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You Might Have a Point

You Might Have a Point

Author: Stephen Dause

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"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast (and a blog) made with the intent of promoting productive conversation about politics and related topics, including philosophy, psychology, and culture. Email stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com with questions and feedback.
15 Episodes
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"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Steven Nelson, reporter for the New York Post (https://nypost.com/author/steven-nelson/). They discuss: * why it's easier to be a straight news reporter as someone who is open to hearing both sides (but also why sometimes, having a strong opinion on an issue might result in better reporting) * how COVID-19 has impacted the job of a journalist in D.C. and how things have still been very slow to change * McConnell's "letter" to Biden about the 1619 project (https://nypost.com/2021/04/30/sen-mcconnell-asks-biden-administration-to-ditch-push-to-teach-1619-project/) * Biden's recent meeting with 6 Republican Senators about infrastructure (https://nypost.com/2021/05/13/biden-meets-with-gop-to-talk-compromise-on-2-3-trillion-infrastructure-bill/) * why Steven found that, when asking Trump questions as a reporter, how you approached him could have a dramatic impact on how he responded * how Steven thinks the media have done covering Biden overall And, as always, Steven gives his answer to the question, "Can you tell me about a time when you heard an argument from your critics and thought you know, you might have a point?" All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
Stephen Dause interviews Iona Italia about her transition from academia to journalism, her new position (https://areomagazine.com/2021/04/06/editorial-announcement/) as editor in chief of Areo Magazine, and two of her recent opinion pieces, "How British Cops Became the Literal Speech Police (https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/politics/how-british-cops-became-the-literal-speech-police)," and "Not All Men (https://areomagazine.com/2021/03/17/not-all-men/)". "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
Jonathan Chan, executive director of a faith-based nonprofit in Richmond, Virginia (CHAT (https://chatrichmond.org/)), joins Stephen to discuss the historical and present-day examples of racial injustice in Richmond and how the organization he leads is working to address some of those issues. They also discuss Chan's perspective on contemporary cultural issues as a Chinese American and as an evangelical Christian. "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Dr. Xavier Bonilla. Dr. Bonilla holds a PhD in clinical psychology, which he currently practices, and he is also the host of the Converging Dialogues podcast. In this interview, they briefly discuss the motivation behind why he started his own podcast before diving into some of the pieces he's published on Medium: "Rediscovering a Radical Centrism (https://xavierabonilla.medium.com/rediscovering-a-radical-centrism-caa14f4487b6)," "Reimagining a Healthy American Nationalism (https://xavierabonilla.medium.com/reimagining-a-healthy-american-nationalism-9f74b91964bf)," and "Latinos and the American Working Class (https://xavierabonilla.medium.com/latinos-and-the-american-working-class-b52abac9df7a)." They conclude their discussion by discussing the role that personality and temperament plays in politics. "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
Stephen Dause interviews Angel Eduardo, musician and freelance writer. They discuss his essays on the Harper's Letter and on starmanning (a complement to steelmanning) and why Angel doesn't often find the 280 character limit on Twitter to be a problem for communicating about complex topics. As with each guest, Angel answers the question about when he heard an argument that he disagreed with and thought, "you might have a point." Referenced articles by Angel: * I'm a Nobody. The Harper's Letter was for Me (https://areomagazine.com/2020/07/18/im-a-nobody-the-harpers-letter-was-for-me/) * How to Starman: Arguing from Compassion (https://centerforinquiry.org/blog/how-to-star-man-arguing-from-compassion/) * 3 Tips for Having Difficult Conversations (https://www.idealist.org/en/days/3-tips-for-having-difficult-conversations) "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Joe Luppino-Esposito, deputy legal policy director at the Pacific Legal Foundation. They discuss the First Step Act and what more work could be done in criminal justice reform at the federal level, the work that the Pacific Legal Foundation has done to combat executive overreach during the pandemic, and some of the needless regulation that has gone by the wayside thanks to COVID-19. Relevant links: * Why Conservatives Support the First Step Act (https://idueprocess.org/blog/f/why-conservatives-support-the-first-step-act) * Say 'No Thanks' to Thanksgiving Mandates (https://thehill.com/opinion/judiciary/527013-say-no-thanks-to-thanksgiving-mandates) * Pandemic silver lining: Getting rid of needless regulation (https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/op-eds/pandemic-silver-lining-getting-rid-of-needless-regulation) "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
In this episode, Stephen interviews Jamie Weinstein, independent journalist and host of the Jamie Weinstein show (http://www.jamieweinstein.com/). They discuss: Weinstein's version of Burkean conservatism the mostly-interview, sometimes-a-conversation style of his podcast, which does not have a pretense of neutrality, but is open to a wide range of viewpoints the difference between opinion, analysis, and reporting, and whether the media does a good job in distinguishing between the three -- and how the American public could do a better job of recognizing the difference Weinstein's take on the first and second impeachments whether what Donald Trump did leading up to January 6th was "incitement" whether Democrats should have taken a slightly different tack on impeachment whether Joe Biden is a "moderate Democrat" how things might go with the COVID relief bill, how bipartisan it will be, and how that will affect Congress moving forward Weinstein's favorite interview of his podcast, the episode with Ta-Nehisi Coates (http://www.jamieweinstein.com/episode-50-ta-nehisi-coates/) the relative rarity of respectful conversations between two people who do not share a similar worldview or ideology the extent to which Weinstein agrees with Coates on different forms of systemic racism times when Weinstein heard an argument he disagreed with and thought, "you know, you might have a point" "You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen interviews Brittany Talissa King, freelance journalist and former leader of the BLM chapter in Columbus, IN. They discuss: her commitment to being an independent thinker and why she resists labels, even ones such as "heterodox" the amount of bias in the media on the left and the right how to be passionate in your argumentation without ignoring the merits of someone else's argument what she thinks of Biden's approach to leadership so far how her faith informs her work her experience leading BLM Columbus and the policy changes that they advocated for why she is somewhat less inclined towards free speech absolutism than she used to be Relevant links: * Free Black Thought (https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/arts-letters/articles/dubois-washington-black-lives-matter) * an article covering her work leading BLM Columbus (https://medium.com/the-interlude/meet-brittany-king-blacklivesmatter-activist-and-journalist-a1d66a8d153e) * follow Brittany King on Twitter (https://twitter.com/KingTalissa) * her podcast on iTunes, American Shade (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/americanshade-w-brittany-king/id1454728890) All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach me on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email me at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen interviews Joshua Schwartz, engineering professor at Trinity University and newly minted freelance opinion columnist. They discuss his favorite class to teach, "What You Know That Just Ain't So," which covers everything from conspiracy theories to ideological belief systems. They then talk about Schwartz's article on the pace of innovation (https://quillette.com/2020/12/29/the-future-is-already-here/) and why, according to his definition of it, is dead. The interview concludes with a discussion on meritocracy and the extent to which meritocracy is good as an ideal and whether, in today's economy, having free riders is okay. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach Stephen on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email him at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Aaron Rabinowitz, a philosophy instructor, education PhD student, and the host of not one, but two podcasts. Aaron reflects on how he's feeling after the storming of the Capitol, the concept of equity vs. fairness, and systemic racism, among other things. They discuss how it can be difficult to agree on terms and the use of language as a power play. They even discuss whether 2 + 2 = 4. Links: Embrace the Void (https://voidpod.com/) -- Aaron's podcast Philosophers in Space (https://0gphilosophy.libsyn.com/) -- Aaron's other podcast Aaron's Enlightening Round essay (https://www.skeptic.org.uk/2020/11/real-in-what-sense-consensually-torturing-skeptics-over-the-nature-of-realness/) All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach me on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email me at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews the hosts of the Two Psychologists, Four Beers (https://www.fourbeers.com/) podcasts, Michael Inzlicht (https://twitter.com/minzlicht) and Yoel Inbar (https://twitter.com/yorl). They discuss their own podcast, the intent behind it, and the reception they've gotten from academics and the public at large. In the second segment, Stephen talks with Michael and Yoel about the social construct theory of emotion, the role that emotion and intuition plays in how we respond to political events, the extent to which the IAT is a valid and reliable psychological measure, and more. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach me on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email me at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Matt Lewis, columnist for the Daily Beast and CNN political commentator. They discuss the importance of sticking to your principles, Matt's disappointment with Marco Rubio, Larry Hogan's chances of becoming the Republican nominee in 2024, and other topics. To close, Matt answers the show's closing question, which is about a time when he recognized that his critics might have a point. Matt on Twitter: @mattklewis (https://twitter.com/mattklewis). Matt on Substack (https://mattklewis.substack.com/) All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach me on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email me at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. In this episode, Stephen Dause interviews Bill Scher, and they discuss how his liberalism has changed somewhat over the years (but why he does not identify as a moderate or a centrist), the pros and cons of the "Defund the Police" slogan, some ways that the Senate might find a way to compromise in the days ahead, and more. References: Bill's episode (https://www.buzzsprout.com/1507639/6621622-he-saved-the-world-edward-r-stettinius-jr) about Edward Stittenius on his "When America Worked." Bill's take (https://twitter.com/billscher/status/1329820653751570432?s=20) on the perception of House Democratic candidates being tied to "Defund The Police" Bill's take (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOMaepdyUpM) on how the covid relief package could demonstrate how bipartisan deals could get done Bill's Web site (https://www.scherable.com/) All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. You can reach me on Twitter at @StephenDause (https://twitter.com/StephenDause) or subscribe to notifications about new blog posts and podcast episodes at @have_point (https://twitter.com/have_point). You can also email me at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com.
"You Might Have a Point" is a podcast that features interviews with guests who specialize in one or more of a broad range of subjects, including philosophy, psychology, politics, public policy, journalism, and culture. On today's episode, the host, Stephen Dause, interviews Maxim Lott, a journalist who has written for FoxNews.com and RealClearPolitics.com, and who is also the executive producer for Stossel TV. They discuss the approach that Lott takes to his reporting, how he views bias in the media today, the article that Lott wrote (https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2020/09/20/google_pushes_conservative_news_sites_far_down_search_lists_144246.html) about the potential political bias in Google's search results, and more. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. If you have any feedback or suggestions for topics or guests, you can reach Stephen at stephen@youmighthaveapoint.com. You can also reach out on Twitter @have_point. Thanks for listening!
Jonathan Stern and Carter Duncan are interviewed by the host, Stephen Dause, about their reasons for founding Pairagraph, how it works, and the importance of written debate generally. All views expressed on this podcast are the opinions of those expressing them and do not necessarily reflect the views of any other person or organization. Note from Stephen: There were some minor audio issues recording this episode. I was able to clean them up for the most part, but I apologize for the distortion that you might hear. I will work to address this in future episodes!
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