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This month’s podcast is brought to you by the children of Cadder Primary School in Glasgow and the Lost Woods Project to tell you all about their work on Every Tree Tells a Story in the run up to COP26 and work to create the Glasgow Children's Woodland.Please note, this episode is partially recorded outdoors due to COVID-19 restrictions. Follow the guests on Twitter: @CadderPrimary @The Lost Woods @everytree––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Green infrastructure features are often celebrated as multifunctional solutions in cities, with an array of benefits that they could provide. However, the implementation of green infrastructure can also cause disservices, including gentrification when green infrastructure features are implemented without a plan for how those features will interact with existing systemic issues. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Fushcia-Ann Hoover about her research on environmental justice issues surrounding green infrastructure. She tells us about her path towards interdisciplinary research, recommendations for cities to envision more equitable green infrastructure implementation, and her business, where she helps researchers and planners alike to center environmental justice in their work and to see the connections between people and the environment.Follow Dr. Fushcia-Ann Hoover on social media!Twitter: https://twitter.com/EcoGreenQueenInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ecogreenqueen/––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Dr. Sybil Derrible (@SybilDerrible) is the creator of the Actionable Science for Urban Sustainability (AScUS) society, and former chair of the International Society of Industrial Ecology's Sustainable Urban Systems section. He is an Associate Professor of Civil, Materials, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois Chicago. His work embraces the growing complexity of cities, exploring our changing relationships with the built environment, natural environment, and cyber technologies, through innovative techniques that reveal the changing networks and behaviors that define urban dynamics. He is interviewed in today's podcast by Dr. Mikhail Chester (@mikhailchester), a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University.Infrastructure Misfits (un)Society:http://www.infrastructurecomplexity.org/Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering | Arizona State University: https://metis.asu.edu/––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Discussions about infrastructure are often centered on the opinions and prevailing ideas within engineering, but other disciplines have valuable insights on what infrastructure is and what it can be. In this first installment of the 2021 Infrastructure and the Anthropocene series, Professor Mikhail Chester of Arizona State University (ASU) interviews his ASU colleague, Professor Chuck Redman, who looks at infrastructure from a more anthropological and social sciences perspective. Topics discussed include whether to think of infrastructure as permanent or impermanent, the ways existing infrastructure shapes future path dependencies, and inserting values into the pursuit of resilience.Infrastructure Misfits (un)Society: http://www.infrastructurecomplexity.org/Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering | Arizona State University: https://metis.asu.edu/––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
In this month's episode, we talk with Nkosi Muse (@weatherkos), a scientific advisor on climate change adaptation to the city of Miami and Ph. D. student at the University of Miami, about climate change and gentrification processes in Miami. We delve into the phenomenon of "climate gentrification," a form of gentrification that proceeds by the wealthy buying properties in marginalized communities in Miami because of their higher elevation and longer-term resilience to climate change. We also touch on another form of gentrification, "downward raiding," identified elsewhere in the world that probably also exists in the US. Finally, as potential inspiration to other academics working in urban resilience, we talk about how Nkosi obtained his dual-status as academic researcher and scientific advisor.––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.
This week we bring you another podcast from the city of Glasgow focusing on the Hidden Environmental Histories of the River Clyde. At the height of the British Empire, Glasgow was the hub of the Scottish and European Enlightenment with a vast manufacturing and ship building industry which profoundly shaped the river and the surrounding communities. We're joined by Ria Dunkley, University of Glasgow and Gillian Dick, Glasgow City Council to tell us all about a new partnership that has been set up between artists, academics, local government, museums and community groups to explore and expose how the rise of empire and industrialisation shaped the River Clyde and its surrounding urban and natural environment. Singer song writer, Ainsley Hamill and poet, Eilidh Northridge also perform artistic contributions that were inspired by the project. Keep up with the people and projects highlighted in this episode on Twitter:The Hidden Environmental Histories of the River Clyde (@hiddenclyde21)Ria Dunkley (@RiaDunkley)Gillian Dick (@gilliand)Eilidh Northridge (@EilidhNorth)Ainsley Hamill (@AinsleyHamill)You can learn more about Ainsley Hamill at her website (www.ainsleyhamill.com), and buy a physical CD with notes and lyrics at her store.Her music is available on all streaming platforms, such as Spotify.––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.
In this episode, a diverse team of graduate students discuss their research on climate gentrification in the Eastern coast of the United States and their personal stories about why they are inspired to study this topic. They share perspectives on the importance of interdisciplinary science in their own professional development and the value of an interdisciplinary approach to tackling wicked problems like climate change gentrification. The team also reflects on the importance of team science with peers in building confidence and establishing an essential network of support as early career researchers.Learn more about the the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center at sesync.org.Follow and connect with this month's guests:Kelsea Best: Twitter, LinkedInAzmal Hossan: Twitter, LinkedInSharif Islam: Twitter, LinkedInZeynab Jouzi: Twitter, LinkedInTimothy Kirby: Twitter, LinkedInBecca Nixon: TwitterRichard A. Nyiawung: Twitter, LinkedIn––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.
Clair Cooper, PhD Candidate at Durham University, is joined by Gillian Dick, Strategic Planning Manager with Glasgow City Council, and Donagh Horgan from the Institute of Social Innovation at the University of Strathclyde to talk about Every Tree Tells a Story.  Every Tree Tells a Story is an innovative new nature-based solution that aims to help communities reconnect with urban nature, particularly urban trees, and understand what are nature-based solutions by sharing and mapping their favourite stories about trees. Gillian and Donagh talk about their inspiration for the project, how it relates to the concept of nature-based solutions, and explain our deep connection with trees. Gillian and Donagh then talk about why it's so important that we educate people about the role of trees in the fight against climate change and how they plan to help people reconnect with trees through community participation and mapping of stories about our favourite trees. You can keep up with this exciting project by following @everytree_ and using #EveryTreeTellsAStory on Twitter.Other Twitter links:Institute for Future Cities (@iFutureCities)Glasgow City Council (@GlasgowCC)Gilian Dick (@gilliannd)Donagh Horgan (@godonagh)Clair Cooper (@cooper_clair)––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.
We hear the term used all over the place: in music, on TV, in books– but what IS resilience? In this episode, we discuss resilience from the Social-Ecological-Technological Systems (SETS) perspective. To understand what resilience means from this perspective, we interviewed urban resilience experts from each of these three disciplines. Dr. Nancy Grimm is a professor of ecology in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU) and a co-director of the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN). Dr. Marta Berbes is a professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU, but is transitioning the University of Waterloo where she'll work on their Future Cities Initiative. Dr. Dan Eisenberg is a Research Assistant Professor of Operations Research at the Naval Postgraduate School. Learn more about and connect with our hosts and guests by checking out these links:Hosts:Stephen Elser: Twitter, LinkedInSam Markolf: Twitter, UC-Merced website, Google ScholarGuests:Nancy Grimm: Twitter, lab webpageMarta Berbes: Twitter, Future Cities InitiativeDan Eisenberg: Personal faculty page, research group page––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.
Green infrastructure (GI) and nature-based solutions (NBS) are relatively new concepts in expert circles, at least by those terms. In this episode, Dr. Elizabeth Cook and Clair Cooper join first-time host Charlyn Green to discuss what green infrastructure and nature-based solutions mean for non-experts. Topics of discussion include examples of GI and NBS at scales ranging from household to city, the benefits of having access to private green space, and factors involved in work to advance the uptake of nature-based solutions in cities.Here are some links to learn more about projects mentioned during the episode:NATURA Network of Networks: https://natura-net.org/Convergence Resilience Research Project | http://convergence.urexsrn.net/  Urban Nature AtlasFollow this month's host and guests on Twitter!Elizabeth Cook: @e_m_cookClair Coope:r @cooper_clairCharlyn Green: @CharlynEGreen ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Description: Alysha Helmrich and Maike Hamann host a discussion on the various perspectives surrounding green infrastructure (GI) with Vinicius Taguchi, Stephen Elser, Clair Cooper, and Zbigniew Grabowski, exploring insights from engineering, public health, ecology, and more!This podcast was inspired by an UREx SRN early career symposium--Get Ready, Get SETS: GI! (Website pending publication in August 2021.) Below are links to references mentioned throughout the episode.Selection of Previous Future Cities GI Episodes:Wetlands as Green Infrastructure in Valdivia, ChileGreen Stormwater Management in Three U.S. CitiesTrees to Help Cities BreatheThe Many Names of Urban NatureCREATE Initiative:Green Gentrification Policy ToolkitFollow us on Twitter!@FutureCitiesPod@stephen_elser @MaikeHamann@cooper_clair  @zjgrabowski––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Cities of Light

Cities of Light

2021-07-0101:00:13

Marissa Matsler and Robert Lloyd explore another dimension of the series title, as they chat with the authors and editors of “Cities of Light” - a new book of science fiction stories focused on solar-powered cities of the future! Guests Joey Eschrich, Clark Miller, Deji Olukotun, and Lauren Withycombe Keeler talk about the creation of the book, the ideas behind it, and how science fiction can help prepare us for the possibilities - and the demands - of future cities.Get a free digital edition of “Cities of Light”, or order a print edition, here: https://csi.asu.edu/books/cities-of-light/Arizona State University Center for Science and the Imagination (@imaginationASU):https://csi.asu.edu/Learn more about this episode's guests and find links to their Twitter accounts below.Joey Eschrich:https://csi.asu.edu/people/joey-eschrich/Clark Miller (@clarkamiller):https://sustainability-innovation.asu.edu/person/clark-miller/Deji Olukotun (@olutron):https://returnofthedeji.com/Lauren Withycombe Keeler (@femmefutura):https://ifis.asu.edu/content/center-study-futures––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended so many aspects of our lives – from the ways we socialize, the ways and places where we spend our free time, and the ways in which we work. Which, if any, of these changes will persist once the pandemic is behind us? This month, our guests are Dr. Laura Schewel (CEO of StreetLight Data) and Dr. Carlo Ratti (Director of the Senseable City Lab at MIT). We discuss whether work-from-home momentum will persist after the pandemic, the 15-minute city, equitable transportation and mobility, and more. Our guests also share insights on interdisciplinary collaboration and their visions and hopes for cities in the year 2080.Learn more about Streetlight Data at their website (www.streetlightdata.com) and connect on social media:Facebook (@StreetLightData)Twitter (@StreetLightData)LinkedInYouTubeLearn more about Dr. Ratti's work at his website (www.carloratti.com) and connect on social media:Facebook (@carlorattiassociati)Twitter (@crassociati)Instagram (@crassociati)LinkedIn––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Doctors Marta Berbes, Nancy Grimm, Robert Hobbins, and Timon McPhearson join Robert Lloyd to talk about how scenarios of future city transformations are analyzed and turned into products that can be understood and used by city practitioners, and the general public, as well as other researchers. Scenarios provide potential goals for practitioners in city government and other actors to work towards in efforts to ensure greater sustainability, resilience, and equity. A new book, the result of collaboration among many of the researchers who participated in this episode and the previous one, is also discussed.Urban Systems Lab Data Visualization Platform: http://urex.urbansystemslab.com/San Juan, Puerto Rico Story Map: https://asu.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=559ac359d9c24bdeb8ce80cbacc3aebaLearn more about our guests:Marta Berbes (@MartaBerbes):https://sustainability-innovation.asu.edu/person/marta-berbes/Nancy Grimm (@DrNitrogen):https://sols.asu.edu/nancy-grimmRobert Hobbins (@RobertHobbins):https://roberthobbins.com/https://urbaninstitute.gsu.edu/profile/robert-hobbins/Timon McPhearson (@timonmcphearson):https://www.newschool.edu/bachelors-program/faculty/timon-mcphearson/Access their recently published book here: https://www.springer.com/us/book/9783030631307––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Doctors Elizabeth Cook, David Iwaniec, Lelani Mannetti, and Tischa Muñoz-Erickson join Robert Lloyd to talk about the production of scenarios for future city transformations. Scenarios provide potential goals for practitioners in city government and other actors to work towards in efforts to ensure greater sustainability, resilience, and equity. Co-production of knowledge, limits of future visions, and the challenges to realizing scenarios are among the topics discussed.Learn more about our guests:Elizabeth Cook (@e_m_cook):https://envsci.barnard.edu/profiles/elizabeth-m-cookDavid Iwaniec (@SustFutures):https://urbaninstitute.gsu.edu/profile/david-iwaniec-2/Lelani Mannetti (@LelaniM)https://urbaninstitute.gsu.edu/profile/lelani-mannetti/Tischa Muñoz-Erickson (@tmunozerickson):https://www.fs.fed.us/research/people/profile.php?alias=tamunozericksonAccess their recently published book here: https://www.springer.com/us/book/9783030631307––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Value-focused Thinking

Value-focused Thinking

2021-04-1501:18:33

When asked what infrastructure are supposed to do, responses of course vary dramatically from the mundane (for example, provide water and power) to the abstract (for example, facilitate improved well-being through the delivery of basic services). Of course, both are right on some level. But what is often lost is the perspective of the values that we use to design and operate infrastructure systems. In the third and final episode of the Infrastructure of the Anthropocene series, Professor Mikhail Chester (@mikhailchester) of Arizona State University interviews Professor Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy (@AdjoKennedy) of Georgia Tech about the need for value-focused thinking to guide how we think about restructuring infrastructure to ensure that infrastructure meets the needs of future populations in increasingly complex environments. See the whole Infrastructure and the Anthropocene playlist on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvz_faOzavaSD40LmDr4RknZZxWAVqwGpAdjo Amekudzi-Kennedy at Georgia Tech – Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS)  Infrastructure Misfits (un)Society | http://www.infrastructurecomplexity.org/  Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering | Arizona State University | https://metis.asu.edu/ Convergence Resilience Research Project |  http://convergence.urexsrn.net/  ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Complexity Leadership

Complexity Leadership

2021-04-0101:26:41

It's widely recognized that infrastructure are central to societal goals, that changes to infrastructure and how we use them can have profound impacts on people and economies. It's critical to recognize that infrastructure are the hammer at the end of the arm, and the arm is governance. In the second episode of the Infrastructure of the Anthropocene series, Professor Mikhail Chester (@mikhailchester) of Arizona State University interviews Professor Mary Uhl-Bien (@MaryUhlBien) of Texas Christian University about how infrastructure is governed and why, and particularly about what she has learned about leadership in complexity. The conversation explores complexity leadership theory, the differences between the leadership models used to govern now and those relevant to an age of uncertainty, and the critical role the threat of failure plays in driving adaptation. See the whole Infrastructure and the Anthropocene playlist on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvz_faOzavaSD40LmDr4RknZZxWAVqwGpInfrastructure Misfits (un)Society: http://www.infrastructurecomplexity.org/Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering | Arizona State University: https://metis.asu.edu/Convergence Resilience Research Project |  http://convergence.urexsrn.net/  ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
People often think of infrastructure as merely physical assets, but they are the outcome of cultural preferences and how we generate knowledge. In this episode, Professor Mikhail Chester (@mikhailchester) of Arizona State University interviews Professor Thaddeus Miller (@Thad_Miller) of University of Massachusetts Amherst about infrastructure governance, the knowledge systems embedded in organizations and governance networks, and the values or assumptions built into those systems. We also hear about complexity and future problems, as well as the importance of transdisciplinary knowledge co-generation to solve problems in the Anthropocene.The Infrastructure and the Anthropocene Forum took place from December 7-9, 2020 and was moderated by Prof. Mikhail Chester of Arizona State University. The forum was hosted by the Infrastructure Misfits and Arizona State University's Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering.See the whole Infrastructure and the Anthropocene playlist on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvz_faOzavaSD40LmDr4RknZZxWAVqwGpInfrastructure Misfits (un)Society: http://www.infrastructurecomplexity.org/Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering | Arizona State University: https://metis.asu.edu/––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at urexsrn.net.
Climate change has contributed to the severity of tropical storms, causing unprecedented coastal erosion and record rates of flooding. Countries around the world are searching for ways to prevent tropical storms from decimating their coastal infrastructure, and the University of Miami has found a tropical solution: coral reefs. Coral reefs can reduce wave energy by up to 97%. However, corals have also suffered from climate change, and are threatened by extinction. Cassie Sturman (@CassieSturman) interviews Diego Lirman and Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos from the University of Miami’s coral reef restoration team who empathize the importance of rescuing coral reefs from climate change.Learn more about the University of Miami's coral restoration program at their website, here and find them on Twitter (@rescueareef).You can also follow the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Restoration Hub (@RestorationHub).––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at www.sustainability.asu.edu/urbanresilience.
 Dr. Lelani Mannetti (Twitter @LelaniM) is a postdoctoral researcher at Georgia State University's Urban Studies Institute. Her research focuses on the analysis of social-ecological systems, particularly surrounding adaptive co-governance of complex systems. In this episode, Dr. Yeowon Kim (Twitter @Yeowon__Kim) talks with her about how she became interested in integrating social, ecological, and technological dimensions for urban resilience study and how her work and academic training in South Africa has affected her becoming an interdisciplinary scholar studying urban systems. Furthermore, she features how the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network’s scenarios team has been adapting their approaches to participatory scenarios development processes during the COVID pandemic, and how she envisions Atlanta’s urban future as a connected and greener city integrating diverse voices of people in the city.Learn more about Dr. Mannetti and her research here: https://urbaninstitute.gsu.edu/profile/lelani-mannetti/––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod. Learn more about the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) at www.sustainability.asu.edu/urbanresilience.
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