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Author: Cristina Querrer

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This podcast is a place to talk about creativity, learn about some artists and writers. It is a safe place for artists and writers to learn about each other's creative processes and craft.
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Episode 26: Rae Luskin

Episode 26: Rae Luskin

2019-07-3000:39:35

Rae Luskin is an award winning creative activist, author and artist.  Listen to her give tips on how to gain a new or different perspective through visual and creative exercises as well as writing prompts.  This is a lively episode jam-packed with great ideas for art lovers, novices and seasoned professionals. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes http://thewinningadventure.com   Bio: Rae Luskin is an award winning artist, author, activist and the creative mindfulness mentor dedicated to raising awareness of creativity as a positive catalyst for health and well-being. She specializes in interactive presentations, providing creative tools and strategies to foster self-worth, resilience, healing, and out of the box thinking. For twenty years she has helped individuals and teams discover their passion, purpose and authentic power to become confident and effective change leaders and creative problem solvers. Rae, a community activist passionately focuses her lens on improving the lives of women and children whether designing art work for Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky’s “ask” gun safety campaign or sharing her personal story of healing from childhood sexual abuse.  Rae believes when we share our stories of resilience, people know they are not alone and it creates a positive ripple of hope. In 2016 she received woman of Distinction award and was nominated for Beauty In Beauty Out award. She is the author of Art From My Heart a self-discovery journal, Stuck to unstoppable journal and the Creative Edge: 30 days of creativity prompts  and the Benjamin Franklin award winning inspirational book, The Creative Activist: Make the World Better, One Person, One Action at a Time.  She has a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree from Roosevelt University and a Master’s degree in Urban Planning.   https://youtu.be/BLGDYoqTp0s
Learn about Daniel García Ordaz, his poetry and insights.  He is a poet, songwriter and teacher from McCallen, TX, doing amazing things for his community as the founder of the Rio Grande Valley International Poetry Festival. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes You can order here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EYRBUTU/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i3   You can order here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07HWW4BVS/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0   Daniel's Poets & Writers page:  https://www.pw.org/directory/writers/daniel_garcia_ordaz   Email:  poetmariachi@gmail.com Website:  www.amazon.com/Daniel-Garc%25C3%... Twitter:  @poetmariachi RSS feed:  poetmariachi.wixsite.com/blog   Bio:  Daniel García Ordaz is the founder of the Rio Grande Valley International Poetry Festival and the author of You Know What I’m Sayin’? and Cenzontle/Mockingbird. His focus is on the power of language, which he celebrates in his writings and talks. He defended his thesis, Cenzontle/Mockingbird: Empowerment Through Mimicry, to complete his terminal degree, an MFA in Creative Writing from The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley, and he co-edited Twenty: In Memoriam, a response by poets across the U.S. to the Sandy Hook shootings. García is a teacher and writer, and a recognized voice in Mexican American poetry. His work has appeared in numerous literary journals, academic collections, and anthologies. He was born in Houston and raised in Mission, Texas. His publishing experience including editing and book cover design credits. He appears in the documentary, “ALTAR: Cruzando fronteras/Building bridges" itself an altar offering to the late Chicana scholar and artist Gloria E. Anzaldúa, one of his great influences for this collection. García was one of five authors and the only poet chosen to participate in the Texas Latino Voices project in 2009 by the Texas Center For The Book, the state affiliate of the Library of Congress. He has been a featured reader and guest at numerous literary events, including the Dallas International Book Fair, McAllen Book Festival, Texas Library Association events, TAIR, TABE, and Border Book Bash, among others. García’s work has also appeared in Juventud! Growing up on the Border (VAO Publishing), Poetry of Resistance: Voices For Social Justice (The University of Arizona Press), La Bloga, Left Hand of the Father, Harbinger Asylum, Interstice, Encore: Cultural Arts Source, 100 Thousand Poets For Change, Gallery: A Literary & Arts Magazine (UTRGV), Boundless, and The Mesquite Review, among others. See a videos of him on YouTube and follow him at @poetmariachi.   Cenzontle*   “Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy . . . but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.” ~Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird And what makes a mockingbird special, anyway? Why it’s the trill from her tongue, the cry from her lungs, the sway of her lips, it’s her dusty, rusty, crusty cries, the trail of tears in her eyes on sheet music playin’, floatin’ and swayin’ to the beat, beat, beating, way-laying, saxopholaying, assaulted, accosted, bushwhacked and busted, cracked open, bruised, banged and accused, flat broke and broken terror bespoken— a token of survivin’, of thrivin’, of juke joint jump jivin’ of death cheaten daily through unwanton wailin’.   Why a mockingbird’s got diamonds at the souls of her blues, whip-lashed back-beats at the edge of her grooves, croons of healing above strangely-fruited plains of grieving. She lets loose veracity with chirps still rising at the edge of a knockabout life, troubled and toiled beat-boxed, embroiled, de-plumed, defaced, ignored, encased, caged and debased ‘cause of the color of her skin. But as the din fades and the cool of eve rolls in, there she stands—chest huff-puffed and proud, unbowed and loud, endowed with the power of flight, under the big dip of night, echoing the ancient Even cry of a lioness defending her pride in that sweet mother tongue: I rise up, and, Adam, I shall not be moved today!   The mockingbird sings what the heart cannot pray. The mockingbird sings what the heart cannot pray.   *Cenzontle is the Nahuatl word for the northern mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos.   Our Serpent Tongue   Your Pedro Infantecide stops here. There shall be no mending of the fence. You set this bridge called my back yard ablaze with partition, division labelization, fronterization y otras pendejadas de alienization Yo soy Tejan@ Mexico-American@ Chican@ Chingad@ Pagan@-Christian@ Pelad@ Fregad@ I flick the slit at the tip of my tongue con orgullo knowing que when a fork drops, es que ¡Ahí viene visita! a woman is coming a woman with cunning a woman sin hombre with a forked tongue is running her mouth—¡hocicona! ¡fregona!— a serpent-tongued ¡chingona! with linguistic cunning a cunning linguist turning her broken token of your colonization into healing y pa’ decir la verdad You are not my equal You cannot speak like me You will not speak for me My dreams are not your dreams My voice is not your voice You yell, “Oh, dear Lord!” in your dreams. I scream “A la Chingada!” in my nightmares Your Pedro Infantecide stops here. There shall be no mending of the fence.    
Episode 32: Luisa Kay Reyes

Episode 32: Luisa Kay Reyes

2019-09-1000:27:31

Listen to me and Luisa Kay Reyes discuss how she got into writing, her many other talents such as singing operatic and classical music, playing the piano, and the many languages she speaks.  We also talk about the lost art of letter writing. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   Changing Dollars by Luisa Kay Reyes published in Little Rose Magazine, March, 2019 As we walked into the empty breezeway of this Spanish Colonial style building that was set off of the main plaza of a rural village in Michoacan, Mexico, the sole gentleman standing there pulled out a very dusty and rickety small wooden table from the back corner along with an equally flimsy small chair and set it out in the middle of the foyer for my father.  Who promptly set his dark colored cloth bag full of Mexican currency on the top of the table. And as soon as I turned around, what had merely a second before been an empty outside corridor styled with the traditional Spanish archways, was now filled with a long line of working men who were eager to change their U.S. Dollars into Mexican pesos. It was a most exposed way of changing money.  Causing my mother to not unjustly worry about the safety of my brother and me as we were visiting our father during the summer and accompanying him while he conducted his in person money exchanges.  With it being the early 1990s and the use of Western Union, Mejico Express, and other means of electronically transferring money internationally not yet in vogue along with the reticence of the mainstream banks to change dollars in a land where counterfeit movies, music, knock-off purses, and fake sterling silver jewelry could be easily purchased at any weekly street market; there was a great demand for those willing to undergo the inherent dangers and risks of such an enterprise.  And my father happened to be one of them. With our proud to be an American side of the family comprising of teachers and professors who were highly educated but receiving at best average compensation, the mass quantities of U.S. Dollars being changed into pesos that day were a first for my brother and me.  For we had never beheld so many bills even during our periodic long drawn out Monopoly games. Yet, as the line continued increasing with the men continually bringing their dollars to change, it soon became evident that while the U.S. Dollars flowing through that day would never run out, the Mexican pesos that our father had brought with him for the exchanges - might. Once the glamour of seeing so many dollars in one place wore off and the day evidenced that it would be a sizeable one, my brother and I ventured out of the breezeway into the village’s central plaza and looked around for what treats we could find to eat.  We were deep in the heart of Mexico in the region that had once housed the mighty Purepecha empire, but with Michoacan being a primarily agricultural state, the current necessities of making a living had commanded many to go up to “el Norte” and figure out how to send their dollars back home. While every year hundreds of millions and perhaps billions of monarch butterflies migrate up to three-thousand miles from Canada and North America to their winter homes in the oyamel fir trees of Michoacan, over time it became apparent that they weren’t the only entity undergoing such a lengthy journey.  For the next time my brother and I went to visit our father in Michoacan, his money exchange business was now a brick and mortar one with several branches operated by his siblings throughout the area. “Why doesn’t Mexico just use the dollar as their currency once and for all?”  I asked my father. For it certainly seemed like a much simpler option than this continual hassle of changing money back and forth from dollars to pesos and vice versa. “Well, that’s what I’ve always said” was his reply.  “But it is better for me that they don’t.” Then late one night we went to meet with some city officials who were wanting to buy some dollars for the city treasury.  For with the ever present concern of the Mexican peso undergoing further devastating devaluations, even the city was deeming it expedient to have some dollars on hand. And my father’s business was in a position to sell them some dollars at a better price than the banks could offer.     Now that the money exchanging business was more official with its office in the center of the historic colonial era downtown, lots of money orders, cashier’s checks, and IRS refund checks were coming through the teller windows, as well. Often times they weren’t filled out properly and we would have to draw arrows back and forth between the “pay to” and the purchaser fields. There were also some very wrinkled diminutive peasant women covered in their native shawls among the clientele now who were coming through with thousands of dollars worth of money orders, the result of five or more sons sending their earnings back home. The locals informed us that Michoacan had reached the point to where there were more people from Michoacan living in the U.S. than in Michoacan, itself.  And the rural villages that we used to go to with our father, were now devoid of men. Since all of the able-bodied males from the ages of twelve to fifty were in the United States working. We actually missed getting to explore some of the outlying villages like we’d done before, although, sometimes my brother was able to accompany the security guards to some of the more remote branches. Why the banks were so hesitant to enter into the money exchange business was a bit mystifying for my brother and me.  Since after seeing so many dollar bills come through, it was quite easy to spot the counterfeit ones. There was just something a little bit off about the swamp green ink color or the thickness of the paper not feeling quite the same.  Yet, one time, my brother took back a counterfeit bill to the States. And after eating at a restaurant, he decided to see if he could get away with using it. Sure enough, the friendly server accepted the bill without question. And fearing that she might receive a reprimand if her boss were apprised of the fact that she had just accepted a counterfeit, I insisted we tell her to bring it back and let us pay with the real money.   She didn’t want to do so.  She just couldn’t see how the bill was a counterfeit since she swore it looked identical to the real thing.  But, after a while, we convinced her to let us pay with the real money and still a bit puzzled by it all she reluctantly accepted to make the exchange.  Admitting to us that she simply couldn’t tell the difference between it and the real money. Having more employees in the money exchange business meant there was less for us to do during our summer visits.  So my brother and I got to indulge in a lifestyle barred from us in the USA, that of spending the day in the country clubs and fine dining in the evenings.  Yet one time I decided I wanted to save some of my money to buy a new cd player. A notion for which I was quickly called to task, since my father felt the money he gave us to spend during our visits was for us to have a good time.  So, while I still managed to save back some and make my purchase when we went back to the States, I did learn to spend the money freely. A lesson I learned perhaps too well. Then one day while I was in college and driving to my local bank in Tuscaloosa, Alabama to deposit my refund check from the U.S. Treasury, I held it up and stared at it in disbelief.  I knew that getting a refund back was far better than owing money and going on an installment plan to make monthly payments to the IRS. But I couldn’t help but stare at its pale yellow background emblazoned with the statue of liberty on it.  Since I was all too familiar with these checks. They were the ones I’d seen the peasants cash back in my father’s business in Mexico. And somehow it had never occurred to me that I would one day receive one of those, as well. But upon glancing at the amount, it occurred to me that I had a lot more work to do before I could match their sums.  And now I understood first-hand where they came from. https://www.facebook.com/LuisaKayReyesWriter/   http://www.amazon.com/author/luisakayreyeswriter/
Episode 27: Briana Muñoz

Episode 27: Briana Muñoz

2019-08-0600:22:31

Listen to Briana discuss how she got into poetry, her new collection & future projects & plans!   http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes You can by her book here:  https://www.amazon.com/Loose-Lips-Briana-Mu%C3%B1oz/dp/1889568066 Interview on San Diego Voyager:  http://sdvoyager.com/interview/meet-briana-munoz-briana-munoz-north-county Instagram: @womanofwords BIO: Briana Muñoz is a writer from San Diego, CA. now living in Los Angeles, CA. Her poetry and short stories have been published in four editions of the Bravura Literary Journal. In the 2016 publication of the Bravura, she was awarded the second-place fiction prize. She has been published in LA BLOGA, an online publication, the Poets Responding page and in the Oakland Arts Review. Her poem “Rebirth” was featured in the Reproductive Health edition of the St. Sucia zine, a publication dedicated to “Exposing What It Is To Be A Mujer”. Briana’s work was one of ten chosen for “The Best of LA BLOGA” from 2015. One of her prouder writing accomplishments is being able to have been part of the 2017 U.S. delegation attending the international poetry festival of Havana. In March of 2018, she presented her poetry at the 21st international Spanish literature and studies conference in Quito, Ecuador. Briana is excited to continue sharing her poetry in print and spoken form. When she isn't typing away, she enjoys traveling, live music, cats, and thrift stores.
Episode 25: Emily Vieweg

Episode 25: Emily Vieweg

2019-07-2300:28:10

Listen to Emily Vieweg discuss her journey to writing poetry with all the complexities and challenges being a single mother of two, and juggling a full-time job and creative writing classes, and surviving bad advice from well-meaning professors.   http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   Conversations with Beethoven and Bach by Emily Vieweg   Emily Vieweg, in her chapbook collection Conversations with Beethoven and Bach, evokes an image of the poet who, deeply entrenched in the complexities of 21st century life as a mother, reaches across time to link with wit and grace her experiences with classical musicality. In her vignettes, so much turns on a single word such as “frolic” that evokes love and fear and changes in both society and environment.  ~ Clifford Peterson, 2017 ~ Taleamor Park Residency Director   BIO: Emily Vieweg is a poet and writer originally from St. Louis, Missouri. She earned her MFA in poetry in 2015 and has published two short chapbooks of poetry. Emily's poetic success includes publications appearing in Indolent Books What Rough Beast, Santa Fe Writers Project, as well as winning Best Performance Work in the 2nd Annual Human Rights Arts Festival for her poem, "Vision." Emily lives in Fargo, ND, where she is a single working mother of two, volunteer car wrangler, human rights advocate, and office assistant.    Web: http://emilyvieweg.com Fb: facebook.com/EmilyViewegWriter Tw: twitter.com/EmilyJVieweg Etsy: etsy.com/shop/EmilyVPoeticsEtc  
Episode 24: Edward Vidaurre

Episode 24: Edward Vidaurre

2019-07-1600:35:27

Edward Vidaurre is the barrio poet from East LA & Poet Laureate of McAllen, TX.  He has amassed several collections of poetry and has been a pivotal voice in the LatinX literary community where he runs Flowersong Books and continues to write and publish.  Listen to us discuss his process, his influences, his experiment with jazz and heavy metal music, and him reading a couple of his inspiring poems. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   JazzHouse ~ compelling love songs to the intensity of everyday life; from the magic in the routine to the marvels and miraculousness of living. Edward Vidaurre takes us with him on his life trip, from East LA to the Rio Grande Valley and the all the far reaching roots that accompany him in the form of ancestors, spirits, family, and other familiars. JAZzHOUSE is a base camp, and a life. We are invited in to share some food, some cafecito, or a glass of wine - to sit awhile and be grateful for every minute we are alive. BIO: Edward Vidaurre, the 2018-2019 McAllen,Texas Poet Laureate and author of six collections of poetry: I Took My Barrio on A Road Trip (Slough Press 2013), Insomnia (El Zarape Press 2014), Beautiful Scars: Elegiac Beat Poems (El Zarape Press 2015),Chicano Blood Transfusion (FlowerSong Press 2016), and Ramona & Rumi: Love in the Time of Oligarchy & Unedited Necessary Poems (Hercules Publishing 2018),JAZzHOUSE (Prickly Pear Press, 2019) and forthcoming from King Shot Press, WhenA City Ends. Vidaurre has been published in several literary journals and anthologies. Vidaurre was the Director of Operations in 2018 for the Valley International PoetryFestival, moderator for Poets Responding, and founder of Pasta, Poetry & Vino - a reading series in the Rio Grande Valley. He is a two-time Pushcart Prize nominee and resides in McAllen. He writes from the front lines of the Mexican-American borderlands of El Valle in south Tejas. Born and raised in Boyle Heights, California.   Poet Laureate: City of McAllen 2018-2019 Publisher: FlowerSong Books Founder of Pasta, Poetry & Vino   http://edwardvidaurre.blogspot.com/ vidaurre.poet@gmail.com 
We are definitely having fun here at http://YourArtsyGirlPodcast.com! Michelle Peñaloza has a new full-length poetry collection, "Former Possessions of the Spanish Empire" & we were all abuzz about it! We also discuss the necessary "hustle" of promoting our poetry because the struggle is real, ya'll. That's why tapping into "community" & getting on this podcast show is such a symbiosis of sorts. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes http://michellepenaloza.com Michelle Peñaloza is author of Former Possessions of the Spanish Empire, which won the 2018 Hillary Gravendyk National Poetry Prize and will be published in August 2019 by Inlandia Institute. She is also the author of two chapbooks, landscape/heartbreak (Two Sylvias, 2015), and Last Night I Dreamt of Volcanoes (Organic Weapon Arts, 2015). Her work can be found in places like Prairie Schooner, upstreet, Pleiades, The Normal School and Third Coast. She is the recipient of fellowships from the University of Oregon, Kundiman and Hugo House as well as the 2019 Scotti Merrill Emerging Writer Award for Poetry from The Key West Literary Seminar. Michelle has also received scholarships from Lemon Tree House, Caldera, Vermont Studio Center, VONA/Voices, and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, among others. The proud daughter of Filipino immigrants, Michelle was born in the suburbs of Detroit, MI and raised in Nashville, TN. She now lives, farms, and writes in rural Northern California. Michelle made a "mixtape" for her poetry collection. Check it out!   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3uAR57qg44gKhnG3uDQTtG?si=Y5vAGHaNTxGbLswX4wPBeg
Rebecca Mabanglo-Mayor is a storyteller, writer and poet residing in Washington state. We talk about her new collection of poetry "Dancing Between Bamboo Poles", her rich family history, about being "silenced" and Filipino stereotypes, to name a few. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   http://rebeccamabanglomayor.com Rebecca's email: rmm.wordbinder@gmail.com   Rebecca Mabanglo-Mayor’s non-fiction, poetry, and short fiction have appeared in print and online in several journals and anthologies including Katipunan Literary Magazine, Growing Up Filipino II: More Stories for Young Adults, Kuwento: Small Things, and Beyond Lumpia, Pansit, and Seven Manangs Wild: An Anthology. Her poetry chapbook Pause Mid-Flight was released in 2010. She is also the co-editor of True Stories: The Narrative Project Vol. 1, and her poetry and essays have been collected in Dancing Between Bamboo Poles. She has been performing as a storyteller since 2006 and specializes in stories based on Filipino folktales and Filipino-American history. Rebecca, as Rebecca A. Saxton, received her MFA in Creative Writing from Pacific Lutheran University in 2012, her BA in Humanities from Washington State University in 1998, and her MA degree in English with honors from Western Washington University in 2003. Artist’s Statement: As a Filipino American writer and performance storyteller, my art is based on the impact of heritage on shaping and informing personal experience and the importance of self-expression as a method of healing. I view my writing and performing as subversive acts against invisibility and silence in a society where women of color are often viewed through an objectifying, exoticizing lens. Raised in a family focused on assimilation, I grew up sheltered from the Vietnam War and the Marcos dictatorship by a shield of language. Becoming a socially aware cultural activist has been a process of understanding the impact of the American Dream trope on my family and upbringing. As a result, I have connected with diverse ethnic groups who also value art as a method of self-expression and an act of compassion. A desire for wholeness drives my art which seeks to weave past and present, folktale with fact, subjectivity with objectivity into works which entertain and enliven others.  
Episode 9: Peter J. Crowley

Episode 9: Peter J. Crowley

2019-03-2600:27:20

Peter J.  Crowley is a fine arts photographer from New England, now living in Olympia, Washington. He has amassed exquisite photos and portraits from people and his surroundings in Norwich, New London and Windham, CT, and wherever he may find himself. But his works include prolific and international recognition. Listen to us talk about how we met, his artistic vision and practices as well as his hope for the future. His website is http://www.peterjcrowley.com.   http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   Peter J. Crowley has worked as a professional photographic artist and teacher for over thirty years.  Throughout his prolific career, Peter's work has come to exemplify not only his purist approach to the medium, but to many people, mastery of the sensuously precise image. His ability to interpret light as emotion has allowed Peter to reproduce the subtleties of tone and sculptural form that is so apparent in his superbly printed photographs. The popularity of his work has been enhanced by the technical perfection of his photography and his insistence on absolute control of the photographic processes. Peter's images have been published both locally and nationally.  Some of the numerous art and literary publications include Florida Design, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and The Sun.   Peter J. Crowley featured in Thurston Talk: https://www.thurstontalk.com/2016/09/15/peter-crowley-photography/ "Norwich Ct. Coffee in my Office 2008" by Peter J. Crowley     Get Peter J. Crowley's photographic book:  "Another Door Entered: A Life in Photographic Art" Peter's extensive gallery shows: https://www.peterjcrowley.com/bio-resume-gallery-shows/
Episode 8: Yvonne Neth

Episode 8: Yvonne Neth

2019-03-1900:23:34

Yvonne Neth is a prolific visual artist working in several mediums.  Listen to us discuss her views on cultural and environmental preservation, as well as her thoughts on striking the balance as a mother and artist, and her experience being a woman in a tech field while gaining her commercial pilot license. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   Yvonne Neth was born on the island of Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) to Pohnpeian and Chamorro parents. She spent her growing years both on Pohnpei and on the island of Saipan in the Northern Marianas. Yvonne attended university in Honolulu, majoring in cultural anthropology, and also earned her FAA Commercial pilot’s license during her years in Hawaii. She returned to Pohnpei in 2009, and worked as a co-pilot for Caroline Islands Air. Eventually, the FSM Government employed Yvonne as their Aviation Operations Inspector for the nation's Division of Civil Aviation. After three years, she shifted from this position and became the Vice-Director for the NGO, Island Research and Education Initiative (IREI), a not-for-profit non governmental organization dedicated to producing culturally-relevant educational materials for Micronesia's students and conducting anthropological, environmental, and geological research in the region. Yvonne has collaborated with professionals throughout the Pacific region and has helped develop a multitude of educational products for Micronesia.  Yvonne’s current art projects include a series of large charcoal portraits of Pacific people and a series dedicated to environment conservation. She also works with a variety of other media, including graphite, colored pencil, conte crayon, ink, pastel and watercolor. Visit her website: http://yvonneneth.com "...Gone Tomorrow: Tuna snarled in commercial fishing net, World Tuna Day Contest" (Majuro, RMI) Charcoal on paper by Yvonne Neth
Episode 7: Kristy Bowen

Episode 7: Kristy Bowen

2019-03-1200:24:03

Kristy Bowen, the founder and editor of  dancing girl press & studios has been a pivotal vehicle for promoting women poets and writers in her e-zine "Wicked Alice" and chapbook series at "dancing girl press".  Listen to us discuss how she started the venture, how she chose the name of dancing girl press, how she grew the press and studio, and her influences and creative processes as a poet and an artist in the book arts. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes Kristy Bowen is a writer and book artist working in both text and image. She is the author of  a number of chapbooks, zines, and artist book projects, as well as several full-length collections of poetry/prose/hybrid work, including SALVAGE  (Black Lawrence Press, 2016) and MAJOR CHARACTERS IN MINOR FILMS (Sundress Publications, 2015). Based in Chicago, she runs dancing girl press & studio and spends much of her time writing, making papery things, and editing a chapbook series devoted to women authors.  You can download and read her chapbook: "the science of impossible objects"   To see more her insights, influences and processes follow her blog: https://kristybowen.blogspot.com/
Episode 6: Tony Robles

Episode 6: Tony Robles

2019-03-0500:30:40

  This year is very significant in that it is the 10 year anniversary of the passing of poet, Tony Robles' uncle, Manong Al Robles.  His uncle started, along with Bill Sorro and others, the Manilatown Heritage Foundation, an organization that keeps alive the memory of the International Hotel and Manilatown.  Tony Robles is now traveling to the Philippines on a journey called, "The Al Robles Express" to Kalinga in the North of the Philippines.  The journey is in dedication to Al Robles and his work as a poet and activist.    http://www.tonyrobles.wordpress.com   Bio: Tony Robles--The "people's poet", was born and raised in San Francisco.  He is the author of two collections of poetry/short stories, entitled "Cool Don't Live Here no More--A letter to San Francisco" and "Fingerprints of a Hunger Strike", both published by Ithuriel's Spear Press.  Tony is also the author of children's books, "Lakas and the Manilatown Fish" and "Lakas and the Makibaka Hotel", published by Lee and Low.  He is the recipient of the San Francisco Art Commission Individual Literary Artist Grantee in 2017 and was a short-list nominee for Poet Laureate of San Francisco in 2016.   http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   Here is the result of Tony's trip on the Al Robles Express! https://vimeo.com/292537800
Episode 5: Luisa A. Igloria

Episode 5: Luisa A. Igloria

2019-02-2600:57:37

My interview with Filipina American poet, Luisa A. Igloria, has not only been informative but quite enthralling as well.  Listen to her explain how nature, place, and histories had such a profound influence on her work. Also discover how her daily ritual of writing a poem a day for eight years and going nourished her creative process and well-being.  http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes Luisa A. Igloria is the winner of the 2015 Resurgence Prize (UK), the world’s first major award for ecopoetry, selected by former UK poet laureate Sir Andrew Motion, Alice Oswald, and Jo Shapcott. Former US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey selected her chapbook What is Left of Wings, I Ask as the 2018 recipient of the Center for the Book Arts Letterpress Poetry Chapbook award. Other works include The Buddha Wonders if She is Having a Mid-Life Crisis (Phoenicia Publishing, Montreal, 2018), Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (2014 May Swenson Prize, Utah State University Press), and 12 other books. She teaches on the faculty of the MFA Creative Writing Program at Old Dominion University, which she directed from 2009-2015, as well as at the MUSE Writers Center in Norfolk. Her website is:  http://www.luisaigloria.com Profile at The Poetry Foundation: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/luisa-a-igloria   Author profile photo - photo credits: Gabriela A. Igloria
Tune in and learn about the inspiration behind the amazing Chicana poet, Ire'ne Lara Siliva's new full-length collection, "Cuicacalli/House of Song". Listen to her as she talks about her insights, aesthetics and philosophies. Please order her book here:Cuicacalli/House of Song.  http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes Ire’ne Lara Silva is the author of two poetry collections, furia (Mouthfeel Press, 2010) and Blood Sugar Canto (Saddle Road Press, 2016), which were both finalists for the International Latino Book Award in Poetry, an e-chapbook, Enduring Azucares, (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2015), as well as a short story collection, flesh to bone (Aunt Lute Books, 2013) which won the Premio Aztlán. She and poet Dan Vera are also the co-editors of Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands, (Aunt Lute Books, 2017), a collection of poetry and essays. ire’ne is the recipient of a 2017 NALAC Fund for the Arts Grant, the final recipient of the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Award, the Fiction Finalist for AROHO’s 2013 Gift of Freedom Award, and the 2008 recipient of the Gloria Anzaldúa Milagro Award. ire’ne is currently working on her first novel, Naci.  Her new collection of poetry, CUICACALLI/House of Song, is forthcoming from Saddle Road Press in April 2019. For more about her, please visit her website: www.irenelarasilva.wordpress.com
Learn more about Filipina American poet, Barbara Jane Reyes' thoughts on her influences, creative process and how building a vibrant community among poets & writers is important for future Filipino American writers. http://www.barbarajanereyes.com/ http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes Barbara Jane Reyes is the author of Invocation to Daughters (City Lights Publishers, 2017). She was born in Manila, Philippines, raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, and is the author of four previous collections of poetry, Gravities of Center (Arkipelago Books, 2003), Poeta en San Francisco (Tinfish Press, 2005), which received the James Laughlin Award of the Academy of American Poets, Diwata (BOA Editions, Ltd., 2010), which received the Global Filipino Literary Award for Poetry, and To Love as Aswang (Philippine American Writers and Artists, Inc., 2015). She is also the author of the chapbooks Easter Sunday (Ypolita Press, 2008) Cherry (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs, 2008), and For the City that Nearly Broke Me (Aztlán Libre Press, 2012). Her sixth book, Letters to a Young Brown Girl, is forthcoming from BOA Editions, Ltd. in 2020. Her work is published or forthcoming in Arroyo Literary Review, Asian Pacific American Journal, As/Us, Boxcar Poetry Review, The Brooklyn Rail, Chain, Eleven Eleven, Entropy, Fairy Tale Review, Fourteen Hills, Hambone, Kartika Review, Lantern Review, New American Writing, New England Review, North American Review, Notre Dame Review, Origins Journal, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, South Dakota Review, Southern Humanities Review, TAYO Literary Magazine, xcp: Cross Cultural Poetics, among others. An Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow, she received her B.A. in Ethnic Studies at U.C. Berkeley and her M.F.A. at San Francisco State University. She is an adjunct professor at University of San Francisco’s Yuchengco Philippine Studies Program. She has also taught at San Francisco State University and Mills College. She lives with her husband, poet Oscar Bermeo, in Oakland. [For a complete list of publications, please click here.]
Episode 2: Eileen R. Tabios

Episode 2: Eileen R. Tabios

2019-02-0700:45:54

Listen and learn about Filipina American poet/writer/critic/artist, Eileen R. Tabios' past and ongoing works, her evolution and her thoughts about her creative process and influences. Please visit her website: http://www.eileenrtabios.com http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes Eileen R. Tabios has released over 50 collections of poetry, fiction, essays, and experimental biographies from publishers in nine countries and cyberspace. Her books include a form-based “Selected Poems” series, The In(ter)vention of the Hay(na)ku: Selected Tercets 1996-2019, THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL: Selected Visual Poetry (2001-2019), INVENT(ST)ORY: Selected Catalog Poems & New 1996-2015, and THE THORN ROSARY: Selected Prose Poems & New 1998-2010. Her award-winning body of work includes invention of the hay(na)ku poetic form (whose 15-year anniversary was celebrated in 2018 at the San Francisco and Saint Helena Public Libraries in California) as well as a first poetry book, BEYOND LIFE SENTENCES(1998), which received the Philippines’ National Book Award for Poetry. Translated into nine languages, she also has edited, co-edited or conceptualized 15 anthologies of poetry, fiction and essays, as well as exhibited visual art in the United States, Asia and Serbia. Her writing and editing works have received recognition through awards, grants and residencies. More information is available at http://eileenrtabios.com. You can also see some of her poems here on Poetry Foundation’s website.
Episode 1: The Start

Episode 1: The Start

2019-01-2800:13:44

Introducing this podcast as a place to talk about creativity, learn about some artists and writers. It is a safe place for artists and writers to learn about each other's creative processes and craft.  This is the first episode, so watch this podcast grow! http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes
This week I am talking to the inaugural Hartford Poet Laureate, Frederick-Douglass Knowles II, whom I've known personally for many years because I also claim Norwich as my "hometown", and as colleagues, we have seen each other "grow up" in the literary scene. Listen to Frederick-Douglass talk about how it was growing up in Norwich and his evolution from spoken word, to the academics, and onto the literary page.  He is prolific with literary and social justice projects literally all over the world while performing his Hartford Poet Laureate duties.  So, listen in. You'll be inspired! http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes   http://frederickdouglassknowles.com You can purchase BlackRoseCity here:  https://www.amazon.com/BlackRoseCity-Frederick-Douglass-Knowles-II/dp/1456729535 Bio:   Frederick-Douglass Knowles II is the inaugural Poet Laureate for Hartford, CT. His collection of poetry, BlackRoseCity, was featured at the 2018 Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP). His works have featured in the Connecticut River Review; Poems on the Road to Peace: A Tribute to Dr. King by Yale UP; Fingernails Across the Chalkboard: Poetry on HIV/AIDS by Third World Press. The Mississippi University for Women nominated his poem “Mason Freeman Cuts Jenkins Down” for a Pushcart Prize. He is the recipient of the 2019 Nutmeg Poetry Award. Frederick-Douglass is an Associate Professor of English at Three Rivers Community College.
Suzanne Frischkorn is a talented and prolific poet living in Connecticut, my home state. Listen to her explain how she got into poetry and the poetry scene and what influenced her work and the many similarities that we shared "growing up" in CT as women writers and poets in our formative years. http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes You can purchase Girl on a Bridge here: https://mainstreetragbookstore.com/product/girl-on-a-bridge/ Poem from Girl on a Bridge --- Great Lash You wear too much eye makeup. My sister wears too much. People think she's a whore. Our cornfields were paved in asphalt, sulfur lights snuffed our stars. When one of us had no shoes, we went barefoot, walking streets laid with tar. First we coated lashes blackest black from tubes of green and pink, our eyes lined kohl. If it was Thursday we found boyfriends and waited by the liquor store for anyone to buy us Smirnoff. Anyone at all. We were not sweet girls. * We were not sweet girls, yet we wore silver chains with silver hearts & crosses, onyx rings, blush, lipstick, powder. Hair flipped by vent brush before entering a night without stars. Our parents were line dancing, were bank tellers, were absent. We were a family that knew nothing about its members. * We cut school and watched Foxes. We cut school and drank vodka. We cut school and got stoned, did our makeup, walked the streets. One of us got out. One of us ran into our connection working a shoe store, one of us glimpsed another with a baby, one of us marries her Thursday night boyfriend and shatters her image. * We were not sweet girls, no. If there had been corn, or stars? Maybe the deep sweet girlness would have surfaced ― dreamy fresh-faced girls ― petals listening to rain.   You can purchase Lit Windowpane here:  https://mainstreetragbookstore.com/product/lit-windowpane/ Poem from Lit Windowpane-- Window  A damp windowsill means nothing— it’s no bird tapping       on a pane— I am waiting  for the swallow’s stone, the anodyne       to illness brought by sparrow song. This morning rain gathers in still puddles and the songbirds      sing without percussion― loud notes echo  the empty street— they sing and       sing and sing. No owl has brushed its wing against our windowpane and sunlight      overcomes the clouds. Thrush birdsong: lacey throated stars. The April        of our fifth year reeds withered around the pond.  Last summer I painted the porch ceiling       robin’s egg blue. Spring now and the sparrows  weave a nest in our dryer vent.      I watch you ladder your way into their world, lift  bits of twine and sticks and string, yet      you know they will return. How I love you then— how I should have loved you all along.   BIO:  Suzanne Frischkorn is the author of Lit Windowpane (2008), Girl on a Bridge, (2010) and five chapbooks.  Her honors include the Aldrich Poetry Award for her chapbook, Spring Tide, selected by Mary Oliver, an Emerging Writers Fellowship from the Writer’s Center, and an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism. Visit her website: https://suzannefrischkorn.com/
Episode 42: Tony Remington

Episode 42: Tony Remington

2019-11-2000:34:18

Tony Remington is a photographer and painter who practices many other art forms. Listen to us discuss his humanistic photojournalist style and portraiture, his vision and desire to continue to create in many genres such as cartooning.  http://yourartsygirlpodcast.com/episodes https://www.instagram.com/xtoid/ https://tonyremington.wixsite.com/mysite Article on the Al Robles Express, 2019, by Lisa Suguitan Melnick:  http://www.positivelyfilipino.com/magazine/the-al-robles-express-is-on-the-right-track Article on Tony Remington's exhibit by Carlos Zialcita: http://www.positivelyfilipino.com/magazine/tony-remingtons-launching-point-to-fil-am-consciousness Bio: Tony Remington grew up in San Francisco's Haight/Ashbury and has lived in many parts of San Francisco such as Daly City and West Oakland. Although he had experience many Balikbayan trips to the Philippines with his parents, in 2005 he began a series of extended visits to the Philippines that accumulated to more than seven years. In 1970 he began his life as a photographer, became involved in Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State College, and developed an interest in Eastern Philosophy. Upon leaving college and after completing his first major photographic essay in the Philippines, he began his work in the post-International Hotel community of San Francisco with poet/activist Al Robles and poet/social worker Presco Tabios. It was here working as food delivery person for home-bound seniors in a makeshift re-established post "Manilatown" he photographed the "Manongs" from 1977 to 1981. The bulk of his economic life span included odd jobs such as handyman carpentry, but most notably to commericial photography, working 15 years as a commercial digital product photographer for two prepress/printing companies. The mainstay of Tony Remington's vision is rooted in his ongoing body of work as a social realist photographer. This influence formally began to transfer into his paintings in 2017 as the official artist of the Manilatown Heritage Foundation's 50th Anniversary of the International Hotel Eviction of August 4. In his own words "I believe in a deeper indigenous sense of continued spiritual evolution." Manong Wilfred Ventura, post Manilatown era, Amparo Hotel, San Francisco, CA, 1979, by Tony Remington   Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, 1975, by Tony Remington   Ondoy Flood, Philippines, 2009, by Tony Remington   "Greetings from an Old Soul", Artex Compound Barangay, Panhulo, Malabon City, Metro Manila, Philippines, 2009, by Tony Remington Laga Festival, Kalinga Apayao, Cordilleras of Luzon, Philippines, 2019, by Tony Remington Juanita Tamayo Lott at the 5th Annual Filipino American International Book Fest, San Francisco Public Library, October 2019, by Tony Remington
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