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Writer and editor Alexander Chee joins hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell live from the annual Writers for Readers gala in Kansas City to discuss editing Best American Essays 2022. Chee talks about what makes a strong essay and how he curated the volume, as well as how his training as a speed reader stood him in good stead as he made his selections. He also comments on specific pieces by Alex Marzano-Lesnevich, Kaitlyn Greenidge, Anthony Veasna So, Ryan Bradley, Vauhini Vara, Erika J. Simpson, and others.  Writers for Readers is an ongoing partnership between the Kansas City Public Library and the University of Missouri’s MFA Program in Creative Writing. Funds raised support the Maya Angelou Book Award and enable graduate students to teach writing classes at the library.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/ This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Alexander Chee The Best American Essays 2022 (Ed.) How to Write an Autobiographical Novel Edinburgh The Queen of the Night Others: Annie Dillard Jamaica Kincaid David Foster Wallace Hilton Als Susan Sontag Cynthia Ozick Edward Hoagland Robert Atwan Elizabeth Hardwick Darryl Pinckney Diaries of Mavis Gallant Dmitri Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov  Black Folk Could Fly by Randall Kenan James Baldwin Joan Didion Anne Carson Edwidge Danticat Brian Doyle Franklin Burroughs Gerard Manley Hopkins Maya Angelou Alex Marzano-Leznevich Erika J. Simpson Ryan Bradley Kaitlyn Greenidge Gary Shteyngart Christopher Leonard “Ghosts” by Vauhini Vara “When World of Warcraft is an Escape – and a Memorial” by Tanner Akoni Laguatan “Baby Yeah,” by Anthony Veasna So Fiction/Non/Fiction, Season 5 Episode 10: “How on Earth Do You Judge Books?” Susan Choi and Oscar Villalon on the Story Behind Literary Awards Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Fiction writer Dan Chaon joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the fate of Twitter and social media in the aftermath of Elon Musk’s $44 billion purchase of the platform. Chaon says Twitter is not a “public square,” it’s a business, and talks about how much we really own our online identities in light of that. He also reads from and discusses his Atlantic article, “The Story of My Imposters,” about a fake website purporting to be his, as well as his latest novel, Sleepwalk, which features characters trying to stay off the grid—and to discern each other’s true identities. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Dan Chaon Sleepwalk Ill Will Stay Awake Await Your Reply Among the Missing “The Story of My Imposters,” The Atlantic Others: Edan Lepucki Charles Baxter The Soul Thief 'A chameleon's skill' | TribLIVE.com George Saunders Writers Wrestle with Twitter: Do I Stay or Go (and Where?) by Jess deCourcy Hinds, Literary Hub Fiction/Non/Fiction, Season 6 Episode 6: “Nancy Pelosi’s Majority: Matthew Clark Davison’s San Francisco Take on a National Leader” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In the wake of the brutal attack on Nancy Pelosi’s husband Paul, and anticipating the midterms, writer and longtime Bay Area resident Matthew Clark Davison joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss Nancy Pelosi’s political trailblazing and what it’s like to live in her district. Davison talks about how he’s seen Pelosi support marginalized groups through the years and his own early impressions of her. He also reads from his novel, Doubting Thomas, which includes some of San Francisco’s political history, especially as it pertains to gay communities. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Matthew Clark Davison Doubting Thomas  Others: Nancy Pelosi “Nancy Pelosi Says Attack on Husband Will Affect Her Political Future,” by Eduardo Medina, The New York Times “The Facts about the Attack on Paul Pelosi, According to Prosecutors,” by The New York Times “Pelosi, Vilified by Republicans for Years, Is a Top Target of Threats,” by Annie Karni, Catie Edmondson and Carl Hulse, The New York Times Janice Mirikitani Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 19: “The Danger is Larger Because the Voice is Bigger.” Alexandra Billings on the Surge in Anti-Trans Legislation Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 6 Episode 5: The Author of Election on the Election: Tom Perrotta Talks Tracy Flick’s Return and the Midterms Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 8: Paul Lisicky and Terese Marie Mailhot on the Long-Term Mental Health Effects of the Pandemic Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1 Episode 12: C. Riley Snorton and T Fleischmann Talk Gender, Freedom, and Transitivity “What ‘news deserts,’ Americans must ensure what they’re consuming is legit,” hosted by Steve Chiotakis, KCRW Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Novelist Tom Perrotta joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the upcoming midterm elections through the lens of his new novel, Tracy Flick Can’t Win, his second about the title character. Tracy Flick serves as an avatar for elite liberalism—a way many view the Democratic Party, he argues, whether the Dems are aware of it or not. Perrotta talks about what it means for his character, and many Americans, to be Republicans at heart while finding it necessary to lean toward the Democratic Party in light of Trump-era Republicanism. He also reads from the novel and explains how #MeToo influenced his decision to return to the iconic heroine. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Tom Perrotta Election Tracy Flick Can’t Win Mrs. Fletcher The Leftovers Little Children Bad Haircut The Wishbones Joe College The Abstinence Teacher Nine Inches Others: "Rhyming Action," by Charles Baxter, from Michigan Quarterly Review, Vol. 35, No. 4 (also in Burning Down the House) 5 scenarios that could decide the Senate in 2022, The Washington Post On Feminism and Fictionalized Histories: Curtis Sittenfeld Tackles Centrism, Clintonism and All Things ‘Hillary Rodham’ (Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 3, Episode 18)  Charles Baxter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Novelist and essayist Porochista Khakpour joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the current wave of protests for women’s rights in Iran, and the government’s brutal crackdown in response. Khakpour laments the deaths of young women who have lost their lives speaking out against compulsory hijab. She also reflects on and celebrates multiple generations of human rights protests in the country of her birth. Finally, she talks about what it means to be Iranian in the United States and reads from her essay “Revolution Days,” which is included in her latest book, Brown Album: Essays on Exile and Identity. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Porochista Khakpour Brown Album: Essays on Exile and Identity The Last Illusion Sons and Other Flammable Objects  Sick Shirin Ebadi: 'Almost a fourth of the people on Earth are Muslim. Are they like each other? Of course not' | Working in development | The Guardian (April 25, 2017) “What I Saw at the Revolution,” The Daily Beast (Feb. 11, 2009) Others: “Iranian President Orders Enforcement of Hijab and Chastity Law for Women” by Ardeshir Tayebi, RadioFreeEurope / RadioLiberty's Radio Farda (July 7, 2022) “In Iran, Woman's Death After Arrest by the Morality Police Triggers Outrage,” by Farnaz Fassihi, The New York Times (Sept. 16, 2022) “Nika Shakarami: Iran protester's family forced to lie about death,” by Parham Ghobadi, BBC Persian (Oct. 6, 2022) “Another teenage girl dead at hands of Iran's security forces, reports claim,” by Deepa Parent and Annie Kelly, The Guardian, (Oct. 7, 2022) “Unity In Diversity: On Overcoming the Erasure of Kurdistan and Jina,” by Ala Riani and Rezan Labady, Los Angeles Review of Books, (Oct. 13, 2022) “Protest Chants, a Riot and Gunshots: How a Prison Fire Unfolded in Iran,” by Farnaz Fassihi, The New York Times (Oct. 21, 2022) Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri on the 40th Anniversary of the Iranian Revolution (Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 2, Episode 23)  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Novelist Aamina Ahmad joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the situation in Pakistan as the country tries to contend with the aftermath of historic floods that have displaced 35 million people. Ahmad, whose debut novel The Return of Faraz Ali is set in Pakistan, talks about her own connection to the country; the scale of what has occurred and its connection to climate change; and how a long history of political instability, militarization, and economic hardship have affected the country’s most vulnerable. She also reflects on writing about corruption, and reads from her acclaimed debut.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Aamina Ahmad The Return of Faraz Ali Others: Review: ‘The Return of Faraz Ali,’ by Aamina Ahmad - The New York Times Pakistan's IMF loan shows few signs of stopping economic slide - Nikkei Asia Pakistan’s Biblical Floods and the Case for Climate Reparations: Isn’t it time for rich nations to pay the communities that they have helped to drown? By Mohammed Hanif, The New Yorker Imran lashes out at 'facilitators of conspiracy’ at Karachi rally Imran Khan: Pakistan police charge ex-PM under terrorism act - BBC News A history of U.S. interference worsened Pakistan’s devastating floods - The Washington Post by Maira Hayat First came the floods. Now, Pakistan's children face a new disaster GoFundMe: Medical Camp for Pakistan Flood Victims  Alia Haider on Twitter Sri Lanka’s IMF Saga – The Diplomat Sri Lanka holds rates as crisis-hit economy banks on govt reforms, IMF bailout | Reuters Poetry, Prose, and the Climate Crisis: John Freeman and Tahmima Anam on Public Space and Global Inequality (Season 3, Episode 17) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Tetyana Ogarkova and Volodymyr Yermolenko, hosts of the podcast Explaining Ukraine, join Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the Russian invasion of Ukraine through the lens of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment. They talk about how Russian literature and Russian culture have separated crime from punishment, creating a society that distrusts laws and regulation and values power and impunity.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Explaining Ukraine podcast Ukraine World Tetyana Ogarkova Ukraine Crisis Media Center  Volodymyr Yermolenko Internews Ukraine   Others: Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 14: “They Didn’t Know Which Way to Go.” Katya Soldak Sheds Light on the Plight of the Ukrainian People Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 15: Scott Anderson on What Russia’s Wars in Chechnya Tell Us about the Invasion of Ukraine Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 17: “We’re There to Bear Witness.” Putsata Reang on Reporting in War Zones Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky “Inside the Ukrainian Counterstrike That Turned the Tide of the War,” by Simon Shuster and Vera Bergengruen Macbeth King Lear Euripides Aeschylus Sophocles Les Misérables by Victor Hugo The Human Comedy of Balzac  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Acclaimed fiction writer Elizabeth McCracken joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell for the show’s fifth anniversary. She reads from her new novel, The Hero of This Book, which she wrote during the pandemic, shortly after her mother’s death. She also discusses what’s involved with tricking herself into writing a novel, particularly one that deals with difficult, almost autobiographical, subject matter.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Elizabeth McCracken The Hero of This Book The Souvenir Museum Bowlaway Thunderstruck & Other Stories The Giant’s House Others: Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 4 Episode 12: WTF, Texas? Lacy M. Johnson and Natalia Sylvester on Surviving the Recent Storm and Unraveling the Whitewashed Myth of Texas Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1 Episode 1: MFA vs. Everything: Four Writers Weigh in Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 42: Yiyun Li on Complicated Friendships Real and Imagined Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 4 Episode 25: Tolstoy Forever: Brigid Hughes and Yiyun Li on Retweeting a Russian Classic Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker  “Against Aboutness” by Yiyun Li, Harper’s Magazine The Book of Goose by Yiyun Li Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Award-winning author Jonathan Escoffery joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the complexity of immigrant communities in Florida. Escoffery talks about children of immigrants who fall into a middle space, unable to identify fully with their parents’ country or the one in which they grew up. He also speaks about generational and emotional gaps between his Jamaican American characters, explains why some Florida immigrants’ history and interests might make them lean conservative, and analyzes how fiction can succeed where politicians often fail: in understanding subtlety, nuance, and difference. Finally, he reflects on the political ramifications of categorizing or othering recent immigrants and their families, and reads from his National Book Award-nominated linked story collection, If I Survive You. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Jonathan Escoffery If I Survive You “Under the Ackee Tree” (Paris Review) Others: The Family Chao by Lan Samantha Chang Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 23, The Brothers Chao: Lan Samantha Chang on Food, Family, and New Ways of Imagining Asian American Narratives Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5 Episode 36, Remembering Afghan’s Wars: Jamil Jan Kochai on Shifting Storytellers and Forms The Emerging Democratic Majority by John B. Judis and Ruy Teixeira  “Lost Hope of Lasting Democratic Majority” by Nate Cohn  “PolitiFact: What we know about DeSantis flying migrants to Martha's Vineyard. Is it legal?” by Maria Ramirez Uribe and Yacob Reyes “Florida's governor signs controversial law opponents dubbed 'Don't Say Gay'” by Jaclyn Diaz “DeSantis Bans CRT From K-12 Classrooms Despite Absence From Curriculum” by Fatma Khaled “Trump cultivated the Latino vote in Florida, and it paid off” by Carmen Sesin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Frenemies of the State: Yiyun Li on Complicated Friendships Real and Imagined Novelist and memoirist Yiyun Li joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss frenemies in writing circles, in literature, and in politics (with a tip of the hat to Joe Manchin). Li explains how intention helps her to distinguish between friendship and frenemyship, talks about finding frenemies in literature more interesting than those in politics, and offers examples ranging from The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie to Sweet Days of Discipline. She also reads from her own new novel, The Book of Goose, and reflects on discovering the intense connection between her two central characters, Agnès and Fabienne, young girls growing up together in France. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Yiyun Li The Book of Goose Must I Go Dear Friend, From My Life I Write to You in Your Life Where Reasons End Others: The Best Frenemies in Fiction ‹ CrimeReads The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante Sweet Days of Discipline by Fleur Jaeggy A Separate Peace by John Knowles “Harry Styles Has Entered the SpitGate Chat” by Adrienne Westenfeld (Esquire) Milan Kundera Chelsea Clinton Talks Candidly About Crumbling of Friendship with Ivanka Trump: 'She Went to the Dark Side' "'Checked Out': Trump rebukes Ivanka over Jan. 6 testimony" by Kelly Hooper (Politico) Column: Bill Barr is telling the truth about Trump. Too bad it’s too little, too late by Jackie Calmes (Los Angeles Times) F/N/F Season 4 Episode 25: Tolstoy Forever: Brigid Hughes and Yiyun Li on Retweeting a Russian Classic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Critically acclaimed fiction writer Andrea Barrett joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss her new collection of short stories, Natural History. Barrett explains her approach to writing about women studying science in the 19th century, reflects on the layers of intimacy in letters, and considers if online exchanges will make archives of correspondence obsolete. She also reads from Natural History and explains some of its connections to her previous work.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Andrea Barrett Natural History Ship Fever Archangel Servants of the Map Voyage of the Narwal The Air We Breathe Others: William Faulkner (via the Nobel Prize) Meet Rosalind Franklin, a sidelined figure in the history of DNA science | PBS NewsHour Daddy Long-Legs Harriet the Spy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Novelist, poet, and memoirist Rachel DeWoskin joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss her work on the Writers for Democratic Action’s National Steering Committee. She explains how the group is partnering with libraries and bookstores across the nation to register voters and connect them with crucial information in the run-up to midterm elections, an effort called Book the Vote. She also reads from her novel, Banshee. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Rachel DeWoskin Banshee Someday We Will Fly Writers for Democratic Action Book The Vote (special events September 20) DEMOCRACY BOOK CLUB: Unthinkable: An Afternoon with Jamie Raskin and Paul Auster Others: Biden's Approval Rating Surges After Hitting Low Mark In July, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Half Of Americans Say Trump Should Be Prosecuted On Criminal Charges Over His Handling Of Classified Documents Democrats and Republicans Agree That Democracy Is in Danger - The New York Times Voting Laws Roundup: May 2022 | Brennan Center for Justice Florida Republicans targeted Black voters, justice department says in filing | US voting rights | The Guardian 2020 Presidential Election Voting & Registration Tables Now Available Americans Think Our Democracy Is on the Brink. So Does Biden. - The New York Times Robert Pinsky Burning Questions by Margaret Atwood Ta-Nehisi Coates Paul Auster Representative Jamie Raskin Ada Limón  David Modigliani Peter Ho Davies Charles Baxter Jacinda Townsend Kiley Reid James Baldwin William Carlos Williams Walt Whitman Ralph Ellison Schoolhouse Rock Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nobel Prize-winning novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the history and lasting effects of colonialism in African nations, particularly Tanzania, where he grew up, and which was once part of German East Africa. He reads from his book Afterlives, which traces the lives of young friends with different relationships to the schutztruppe, the German colonial troops.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Abdulrazak Gurnah Afterlives Gravel Heart The Last Gift Others: Abdulrazak Gurnah – Facts – 2021 - NobelPrize.org Abdulrazak Gurnah Refuses to Be Boxed In: ‘I Represent Me’ - The New York Times Nobel Prize in Literature: Read About Abdulrazak Gurnah's Books - The New York Times Stories of Familial Unrest and Displacement - The New York Times In Tanzania, Gurnah’s Nobel Prize win sparks both joy and debate | Arts and Culture News | Al Jazeera The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In the wake of Nancy Pelosi’s recent visit to Taiwan, fiction writer Phong Nguyen joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss China’s interests abroad. Nguyen speaks about his new historical novel Bronze Drum, in which he retells the story of Viêt sisters who led an army of women in battle against their Hán Chinese occupiers. He explains how their actions laid the groundwork for an independent Vietnam, and considers modern relationships between China and other countries around the world. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Phong Nguyen Bronze Drum Pages From The Textbook Of Alternate History Roundabout: An Improvisational Fiction Others: Pelosi’s ‘reckless’ Taiwan visit deepens US-China rupture – why did she go? U.S. Insists It Will Operate Around Taiwan, Despite China’s Pressure - The New York Times The Princess Bride Thelma and Louise Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Fiction writer Anthony Marra joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss how his new historical novel, Mercury Pictures Presents, echoes the right’s current embrace of authoritarianism in the U.S. and globally. By looking at censorship in 1940s Hollywood and the fascist regime of Italy during that same period, Marra teases out truths about conservatives’ current interest in controlling popular opinion.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Anthony Marra Mercury Pictures Presents The Tsar of Love and Techno A Constellation of Vital Phenomena Others: Frankenstein Psycho Lightyear S5 Episode 13: Farah Jasmine Griffin: Censoring the American Canon S5 Episode 12: Intimate Contact: Garth Greenwell on Book Bans and Writing About Sex  Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann Billy Wilder Three Days of the Condor Jason Bourne franchise Ban on 52 Books in Largest Utah School District is a Worrisome Escalation of Censorship - PEN America Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Fiction writer Jamil Jan Kochai joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell almost a year after U.S. troops’ withdrawal from Afghanistan to talk about how the wars there will be remembered. He reflects on how growing up with Western stereotypes of Afghans made him want to revise false narratives, and also discusses how fiction’s flexible forms allow him to reorient his own thinking about the stories of war-affected Afghans and diaspora. He reads from his new book, The Haunting of Hajji Hotak and Other Stories. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Jamil Jan Kochai The Haunting of Hajji Hotak and Other Stories 99 Nights in Logar Jamil Jan Kochai Reads “The Haunting of Hajji Hotak” | The New Yorker “Playing Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain,” by Jamil Jan Kochai | The New Yorker Jamil Jan Kochai Reads “Occupational Hazards” | The New Yorker Jamil Jan Kochai on Résumés as Stories | The New Yorker Others: U.S. is rejecting over 90% of Afghans seeking to enter the country on humanitarian grounds - CBS News S4 Ep. 26: Bullshit Saviors: Helen Benedict and Nadia Hashimi on Depictions of the American Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq  “Love and honour and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice…” - by Nam Le Prospect Magazine “The Indian Uprising” by Donald Barthelme | The New Yorker Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Novelist Margot Livesey joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell from London to discuss the downfall of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the legacy of his decision to “do Brexit.” Livesey, who grew up in Scotland, explains Johnson’s career of fabrications, talks about how Brexit looks now, and shares her experience of the recent heat wave in the U.K. Finally, she and the hosts analyze characters who resemble Johnson in literature–including the antagonist in Livesey’s novel The Missing World. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Margot Livesey The Hidden Machinery: Essays on Writing The Boy in the Field Mercury The Missing World The Flight of Gemma Hardy Others: Protesters in UK decry climate change after record heat wave - ABC News Quentin Blake Roald Dahl Matilda by Roald Dahl The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov The Guardian Martin Amis S5 Episode 6: Nadifa Mohamed on Writing the Convoluted Terrains of Immigration Howards End by E.M. Forster The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett Barbara Kingsolver Venetia Welby J.G. Ballard Have I Got News for You Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Memoirist Emi Nietfeld joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss how the pandemic has caused an increase in unhoused Americans as well as common—and off-base—tropes associated with homelessness. Nietfeld, who as a teenager spent time in foster care and living out of her car, talks about the American urge to view suffering as something that makes you stronger. She reads from her new book, Acceptance; reflects on being expected to shape a story about overcoming hardship to access an Ivy League education; and explains how she ultimately chose to resist simpler narratives of grit and resilience.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Emi Nietfeld Acceptance  Others: In the Midst of Plenty by Marybeth Shinn and Jill Khadduri The Invisible Child by Andrea Elliott Random Family by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson Miles from Nowhere by Nami Mun United States: Pandemic Impact on People in Poverty | Human Rights Watch  Minneapolis: City Response to Homelessness HUD Releases 2021 Annual Homeless Assessment Report Part 1 Homelessness in America State of Homelessness: 2021 Edition Inflation and rent increases are making homelessness worse - The Washington Post America’s Homelessness Crisis Is Getting Worse - The New York Times Rep. Omar Reintroduces Homes for All, Manufactured Housing Legislation A New Bill Would Declare Housing as a Human Right - Progressive.org Housing is a Human Right Act of 2021 H.R.4496 - 117th Congress (2021-2022): Ending Homelessness Act of 2021 H.R.7191 - 117th Congress (2021-2022): Homes for All Act of 2021  Guidance on Complying With the Maximum Number of Units Eligible for Operating Subsidy Pursuant to Section 9(g)(3)(A) of the Housing Act of 1937 (aka the Faircloth Limit)  Representatives Davis, Gomez, Peters, and Panetta Introduce the “Rent Relief Act of 2022” to Establish a Renters’ Tax Credit | National Low Income Housing Coalition We Need to Keep Building Houses, Even if No One Wants to Buy Congress is 35 years overdue on its promise to end homelessness | The Hill Kansas City to Temporarily House Homeless People in Hotels 1780 Foster Kids Went Missing in Missouri Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Writer and professor Charles Baxter joins Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss his new essay collection Wonderlands: Essays on the Life of Literature, and how his thoughts on craft are linked to the times in which we live. He defines concepts he has used, including “wonderlands,” “Captain Happen,” “request moments,” and “toxic narratives,” and offers illustrations from literature and the world around us to show how these can inform the writing of fiction. For example, he explains, Donald Trump rejects his loss in the 2020 presidential election as a toxic narrative because it would change his understanding of who he is.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Charles Baxter Wonderlands Gryphon Burning Down the House There’s Something I Want You to Do The Art of Subtext Behind Murakami's Mirror | The New York Review of Books Others: Is the World Really Falling Apart, or Does It Just Feel That Way? by Max Fisher - The New York Times S4 Episode 6: Hope on the Horizon: Charles Baxter and Mike Alberti on Despair and Renewal in Fiction S1 Episode 4: We're All Russian, Now World of Wonders by Aimee Nezhukumatathil Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Haruki Murakami 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami Either/Or by Elif Batuman The Lighthouse The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë Dracula by Bram Stoker The Wicker Man Bennett Sims Lacy Johnson Get Out Mike Alberti Jamaica Kincaid The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien Stacey D’Erasmo Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy Dog Day Afternoon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Poet Diane Louie and Editions Gallmeister editor Benjamin Guérif join Fiction/Non/Fiction hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss what recent losses by centrist President Emmanuel Macron’s party—combined with wins for the left and far right—mean for France’s political future. Guérif, a French citizen, and Louie, an American expat in Paris, talk about how small towns in France are faring economically and how the French view Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Louie also reads a selection of her prose poems from her 2020 collection, Fractal Shores. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: https://www.fnfpodcast.net/. This podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Diane Louie Fractal Shores Benjamin Guérif Editions Gallmeister Actualitte Rat Noir Others: French election: Six key takeaways as Macron falls short of an absolute majority | Euronews A Fragmented Parliament Brings Macron Back Down to Earth - The New York Times Who are the gilets jaunes and what do they want? | France | The Guardian ENSEMBLE! – Mouvement Rassemblement National NUPES-2022.fr What Do Dems Do Now? Thomas Frank on How the Left Can Counter a Rogue Supreme Court Season 5, Episode 31 of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast Gertrude Stein James Fenimore Cooper François Bon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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