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gone cold podcast - texas true crime

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

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gone cold podcast - texas true crime explores unsolved homicides and missing persons cases throughout the state of Texas, providing the victims and their families with a voice.
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A small-town cop known as “GI Joe” is gunned down in a swamp in the summer of 2015 and quickly becomes a martyr in the national media. But when a dogged investigator and his team set out to get justice, they uncover unsettling secrets about Joe, the local police department, and the village of Fox Lake. From Wondery, the makers of The Shrink Next Door and Dr. Death comes the third season of Over My Dead Body: Fox Lake. Hosted by Matt Baglio. Listen to Over My Dead Body: wondery.fm/FL_GoneCold
In December of 2002, Japanese exchange student Mikiko Kasahara was excited to have completed her freshman year at Texas Lutheran University in Seguin, Texas. She acclimated to her new environment well, made several close friends, and was excelling academically. On the night of the 13th, Mikiko through a celebration party for her and her friends’ accomplishments – a low key get-together with just a few fellow students. The following morning, after everyone left her home, Mikiko’s apartment went up in flames. When the smoke cleared, the 21-year-old coed’s body was inside, charred beyond recognition. Though the Seguin Police painstakingly looked for evidence that pointed to the identity of the monster who savagely slayed Mikiko Kasahara, and worked the case for many years to come, it remains unsolved. If you have any information about Mikiko’s slaying, please contact the Rangers at 800-346-3243 or by messaging them through there cold case website: dps.texas.gov/ColdCaseIf you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comBe sure to check out one of our favorite podcasts True Consequences, whose promo is featured at the beginning of this episode. You can find it wherever you listen to podcasts or at TrueConsequences.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast......and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcast The Austin American-Statesman, The Houston Chronicle, The Seguin Gazette, The Texas State Historical Association, and HauntedMagnoliaHotel.com were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForMikikoKasahara #Seguin #SanAntonio #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #Unsolved
In October of 1979 7-year-old Elizabeth Lynne Barclay, along with her little brother and a neighbor friend, headed to a convenience store near home to get some ice cream. Just minutes after they left, Elizabeth’s brother came running back to the Barclay apartment, telling his mother that his big sister had been taken by a man. What followed was a massive search effort conducted by the Dallas Police, the Barclay Family, and volunteers from all over. She was found deceased miles from home about 7 weeks later. The death was ruled homicide, most likely by gunshot wound. No clear suspect was ever identified, but it’s likely at least some Dallas Detectives theorized a connection between Elizabeth’s case and the 1977 murders and abductions of 7-year-old Ladina Ann McCoy and 12-year-old Suzie Marie Mages. Clear suspects in those cases, too, are elusive. If you have any information about the 1979 murder of Elizabeth Barclay, please contact the Texas Rangers at their cold case website (dps.texas.gov/coldcase) or by phone at 800-346-3242If you have any information about the 1977 murder of Ladina McCoy, or the 1977 murder of Suzie Mages, please contact North Texas Crime Stoppers at 877 373 8477If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Dallas Morning News, The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, The Wills Point Chronicle, and the Denton Record-Chronicle were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForElizabethBarclay #JusticeForLadinaMcCoy #JusticeForSuzieMages #Dallas #DallasTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #Unsolved
Few things are more devastating than a loved one going missing. On The Vanished podcast from Wondery, host Marissa Jones tells stories of missing persons that have gone overlooked by mainstream media. She gets the story from friends and family of the missing person, and frequently talks with law enforcement and others close to the case. This is just a preview of The Vanished, but you can listen to the full episode at: wondery.fm/TV_GoneCold
In November of 1984, a brutal and shocking murder rocked the otherwise crime-free and exclusive Colleyville subdivision Tara Plantation. Judy Herron was a 37-year-old stay at home parent and was attacked and slain not long after her husband Lee left for work. Though Colleyville authorities enlisted the help of multiple outside jurisdictions, Judy’s killer slipped away without so much as a trace. Less than two months later, two similar, violent crimes perpetrated by the same man had Colleyville Detectives almost certain they’d found the man who murdered Judy Herron. Evidence to prove it, however, was elusive.If you have any information about the Judy Herron murder case, please contact Colleyville PD at (817) 503-1202.Special thanks to Shawn B for bringing our attention to Judy’s case.If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastTexas State Historical Association, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForJudyHerron #Colleyville #ColleyvilleTX #TarrantCountyTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #Unsolved
On August 4th, 1992, 23-year-old Tara Breckenridge vanished without so much as a trace after leaving her job at Houston’s The Men’s Club. Besides a theory that her car was tampered with, Houston Detectives were ultimately unable to find a single solid lead, even after discovering that Tara had an admirer and that she and her boyfriend were having relationship trouble. After a 2007 DNA match between two other unsolved Houston cases, speculation that a serial rapist and killer was stalking women who worked at adult entertainment venues was the talk of the metropolis.If you have any information about the disappearance of Tara Breckenridge, please call Houston Crime Stoppers at 713-222-8477. If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Houston Chronicle, The Del Rio News-Herald, and the television show Unsolved Mysteries were used as sources for this episode.#WhereIsTaraBreckenridge #JusticeForTaraBreckenridge #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #Disappearance #Missing #MissingPerson
Glen Samuel McCurley’s heinous and depraved act against Carla Walker was confident and brazen; it was as if the man had done it before. There are many murders in the city of Fort Worth in which McCurley’s involvement can be speculated, particularly the several victims of what became known as “The February Slayings.” Victims of those murders include Becky Martin, June Ward, and Christy Tower. This episode explores the possibility that Glen McCurley is responsible for these young women’s violent and tragic deaths, and others.Special thanks to Cindy, Jim, Tarrant County Assistant Criminal District Attorney Emily Dixon, and Othram Incorporated CEO David Mittelman for their contributions to this episode.The city of Fort Worth still has nearly 1,000 cold cases dating back to 1959. If you have any information about any unsolved case in the city, please contact the cold case unit at 817-392-4307 or email detectives at coldcase@fortworthpd.com.If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast#JusticeForBeckyMartin #JusticeForJuneWard #JusticeForChristyTower #JusticeForPaulaDavenport #JusticeForNancyBay #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
In a surprise move, Glen Samuel McCurley changed his plea from “not guilty” to “guilty” on Tuesday, August 24th, 2021, the third day of his trial for the February 1974 murder of Carla Jan Walker. On Part 3 of Justice for Carla, Emily Dixon speaks with us about what the third day of trial had in store if it had proceeded and Carla’s siblings, Jim and Cindy, share with us their thoughts on everything from their allocations to their sister’s new legacy – her murder case as a template for other families desperate for answers.Special thanks to Cindy, Jim, Tarrant County Assistant Criminal District Attorney Emily Dixon, Nicole (Juror #6), and Detectives Jeff Bennett and Leah Wagner for their contributions to this episode.The city of Fort Worth still has nearly 1,000 cold cases dating back to 1959. If you have any information about any unsolved case in the city, please contact the cold case unit at 817-392-4307 or email detectives at coldcase@fortworthpd.com.If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.com.As always, you can support gone cold at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast.#CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
After Glen Samuel McCurley was arrested for the kidnapping, sexual assault, and murder of Carla Walker, Tarrant County Assistant Criminal District Attorneys Kim D’Avignon and Emily Dixon, along with DA Investigator Chris Lachance, began their work to obtain a conviction. First, the case had to go before a Grand Jury, followed by a series of pretrial hearings in which the man’s defense attempted to get evidence thrown out. But the efforts of the court appointed defense team, for the most part, failed. Last episode, we heard Detectives and DNA experts recall their roles in the arrest of Glen McCurley. This episode, ADA Emily Dixon discuss her and ADA D’Avignon’s role in obtaining a conviction. Also this episode – Detectives Wagner and Bennett and Nicole, or juror number 6. The city of Fort Worth still has nearly 1,000 cold cases dating back to 1959. If you have any information about any unsolved case in the city, please contact the cold case unit at 817-392-4307 or email detectives at coldcase@fortworthpd.com.If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.com.You can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast #CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
It wasn’t for a lack of effort and determination that past Fort Worth Police Detectives couldn’t solve the February 17th, 1974 murder of Carla Walker. It was because her killer was a complete stranger and the technology needed to find the perpetrator didn’t exist. Forty-five years after the terrible crime, Detectives Leah Wagner and Jeff Bennett began working the case from scratch, and their diligence paid off after their paths crossed both Mallory Pagenkopf of the Serological Research Institute and David Mittelman of Othram, Incorporated. In September of 2020, Carla’s killer was arrested.The city of Fort Worth still has nearly 1,000 cold cases dating back to 1959. If you have any information about any unsolved case in the city, please contact the cold case unit at 817-392-4307 or email detectives at coldcase@fortworthpd.com.If you’d like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, you can at DNAsolves.comIf you don’t have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get one at connect.DNAsolves.com.#CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
#CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
#CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
The final episode of our Death in Houston High Society series. Dean Goss’s final decent was in November of 1992. Both rumors of that the man had committed suicide and been slain by the same person who’d killed his first and second wives swirled around Houston, but the truth was neither. Friends of Dean eulogized him at one of the man’s favorite watering holes. But after the death, the slayings of Elaine Richman Goss, Paula Brawley Goss, and James Jackson Brown seemed to become erased from Houston’s collective memory. The murders remain unsolved to this day, and it seems incredible that “The Riddle of Dean Goss” didn’t land itself along the city’s other infamous true crime cases – such as the Ice Box Murders and the Candyman.You can support gone cold – texas true crime and listen ad-free at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Houston Press, The Houston Chronicle, The Austin Statesman, kvue.com, Headquarters Detective Magazine’s November 1993 issue and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForPaulaGoss #JusticeForElaineGoss #JusticeForJJBrown #DeanGoss #BlueBeard #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
If you’d have asked any of Dean Goss’s friends how he was doing after the death of his second wife Paula, they’d tell you he was a wreck – miserable. None of them seemed to believe the man was responsible for Paula’s murder or, for that matter, the slaying of his first wife, Elaine. The cops, too, appeared to think Dean was in the clear. Houston’s press, however, had no problem conducting their own trial of the man through newspaper articles and television news segments. “The Blue Beard of Houston” was just too sensational a headline to let go. When Dean Goss took his slain second wife’s brother to court over a dispute about her estate, however, revelations about the man – and the man’s second-born son – came to light. Details of the investigation of Paula’s murder, among other things, became publicly known. Check out the great Tex Arcana at: https://texarcanapodcast.comYou can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Houston Press, The Houston Chronicle, The Austin Statesman, kvue.com, and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForPaulaGoss #JusticeForElaineGoss #JusticeForJJBrown #DeanGoss #BlueBeard #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
A couple years after the death of his first wife Elaine, Dean Goss met and married Paula Brawley. Only months after putting up a substantial amount of money to get Dean’s latest idea off the ground, that venture went belly up following a series of bizarre, suspicious, and flagrantly shady events. Paula had lost her investment and her relationship with Dean was soured. Following a few other bizarre circumstances, in July of 1985, Paula Goss was brutally murdered. The act appeared to be one of rage, but Houston Homicide Detectives failed to identify a clear cut motive and Paula’s murder remains unsolved. You can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Houston Press, The Houston Chronicle, The Austin Statesman, kvue.com, and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForPaulaGoss #DeanGoss #BlueBeard #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
In 1982, when Dean Goss needed cash to pay for his murdered wife Elaine’s funeral, he sought out Houston Carpet & Flooring magnate Frank DiMaria. Back in 1968, when Imperial Carpet executive Alan Berg disappeared and was later found murdered, Frank DiMaria stood accused of having hired a notorious Texas hitman – Charles Voyde Harrelson – to do the job. DiMaria and the Bergs had been feuding for some time, and though Harrelson’s girlfriend came clean about her role in Alan’s death, his murder remains officially unsolved to this day.You can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Brazosport Facts, the Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Odessa American, the Austin Statesman, and David Berg’s book Run, Brother, Run: A Memoir of a Murder in My Family were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForAlanBerg #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #MurderForHire #Hitman #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
In 1968, Elaine and Dean Goss opened up the Holiday Dinner Theater in Houston, Texas. The place was a huge hit and so was Dean Goss, who quickly became known as “The Jackie Gleason of Houston.” Dean was so big, in fact, that he and Elaine’s establishment was renamed The Dean Goss Dinner Theater. For a decade, Elaine and Dean lived the high life, hobnobbing with socialites, celebrities, and politicians. But after the theater went out of business, things spiraled downward. Then in 1982 came the unthinkable when Elaine Goss was murdered in the couple’s home in the Meyerland neighborhood of Houston. But it would be far from the last slaying of someone close to Dean Goss, and many, perhaps unfairly, began calling him by a different nickname, “The Bluebeard of Houston.”You can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Houston Press, The Houston Chronicle, The Austin Statesman, kvue.com, and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForElaineGoss #DeanGoss #BlueBeard #Houston #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
A year after millionaire businessman Jacque Mossler found out his wife Candy was having an incestuous love affair with her nephew, he was living in Florida after leaving the couples mansion in Houston, Texas. When Candy brought the estranged couple’s kids for a visit, Jacque was brutally murdered in an act of overkill that had to be personal. Candy’s nephew and lover, Melvin Lane Powers, just happened to fly into Miami hours before Jacque was killed, and Candy had what looked like a staged alibi. But after their arrests, they spared no expense and got the best defense attorney in the country: Percy Foreman. The murder of Jacque Mossler remains officially unsolved to this day.You can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastThe Chicago Tribune, The Houston Chronicle, The Washington Post, The LA Times, The Miami Sun Sentinel, TruTV.com, and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeJaqueMossler #CandyMossler #BlackWidow #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Miami #Florida #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
When Candy Weatherby Johnson met multimillionaire Jacque Mossler while soliciting donations for the New Orleans Grand Opera Company, the two hit it off and began a whirlwind romance. They settled down in a large mansion in Houston, Texas and for years, had a happy marriage. But when Candy’s nephew Melvin Lane Powers came to town, everything came crashing down. This is preface one of two of the story about The Blue Beard of Houston.You can support gone cold – texas true crime at https://www.patreon.com/gonecoldpodcast Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcastSubmit your DNA data from a consumer testing company to Othram’s database, dnasolves.com. It’s only used for law enforcement investigations: https://dnasolves.com/user/register The Chicago Tribune, The Houston Chronical, The Washington Post, The LA Times, The Miami Sun Sentinel, TruTV.com, and court documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeJaqueMossler #CandyMossler #BlackWidow #HoustonTX #HarrisCountyTX #Miami #Florida #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
On Friday, July 9th, 2021, a second pretrial hearing was held in the State of Texas v Glen Samuel McCurley to decide what evidence would be allowed at the accused’s trial, specifically the DNA evidence. I attended and this episode is a summary of the motions to suppress filed by McCurley’s defense team, the State’s response, Judge Elizabeth Beach’s decisions, and a few other things outside the hearing.Also, at the top of the episode are two overdue updates – one for the 1973 Harlingen, Texas murder of Candy Mora, and the other concerning Briuna Harps, innocent victim of a drive by shooting in south Fort Worth in 2019.#CarlaWalker #JusticeForCarlaWalker #FortWorth #FortWorthTX #TarrantCountyTexas #Texas #TX #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #Solved #DNA #Murder #UnsolvedMysteries #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime
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Comments (40)

꧁WupperElfe꧂

Tyra was "skeleton-like" (skeletonized) after 9 days of having been buried?

Oct 4th
Reply (1)

Aflacbird

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Aug 30th
Reply

derrick

don't understand why you kept calling Steve's home her home. it was owned by him. just because they were "spilt" does not remove his ownership of the home.

Aug 16th
Reply

derrick

it is against vidor city law to burn trash inside the city limits. there is not a bunch of burn piles all over the time.

Aug 16th
Reply

derrick

most people in vidor are not roughnecks.

Aug 16th
Reply

derrick

cheating slutty wife... that's normal.

Aug 15th
Reply

Aflacbird

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐,WOW !! very intriguing episode

Jul 25th
Reply

Aflacbird

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Baltimore, MD

Jun 28th
Reply

William H Bonny

am I the only person that can hear whistling when he say a S word

Jun 2nd
Reply

Aflacbird

👍👍👍👍👍 Great podcast, keep up the good work.

May 23rd
Reply

Kasey Callahan

This episode moved me. Just broke my heart for her father.

May 10th
Reply

Cassandra De Los Santos

Wow! love this podcast.. I'm from Victoria, tx and have never heard if this case. So its very interesting to hear local crimes before my time. keep up the good work 👏

Mar 30th
Reply

dachiggaman

2 years aggravated assault of a child?

Mar 19th
Reply

Maurin Phillips

good episode. heartbreaking and my heart goes out to this family. they deserve to be treated so much better than dallas pd or 911 did.

Mar 1st
Reply

average dinosaur

I enjoyed this podcast for a while, but the intrusive ads are a dealbreaker.

Dec 19th
Reply

zimby zimbabwe

no one misses JC Penny...

Jul 2nd
Reply (1)

C Gtz

oddly enough I currently work in Burnet County and constantly drive by Kingsland, granite shoals & marble falls.

Mar 31st
Reply

Megan Langreck

The theoretical suspect(s) must be Asian. Asian people seem to have helped the Detective form his press statement.

Nov 19th
Reply

Christina L Wertman

ugh exaggerated voice is so annoying. Just talk normal. couldn't even listen for 10 minutes.

Oct 11th
Reply

Amy Buckley

why does the sound bites repeat like back to back without a break? I get some times you replay a snippet when returning from a break... but I've noticed with this podcast it's more frequent and not associated with a break... back to back or repeated sections are a bit annoying...

Oct 3rd
Reply
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