DiscoverLaw To Fact
Law To Fact
Claim Ownership

Law To Fact

Author: Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer

Subscribed: 488Played: 7,673
Share

Description

Law to Fact began as a study tool for a Law School Professor's students. Today, it has grown into the go to place for all things law. Application tips, study strategies, and career advice: all packed into one podcast. Law to Fact is hosted by Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer of Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law.
110 Episodes
Reverse
In this episode, I speak with Professor Francine J. Lipman, the William Boyd Professor of Law at William Boyd Law School at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.Some key takeaways,1. Tax is a three-letter word not a four-letter word!2. Undocumented immigrants do pay taxes3. Tax cases are about the human life story4. All students should take taxAbout our guestFrancine J. Lipman is a distinguished accountant, a lawyer, a teacher, and a scholar. After working as a CPA in an international accounting firm and as the Chief Financial Officer for a chain of retail jewelry stores, Professor Lipman turned to law where she served as the Editor in Chief of the UC Davis Law Review and was recognized as an Outstanding Law Student and a member of the Order of the Coif. Following a similarly stellar record in NYU’s Graduate Tax Law Program, where she was a Tax Law Review Scholar, she practiced law with O’Melveny & Myers LLP and Irell & Manella LLP. Professor Lipman joined the faculties of Chapman University’s School of Business and Economics in 2001 and the School of Law in 2003. Professor Lipman is an elected member of the American Law Institute, the American College of Tax Counsel, and the American Bar Foundation, and an editor and former committee chair for the Tax Section of the American Bar Association. She has been a visiting professor at UC Hastings College of Law and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. In 2016, Governor Brian Sandoval appointed, and in 2020 Governor Steve Sisolak reappointed, Professor Lipman to serve as Nevada Tax Commissioner. The Nevada Tax Commission consists of eight Nevadans with various professional and business backgrounds. The Commissioners supervise the overall administration and operations of the Nevada Department of Taxation. Professor Lipman has written extensively on tax and accounting issues for legal journals, including the Wisconsin Law Review, Florida Tax Review, Virginia Tax Review, SMU Law Review, Nevada Law Journal, American University Law Review, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Harvard Latino Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, The Tax Lawyer, The Practical Tax Lawyer, Taxes and Tax Notes. Professor Lipman is a frequent speaker on tax subjects to law and business groups.  You can access Professor Lipman's scholarship here.   You can follow Professor Lipman on twitter @NarfnampilYou can access Prof. Bridget Crawford's Critical Tax Theory: An Introduction hereAs always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter
Election Law

Election Law

2019-11-0537:06

In this episode, Prof. Michael Morley, Associate Professor of Law at Florida State University College of Law, explains the essentials of election law.  This episode is a must listen to for any student of election law and incredibly informative for those who just want to learn a little bit more about our electoral process, our electoral history and the meaning of Citizens United v. The Federal Election Commission.Some key takeways are...1. The right to vote is not absolute2. If the burden on the right to vote is too onerous, the right is violated3. Congress can legislate state and local elections under the enforcement clause. About our guest...Professor Morley joined FSU Law in 2018, and teaches and writes in the areas of election law, constitutional law, remedies and the federal courts. Before joining FSU Law, Professor Morley was an associate professor at Barry University School of Law. Prior to his experience in academia, he held numerous positions in both private practice and government, including as special assistant at the Office of the General Counsel, Department of the Army, at the Pentagon, clerk for Judge Gerald B. Tjoflat, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, and as an associate at Winston & Strawn, LLP, in Washington, D.C. Professor Morley earned his J.D. from Yale Law School in 2003, where he was a senior editor on the Yale Law Journal, served on the moot court board and received the Thurman Arnold Prize for Best Oralist in the Morris Tyler Moot Court of Appeals.As always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. If you're currently in law school, interested in attending law school, or simply want to learn more about law school or the legal field, subscribe to Law to Fact.  Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up. 
In this episode, I speak with Professor Maybell Romero, Associate Professor of Law at Nothern Illinois University College of Law about law school post-pandemic. Some key takeaways1. Zoom classes have given professors time and space to offer more in-class assessments, a practice that is likely to migrate into in-person classroom learning.2. Initial hiring practices via video are likely to stay, offering more access to applicants wh can't necessarily afford to travel for that first interview. 3. We do miss seeing our students in person and can't wait to get back into the classroom!About our guestMaybell Romero joined the NIU Law faculty in 2017. She has varied research interests in criminal law, criminal legal system ethics, constitutional law, and juvenile justice; a major focus of her research centers on rural criminal legal systems. At NIU College of Law she teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure: Adjudication, Constitutional Law, Children & The Law, and a seminar on Criminal Justice System Ethics. From 2015 to 2017, Professor Romero was a visiting professor at the J. Reuben Clark Law School at Brigham Young University. She has served as both a state’s attorney and defense attorney during her decade of practice in Utah, where she also handled child welfare and civil litigation matters. Professor Romero is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley School of Law.You can find Professor Romero's interesting scholarship here. You can follow her on Twitter @MaybellRomeroAs always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter
In this episode, I speak with Dean Horace Anderson Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University on the importance of voting.  About our guest:Dean Horace E. Anderson, Jr. joined the Pace Law School faculty in 2004 from the New York office of White & Case LLP. His practice there focused on intellectual property, privacy and data protection, the Internet, and media and technology law. He was appointed Interim Dean of the Law School in 2018 and was named the ninth Dean of the Law School in December 2019.In addition to his experience in law practice, Professor Anderson has advised companies in business strategy as a consultant at the New York office of Monitor Group, and he worked as a systems integration consultant in the Financial Markets Division of Andersen Consulting (now Accenture). Professor Anderson received a JD from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1996, and a BS in Economics with a concentration in Finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1991.You can find all our podcasts, available for free at www.lawtofact.com
In this episode ...Professor Jen Reise discusses her program, JD Navigator, a program to help individuals decide whether law school is the right choice. About our guest...Jen Randolph Reise teaches business law as a visiting professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law, the first U.S. law school to launch an ABA-approved blended learning J.D. program. She is a securities and corporate governance attorney by training and has worked both in private practice at a large Minneapolis firm and in-house at a public company. She has also founded tech-ed startup JD Navigator as a way to help people considering law school get the information they need, from anywhere.You can check out the JD Navigator course discussed in the podcast, "Should I Go to Law School?" here. Podcast listeners can use the code LAWTOFACT to get the full online course for $99.Law to Fact is a podcast about law school for law school students.  As always if you  if you have any suggestions for an episode topic concerning any matter related to law school, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes.Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com. This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up. 
In this episode....Steve Schwartz, LSAT tutor and author of the LSATblog explains the new LSAT Flex Test.About our guest…Steve Schwartz is a full-time author, teacher, and founder of the LSAT Blog and  LSAT Unplugged YouTube channel and LSAT Unplugged podcast, with an audience of over 100,000 on LSAT and law school admissions. He's taught the LSAT since 2005 and scored 175 on the LSAT.Check out these links Steve is sharing with usFree LSAT Cheat Sheet: https://bit.ly/lsatcheatsheetFree LSAT Course: https://bit.ly/lsatcourseLSAT Blog Free Stuff: http://lsatblog.blogspot.com/p/lsat-prep-tips.htmlAs always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up. 
In this episode ...Zamir Ben-Dan, Community Justice Attorney for Legal Aid Brooklyn shares his experiences as a legal aid attorney and his path to securing his dream job.  Mr. Ben-Dan highlights the importance of legal research and writing classes.  He also emphasizes the value of networking.  The discussion highlights some of his most interesting cases and is a must-listen for law students and lawyers alike. About our guest...Zamir Ben-Dan, Esq. is an attorney at the Legal Aid Society. He did direct representation in the Bronx for four years before joining the Community Justice Unit in November 2019. He is also an adjunct professor in the Black and Latino Studies department at Baruch College.​
In this special episode of law to fact, Professor Heidi K. Brown, Director of Legal Writing and Associate Professor of Law shares very specific pointers for success during online moot court arguments.  Some key takeaways are: Make sure your space looks professional. Stand, rather than sitting and dress in courtroom attireKnow that people tend to interrupt online, wait for a moment to speakAlways remember you know your material better than the judges About our guest…Professor Heidi K. Brown is the Director of Legal Writing and Associate Professor of Law.She is a prolific scholar and author on the importance of legal writing, she has published four books on predictive and persuasive legal writing and federal litigation, as well as numerous scholarly articles for law journals. In 2017, she published her fifth book, The Introverted Lawyer: A Seven-Step Journey Toward Authentically Empowered Advocacy. Inspired by her own experience conquering the fear of public speaking during her litigation career, she is passionate about helping law students and lawyers “find their authentic lawyer voices” and overcome anxiety about Socratic legal discourse. Untangling Fear in Lawyering is available at  https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/358687385/  Her other books, including The Introverted Lawyer, are available at Amazon.com You can learn more about Prof. Brown at https://www.brooklaw.edu/faculty/directory/facultymember/biography?id=heidi.brown As always, if you have and suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com. Tags: Academic SuccessLegal Research and WritingMoot Court1L2LLawLawyerLaw StudentLSATLaw SchoolLaw School ExamsEpisode is LivePublished: Mar. 26, 2019 @12AM EditUnpublishAmplify this EpisodeAdd Chapter MarkersTranscribe this EpisodePromote this EpisodeCreate a Video SoundbiteShare on FacebookShare on Twitter
In this episode...Bridget Crawford, Professor of Law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, shares key strategies for students engaged in distance learning.Some takeaways are...1. Identify learning objectives from each class and make certain you understand them2. Treat online learning like a classroom experience, dress, sit at a desk3. While in class cameras on, mics offAbout Professsor CrawfordProfessor Bridget J. Crawford teaches Federal Income Taxation; Estate and Gift Taxation; and Wills, Trusts and Estates at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law.   Prof. Crawford has been engaged in distance learning for the past 11 years.  Her teaching has received both national and school-wide attention having received every major faculty award (including best professor 8 times!) and  Michael Hunter Schwartz' included her in his book,  What the Best Teachers Do. Her scholarship focuses on issues of taxation, especially wealth transfer taxation; property law, especially wills and trusts; tax policy; and women and the law. Prior to joining the Pace faculty, Professor Crawford practiced law at Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy LLP in New York. Her practice was concerned with income, estate and gift tax planning for individuals, as well as tax and other advice to closely-held corporations and exempt organizations.  Professor Crawford is a member of the American Law Institute and the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. She is the Editor of the ACTEC Journal. Professor Crawford is the former chair of the AALS Section on Women in Legal Education and the AALS Section on Trusts & Estates. She is one of 26 law professors profiled in the book by Michael Hunter Schwartz et al., What the Best Law Teachers Do, recently published by Harvard University Press. From 2008 through 2012, Professor Crawford served as Pace Law School's inaugural Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, and she served again in that role in 2014-2015.  Her book Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Opinions of the United States Supreme Court (co-edited with Linda L. Berger and Kathryn M. Stanchi), was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016.  Her following book, Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Tax Opinions (co-edited with Anthony C. Infanti), was published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. Professor Crawford is the co-editor of a series of Feminist Judgments books that cover a wide range of subject matters. Most recently, Professor Crawford is a co-author of the seventh edition of Federal Income Taxation: Cases and Materials (with Joel Newman and Dorothy Brown).  You can follow Professor Crawford on Twitter at @ProfBCrawford
In this episode...Dean Katheleen Guzman, Interim Dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Law discusses the requirements for validating a will.Some key takeways...1. Many jurisdictions have relaxed the strict common law requirements for wills2. Holographic comes from  Holo (whole) and graphic (written) so the holographic will is a will that is handwritten.3. Many states accept holographic wills as proof of the testator's intent.About our guest...Dean Katheleen Guzman joined the OU Law faculty in 1993, where she has taught numerous courses targeting the dimensions of the property and its transfer and writes in related areas.She was named the MAPCO/Williams Presidential Professor in 2000 and the Earl Sneed Centennial Professor of Law in 2015. From 2003 to 2006, she served as associate director of the Law Center and associate dean of academics, and from 2017 to 2018, she served as associate dean for research and scholarship.As always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.   
In this episode.Bridget Crawford, Professor of Law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, walks listeners through the steps necessary to create a distance learning class.Some key takeaways are...1. Take time to understand the platform you will use.2. Decide whether you want to create a synchronistic or asynchronistic class.3. For asynchronistic classes:   a. Layout the agenda, prepare a lesson plan, include powerpoint presentations   b. Record in bits rather than one long session   c. Create post-recording assessments.4. For Synchronistic classes   a. Choose your technology   b. Set student expectations5. One other option is to hold the class in a conference call format. About Professsor CrawfordProfessor Bridget J. Crawford teaches Federal Income Taxation; Estate and Gift Taxation; and Wills, Trusts and Estates at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law.   Prof. Crawford has been engaged in distance learning for the past 11 years.  Her teaching has received both national and school-wide attention having received every major faculty award (including best professor 8 times!) and  Michael Hunter Schwartz' included her in his book,  What the Best Teachers Do. Her scholarship focuses on issues of taxation, especially wealth transfer taxation; property law, especially wills and trusts; tax policy; and women and the law. Prior to joining the Pace faculty, Professor Crawford practiced law at Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy LLP in New York. Her practice was concerned with income, estate and gift tax planning for individuals, as well as tax and other advice to closely-held corporations and exempt organizations.  Professor Crawford is a member of the American Law Institute and the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. She is the Editor of the ACTEC Journal. Professor Crawford is the former chair of the AALS Section on Women in Legal Education and the AALS Section on Trusts & Estates. She is one of 26 law professors profiled in the book by Michael Hunter Schwartz et al., What the Best Law Teachers Do, recently published by Harvard University Press. From 2008 through 2012, Professor Crawford served as Pace Law School's inaugural Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, and she served again in that role in 2014-2015.  Her book Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Opinions of the United States Supreme Court (co-edited with Linda L. Berger and Kathryn M. Stanchi), was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016.  Her following book, Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Tax Opinions (co-edited with Anthony C. Infanti), was published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. Professor Crawford is the co-editor of a series of Feminist Judgments books that cover a wide range of subject matters. Most recently, Professor Crawford is a co-author of the seventh edition of Federal Income Taxation: Cases and Materials (with Joel Newman and Dorothy Brown).  You can follow Professor Crawford on Twitter at @ProfBCrawford
In this episode... I speak with Nina Kohn, the David M. Levy Professor of Law and Faculty Director of Online Education at Syracuse University College of Law about developing on-line classes for legal education.   Some key takeaways...1. Online classes are asynchronous or synchronous.  Asynchronous classes are recorded and students can watch them on their own time.  Synchronous classes are live.  Students are all present at the same time and the professor is able to engage in dialog.2. Developing an online class is not as difficult as one might think (and Prof. Kohn explains how to make it happen)3. The key to creating an online class is to first identify goals and principles.4. Faculty can deliver the Socratic method through online learning.About our guest...  Nina A. Kohn is the David M. Levy Professor of Law and Faculty Director of Online Education at Syracuse University College of Law, a faculty affiliate with the Syracuse University Aging Studies Institute, and a member of the American Law Institute.  Professor Kohn is currently a Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School for the 2020-2021 academic year. Kohn led the development and launch of Syracuse University College of Law’s online JD program (“JDinteractive” or “JDi”).  The program is the nation’s first fully interactive online JD program. In addition to teaching Torts to JDi students, Kohn oversees the program’s continuing development and operations.Professor Kohn’s scholarly research focuses on elder law and the civil rights of older adults and persons with diminished cognitive capacity.
In this episode...1st Lieutenant  Officer Steven Arango, USMC, and Federal Law Clerk to U.S. District Judge Fernando Rodriguez, Jr. in the Southern District of Texas shares his wisdom about life as a law student and beyond.  We cover a range of topics including JAG Corps, Study Skills, post-law school employment and the importance of mentors. 1st Lt Arango works with veterans attending college and law school to help them succeed in their academic studies.  Our discussion is of great value to military personal and anyone else thinking about, enrolled in or graduated from law school.Some key takeaways...1. Build relationships with professors while in law school.  They can help you years after you graduate.2. Find a mentor to help you navigate the legal world.3. Outline your classes on your own. The outlining process is where you can do your best learning.About our guest...1st Lt Steven Arango is an officer in the United States Marine Corps, a lawyer, and a dedicated public servant. Arango is always seeking opportunities to join non-profit organizations and to mentor others.  Currently, he is a Federal Law Clerk for U.S. District Judge Fernando Rodriguez, Jr. in the Southern District of Texas. Arango conducts research and drafts opinions on various issues dealing with immigration, constitutional, and administrative law. He also manages and drafts all orders related to land cases, mainly dealing with Southern Border issues.Before his clerkship, Arango worked for the U.S. House of Representatives, specifically for Representative Jeff Duncan (SC), and for the Department of Defense in the Office of General Counsel, International Affairs. He has been fortunate to work in all three branches of government at an early age, and learn how the federal government operates.1st Lt Arango is a law school and undergraduate Ambassador to Service to School, a non-profit that provides free college and grad school application counseling to military veterans and servicemembersClick here to reach 1st Lieutenant Officer Arango.    As always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.  
In this episode ...Professor Wayne Barnes, Professor of Law at Texas A & M School of Law and a lecturer with Kaplan Bar Prep explains consideration in contracts.Some key takeaways...1. Consideration is a bargained-for exchange2. The promisor must receive something of value in exchange for his promise3. The thing of value can be a return promise or performance. About our guest...Professor Wayne Barnes teaches and writes about contract law.  His scholarly interests focus on contract law, including the implications of contract theory for ascertaining assent by consumers to standard form contracts. He has especially focused on such assent to form contracts in the online Internet context, and the implications of the online environment for the contracting process. He is a co-editor of the student edition of the venerable White & Summers treatise on the Uniform Commercial Code, the Learning Core Commercial Concepts coursebook by West Academic, and The Short & Happy Guide to Secured Transactions.  Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M, Professor Barnes practiced law for eight years in commercial litigation, creditors’ rights and bankruptcy, first at a law firm in Amarillo, Texas, and later at a large Dallas law firm. He is also the lead national Kaplan lecturer for Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code, and also lectures for PMBR on MBE preparation.Law to Fact is a podcast about law school for law school students.  As always if you  if you have any suggestions for an episode topic concerning any matter related to law school, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.  
In this episode, Professor Karl Coplan, Professor of Law and Director of the Environmental Litigation Clinic at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University discusses his new book, Live Sustainably Now: A Low Carbon Vision of the Good Life, published by Columbia University Press.   Professor Coplan shares ways, both small and large, in which each of us can lower our carbon footprints, and together make a difference in the fight against climate change.  Live Sustainably Now reads as much as a memoir as it does a call to arms. Coplan shares how he lives on a 4-ton annual carbon budget by kayaking across the Hudson River to work or inserting a wood stove to heat his home, through what he calls Carbon Diaries. Each Diary is a fun read and an aspirational example of helping with climate change. He presents his efforts through what he calls Carbon Diaries, each of which is fun to read through his Carbon Diaries. , which include --- carbon life, sharing his carbon diary (like how he kayaks to work or rode his bike rather than drives). But unlike so many books on climate change, this book is neither unreasonably aspirational nor preachy. Coplan recognizes that his efforts may be other herculean and offers small reasonable steps that each of us can take to effect change, and feel good doing so. (check out the chapter on Having Fun on a Climate budget!) He also clearly explains what factors work against our climate and does so -- easily and understandably. Filled with information sandwiched between personal highlights, it is an interesting read; You are likely to finish it in one sitting.Some key takeaways....1. Every flight across the country emits enough carbon monoxide to fill a house2. Of all protein production, Pork and Meat production emits the highest levels of carbon monoxide.3. Doing something as simple as switching to renewable energy will make a difference4. The easiest and best step we can each take is to check our carbon footprints.
In this episode...Three writing expert writing professors share their advice and key strategies to assure success on the appellate brief.  Christine Coughlin, Professor of Legal Writing at Wake Forest School of Law, Jean Goetz Mangan, Legal Writing Instructor at the University of Georgia School of Law and Ruth Anne Robbins, Distinguished Clinical Professor of Law at Rutgers Law School highlight the importance of pre-writing, narrative and even font choice when drafting the brief.  And we all share the fear we first felt, and fun we finally had, when arguing the brief.Some key takeaways...1. Chart the arguments both pro and con before you begin writing your argument.2. Document design can improve the quality of your brief.  3. Headings are the prime real estate of your appellate brief.4. There is a huge value to pre-writing.Our experts share some key reference books for you to check out!Ruth Ann Robbins, Ken Chestek and Steve Johansen, Your Client’s Story: Persuasive Legal Writing (2d ed. 2019)Christine Coughlin, Jean Malmud Rocklin et. al, A Lawyer WritesRuth Anne Robbins, Painting with Print: Incorporating Concepts of Typographic and Layout Design into the Text of Legal Writing DocumentsLaura P. Graham and Miriam E. Felsenburg, The Pre-Writing Handbook for Law Students: A Step by Step GuideAs always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes.Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com. Feed Spot's Top 50 Podcasts You Must Follow in 2020 . FM Player's Best Law Shool Podcasts (2020).This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up. 
In this episode...I speak with Sarah Morath, Clinical Associate Professor, Director of Lawyering Skills and strategies at The University of Houston Law Center, about drafting a scholarly article.  Most law schools have an upper-level writing requirement.  Expert Sarah Morath provides valuable insights to help you get the job done right!!Some key takeaways...1. Scholarly articles must have a legal "so what."  Be careful not to write an undergraduate thesis.2. Footnotes for law review articles are different from those in a memorandum of law or appellate brief.  Use the main part of the Bluebook for reference.3. Pick a topic that interests you, you will be with the topic for a long time. Law to Fact is a podcast about law school for law school students.  As always if you  if you have any suggestions for an episode topic concerning any matter related to law school, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.    
Privacy Torts

Privacy Torts

2020-01-2134:12

In this episode, Professor Amy Gajda, the Class of 1937 Professor of Law at Tulane Law School explains the four privacy torts and shares discusses the likely impact of recent cases including Bollea v. Gawker (The Hulk Hogan Case)Some key takeaways are... The Privacy Rights are(1) Misappropriation - use of another's name or identity without permission.(2) Intrusion into seclusion - peering in on someone who is in seclusion.(3) Publication of private facts (the gossip tort) publishing of private information about another person that is highly offensive and not newsworthy.(4) False Light - which is similar to the tort of defamation and not accepted in all jurisdictions.About our guest...Amy Gajda is recognized internationally for her expertise in privacy, media law, torts, and the law of higher education; her scholarship explores the tensions between social regulation and First Amendment values. Gajda’s first book, The Trials of Academe (Harvard 2009), examines public oversight of colleges and universities and its impact on academic freedom.  Her later work draws on insights from her many years as an award-winning journalist and focuses on the shifting boundaries of press freedoms, particularly in light of the digital disruption of traditional media and rising public anxieties about the erosion of privacy.  Her second book, The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press (Harvard 2015), explores these boundaries in the context of judicial oversight of journalistic news judgment.  Gajda is presently at work on a third book, The Secret History of the Right to Privacy, under contract with Viking and slated to be published in 2021.  Her upcoming book, tentatively titled The Secret History of the Right To Privacy will be published by Viking Press.  In Fall 2019, the American Law Institute appointed her to serve as an Adviser for its new Restatement on Defamation and Privacy, a multi-year project that begins in 2020.  You can hear Professor Gajda's take on the Hulk Hogan case and its fallout, by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnaCDyP_k7s&t=109sThis episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.   
In this episode...Professor Victor Flatt, The Dwight Olds Chair in Law at The University of Houston Law Center and the 2019 Haub School of Law at Pace University Visiting Scholar, explains the requirements of Model Rule of Professional Responsibility 1.6(b), which permits attorneys to disclose information to prevent death or serious bodily harm and how bar associations can use the rule to prevent further climate change.  He presents his theory in his most recent article, Disclosing the Danger: State Attorney Ethics Rules MEet Climate Change, to be published in the Utah Law Review.About our guest...Professor Victor B. Flatt returned to the University of Houston in 2017 as the Dwight Olds Chair in Law and the Faculty Director of the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources (EENR) Center. He also holds an appointment as a Distinguished Scholar of Carbon Markets at the University of Houston’s Global Energy Management Institute. He was previously the inaugural O’Quinn Chair in Environmental Law at UHLC from 2002-2009.Professor Flatt’s teaching career began at the University of Washington’s Evins School of Public Affairs, and he has previously taught at Georgia State University College of Law, and most recently at the University of North Carolina School of Law, where he was the inaugural Taft Distinguished Professor in Environmental Law and the Co-Director of the Center for Climate, Energy, Environment, and Economics (CE3).Professor Flatt is a recognized expert on environmental law, climate law, and energy law. His research focuses on environmental legislation and enforcement, with particular expertise in the Clean Air Act and NEPA. He is co-author of a popular environmental law casebook, and has authored more than 40 law review articles, which have appeared in journals such as the Notre Dame Law Review, Ecology Law Quarterly, Washington Law Review, Houston Law Review and the Carolina Law Review. Six of his articles have been recognized as finalists or winner of the best environmental law review article of the year, and one was recognized by Vanderbilt University Law School and the Environmental Law Institute as one of the three best environmental articles of 2010, leading to a seminar and panel on the article in a Congressional staff briefing.Professor Flatt has served on the AALS sub-committees on Natural Resources and Environmental Law and was chair of the AALS Teaching Methods Section. He has served on many other boards and committees in his career including the national board of Lambda Legal, and the Law School Admission Council’s Gay and Lesbian Interests section. He is currently on the Advisory Board of CE3, a member of the ABA’s Section on Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Law Congressional Liaison Committee, and a member scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform.Law to Fact is a podcast about law school for law school students.  As always if you if you have any suggestions for an episode topic concerning any matter related to law school, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes. Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.  This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review.  Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on t
In this episode...Judge Lisa Margaret Smith, Magistrate Judge, Southern District of New York and Professor Michael Mushlin, Elisabeth Haub School of Law share their experience jointly teaching their 1L Civil Procedure class with a courtroom component. The program gives the students a flavor of the practical aspects of civil procedure and a context within which to grasp doctrinal concepts. Their approach supplements the traditional casebook materials and typical Socratic teaching method used in first-year law courses by challenging students to draft court documents, allowing them to visit a federal court and meet regularly with the judge. Their approach recognizes the disconnect between 1L doctrinal classroom teaching and the practice of law. This class provides students with context, which translates to a greater interest in and understanding of Civil Procedure Substantive law. The experience has been a huge hit among those who have had the good fortune of taking the class. You can read more about the class, including an analysis of the benefits and costs of the program in Judge Smith and Professor Mushlin's article,  The Professor and the Judge: Introducing First-Year Law Students to the Law in Context, 63 J. Legal. Educ. 460 (2014). This episode is of value to law students, who will learn the importance of courtroom experience. Judge Smith also explains how law students can gain access to a courtroom even if students do not have the benefit of a formal program. The episode is equally important to law professors. Professor Mushlin's first-hand experience is enough to convince any law professor to incorporate some experiential work into every doctrinal class.Some key takeaways are...1. Students learn better when they understand the context of the material2. Many schools overlook the fact that students do not have context as they have never been in a courtroom before, and, if they are first-generation law students, they do not have exposure to the legal profession.3. Skills assignments and courtroom exposure during the 1L year increase student investment in the subject matter. As always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on iTunes.  Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact? Join our mailing list by visiting us at www.lawtofact.com.
loading
Comments (1)

Glai Martinez

1bbbbbbb

Sep 26th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store