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Author: Jeremy Goldman

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Welcome to FUTUREPROOF. We're the podcast that delves into the future. From Augmented Reality to Artificial Intelligence to Smart Cities to Internet of Things to Virtual Reality, we speak with some of the sharpest minds to better help you understand what the next few years may look like.Brought to you by author Jeremy Goldman (Going Social, Getting to Like).For booking inquiries: vie@futureproofshow.com
103 Episodes
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Victoria Montgomery-Brown is CEO and co-founder of Big Think, the knowledge company that makes people and companies smarter and faster through short-form video with the world’s best thinkers and doers. Since founding Big Think in 2007, Victoria has built the company from a fledgling thought-leadership media platform to the leading knowledge company for ideas and soft skills. We had Victoria on to discuss her new book, DIGITAL GODDESS: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur, the future representation of women among Fortune 500 CEOs, whether female entrepreneurs are getting funded and the impact the pandemic is having on them, and how leaders and innovators have to think differently heading into 2021. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
As you know, we geek out getting to speak to guests we can learn from, so it’s extra special when we can track down two people to learn from in the same week. Po Bronson is a former finance and tech journalist covering Silicon Valley for Wired, The New York Times Magazine, and an op ed contributor for The Wall Street Journal who’s now the Managing Director of IndieBio, the world’s #1 biotechnology accelerator, founded by Arvind Gupta, who now co-leads global VC firm Mayfield’s engineering biology practice. In their new book, Decoding the World: A Roadmap for the Questioner, Bronson and Gupta offer a vision of the future that uses cutting-edge biotech to explore the deepest mysteries of the 21st century. In the book, they use their first-hand experience funding technologies that solve the world's most complex problems—like how to counteract climate change, dwindling bee populations, cloning human organs, and much  more— often involving genetic engineering. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
For our 100th episode, we wanted to try something a little different. You’re going to hear what the team behind this show has found most interesting from the conversations we’ve had with futurists and leaders from across a wide variety of disciplines. We’re going to bring you some of our favorite clips from our archive, narrated by Jeremy and his team of motley producers. If you've never listened to an episode before, you're in for a treat.This episode features:Author Nir EyalWashington Post CMO Miki Toliver KingEditor-in-Chief of Entrepreneur Jason FeiferToronto mayor John ToryAdvertising icon Cindy GallopVox Co-founder Matthew YglesiasChief co-founder Lindsay KaplanJournalist & author Alex Kantrowitz As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
If there’s anything we’ve noticed from our work on this show, it’s that sometimes society focuses on the bright, shiny object instead of the quote-unquote unsexy technologies and products we as humans need to survive. One of those unsexy topics is the fact that we all have something in common: we’re all aging, every single one of us, and we don’t talk enough about meeting the needs of consumers as they age. Mia Abbruzzese and Alexandra Fennell launched Attn: Grace, the first cleaner, greener personal care brand for women 40+, starting with the $2.5B bladder leakage market. They’re on a mission to destigmatize aging, and we wanted to have them on to discuss how they’re trying to launch a disruptive product in such a challenging year.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
We're really excited this week, since Allan Lichtman is in the house! He's a historian who has taught at American University in. since 1973. Famously, he created the The Keys to the White House model, which he created with a Russian seismologist (really!) in 1981.  Lichtman's model uses 13 True/False criteria to predict whether the candidate of an incumbent party will win or lose the next election for the U.S. president, and he's been right in every election since, including Trump's 2016 win.We talk about Lichtman's predictions for 2020 right before Election Day, as well as how to factor new unexpected variables (say, a pandemic) into your model, and how to get better at forecasting on an ongoing basis. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
Often we’re talking about exciting new technologies on this show, but we also try to talk about things that are incredibly human. We've found that management during a pandemic has been especially challenging for some professionals, so we wanted to speak to an expert on the evolution of management - from fear-based management to something hopefully better. That’s why we turned to Rena DeLevie. She wrote the book on Compassionate Management. Literally. Her book, Compassionate Management: How Ambitious Creatives Become Kick-Ass Leaders, came out in 2018, but she’s actually been coaching and speaking out on the topic for much longer than that, so we think you’ll learn quite a bit from this conversation.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
Two of the storylines we’ve been following closely this year have been disparities between Black and White Americans in Corporate America, and disparities between men and women in executive levels of leadership. That’s why I wanted to speak with Ella Bell Smith. She’s a Professor at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. She is also an author, managerial consultant, national recognized researcher and advocate on women's workplace issues. She's also the co-author of Our Separate Ways: Black and White Women and the Struggle for Professional Identity. On this episode we cover Kamala Harris, the swinging political pendulum, equal representation and whether or not we’ll ever reach that in the US, the need for better mentors and resources in disadvantaged communities, and much more.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
Women have made strides in the workplace over the last few decades, but there’s still plenty of progress yet to be made. In particular, women are underrepresented within executive leadership of many organizations. Is that going to change in our lifetime? What progress are we making at championing gender diversity and allowing women to get ahead?To answer that question, we turned to Lindsay Kaplan, who’s been a leader in the marketing & communications field for some time now. She first came to my attention when she joined Casper’s founding team to lead communications and brand engagement. In 2019, she co-founded Chief, the private network dedicated to connecting and supporting women in executive leadership.On this episode we discuss Chief's mission, the company's COVID pivot, how the pandemic has hit working mothers especially hard, why Taylor Swift's "The Man" is a real thing, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg: her legacy and fear of what's to come next.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
The New York Times has called Peter Shankman “a rockstar who knows everything about social media and then some.” He is a 5x best selling author, entrepreneur and corporate in-person and digital keynote speaker, focusing on customer service and the new and emerging customer and neuroatypical economy.  With three startup launches and exits under his belt, Peter is recognized worldwide for radically new ways of thinking about the customer experience, social media, PR, marketing, advertising, ADHD, and the new Neurodiverse Economy.Peter’s Customer Service and Social Media clients have included American Express, Sprint, SAP, The US Department of Defense, Walt Disney World, and many others, so when we wanted to cover customer service and what the customer experience of tomorrow might look like, I knew Peter was the one we had to speak with.On this episode we discuss what stellar customer service is these days, how a company figures out the ROI on a strong customer experience, and whether or not companies can still deliver those powerful customer experiences in the COVID era.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
When we’re thinking about the future, one of the biggest pieces of the puzzle is this: how will our economy grow? Over the past few years, cannabis has been one of the most interesting industries to watch in that regard. It has had a rapid growth curve, and it’s more intriguing to many because of its complex legal situation. The best way to get a better understanding of the future of any industry is to enlist an expert, which is why we sought out Cy Scott. Scott is the co-founder and CEO of Headset, the leading real-time cannabis consumer trends & market intelligence company. We talk to Cy about how he identified a need for a cannabis-specific analytics company, the thorny and unpredictable topic of legalization and how Headset prepares for an uncertain future, and much more - and it all starts now.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
Matthew Yglesias co-founded Vox.com with Ezra Klein and Melissa Bell in 2014. He's now a senior correspondent focused on politics and economic policy, and co-hosts "The Weeds" podcast twice a week. Yglesias is the author of three books, including his most recent, One Billion Americans, which is hitting stores as we speak, and makes a case for how Americans need to think bigger - not just in terms of population growth, but across the board. We discuss Yglesias's new book, the decline of the US on the world stage, and even that now-infamous Harper's letter.Praise for One Billion Americans:"One of those rare, sparkling books that sets out to argue a point that you are likely not to have a deeply settled opinion on, and then forces you to work through a whole series of interconnected views and assumptions you may not realize you had. Persuasive and fresh, even where it may fail to convince you, it succeeds in making you think. Really think."—Chris Hayes, host of "All In" on MSNBC and the "Why is this Happening?" podcast and author of A Colony in a NationAs always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
In this episode, we talk to Erich Joachimsthaler, a recovering academic and founder & CEO of Vivaldi Group, a digital transformation firm that has worked with the likes of American Express, Disney, Airbnb, Lego...you name it. He’s also the author of The Interaction Field, which is being released as this episode goes live, so be sure to pick it up. It’s a really interesting work which discusses the companies who will be winning in the marketplace of tomorrow. They’ll be generating, facilitating, and benefiting from data exchanges --from customers and stakeholders, but also from those you wouldn't expect to be in the mix, like suppliers, regulators, and even competitors. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
What does a futuristic do on a day to day basis? On this episode, we talk to noted futurist Christian Kromme on how he became known as a futurist, how to study history to better predict the future, how to effectively forecast using pattern recognition, whether or not it’s better to be a generalist or a specialist, what’s the ideal time horizon to employ when making a prediction, and how to account for black swan events that throw off all of your previous estimates. So let’s jump right in! As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
I think 2020 has taught us all the importance of infrastructure. That, and face masks. Anyhow, Jeremy came across CALA recently, and I thought it was a startup that’s very of the moment. They’re a New York-based marketplace that provides a total retail infrastructure for influencers and existing fashion brands to design and launch their own fashion brands. Think of it as taking your idea from a napkin sketch to the product being delivered to a warehouse.slacAs always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
It’s a crazy world right now, and COVID has exposed quite a few problems with capitalism as it’s currently constructed. In Accountable: The Rise of Citizen Capitalism, Warren Valdmanis and Michael O’Leary take us inside the fight to save capitalism from itself. Corporations are broken, reflecting no purpose deeper than profit. But the tools we are relying on to fix them—corporate social responsibility, divestment, impact investing, and government control—risk making our problems worse. Instead, they propose a new economic model they call citizen capitalism that will generate prosperity for all, not just those who sit atop the earning chart, and will demand, above all else, accountability. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
Let’s face it: it’s not hard to list companies that have been big losers in 2020, right? And yet, there have been some bright spots. Zoom has been one of the darlings of 2020, with its live video platform taking off in the early days of the pandemic. And yet, often live video is not the right solution for you at a given moment - just like sometimes it’s better to text than to make a phone call. Michael Litt is the Co-Founder and CEO of Vidyard, which helps with asynchronous video communication (as opposed to requiring you to be available on video in real-time like Zoom). Jeremy spoke to Michael on a wide range of topics, from the value of asynchronous video to growing during a pandemic to the downside of adding yet another tech tool to our arsenals. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
How’d you subscribe to this podcast in the first place? Was it Apple Podcasts? Or, how’d you discover FUTUREPROOF. In the first place? Was it through a Facebook post, or a Google ad? Or maybe you’ve been following my work since you bought one of my books on Amazon. These companies are part of Big Tech: the companies every competitor seems to fear, and yet they’re also the ones us consumers are most beholden to. That’s part of why some of these companies’ leaders were on Capitol Hill for hearings recently. One of the journalists who knows these companies the best is Alex Kantrowitz, who was most recently a senior technology reporter for BuzzFeed News and based in San Francisco. He’s now the author of Always Day One from Penguin Portfolio, where he discusses how Amazon, Facebook, Google, Apple, and Microsoft have encouraged moving fast and challenging the status quo - and how we can all learn something from how these companies innovate.To subscribe to Alex's Big Technology newsletter: https://bigtechnology.substack.com/To subscribe to Alex's Big Technology podcast: https://redcircle.com/shows/big-technology-podcastAs always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
A lot of us are working from home these days. Sam Dunn is the CEO of workplace management software, Robin, and frankly he's worked from home more in 2020 despite his company's mission: to make places of work more efficient. That's why we thought it the perfect time to check in and ask: how will the workplaces of tomorrow be designed in a manner to be socially distant, assuming COVID is still a thing? How can offices going forward be designed in a more inclusive manner? And, how can we take this time to rethink corporate culture as well?As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
Tudor Gîrba is a software environmentalist and co-founder of feenk where he works with his team on Glamorous Toolkit, a novel IDE that enables moldable development. He has won the prestigious Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize for his software engineering research, being the only non-university professor to ever receive that prize.On this episode, we discuss the software environmentalism - what it is, and why we need to adjust the way we develop and maintain software. We also discuss how the software industry behaves more like the plastics industry thank you might expect, why we abandon successful technology and programming languages, and how the way that we shape tools - everything from spreadsheets to apps to devices - impacts how we use data and shape the future.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. 
Is higher education broken? Maybe a four-year degree followed by graduate school and six figures of debt makes sense for some professions like doctors and lawyers, but what about for the rest of us?Frequent listeners may know that Jeremy spent a bit of exile during the early months of the pandemic in Ohio, which made us really want to spotlight some of the state’s interesting entrepreneurial stories. Enter Dwight Heckelman, who founded Columbus, Ohio-based Groove U, which offers two-year diplomas in Music Industry Entrepreneurship in focal areas like Music Business, Live Sound, Interactive, and more. Jeremy had a chance to sit down with Dwight to talk about ways in which higher education must evolve, what programs should really be judged on, and the universal value of entrepreneurial skills. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play.
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