz, Vox's senior health correspondent, to talk about how Vietnam has managed to keep its total coronavirus deaths to just 35 — yes, you read that right, 35 — in part by completely sealing its borders with one of the world’s strictest travel bans. The gang discusses what led Vietnam to take such drastic measures, why they seem to have worked so well, and whether replicating that approach in other countries currently experiencing outbreaks is feasible now that the virus is so widespread. Then they zoom out to look at whether we can take lessons from Vietnam’s experience when thinking about how to deal with the next pandemic. References: Here’s Julia’s excellent piece for Vox on how Vietnam handled Covid-19. Vietnam has long been a Covid-19 success story. Vox wrote about it here and here. Check out Vox’s “Pandemic Playbook” series, featuring work from friend-of-the-show Jen Kirby on Senegal. The Hindustan Times notes that the farmers’ protest didn’t lead to India’s second wave. Here’s Kirby’s piece for Vox on India and its second wave. The Atlantic published a piece in 2020 about why the pandemic meant the post-9/11 era was over. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow us: Vox.com Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Twelve of Europe’s richest soccer teams tried, and failed, to create their own elite tournament in a naked money grab. Worldly’s Alex Ward, arguably Vox’s top soccer fan, explains why the move angered basically everyone and the scheme failed — for now. References: Alex wrote an explainer on the Super League and how the fans killed it. Support Worldly by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In a very special Earth Month episode, Zack, Jenn, and Alex use Nigeria as a case study to uncover the deep reasons why it’s so hard for the world to quit fossil fuels. Nigeria is a country deeply threatened by climate change, but it’s also one with a major oil industry that hopes to lift millions out of poverty — a feat that has never been done without some degree of reliance on dirty energy. The team explains how these barriers affect the prospects for mitigating climate change in both Nigeria and globally, and talk about what solutions might help overcome these barriers. References: Check out all of Vox’s Earth Month podcasts. This is Nigeria’s national climate action plan. Reuters reports on how Nigeria’s minister of environment said the country must be ready for oil’s decline. Science magazine explains how fighting poverty makes it harder to fight climate change. Amnesty International details the Shell controversy Zack mentioned. Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò wrote about the African case for carbon capture for Africa Is A Country. Zack read from this smart paper on home energy needs in Nigeria. Here’s Private Empire, the book on ExxonMobil by Steve Coll that Alex referenced. Learn about the problem with “degrowth.” Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow us: Vox.com Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex talk about President Joe Biden’s announcement that all remaining US troops will withdraw from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 — the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks that launched the war. They discuss what the US withdrawal means for the near-term future of Afghanistan, why Biden finally made the tough call that his predecessors couldn’t (or wouldn’t), and what that decision tells us about how Biden sees the future of US military engagement abroad. References: Here’s Alex’s Vox story on Biden’s announcement to withdraw all US troops by September 11. Alex interviewed experts making the best case for and against an Afghanistan withdrawal. Biden’s Afghanistan withdrawal speech is on the White House’s website. The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace, and Security ranked Afghanistan as the second-worst country for women. The BBC reports that the Taliban is already claiming it won the war. The Wall Street Journal reported how the US is looking to other countries to base its counterterrorism forces. Here’s the story by the Daily Beast’s Spencer Ackerman on how Biden defended the war on terrorism. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex break down the royal drama that has roiled the normally quiet kingdom of Jordan this week: The king has accused his half-brother, the former crown prince, of a vague conspiracy against the crown and has put him under house arrest. The Worldly crew lays out what we actually know about what happened, what led to this family tension spilling out into the open, what political instability in Jordan could mean for the broader Middle East, and whether the Biden administration is betraying its stated commitment to defend democracy and human rights by unequivocally backing the king in this dispute. Also, Zack sings. References: Alex wrote Vox’s explainer on the royal family feud. This is the audio of Prince Hamzah and the Jordanian general talking that Jenn mentioned. The New York Times has a good piece on the roots of the King Abdullah and Prince Hamzah split. You can watch Hamzah’s self-filmed video sent to the BBC, well, on the BBC. The White House had a readout of President Biden’s call with Abdullah. Biden told Abdullah to “stay strong.” Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Alex, and returning guest Jen Kirby talk about the potential for a “bloodbath” in Myanmar. Since the military deposed the democratic government in a February 1 coup, pro-democracy protesters and armed ethnic groups have risen up against the junta. They’ve been met with extreme violence, leading to more than 500 dead and concerns from experts that a broader civil war is coming. The Worldly crew explains how this horrible situation came to be, what may come next, and what — if anything — the international community can do to stop a Syria-like crisis. References: The Associated Press has a good story on the air campaign against the Karen ethnic group. Reuters describes the struggle of pro-democracy protesters and ethnic groups against Myanmar’s military junta. Some experts think Myanmar is on the verge of becoming a “failed state,” per CNBC. The RAND think tank has a long study on how insurgencies end. Expert Ashley South has a report on the Karen and their long conflict against Myanmar’s government. Here’s the Mother Jones interview with a pro-democracy protester Zack mentioned. And here’s Vox’s explainer on the Myanmar coup. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In a very special Worldly episode, Zack, Jenn, and Alex answer YOUR questions! From the many great listener questions sent in over the last several weeks, the gang picked four to answer in this week’s episode: What is “the Quad” and how does it fit into geopolitics in the Indo-Pacific; what’s driving migration to the US from Central America; why Imperial Japan’s use of Korean forced labor and “comfort women” in the 1930s and ’40s continues to complicate relations between Japan and South Korea today; and how to go about explaining world affairs topics to folks who don’t have a deep background in these subjects. References: Alex wrote an explainer on “the Quad.” Vox has a piece on the hurricane’s effects in Central America. Here’s Jen Kirby’s story about a better US policy for the Golden Triangle. This is the Washington Post analysis on the situation at the border. Deutsche Welle has a smart explainer on the forced labor issue on the Korean Peninsula. The Asahi Shimbun has a report on the Japanese firms facing a wartime damages suit. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the raft of problems stymying Europe’s vaccine rollout, which has been slower and messier than expected, given some of the earlier successes the continent had controlling infection rates. They talk about why some countries decided to pause administering the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine and how the EU’s decision to negotiate for vaccines as a bloc, rather than as individual countries, slowed down the rollout and exacerbated tensions between some of the wealthier and less-wealthy countries in the bloc. They also discuss what all of this turmoil might mean for the future of the EU as a political institution. References: Politico Europe has a great piece on how the EU fell behind on vaccines. Yes, Germany was let off the hook after it tried to make a side vaccine deal. The Washington Post noted that the EU pays less than the US for vaccines. Here’s the survey showing Europe is the most vaccine-skeptical region of the world. The New York Times reported politics may have played a bigger role in the AstraZeneca vaccine freeze than science. This is the Science magazine piece Jenn mentioned about the blood clots. The Washington Post reported that Europe may be headed into a third coronavirus wave. The Atlantic has a smart piece on France’s vaccine skepticism. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the huge news out of Brazil this week, where a judge annulled the corruption conviction of the country’s former leftist president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, opening the door for him to possibly run for president in 2022. The gang talks about what Lula was accused of, the debate about whether the case was fairly prosecuted, why Lula is revered by many of the country’s poor but loathed by its conservative elites, and how his return to the political scene could set the stage for a fiery election contest against the country’s current president, the far-right Jair Bolsonaro. References: Two Vox videos, one on Operation Car Wash and the other on Bolsonaro’s rise, provide great context. Back when it happened, Zack explained Operation Car Wash for Vox. Here’s Lula’s recent interview with The Ink where he discusses his, uh, vigor. The Intercept Brazil showed Sergio Moro’s connections to the prosecution during Operation Car Wash. Voice of America offered a good rundown of the case against Lula. Reuters covered Lula’s “stump speech” that has many speculating about his 2022 plans. Bolsonaro’s messaging on Covid-19 has been disastrous, BBC News reported. The stats Jenn cited about Lula’s approval rating after he left office came from El País. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex debate whether the US should continue to treat Saudi Arabia as a close partner given its atrocious human rights abuses and the declining US dependence on Middle Eastern oil. In the second half of the show, Jenn interviews Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) about his proposed strategy for a new US approach to the Persian Gulf. References: Read Sen. Murphy’s Foreign Affairs piece on a new Middle East strategy Read Alex’s profile about Sen. Murphy’s foreign policy views. Alex also wrote about how Biden didn’t follow through on his promise to punish MBS. CNN reported that the Biden administration never considered sanctioning MBS. In 2018 Alex conducted an interview with an expert on why the US wouldn’t end its relationship with Saudi Arabia over the Khashoggi murder. You can read America’s intelligence report on the Khashoggi murder. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex break down why the Biden administration hasn’t yet reentered the Iran nuclear deal. They explain that the process of rejoining is more complicated than it might seem, but that it’s still likely the deal will come back eventually. They then debate the pros and cons of rejoining the accord and how well the Obama foreign policy team — many of whom have joined the Biden administration — handled the pact. One point of agreement: The Trump administration’s Iran policy failed. References: Alex wrote about the impending US-Iran talks over the nuclear deal. And he also wrote about Colin Kahl’s under-threat confirmation. Foreign Policy asks if Biden took too long to reengage Iran. Jenn noted a Politico magazine story detailing how the Obama administration let a Hezbollah criminal enterprise proceed to help strike the 2015 deal. Al Jazeera reported on then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s 12 demands on Iran. He achieved none of them. Vox has a great visual explainer on the Iran deal. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex break down one of the DC foreign policy world’s hottest new catchphrases: “great power competition.” It’s the idea that international politics in the 21st century will be dominated by a struggle for influence between the US, China, and (to a lesser extent) Russia. The gang talks about what the concept actually means and whether it’s a useful framework for understanding international politics today and in the future. References: Dan Nexon’s Foreign Affairs article inspired the Worldly crew to record this episode. The Atlantic had an excellent piece explaining how “great power competition” became a DC buzzword. The National Interest had an op-ed detailing why great power competition could be a problem. Matthew Kroenig wrote in Foreign Policy on how the US should outline goals for its competition with China. The Congressional Research Service has a comprehensive report on what “great power competition” has meant in recent years. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the huge farmers’ protests in India. They explain the very real policy debate over new agricultural reform laws that sparked the protests, and how that debate has now been obscured by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist politics, international celebrity activism, and online trolls. Oh, and they talk about Rihanna. Yes, that Rihanna. References: Vox’s Jariel Arvin explains the Indian farmers’ protest. And he also writes about why India’s government is mad at Rihanna. Plus, Vox has a smart video on the protests. The India Forum has an excellent deep dive into India’s three farming reforms. Scientific American lays out the environmental problems with farming in India. The New Yorker in 2019 had an excellent feature on Modi’s Hindu nationalism. The Times of India looks into the rise of internet trolls. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the recent coup in Myanmar, in which the Myanmarese military deposed the country’s quasi-democratic government and detained its civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, along with hundreds of members of her political party. They look at why this happened, explain why both sides in this fight are morally compromised, explore what the Biden administration and the international community can (and can’t) do in response, and project what this means for the future of Myanmar's democracy — and the safety of the country’s many persecuted minority groups. References: Alex wrote an explainer on the Myanmar coup. And he also wrote about why the coup is a problem for Biden’s pro-democracy agenda. Jen Kirby wrote on why the coup is deeply troubling for Myanmar’s most vulnerable. And she wrote about the laughable charges the military leveled against Aung Sang Suu Kyi. The AP explains the differences between “Myanmar” and “Burma.” The new military leadership has shut down Facebook, Reuters reported. Slate has a great piece on why an Obama-era democratization push for Myanmar probably won’t happen this time. Here’s the Foreign Policy story with the headline “Who Lost Myanmar?” Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the nationwide demonstrations in Russia in support of dissident opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who returned to the country this week from Germany, where he was recuperating from a poisoning believed to be an assassination attempt directed by the Kremlin. Navalny was immediately arrested upon his arrival, sparking protests across the country. The gang discusses who Navalny is, why President Vladimir Putin views him as a threat to his grip on power, and what the protests might mean for the future of Russia. References: Vox has a piece on last weekend’s protests. Alex wrote about the Biden-Putin call and Navalny’s arrest. You can find Navalny’s platform here. Check out Pod Save the World’s interview with a Russian journalist about Navalny. Russian reporter Alexey Kovalev writes that “something special just happened in Russia.” This is the Time piece Zack mentioned. Political scientist Timothy Frye wrote about Putin’s “repression trap” for the Washington Post. The Atlantic profiles some of Navalny’s most unsavory views. Jenn noted that Russia has an Internet repression problem. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Biden’s World

Biden’s World

2021-01-2146:121

Zack, Jenn, and Alex host the first Worldly episode of the Biden administration, the show’s first-ever episode when Donald Trump is not president. They discuss how US foreign policy will differ under Biden — and surprising ways it might stay the same — on topics ranging from China to Middle Eastern alliances to climate change. References: Alex has a thorough explainer on Biden’s foreign policy. Zack wrote that it’s okay to feel hope after Biden’s inauguration. Here’s Biden putting the US back in the Paris climate agreement. And here’s Biden having the US rejoin the World Health Organization. Vox wrote up how the confirmation hearings for Biden’s key national security Cabinet picks went this week. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Was it terrorism?

Was it terrorism?

2021-01-1444:102

Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss how the US Capitol insurrection fits into the broader spectrum of far-right political violence in the US. They debate whether the incident should be considered an act of terrorism, and if so, what that means in terms of how to craft policy responses to the threat. They end by looking at President Donald Trump’s role in uniting disparate far-right groups, from white supremacists to eco-fascists to anti-government militias, into a loose but dangerous coalition that may persist long after he leaves office. References: Jenn has a Vox story on what constitutes “domestic terrorism” Zack wrote that “Republicans own this” Vox’s Fabiola Cineas says that “Donald Trump is the accelerant” Here’s Vox’s explainer on the Proud Boys And here’s Vox’s explainer on the QAnon conspiracy theory Lawfare has a smart piece on how the far-right is fractured Vice wrote about how neo-Nazis use imagery of Osama bin Laden Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
America, humiliated

America, humiliated

2021-01-0744:521

Zack, Jenn, and Jen Kirby discuss the assault on the US Capitol by a pro-Trump insurrection that has shaken America to its core. They look at the intelligence and law enforcement failures that allowed a mob to so easily seize one of the pillars of American government despite the US having spent billions on national security since 9/11. In the second half of the show, they talk about the damage the siege has done to America’s image abroad and what that means for the future of global politics and democracy. References: Threats spread online before the assault on the US Capitol Buzzfeed’s report on the right-wing online organizing  What we know about the security failures The Washington Post’s report on the role of the National Guard A coup expert on Wednesday’s events How world leaders are reacting ITV’s report on the Capitol insurrection The Atlantic’s Anne Applebaum on the diminished power of America’s democratic example Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Jen Kirby (@j_kirby1), foreign reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Hindsight is 2020

Hindsight is 2020

2020-12-1749:571

Jenn, Alex, and Jen wrap up 2020 by discussing the biggest stories that flew under the radar this year because of, well, everything. They talk about the war in Ethiopia, a major leadership change in Japan, and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s constitutional amendments that allow him to stay in power basically for life. Then they turn to the big storylines they’re watching in 2021, including the end of Angela Merkel’s chancellorship in Germany, Joe Biden’s Latin America policy, and potential North Korean provocations. Most importantly, the gang wishes everyone a safe and joyful holiday season. References: Today, Explained explains Ethiopia’s crisis A top aid official on Ethiopia’s humanitarian crisis Alex’s reporting on Japan’s remilitarization  Who is Japan’s new prime minister? Putin’s president-for-life plans The race to replace Angela Merkel  Joe Biden looks to Latin America The challenges of US policy in Latin America Will Kim Jong Un welcome Biden with a weapons test? Hosts: Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), national security reporter, Vox Jen Kirby (@j_kirby1), foreign reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (19)

asocality

About 23% of this episode is just "you know."

Oct 8th
Reply

Mark H.

Ummm... to address one of Jenn's points- I don't think our troops stationed in Germany are just "done" and suddenly jobless because they are pulled from Germany 😂😂 there are other things they do in the military than just "troop around" as she implies. Her argument kind of falls backwards on itself. Am I wrong? The hosts have a great sense of humor but Jenn also takes forever to get her point out. It's like spit it out already.

Aug 1st
Reply (1)

Mark H.

Alex, watch documentary "Unacknowledged" on Netflix.

May 13th
Reply

Nicolas Brylle

the EU should do more. But the reason why they haven't until recently is because healthcare is a national concern. It is not regulated on a European level. Vox commentators should know this before telling disinformation.

Mar 20th
Reply

Jaylani Adam

Thank you guys for critiquing Tulsi Gabbard's foreign policy. I am a skeptic of hers. As a matter of fact, I don't trust her.

Feb 24th
Reply

shekhu verma

How stupid you have to be call this bill assault on muslim rights when it has nothing to do with Muslims of India. Read the bill and debate on facts but stop your propaganda. Totally biased podcast, i am unsubscribing your podcast and all other vox podcasts because you guys are liars whi dont do research and spread propaganda.

Jan 3rd
Reply

TruthSeeker

This is a biased podcast. Why don't you do a podcast on the treatment of minorities in Muslim majority countries? Too scared?

Dec 14th
Reply

Alexander Hetherington

sounds level is far too low for this episode and same for the ads recently they've been really quiet.

Nov 8th
Reply (3)

Forrest Elliott

These people sound, like, idiots, like, totally

Aug 24th
Reply

Fee Leakey

Wow, I usually love the duality of perspectives on your show but today... seemed so one sided and without the usual amount of research? You guys are awesome, but today was less than your greatest feat...

May 30th
Reply

Subedi Sudip

Hi Vox Wordly, can you please do a little explainer on Sri Lanka crisis on one of your future shows? Thanks in advance.

Dec 16th
Reply

Sherry Martin

Mr Mueller she wrote

Sep 20th
Reply

Daryl Sande

Jenn, Try doing a podcast without saying "Right?" or "like" once. thanks

Jun 12th
Reply (1)

Monu Rajan

your explanation of the India-Pak dispute is a very simplistic rendition of a very complex issue.

Jun 4th
Reply
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