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Amidst a backdrop of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, rapidly rising inflation, ever-lingering COVID, and near constant political convulsions, this year’s COP27 took on an unprecedented weight. In this episode, let John Stackhouse walk you through the recently wrapped COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. With his special guest co-host Naomi Powell, Managing Editor of RBC Economics and Thought Leadership, get John’s front row seat perspective on the United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as the Conference of the Parties (COP27)Hear from some of the world’s top leaders and thinkers, including talking to climate scientists Katharine Hayhoe and Johan Rockström; Elizabeth Nsimadala, the President of the Eastern Africa Farmers Federation, as well as Heather Chalmers, the president and CEO of GE Canada.From loss and damages to climate financing, John talks about the successes and failures of COP27, and where Canada stands out. Is the goal of halting global warming at 1.5*C still attainable? Listen in and find out. John Stackhouse shares his takeaways from COP27, click here to read the piece called, “Reality Bites”. For more information about COP27, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt click here. If you’d like to know more about some of the people John spoke with, read up on Katharine Hayhoe at the Nature Conservancy; Rick Smith, the president of the Canadian Climate Institute, or the call to action by Elizabeth Nsimala, the President of the Eastern Africa Farmers Federation. Disruptors recently took an in-depth look at how Canada can reduce emissions and waste in the agricultural sector, it’s a special, three-part series called, The Growing Challenge, listen here.
It’s an issue that’s estimated to cost Canada more than $21 billion per year -- nevermind the environmental impacts. But how much thought have you really given to the problem of food waste and spoilage, and how it could be hampering our country’s effort to reduce emissions? Whenever wasted or spoiled food ends up buried in a landfill instead of decomposing while exposed to air, it generates methane — a potent greenhouse gas with 86 times the warming power of carbon dioxide. And it just so happens that Canada is one of the worst countries on the planet when it comes to wasted food. So what can be done about it?On this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do wrap up their special, three-part series called “The Growing Challenge”, with an in-depth examination of how both food waste and spoilage represent a huge and often overlooked obstacle to our nation’s sustainability efforts. They’ll also discuss new technologies and tactics helping food producers to address the issue — as well as how we as consumers all need to change our attitudes when it comes to things like best before dates, portion sizes, and so-called “rescued food.” In addition to some familiar voices from earlier episodes in the series like Sonya Hoo, Evan Fraser, and Kristjan Hebert, John and Theresa will also hear from Meeru Dhalwala, author, chef, and the co-owner of Vij’s and Rangoli restaurants in Vancouver; Randy Huffman, the Chief Food Safety and Sustainability Officer at Maple Leaf Foods; Kevin Groh, Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs at Loblaw Companies Limited; as well as Jeremy Lang, the founder and Vice-President of Sustainability at Pela Earth, which makes a smart, countertop-based composting system called Lomi.  To learn more about Meeru Dhalwala you can visit her Wikipedia page or follow her on Instagram at @meerudhalwala. Maple Leaf Foods has much more information about its sustainability goals on its website. Loblaw Companies Limited has details on its efforts to reduce waste in both the textiles and food industries. Click here to learn more about the Lomi smart composter, and here for information about Pela’s compostable phone cases. For more about BCG’s work on food systems and food security—follow this link. And for details on The Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, please click here.
When people are asked to name the most innovative industries in North America, Canada’s beef and dairy sectors probably aren’t the first ones to come to mind. But it turns out the agrifood business in our country has been undergoing a rapid and dramatic evolution for a number of years now -- and it’s going to need to keep on innovating if it’s going to meet one of the most pressing challenges of our time; climate change. Because while the beef and dairy industries contribute more than $40 billion to the economy, they’re also a key source of one of the most potent greenhouse gases; methane. So which new technologies, data systems, and processes will be critical if Canada is going to meet the needs of a growing population while simultaneously reducing emissions? That’s the central question at the heart of this second episode in a special, three-part series, “The Growing Challenge”, this fall on Disruptors, an RBC podcast. Join co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do as they share first-hand insights from their own experiences, and speak with guests working up and down the beef and dairy supply chain, like Dr. Calvin Booker, a veterinarian and General Manager for Services and Research at TELUS Agriculture & Consumer Goods; Alison Sunstrum, the CEO of CNSRV-X Inc and General Partner of The51 Food and AgTech Fund; and John van Logtenstein, the vice-president of  Dairy Lane Systems and DLS Biogas, and Kristjan Hebert, managing partner of Hebert Grain Ventures.Together, they discuss the skills, talent, technology, and innovation that are needed to maximize production while minimizing our environmental impact — and make Canada a world leader in sustainable agriculture without compromising on its net-zero goals. You can learn more about TELUS Agriculture & Consumer Goods and its commitment to a sustainable value chain here. CNSRV-X is working on advanced technology solutions for agriculture and carbon markets—read all about it on their website. Follow this link to explore the work of The51 Food and Agtech fund, and these two to read up on the people and processes at Dairy Lane Systems and DLS Biogas. And Kristjan Hebert has his own website, as does his company, Hebert Grain Ventures.
Extreme weather and geopolitical turmoil have placed the world’s food systems under tremendous stress.At the same time, climate change is slowing agricultural productivity among major producing nations, there’s a growing need for more food: globally, over 800 million people are food insecure — meaning that they don’t have access to enough safe and nutritious food to meet their daily needs. In Canada, one-in-six people are food insecure. As a top agricultural exporter, Canada has both a responsibility and an opportunity to help. But agriculture is also one of the biggest contributors to our carbon footprint: by one estimate, 10% of Canada's emissions are from crop and livestock production. How can Canada feed a growing population while simultaneously slashing emissions? That’s the problem we’ll tackle in a special three-part series on Disruptors, an RBC podcast, called, “The Growing Challenge”. In it, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do speak with some of the top innovators and big-picture thinkers who are helping Canadian agriculture meet this grand challenge.In our first episode, John and Theresa speak with Sonya Hoo, a managing partner at BCG who studies the Canadian food and agricultural sector, Evan Fraser, director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph and author of the new book, “Dinner on Mars: The Technologies That Will Feed the Red Planet and Transform Agriculture on Earth”, Kristjan Hebert, managing partner of Hebert Grain Ventures (HGV), a large grain and oilseed operation in southeast Saskatchewan, and Murad Al-Katib, president and CEO of AGT Food and Ingredients, a global value-added pulses, staple foods and ingredient company. By one account, humanity must produce more food over the next four decades than we have in the last 8,000 years of agriculture combined. Can we make it happen — while simultaneously lowering our greenhouse gas emissions? Tune in over the next few weeks to find out! To learn more about BCG’s work on food systems and food security — follow this link, and to learn more about their Centre for Canada’s Future, click here.The Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph has a mission to “bring people together to conduct research, train the next generation of food leaders and shape social, industrial and governmental decisions”; to read some of their work, click here. And to check out director Evan Fraser’s new book—which he co-wrote with author Lenore Newman—follow this link. Farmer Kristjan Hebert has his own website, if you’d like to find out the latest on what he’s up to. Kristjan also appeared recently on The Farm CPA Podcast; you can listen to his interview here.To learn more about Murad Al-Katib’s business, AGT Food and Ingredients, follow this link. Murad is also chair of the federal government’s Economic Strategy Table for agri-food. To read more about their work, click here.
It may not be top of mind for most Canadians -- or the top issue in most public opinion polls -- but it’s one of the greatest challenges our world has ever faced; climate change. And did you know that 10% of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions can be traced back to the very food we eat?This fall on Disruptors, an RBC podcast, hosts John Stackhouse and Theresa Do will tackle a critical question for the 2020’s -- how can Canada feed its growing population, and potentially the world, while simultaneously reducing our carbon footprint in order to meet our nation’s net-zero goals?To find out, John and Theresa have visited farms and production facilities across the country, and spoken with an array of experts who are working up and down the agrifood supply chain, including farmers, academics, scientists, and restaurateurs. And they’ll share what they’ve learned in a special, three-part series called The Growing Challenge. They’ll take you from the field, to the processing facility, to the dinner table, to learn how we can harness new technologies and processes to improve efficiency, cut carbon emissions, and reduce food waste. It turns out, Canada may have much more to contribute to the global food system than just poutine and maple syrup.
Despite the economic storm clouds on the horizon, there is little doubt that Canada’s labour market is in desperate need of talent — and will be for many years to come.In this special LIVE episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, host John Stackhouse speaks with tech entrepreneur Martin Basiri about immigrant and employment — specifically, how Canada can build a pathway to citizenship for immigrants, and how companies can do a better job of attracting and retaining this global talent. Basiri is the co-founder and CEO of Kitchener, Ontario’s ApplyBoard. ApplyBoard has an AI-enabled software platform that lets students from around the world quickly identify and apply for university or college programs across North America, the U.K. and Australia. Basiri’s tech platform improves global access to education by streamlining the study abroad search and application process for students all over the world.For any listener looking for work — or looking for workers — this is an episode you won’t want to miss! To learn more about The Business + Higher Education Roundtable (BHER) — the non-partisan, not-for-profit organization that hosted this discussion — follow this link.ApplyBoard uses an AI recruitment platform to connect international students with post-secondary institutions. To learn more, follow this link. And to read about Martin Basiri’s fundraising success (totaling approx. $600 million), check out these two articles.
Inspiration is something that fuels every entrepreneur’s journey — and few stories are as inspiring as John Ruffolo’s.In this special LIVE episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, host John Stackhouse speaks with Canadian tech investing legend John Ruffolo at the ELEVATE Festival in downtown Toronto — the largest gathering of creative thought leaders in Canada. Ruffolo is the founder and managing partner of Maverix Private Equity and previously founded OMERS Ventures, where he made several winning bets on Canadian tech powerhouses, including Hootsuite, Wattpad and Shopify. The two talk about Ruffolo’s amazing investing journey, as well as his inspiring “road to recovery” from a near-deadly cycling accident in 2020.It’s an insight-filled conversation that will resonate with Canadian entrepreneurs everywhere — a story about resilience, bold risks and hard work. To learn more about John Ruffolo and Mavrix Private Equity, follow this link.Ruffolo is also the co-founder and current vice-chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators. You can find out more about their work here.
Despite economic turmoil in 2022, Canada continues to experience a very tight labour market. And in many professions — from healthcare to engineering — jobs continue to go unfilled. The answer to this challenge, according to many: Strengthen the pathways from classrooms to citizenship, and leverage the growing presence of international students — now totalling some 600,000 — to meet Canada’s pressing labour needs.In this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do speak with two women leading the charge to foster and retain top international talent. In the first half of the show, they speak to Larissa Bezo — the president and CEO of the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE). The CBIE is a national, non-profit organization helping Canadian education institutions achieve their internationalization goals. And in the second half, they chat with Pat Chaisang, a former international student from Thailand (now based in Vancouver) who has launched Isempower: a job-search platform for international students hoping to secure meaningful work in Canada. To learn more about the work of the Canadian Bureau of International Education — and its advocacy for international students — check out its website.Isempower describes itself as “Canada’s first job search platform for international students.” To find out more, follow this link.In the episode, Theresa and John reference a new report from RBC Economics and Thought Leadership called “Course Correction: How International Students Can Help Solve Canada’s Labour Crisis.” You can read it here.
From the invasion of Russia to soaring inflation, the rising cost of energy has forced many countries to delay or scale back their climate ambitions. Suddenly, many are also looking to Canada — and its abundance of energy — for desperately needed supply.But in the wake of yet another summer of record heat and forest fires, the need to balance climate and energy security has never been more apparent. That sort of balance — a more holistic approach to energy development — is something that Canada’s Indigenous leaders have been stressing for decades. In this special “Best Of” episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, Trinh Theresa Do revisits three conversations she and her co-host, John Stackhouse, have had over the past season with some of Canada’s most thought-provoking Indigenous leaders. First up, we hear from JP Gladu, a Suncor Energy board member and executive director of the Indigenous Resource Network. And in the second half, it’s Mark Podlasly, director of economic policy at the First Nations Major Projects Coalition, and Crystal Smith, chief councilor of the Haisla Nation and chair of the First Nations LNG Alliance — each bringing their experience and wisdom to bear in this vital discussion about Canada’s energy future.SHOW NOTES:JP Gladu has taken his extensive experience in corporate Canada to build his own consultancy, Mokwateh. To learn more about what Mokwateh does, check out his website.The First Nations Major Projects Coalition is a collective of First Nations united to promote shared interests and gain ownership in the major developments in their territories. You can find out more here. To learn more about the Haisla Nation and their history, follow this link. During the episode, Crystal mentions the vital oolichan fishery; to understand more, click here.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Carbon offsets could counterbalance some of the environmental damage of human activities, including that of short and long-haul flights. But do they actually deliver on this promise? In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-host Trinh Theresa Do casts a critical eye on the voluntary carbon market, specifically, carbon offsets. She’s joined by Suha Jethalal, President of Bullfrog Power, who explains how these credits work, and what consumers should think about when buying them. To learn more about Bullfrog Power or their subsidiary less.ca, visit their website.  Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Are you looking to buy a new or used vehicle this year? You may be in for a long wait. In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-host Trinh Theresa Do dives into how global chip shortages, rising fuel costs and the summer travel season have upended the market. She’s joined by Cody Green, founder & CEO at Canadadrives.ca, who describes the challenges today’s consumers face when buying or selling vehicles and how tech is helping address them.To learn more about Canadadrives.ca, visit their website.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Are you planning to take a trip this summer? After two long years of COVID-related complications, Canadians are finally traveling freely again. The cruise sector is back in business, outdoor festivals and other big public events have returned, and of course, air travel is booming, leading to long lines at Canadian airports, thanks to all the pent-up demand from people forced to spend most of the pandemic on the ground. Thankfully, there are technological solutions to some of the headaches associated with booking a trip.On this encore episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do explore the “new normal” for travel and tourism with Hussein Fazal. Fazal is the CEO of SnapCommerce, whose flagship product, SnapTravel, is an AI-powered half-bot half-human service that helps customers book hotel rooms, flights, and car rentals, either through their website, or  through SMS, Messenger and WhatsApp. But despite the fact services like SnapTravel have been logging record traffic, there may be a dark lining to those silver clouds. Inflation is at a 40-year high, gas prices are soaring, and Europe remains engulfed in geopolitical turmoil. It’s fair to say that for those in the travel industry — or folks hoping to travel — there may still be some turbulent skies ahead.SHOW NOTES:To learn more about SnapCommerce and its flagship product, SnapTravel, check out its website here. In the episode, Theresa mentions new travel statistics and trends from the RBC Consumer Spending Tracker. To read more, follow this link.Also mentioned is a new RBC report that looks at the importance of boosting women’s pay and participation in the labour force—and presents some possible solutions. The report, called, “Equal Measures: Advancing Canada's working women in a post-pandemic economy,” can be found here.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
How have job cuts changed the fierce war for talent in tech?  In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-host Trinh Theresa Do explores the wave of uncertainty that’s hit the sector, how firms should be rethinking their strategies and what it all means for tech workers. She’s joined by Anthony Mouchantaf, Director of Venture Capital at RBCx to offer advice for navigating the months ahead.To learn more about RBCx and its offerings, visit www.rbcx.comDisruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Many Indigenous communities in Canada face unique limitations that inhibit the use of traditional financing – and access to financing – that has long been a stumbling block to economic development. But it takes more than money to achieve economic reconciliation while on the path to Net Zero. “Indigenous capital” is a holistic concept that considers the full wealth of resources held by Indigenous nations, whose leadership and partnership is especially needed in light of Canada’s climate goals.In this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, host Trinh Theresa Do discusses the vital importance of Canada’s Indigenous communities as we work to find an economically and environmentally sustainable path to Net-Zero. Her main guest is Sharleen Gale, chief councilor of the Fort Nelson First Nations and chair of the First Nations Major Projects Coalition. Chief Gale is working to bring disparate voices together, from across the country, to build a new model for economic development. We also hear from RBC assistant chief economist Cynthia Leach, lead author of a new RBC report on Indigenous capital; Dawn Madahbee Leach, chair of the National Indigenous Economic Development Board and one of the leaders behind Canada’s new National Indigenous Economic Strategy, and Mark Podlasly, director of economic policy at the First Nations Major Project Coalition.SHOW NOTES:To learn more about the work of the First Nations Major Projects Coalition, follow this link.Chief Sharleen Gale spoke in the episode about how the Fort Nelson First Nation was working to produce geothermal energy from the depleted Clarke Lake gas fields in B.C.; to read more about that initiative, click here. To read more about the National Indigenous Economic Strategy—a blueprint for inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian economy—click here.Finally, RBC Economics and Thought Leadership recently launched a new report called “92 to Zero: How economic reconciliation can power Canada’s climate goals.” To read it, and other thought leadership pieces, visit RBC.com/thoughtleadership.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do explore how uncertain weather conditions and economic challenges are affecting the 2022 growing season, and what solutions are available to support Canadian farmers. How can agriculture technology, or agtech help increase yields? They’re joined by Wade Barnes, founder and former CEO of Farmers Edge (and a farmer himself), to offer some insights.EPISODE NOTES:Read the latest Provincial Report from RBC Economics, Western provincial economies shining more brightly in 2022, at RBC Economics.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do explore the travel industry’s powerful post-crisis rebound. Can the industry keep up with pent-up demand given current labour shortages and record inflation? They’re joined by Claire Fan, Economist at RBC Economics, who breaks down what Canadians’ spending habits reveal.EPISODE NOTES:Read Claire’s new, RBC Proof Point, Canadians are scratching the travel itch again, but can the industry meet demand?, at RBC Thought Leadership.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Innovation is key to lasting prosperity and meaningful improvements to our quality of life. But what does innovation really mean? Is it enough to just “invent things”—or should we be aiming higher, and seeking out ways to improve all corners of the economy? And how do we actually achieve innovation—in a world where people are working remotely, and global forces are challenging the notion of specialization and collaboration? In this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do tackle innovation—and explore how Canada can play a leading role in the innovation economy. Their guests include innovation guru Dan Breznitz, Munk Chair of Innovation Studies at the University of Toronto and author of the 2021 book, Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World; and Karen Nutarak and Tessa Lochhead, co-founders of Pirurvik—a groundbreaking preschool in the remote arctic community of Pond Inlet, Nunavut. Whether it’s product or service innovation, process innovation or a wholesale business model innovation, bold risks are what’s needed for Canada to prosper in “an unforgiving world”—and to build a more sustainable future for all. SHOW NOTES:To learn more about Dan Breznitz, click here. His latest book, Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World, is available through Oxford University Press or from your favourite book retailer.Pirurvik Preschool combines traditional Inuit knowledge and ways and traditional Inuit child-rearing with Montessori methods; to learn more about it, follow this link. Pirurvik was one of six winning teams at the 2022 Governor General’s Innovation Awards; to read about all the winners, click here.Finally, RBC Economics and Thought Leadership recently launched a new series of reports, with timely economic insights, called Proof Point. To read recent Proof Point reports on how demand for cash is at its highest level in 60 years, or why Atlantic Canada has become a magnet for new residents, visit RBC.com/thoughtleadership.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-host Trinh Theresa Do explores why Canada’s housing market has suddenly cooled after a heated two-year pandemic-driven rise. She’s joined by Robert Hogue, Assistant Chief Economist at RBC Economics, who shares insights and predictions on what's to come, for both buyers and sellers. EPISODE NOTES:To read Robert’s latest housing report, “Canada’s housing market taps on the brakes as interest rates rise,” visit RBC Economics.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
The past 30 years have been among the most disruptive in music. Starting with peer-to-peer file sharing services such as Napster and Limewire, musicians saw a sudden drop in the money received from each recording—as more and more listeners found ways to get music for free. Eventually, Big Tech would get involved and launch subscription streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music. But still, artists receive just a fraction of a penny for every song streamed.In this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do explore the latest technological disruption to shake the music business—blockchain—and ask: Are we ready to pay once again for music—and fully support creators? Their guest is Raine Maida, lead singer of the Juno-award winning band Our Lady Peace and Chief Product Officer for online music marketplace S!NG.Whether it’s NFTs (non-fungible tokens) or disintermediated streaming services, Maida and others believe that the future of music lies in the blockchain—with new ways for enterprising artists to capitalize on their creative output, cut out the middleman, and establish a profitable relationship with their biggest fans. SHOW NOTES:To learn more about the S!NG—and how it creates NFTs for musical artists and stores them in a blockchain wallet—follow this link.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.In the episode, Raine Maida referred to his involvement in a new startup called Drrops—a mobile platform that delivers exclusive experiences, photos and merchandise to fans at live events. Find out more here. Our Lady Peace is touring throughout Canada this summer, starting in Victoria in June. To see their full schedule, click here.Finally, Sasha Braganza from RBCxMusic mentioned a new initiative to support emerging artists, partnering with Sounds Unite to deliver a global mobile music education ecosystem. You can find out more by following RBCxMusic on Instagram.
In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, host John Stackhouse and co-host Trinh Theresa Do examine why demand for cash in Canada is at its highest level in 60 years. They’re joined by Josh Nye, Senior Economist at RBC Economics, who shares insights on what this means for Canada’s future with digital currencies.EPISODE NOTES:To read Josh’s new report, “Proof Point: Canadians can't kick cash,” visit RBC Thought Leadership.Disruptors wants to hear from you! Please fill out our quick 5-minute listener survey and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a pair of Apple AirPods Pros.
Comments (7)

Tom MacDonald

well spoken doesn't necessarily mean well thought out. I'll leave it at that

Sep 27th
Reply

Vincent Auth

kintu p

Oct 20th
Reply

Mehrnoosh Mehrabi

و ،۸گ ‌ثک..‌فگق۴...ت.گلقدقثگک..گک ت... .لب‌گ۲گق.گف.‌ثگگ‌ث..‌وث ن‌گقگ...گثگ گ ثثگف. ثلب وک فگ.گگگث کلقط ناگهان........گ.لث‌گ.

May 22nd
Reply

Mehrnoosh Mehrabi

و ،۸گ ‌ثک..‌فگق۴...ت.گلقدقثگک..گک ت... .لب‌گ۲گق.گف.‌ثگگ‌ث..‌وث ن‌گقگ... گ ثثگف. ثلب وک فگ.گگگث کلقط ناگهان........گ.لث‌گ.

May 22nd
Reply

Michael

really important topic, thanks for covering this and maybe include more oceanic engineers into the conversation :)

Aug 15th
Reply (1)

M Biddle

Extremely well done. Great moderation. Well articulated, insightful and valuable comments and ideas from the two guests around how Canada can become a new energy leader. It left me hopeful and motivated.

May 5th
Reply
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