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freeCodeCamp Podcast

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The official podcast of the freeCodeCamp.org open source community. Each week, founder Quincy Larson interviews developers, entrepreneurs, and professors. You'll learn all about how to build your skills and accelerate your career in tech.

Learn to code with free online courses, programming projects, and interview preparation for developer jobs: https://www.freecodecamp.org
128 Episodes
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On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Adrian Twarog. He's a Software Engineer who started his career by working as the office IT guy at a school and other offices for 10 years. He's since published YouTube courses that millions of people have watched. We talk about: - How Adrian built his development skills by volunteering to taking on web design projects at work - How he started making design tutorials on YouTube and published 300 in a single year - How he was early to the AI engineering craze and published GPT tutorials with millions of views – Adrian's many freeCodeCamp courses, and his gorgeous book on design fundamentals - Being a dev in Perth, Australia – on the other side of the Earth from Silicon Valley – yet still staying at the forefront of the state of the art Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1995 industrial rock anthem. Also, I want to thank the 9,771 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during our conversation: - Adrian's popular video "Real life RPG to track your life": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMn9sxCWN0M - Adrian's UX course on freeCodeCamp: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/ui-ux-design-tutorial-from-zero-to-hero-with-wireframe-prototype-figma/ - Merge, Adrian's Discord community for devs: https://www.mergewebdev.com/ - Adrian's design book, Enhance UI: https://enhanceui.com/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Colby Fayock. He's a Software Engineer and prolific teacher who has created 68 tutorials for freeCodeCamp, and more than 100 videos on his YouTube – all freely available. We talk about: - Colby's early days doing design work for local bands - How Colby went to art school, then pivoted that into a software development - His early career at ThinkGeek where he not only did web dev but also worked as a male model for their products. - Colby's day-to-day work as a developer experience engineer, building demo applications and SDKs - How Colby uses AI tools in his day-to-day work, and what he thinks its current limits are. Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1995 punk song. Also, I want to thank the 9,771 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during our conversation: Colby's freeCodeCamp course on building a clone of Google Photos using AI tools and Next.js: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/create-a-google-photos-clone-with-nextjs-and-cloudinary/ Colby's Trailer and web design work: https://photowall-colbyfayock.vercel.app/wall/design Colby's ThinkGeek Modeling. He's legit a male model: https://photowall-colbyfayock.vercel.app/wall/thinkgeek Colby's music from his band years: https://soundcloud.com/colby-fayock/sets/day-late-hero The XKCD comic I mention about how the scope of developer work can be non-intuitive: https://xkcd.com/1425/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Dr. Chuck. He's a software engineer and Computer Science professor at University of Michigan, which has one of the top-ranked CS programs in the world.  Dr. Charles "Chuck" Severance is also creator of many popular free learning resources like his Python for Everyone and C for Everyone, which millions of students have taken over the past decade. We talk about: - What seperates a Master Programmer from an average developer, and how to become one - Dr. Chuck's mission to make programming knowledge freely available - The fundamental shortcomings of how Computer Science is currently taught at universities – even elite universities like the one he's a professor at - Dr. Chuck's theories on recent tech layoffs and what he thinks the near future holds - Dr. Chuck's love of racing $2,500 "lemon" cars that he revives from the junk yard, and flying planes Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1973 song. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,331 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during our conversation: - Dr. Chuck's latest freeCodeCamp course on C programming: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/complete-c-programming-course-from-dr-chuck/ - Dr. Chuck's Python for Everyone freeCodeCamp Course: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/python-for-everybody/ - Kylie Ying's popular Machine Learning for Everyone course inspired by Dr. Chuck: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/machine-learning-for-everybody/ - Dr. Chuck's website with his free interactive coursework: https://online.dr-chuck.com/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Suz Hinton. She's a software engineer, security researcher, and one of the first ever people to live-stream her coding on Twitch. We talk about: - How Suz started her career building browser ads in Adobe Flash, working around bandwidth early 2000s limitations. - How she moved to the US from Melbourne to work at Zappos, and then Microsoft and Stripe. - Her love of hardware and embedded development - How she went back to school to study infosec, and launched a second career as a security researcher - How she nearly burned out after 20 years in tech, and what she's doing to recover. Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's a 2015 song from an Australian musician. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,331 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during our conversation: - Suz's article on live coding on freeCodeCamp: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/lessons-from-my-first-year-of-live-coding-on-twitch-41a32e2f41c1/ - NoClip video game development documentaries: https://www.youtube.com/@NoclipDocs - The Dream Machine by M. Mitchell Waldrop. Suz says it's "Dense and long, but the best narrative about how computing came to be." https://press.stripe.com/the-dream-machine - Space Rogue: How the Hackers Known as L0pht Changed the World by Cris Thomas. "A book about the original cult of the dead cow hacking group." https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/space-rogue-cris-thomas/1142912008
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Jerod Santo, host of The Changelog, a podcast about open source software development that has been going strong for 15 years. Jerod is plugged in to the world of Open Source, going to all the big conferences and interviewing all the big open source creators.  We have a fun, wide-reaching conversation about some of the current issues facing open source, such as AI models and Relicensing – essentially, a big company closed-sourcing a previously open source project after they buy out its creator. (Fun fact: this can't happen to freeCodeCamp because charities cannot be bought or sold.) I ask Jerod about: - his life as a remote dev in Omaha, Nebraska, raising his 6 his kids - the Changelog News podcast with its weekly 10 minutes of updates on the world of open source - his process, and how he researches and surfaces interesting news for his show - and how The Changelog commissioned 3 full albums worth of music over the years, which you can stream for free. Can you guess what bass line I'm playing during the intro? It's from a 1984 pop classic. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,331 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during our conversation: Jerod's weekly Changelog News podcast that you should totally subscribe to (it's free): https://changelog.com/news Jerod and Adam interview the head of the Open Source Initiative on AI models and open source, which he and I discussed during this podcast: https://changelog.com/podcast/578 Changelog Beats: https://changelog.com/beats And of course, my interview with Jerod and Adam about their developer journeys, and the history of The Changelog on its 10th anniversary: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/open-source-moves-fast-10-years-of-the-changelog/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews ThePrimeagean. He's a software engineer who streams himself programming. He recently left his job at Netflix to stream full-time. We talk about: - Prime's journey from his teacher telling him he'll never accomplish anything in life to working as an engineer at one of the most prestigious tech companies. - Prime's love of "Nintendo Hard" video games, and how his love of challenge propelled him to "get good" at coding - What it's like to live stream coding in front of more than 1,000 people for a dozen hours each week - Leaving San Francisco to move his family of 6 to a horse ranch in South Dakota - Prime's thoughts on AI and how he thinks it will actually create more developer jobs than it destroys I had a blast talking with this guy. Though I don't agree with everything he says, I am right there with him on AI and how it's useful but over-hyped. We'll see what future versions hold and whether a "Moore's Law of AI" is really at work here, or whether it will plateau. I also agree with Prime that devs need to slow down and improve their foundational skills. There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going. Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1996 rock song. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,331 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: - Prime's Twitch, from which his YouTube videos are derived: https://www.twitch.tv/theprimeagen - Prime's Harpoon library on GitHub, which he talks about maintaining: https://github.com/ThePrimeagen/harpoon - A speedrun of Battletoads by The Mexican Runner, to show you how "Nintendo Hard" this game really is. 36 minutes is an excellent time for a non-pro speedrunner like Prime to achieve: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTPGpA0ha9Y
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Gary Simon, a developer and designer who started DesignCourse.com and has published several courses on freeCodeCamp.org over the years. We talk about: - Growing up in rural Ohio, marrying young, and staying out there despite his success as a developer and entrepreneur. - Early client work, and how he designed thousands of logos for clients before becoming an all-out web developer. - Using his skills to help his wife start her own lactation consultant business online - Gary's guitar shredding chops. I recorded this podcast live and I haven't edited it at all. I want to capture the feel of a real live conversation, with all the human quirks that entails. Can you guess what song I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1995s Nintendo game. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,331 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: - Gary's Learn UI Fundamentals course on freeCodeCamp: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/learn-ui-design-fundamentals-with-this-free-one-hour-course/ - Gary's freeCodeCamp live stream series: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/design-course/ - Gary's tool for memorizing the Guitar fretboard and it's 49 notes: https://fretastic.com/ - Gary's Retrowave Guitar music video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDc2OvReYh0
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews prolific programming teacher John Smilga. John grew up in the Soviet Union. He worked construction for 5 years before becoming a developer. Today he has taught millions of fellow devs through his many courses on freeCodeCamp. John spent his childhood in Latvia before the Soviet Union fell. He sought work in the UK as an expat hospitality worker on the tiny island of Guernsey. But he had his sights set on moving to the US. There he worked construction and taught himself to code. He also attended online university courses to get a degree. He met his wife, a nurse from Ukraine. Together they started a family and live together in Florida. During this conversation, John talks about his journey into teaching the programming and computer science concepts he's learned. He talks about his free courses on freeCodeCamp and his paid courses that help him pay the bills. John's voice is instantly recognizable by developers. He shares that this is because he has condition where is vocal cords are partially paralyzed, for which he has to receive frequent injections. I hope you enjoy our conversation. Can you guess what bass line I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1982 song produced by Quincy Jones. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 9,003 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: Guernsey island: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guernsey John's personal website: https://johnsmilga.com/ John Smilga on Twitter: https://twitter.com/john_smilga
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Ben Awad, a game developer who creates developer tutorials on YouTube and TikTok. I hope you enjoy our conversation. Can you guess what bass line I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's from a 1979 song. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 8,983 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: Ben's game, Void Pet on Android and iOS (Built in React Native): https://voidpet.com/ XKCD coming on "Real Programmers" that Quincy mentions: https://xkcd.com/378/ React Native course by Ben Awad: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/create-an-app-that-works-on-ios-android-and-the-web-with-react-native-web/ I can't find my Mac Control hotkeys video tutorial that I mentioned anywhere, so I wrote a quick article explaining how to use these: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/mac-control-keyboard-shortcuts-hotkeys-that-work-everywhere-in-macos/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Andrew Brown, a CTO-turned co-founder of ExamPro.co. Andrew created this cloud certification exam prep website with another Andrew – also from Canada, who also loves Star Trek. We talk about Andrew's early career fixing computers in the 90s, and his early freelance web development work. These ultimately lead to jobs and promotions that leveled him up to CTO. Andrew also shares his advice to devs who want to learn DevOps and Cloud Engineering, and which certs to prioritize. Andrew suffers from Muscle Tension Dysphonia, a disease that causes voice loss. He shares how he's using AI tools to get around this. Andrew also talks about his love of Tetris Attack (also known as Panel de Pon or Pokémon Puzzle League). He built a frame-perfect port for competitive online play. And of course, Andrew's favorite Star Trek episodes of all time. Can you guess what bass line I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's the theme from a 90s cartoon. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 8,933 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: Just a few of Andrew's many freeCodeCamp cloud cert prep courses. (He has dozens more on freeCodeCamp's YouTube channel): https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/author/andrew/ His website, ExamPro.co: https://www.exampro.co/ American Mall simulator browser game by Bloomberg: https://www.bloomberg.com/features/american-mall-game/ The Greatest Generation podcast: https://maximumfun.org/podcasts/greatest-generation/
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Kass Moreno, a Senior Front End Developer and CSS Artist. Kass started learning coding at age 28 and has since built a reputation as one of the most skilled artists who work with CSS. We talk about: Her childhood in Mexico and in Texas Making the hard decision to drop out of architecture school Her dreadful years working as a salesperson Learning from freeCodeCamp and doing the 100DaysOfCode challenge Getting freelance clients and expanding her skills Her rapid career growth as a developer Can you guess what bass line I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's a 1982 pop classic. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 8,904 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: Kass's portfolio of CSS art Bruno Simon's 3D interactive portfolio using Threejs. Drive an RC car around knock things down. 1-Dimensional PacMan game that I mentions. (Be careful – it's addictive)
On this week's episode of the podcast, I interview Jabril. He's an indie game developer who's building a turn-based fighting game called ultrabouters. Jabril has developed tons of other games as well. He runs the popular Jabrils gamedev focused-YouTube. He's also published a 5-hour introduction to programming course on freeCodeCamp. We talk about: - How Jabril got into gamedev as a kid when he got a copy of GameMaker - Jabril's career working at a comedy club and a radio station - The anime that Jabril's been working on for years - Jabril's advice to gamedevs who want to make a career out of building video games Can you guess what bass line I'm playing on my bass during the intro? It's a 2009 song that became popular in the 2010's by being associated with a meme. Be sure to share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 8,909 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: Jabril's full length Programming for Beginners course on freeCodeCamp: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/programming-for-beginners-how-to-code-with-python-and-c-sharp/ That time Quincy angered the entire BTS army with a confused tweet: https://twitter.com/ossia/status/993171422863417344 "The best episodes of Shark Tank are the bad ideas." How Jabril created a Fake Shark Tank Episode Generator using AI tools: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcGjYivktyc Subscribe to Jabril on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@Jabrils
On this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp Founder Quincy Larson interviews Leon Noel, founder of 100Devs and head of engineering at Resilient Coders. Growing up, Leon had it drilled into him that he had to become a doctor, lawyer, or dentist. But his ambitions grew and he went on to have an exciting career in tech. After a successful exit from a startup, Leon wanted to help folks who were struggling during the pandemic. He started 100Devs, a charity which has helped 10,000s of people learn to code. We talk about: dropping out of Yale getting into the selective Tech Stars startup accelerator Getting involved with Resilient Coders, a charity that helps court-involved youth learn coding Starting 100Devs and building a Discord server with 60,000 people learning to code together Quincy recorded this podcast live and hasn't edited it at all. We want to capture the feel of a real live conversation, with all the human quirks that entails. Can you guess what song he's playing on my bass during the intro? It's his arrangement of the intro to a 1990s cartoon. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, we want to thank the 8,427 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: The video that changed Leon's life on Spaced Repetition, by Ali Abdaal: https://youtu.be/Z-zNHHpXoMM The official Anki app, which is free on web / desktop and doesn’t lock you into a subscription. Leon's advice: "Only create cards on one device, but review on any to save you from weird syncing issues." https://apps.ankiweb.net Dr. Barbara Oakley’s Learn How to Learn course, which Leon calls "a masterpiece":  https://coursera.org/learn/learning-how-to-learn The 100Devs website (new cohort starting in early May): https://100devs.org/about Trailer for X-men '97: https://youtu.be/pv3Ss8o9gGQ Thelonious Monk [pianist Quincy mentions] "Straight No Chaser" documentary trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dx0E9-ThvKc Leon on YouTube: http://leonnoel.com/youtube Leon on Discord: http://leonnoel.com/discord Leon's Twitch for his live streams: http://leonnoel.com/twitch Leon's website: https://leonnoel.com/
In this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Jessica Lord, AKA JLord. She's worked as a software engineer for more than a decade at companies like GitHub and Glitch.  Among her many accomplishments, Jessica created the Electon team at GitHub. Electron is a library for building desktop apps using browser technologies. If you've used the desktop version of Slack, Figma, or VS Code, you've used Electron. I recorded this podcast live and I haven't edited it at all. I want to capture the feel of a real live conversation, with all the human quirks that entails. As with all my podcast episodes, I start by performing a classic bass line. Can you guess what song this bass line is from? It's a "cult" hit from 1990. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Also, I want to thank the 8,427 kind people who support our charity each month, and who make this podcast possible. You can join them and support our mission at: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate Links we talk about during the interview: GitIt, Jessica's interactive Git course on Node School: https://github.com/jlord/git-it Jessica's old craft blog (you may get an HTTPS warning from your browser but the site is just an old Blogspot site): http://www.ecabonline.com/ JSBin founder Remy Sharp's blog about JSBin and how he "lost his love of his side project": https://remysharp.com/2015/09/14/jsbin-toxic-part-1 Subdivisions song by Rush that Quincy mentions. Great early morning listening: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYYdQB0mkEU    
This week freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Phoebe Voong-Fadel about her childhood as the daughter of refugees, and how she self-studied coding and became a professional developer at the age of 36. Phoebe worked from age 12 at her parent's Chinese take-out restaurant. She was able to study history at the London School of Economics, before working in higher ed. She left her job to raise two kids due to the high cost of childcare in the UK, and spent years self-studying coding before becoming a software developer at age 36. I recorded this podcast live and I haven't edited it at all. I want to capture the feel of a real live conversation, with all the human quirks that entails. As with all my podcast episodes, I start by performing a classic bass line. Can you guess what song this bass line is from? It's from 1989. Phoebe has earned multiple certifications from freeCodeCamp, and also published a number of articles on our publication. How Phoebe went from stay-at-home mom to Front End Web Developer at age 36: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/how-i-went-from-stay-at-home-mum-to-front-end-web-developer-39724046692a/ Phoebe's review of Harvard CS50: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/cs50-course-review/ The BBC Take-away Kids documentary, which Phoebe said is what her childhood was like, working from age 12: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/stories-47007812 Phoebe's website, with her portfolio and links to her socials: https://www.thecodinghamster.com/ You can watch a video version of my interview with Phoebe here: https://youtu.be/WomQr-jRO1c If you've read this far, consider supporting our 501(c)(3) public charity, and aiding us in our mission to create more free learning resources for everyone: https://www.freecodecamp.org/donate  
In this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson talks with developer-turned-CTO Cassidy Williams, also known as Cassidoo on Twitter and TikTok. She's worked in tech for over a decade as a developer at several tech companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Netlify. She has gradually progressed to senior developer and now CTO. Links we talk about during the interview: Cassidy's newsletter: https://cassidoo.co/newsletter/ Cassidy on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cassidoo Cassidy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cassidoo The National Center for Women and Information Technology: https://ncwit.org/
In this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson discusses AI and the future of education with Seth Goldin. Among other things, Seth is co-founder of College Compendium, an education charity, and studies computer science at Yale. Also, the quote Quincy mentioned isn't by Ben Franklin. It's by William Blackstone in 1769 who said: "the law holds that it is better that 10 guilty persons escape, than that 1 innocent suffer (innocent person be convicted)." Seth's free "Google Like a Pro" course: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/how-to-google-like-a-pro/ Seth's free "The Ethics of AI and ML" course: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/the-ethics-of-ai-and-ml/ Follow Seth on Twitter: https://twitter.com/seth_goldin Seth's recommended article "ChatGPT is a Blurry JPEG of the Web": https://www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/chatgpt-is-a-blurry-jpeg-of-the-web Klara and the Sun book Seth recommended: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klara_and_the_Sun Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech.
On this week's episode of the podcast, I interview Logan Kilpatric, a software engineer and ChatGPT creator Open AI's first-ever Developer Advocate hire. The week Logan started, ChatGPT hit 1 million users. (It now has 180 million monthly users.) During our conversation, Logan shares his journey from Illinois to Harvard, NASA, and now the world's most-watched tech company, Open AI. Along the way, he joined the board of NumFOCUS, which oversees Data Science Python libraries like NumPy, Pandas, and Matplotlib. This is my long, intimate conversation with an emerging star in the AI and Machine Learning world. Logan is also a prolific freeCodeCamp.org contributor. It was a blast talking with Logan for nearly two hours. I think you'll dig it. You can follow Logan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OfficialLoganK  
On this week's episode of the podcast, I interview orchestral musician-turned software engineer Jessica Wilkins. Jessica found success in the extremely competitive field of classical music, playing the Oboe in orchestras, recording sessions, and even at major events such as the NFL awards on national television. She started her own business – a sheet music e-commerce website. This not only helped her survive in the high cost of living city of Los Angeles – it also helped her learn web development. During the pandemic, many of her performance and recording gigs were cancelled. This inspired her to dive much deeper into coding. She now works as a software engineer at freeCodeCamp, and has contributed substantially to freeCodeCamp's core curriculum. Also, her many freeCodeCamp tutorial articles have more than 400,000 readers each month. During our conversation, Jessica talks about the insane pressure she faced as a musician, where standards are incredibly high. So many people want to be professional musicians, and there is so little money in the industry. Jessica was a rare case of finding success. But even that success could not dissuade her from diving into software development. This is a long, intimate conversation with one of the sharpest minds behind freeCodeCamp.org. It was a blast talking with Jessica for more than two hours. I think you'll dig it. Some timestamps in case you want to skip some our lengthy discussion about music education and the music industry: - 0:00:00 My bass intro. See if you can guess this 1970 classic bassline. - 0:01:00 Our discussion of Jessica's upbringing by a school teacher and single mom, and her journey into classical music - 1:07:00 Jessica Learns to code and builds a profitable sheet music e-commerce business - 1:35:00 Jessica's decision to go all in on software development - 1:44:00 Contract work and thoughts on what caused recent tech layoffs Links we talk about during the interview: One of Jessica's articles - 40 JavaScript Projects for Beginners – Easy Ideas to Get Started Coding JS: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/javascript-projects-for-beginners/ The Black Excellence Music Project, Jessica's first React project: https://blackexcellencemusicproject.com/ Danny Thompson freeCodeCamp Podcast interview: https://freecodecamp.libsyn.com/site/were-back-danny-thompsons-journey-from-chicken-fryer-to-software-engineer Danny's LinkedIn course that Quincy mentions: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/linkedin-profiles-for-technical-professionals/main-visuals-on-your-profile
In this week's episode of the podcast, freeCodeCamp founder Quincy Larson interviews Per Borgen about AI engineering and interactive developer education. Per is the co-founder and CEO of Scrimba and is a software engineer. Be sure to follow The freeCodeCamp podcast in your favorite podcast app. And share this podcast with a friend. Let's inspire more folks to learn to code and build careers for themselves in tech. Links we talk about during the interview:  Per's HTML + CSS course: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/learn-html-and-css-from-the-ceo-of-scrimba/  Per's JavaScript course: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/full-javascript-course-for-beginners/
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Comments (32)

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Jan 16th
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Matheus Alves

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Jan 12th
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Ellie White

please release a podcast about the website https://www.synergisticit.com/

Apr 7th
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Karl Haines

excellent 🙏 thanks

Mar 16th
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Andrea Diotallevi

Amazing episode!

Jun 12th
Reply

Афон justin

shady asf

Sep 17th
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saltgen

This is awesome!!!!

Sep 17th
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Ulrich Bosquet

Great episode

Sep 16th
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Damien

Aussie Aussie Aussie!!!!!

Sep 10th
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Damien

soooo inspiring

Sep 3rd
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Ulrich Bosquet

Great

Aug 14th
Reply (1)

Adam Galek

Really loved this episode; Joe is such a great guest and speaker! As someone who is transitioning out of archaeology this helped so much.

Jul 18th
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Sai Lao Kham

I love her talking style, clear and it's very informative for young adults

Jun 12th
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Sai Lao Kham

Interesting! I love this

Jun 12th
Reply

Justin Ott

Beautiful success story of the American Dream

Jun 7th
Reply

Andrea Diotallevi

This was an absolutely outstanding interview. Very interesting experiences, coming from a different background and creating powerful transferable skills. One of the best content I have listened to over the last year. Thank you!

Apr 30th
Reply

Pedro Nunes

Fantastic!

Mar 12th
Reply

Souvik

helpful thank you

Dec 5th
Reply

Souvik

thank you

Dec 5th
Reply

Souvik

awesome

Dec 5th
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