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The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

Author: Kevin Patton

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Explore human anatomy and physiology (A&P) teaching and learning with host Kevin Patton. An experienced professor, textbook author, and mentor, Kevin is a recognized leader in A&P teaching. The A&P Professor updates science content and provides practical teaching advice. Want some ideas to supercharge your A&P course? How about some support from a fellow A&P professor? This is the podcast for you!
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Episode 92 is all about how we can use customer-service concepts in education. Tune in and hear Kevin Patton discuss the importance of being a good listener and empathetic responder. You’ll also hear about new research that shows not all plaques are bad actors when it comes to Alzheimer disease. And finally, find out how to get free almost-daily updates on life science, teaching, and learning! 00:00 | Introduction 00:53 | New Discovery about Plaque 08:33 | Sponsored by AAA 09:51 | New TAPP Science & Education Updates 15:23 | Sponsored by HAPI 16:45 | Are We Answering Student Questions? 30:52| Sponsored by HAPS 31:40 | Power Skills for Answering Students 40:19 | Staying Connected   If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates   The most basic of all human needs is the need to understand and be understood. The best way to understand people is to listen to them. (Ralph Nichols)   New Discovery about Plaque 7.5 minutes In teaching A&P, it's not our objective to dive too deeply into pathophysiology. But we do use it as a tool to help students understand and apply concepts of "normal" structure and function. A new discovery about plaque's role in Alzheimer disease—or perhaps what is NOT its role—is a story that at once helps students make clinical applications, lets students know more about the vital functions of glial cells, and gives a glimpse of contemporary scientific discovery. Plaque Protect: Study Makes Surprising Finding About Alzheimer's Hallmark (summary article) my-ap.us/3aJFzCy In surprising twist, some Alzheimer’s plaques may be protective, not destructive (announcement from Salk Institute) my-ap.us/2S9BvW5 Microglia use TAM receptors to detect and engulf amyloid β plaques (research article from Nature Immunology) my-ap.us/3eBEf5S Image: dense-core amyloid-beta plaque (red) surrounded by microglia (white) [Credit: Salk Institute] my-ap.us/3gFlp0l   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   New TAPP Science & Education Update 5.5 minutes You may (or may not) remember that Nuzzel newsletter I've had going a couple of years. It was an almost-daily curated list of headlines of interest to anatomy and physiology faculty (and, I've discovered, some random non-A&P folks who just like the content). Well, Nuzzel is suddenly shutting down it's newsletter function and so I've switched to Revue by Twitter. Here's how to subscribe (it's free) if you're not already subscribed: The A&P Professor Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1.5 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Are We Answering Student Questions? 14 minutes No, really. Am I really answering what each student wants to know? Or am I simply reacting to key words or phrases without really listening to the specifics of each student question. This segment asks us to consider using some customer-service (gasp!) techniques to make sure we're not leaving our students alone and frustrated. Some previous episodes that touch on the customer-service model and student questions 49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | Episode 22 EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | Episode 23 Connecting in The Distance Course Special | Episode 50 The Case for Transparency | Episode 51 Still Moving Our Course to Remote| Episode 65 Information on TextExpander—a tool for quickly inserting saved snippets of text (I am an affiliate) The Case for Case Studies | Episode 52 (has a segment discussing TextExpander theAPprofessor.org/textexpander   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Power Skill for Answering Students 8.5 minutes Starting with some "power phrases" from a recent article, we explore some words and phrases to use when answering student questions. These 7 phrases can help you sound more powerful at work (article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3eykP1N   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources TAPP Science & Education Updates Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Burnout is a serious issue that can affect your health, relationships, and job performance. It’s important to know the signs of burnout so you can take steps to prevent it from happening in the first place. But if you do experience burnout, don’t panic! There are ways for you to get back on track and feel good again. Listen to this episode of The A&P Professor with Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark about how we can avoid, deal with, or be there for others experiencing burnout! You'll be glad you did! 00:00 | Introduction 00:48 | Rebecca Pope-Ruark 02:42 | Sponsored by AAA 04:08 | Burnout & How to Fix It 18:41 | Sponsored by HAPI 19:59 | Reducing Academic Burnout 34:42 | Sponsored by HAPS 35:59 | Student Burnout 41:54 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! Connection with peers, rather than competition, can drive our creative energy and help us through difficult times. (Rebecca Pope-Ruark)   Rebecca Pope-Ruark 2 minutes Introduction to this episode's special guest, Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark. She's an author of the popular book Agile Faculty, host of the Agile Faculty podcast, and an expert in faculty burnout. The Agile Faculty Life (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's website) my-ap.us/3dAYcJB Agile Academic (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's blog) my-ap.us/31MFLfB The Agile Academic Podcast (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's podcast for women in higher ed) my-ap.us/3dysixv Agile Faculty: Practical Strategies for Managing Research, Service, and Teaching (book by Rebecca Pope-Ruark) amzn.to/3wrZFKU   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Burnout & How to Fix It 14.5 minutes Following up on a recent online HAPS webinar hosted by Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark lays out some of the basics of burnout. What is burnout? Is it different than stress? How can we deal with faculty burnout? Keeping the Spark - March 10, 2021. Presentation by Rebecca Pope-Ruark on faculty burnout and how to avoid or recover from it. Sponsored by HAPS and AACA. (recording of presentation) my-ap.us/3rSOsQb   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1.5 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Reducing Academic Burnout 14.5 minutes What can we do to prevent or reduce faculty burnout? Are there ways we can support each other and keep each other out of "the burn?"   Sponsored by HAPS 1.5 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Student Burnout 6 minutes Yes, there are things we can do in our courses to help with student burnout.   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Episode 90 of The A&P Professor podcast is a thematic smörgåsbord, full of tasty tidbits to share with students and colleagues. Host Kevin Patton talks about dealing with resistance when we try to take bold steps in teaching. Is note taking better with a paper or an electronic device? The effects of diluting blood plasma on aging (don't try this at home).And the phenomenon of pandemic weight change. 00:00 | Introduction 01:06 | Notetaking: Paper or Digital? 13:14 | Sponsored by AAA 14:53 | Pandemic Twenty? 19:27 | Sponsored by HAPI 20:39 | Diluted Blood: Fountain of Youth? 28:25 | Sponsored by HAPS 29:37 | Taking Bold Steps in Teaching 42:57 | Long-Term Learning Seminar 44:20 | More Bold Steps 50:46 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Of all frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called ‘the greatest evil in the world’. The friction which results from ignorance can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and the unification of the heterogeneous elements of humanity. No effort could be better spent. (Nikola Tesla)   Notetaking: Paper or Digital? 12 minutes It's the battle of paper notetaking vs. digital notetaking. Who's the winner? Are are we ready to declare a winner? The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking (journal article from Psychological Science) my-ap.us/39qbNCo Don’t Ditch the Laptop Just Yet: Replication Finds No Immediate Advantage to Writing Notes by Hand (blog article from American Psychological Association) my-ap.us/39svN7h Don’t Ditch the Laptop Just Yet: A Direct Replication of Mueller and Oppenheimer’s (2014) Study 1 Plus Mini Meta-Analyses Across Similar Studies (journal article from Psychological Science) my-ap.us/3fpmHff Paper Notebooks vs. Mobile Devices: Brain Activation Differences During Memory Retrieval (journal article from Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience) my-ap.us/3u3YjEb Stronger Brain Activity After Writing on Paper Than on Tablet or Smartphone (article at Neuroscience News) my-ap.us/3ftufxE   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Pandemic Twenty? 4.5 minutes Originally conceived as the equivalent of the mythical "freshmen 15," the "pandemic 15" may turn out to be the "pandemic twenty" or more. Or less. Listen and find out. How Much Weight Did We Gain During Lockdowns? 2 Pounds a Month, Study Hints (article from New York Times) my-ap.us/3fqgX5a Body Weight Changes During Pandemic-Related Shelter-in-Place in a Longitudinal Cohort Study (journal article from Journal of the American Medical Association) my-ap.us/3dg5L8y   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Diluted Blood: Fountain of Youth? 7.5 minutes New research suggests that diluting our blood plasma could reduce or reverse some effects of aging. Don't try this at home! Rejuvenation of three germ layers tissues by exchanging old blood plasma with saline-albumin (journal article) my-ap.us/31lDHeq Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue and reverses aging (summary article of the recent research) my-ap.us/3cjkGiR Rejuvenation of aged progenitor cells by exposure to a young systemic environment. (Journal article on the 2005 research) my-ap.us/3ckyUQu   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps Check out: My Experience in Striving for Equitable Education in A&P Curriculum: Why it Matters to my Students (HAPS blog post) my-ap.us/39q8R8B   Taking Bold Steps in Teaching 13 minutes Ever feel resistance from peers when suggesting a try of  new or different teaching or curriculum strategies? Yeah, me too. No One Is A Prophet In Their Own Land (blog post) my-ap.us/3wdQzkL   Long-Term Learning Seminar 1.5 minute Here's a great refresher of some basic evidence-based strategies that you can use to take a bold step in teaching: Five Powerful Ways You Can Enhance Long-Term Learning in Your A&P Course Topics include: spaced retrieval practice test debriefing pre-testing cumulative testing initial exams Don't forget! You can earn a digital credential in professional development for this online seminar.   More Bold Steps 6.5 minutes The conversation continues with some practical advice. For example, how to bring your critics on board with your bold ideas!   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Host Kevin Patton outlines several new discoveries, including the function of background noise in the brain, how exercise triggers immunity, a possible blood marker for longevity, and how mitochondria are organized during cell division. And he discusses how easy animation effects can help students focus on important elements of the story of anatomy and physiology. 00:00 | Quotation & Intro 00:47 | Brain's Background Noise 08:06 | Sponsored by AAA 09:12 | How Exercise Triggers Immunity 13:30 | Sponsored by HAPI 14:41 | Mitochondria During Cell Division 22:10 | Sponsored by HAPS 23:03 | How Old Will We Get 26:22 | Focus Our Story on Slides 35:22 | The Scoop About Segments 36:33 | Smooth Slides for a Smooth Story 43:56 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! We deal with our mind from morning till evening, and it can be our best friend or our worst enemy. (Mathieu Ricard)   Brain's Background Noise 7 minutes The so-called "background noise" in an electroencephalogram (EEG)—that aperiodic data that contrasts with the periodic waves we usually look for—may be a measure of consciousness. Brain’s ‘Background Noise’ May Hold Clues to Persistent Mysteries (Quanta magazine article) my-ap.us/3lisLqW Most brain activity is "background noise" — and that's upending our understanding of consciousness (Salon magazine article) my-ap.us/30KWq2q   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership! Sign up for the new VDD or Virtual Dissection Database. You can access it at www.virtualdissectiondatabase.com   How Exercise Triggers Immunity 4 minutes We know that exercise has many beneficial effects in the body, including stimulation of the immune system. A new discovery in mice suggests that the same pressure that triggers bone growth with exercise also triggers the precursors to lymphocytes in bone marrow. Exercise generates immune cells in bone (article in Nature) my-ap.us/30JA4i5   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Mitochondria During Cell Division 7.5 minutes We know how the nuclear genome is organized into two equivalent groups during cell division—at least the broad strokes. A new discovery sheds light on complex mechanisms that distribute the mitochondrial genome. Actin cables and comet tails organize mitochondrial networks in mitosis (article in Nature) my-ap.us/30J7cX4   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   How Old Will We Get? 3 minutes A study of 90- to 100-year-olds suggests that there's a blood marker that might give clues to our longevity. More than 100 centenarians help to reveal a biomarker for long life (news item in Nature) my-ap.us/2NlN8a9 A neuronal blood marker is associated with mortality in old age (article in Nature Aging) my-ap.us/30Kxngf   Focus our Story on Slides 9 minutes It's best to have few, if any, phrases of text on our teaching slides—so that students will focus on our orally presented story of anatomy and physiology. But when we do need more than a phrase or two—a term or two—then using simple animations to bring them in one at a time works well. Slides Serve the Story of Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 66 PowerPoint: Animating Text and Objects (video) my-ap.us/30NBeZW   The Scoop About Segments 1 minute Chunking. I use segments to divide the episode partly to give room for sponsor messages (thank you, sponsors!), but also to chunk the content so that it doesn't feel like you are drinking from a fire house. You know?... a bit of a cognitive "breather" before moving on to the next thing. How to use chapter markers in Apple’s Podcasts app (a how-to for flipping from segment to segment; also works similarly in other podcast platforms) my-ap.us/3bVFoVZ   Smooth Slides for a Smooth Story 7.5 minutes Smooth and subtle animations for bringing in new slide elements work better that jarring "appear" animations or wildly sliding or jumping or scrolling animations. This is especially important when considering accessibility for those with motion-sensitive conditions. Smooth... that should be our mantra! The Golden Voice Behind All Those Ken Burns Documentaries (about Peter Coyote, mentioned in this episode) https://my-ap.us/3tranz1   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Ever wonder why topics in A&P seem to have a uniform order of topics in all the courses & textbooks? Host Kevin Patton discusses the proper order of those concepts. We continue the discussion of gamification, including a focus on leaderboards. And we tackle why pandemic learning causes students to lament that they have to teach themselves. 00:00 | Quotation & Intro 00:44 | More on Gamification 06:20 | Sponsored by AAA 07:38 | Leaderboard Competition 16:02 | Sponsored by HAPI 17:16 | Pandemic Feelings of Learning 25:12 | Sponsored by HAPS 26:16 | Order of A&P Topics 35:27 | TAPP Community 36:03 | The Proper Order? 41:18 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! I never teach my pupils, I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.  (Albert Einstein)   More on Gamification 5.5 minutes We revisit how Kevin uses Badgr badges in his course and in the TAPP-ed program—including the main steps for setting up either badges internal to the learning management system (LMS) or external to the LMS. Listening to the previous episode is a good idea! Micro-Credentials & Gamification in the A&P Course | Brown & Black Skin | Refresher Tests | TAPP 87 Gamifying Education: Motivation and the Implementation of Digital Badges for Use in Higher Education (journal article) my-ap.us/3rxneig The Usefulness of Digital Badges in Higher Education - Exploring the Student Perspectives (journal article) my-ap.us/2MLz4GL The Elements of Gamification Learning in Higher Education: A Systematic Literature Review my-ap.us/36SntfJ Sample form platforms Google Forms my-ap.us/2AfzbQU JotForm jotform.com (Kevin's favorite) Sample automation services Zapier zapier.com IFTTT ifttt.com Integromat www.integromat.com/en Badgr.com   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership! Sign up for the new VDD or Virtual Dissection Database. You can access it at www.virtualdissectiondatabase.com   Leaderboard Competition 8.5 minutes Competition can be a potent part of the gamification strategy in education. This competition can motivate students to keep going and keep succeeding. One way to to support this kind of competition and collaboration is to use a leaderboard. Leaderboards are built into the Badgr microcredential system— as well as other microcredential systems. The effect of challenge-based gamification on learning: An experiment in the context of statistics education (recent research study on using leaderboards in higher ed) my-ap.us/3sg4Drg Kevin's badge page for his Pre-A&P students lionden.com/fis-badges.htm Duolingo (free app for learning a new language, where Kevin is currently experiencing the advantages of gamification as he learns the Esperanto lingvo, er, language) www.duolingo.com/info Using Badgr's Course Leaderboard my-ap.us/3aLovfP Gamification in Science Education. A Systematic Review of the Literature. (review article from the journal Education Sciences)my-ap.us/3khSy2b The Gamification of Learning: a Meta-analysis (journal article from Educational Psychology Review) my-ap.us/2NPf0U2   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Pandemic Feelings of Learning 8 minutes Applying what we learned from The A&P Professor Journal Club in Episode 83, we examine that common student lament heard while pandemic teaching: I feel like I have to teach myself! Just one element of the pandemic teaching & learning experience, maybe this one is partly explained by the natural gap between "feelings of learning" and "actual learning" experience when moving from passive to active learning strategies. Maybe. Actual Learning vs. Feeling of Learning | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 83 86 | What a Year! | Pandemic Teaching & More | A Reflection (features Kevin's psychic predictions) Desirable Difficulty | More Web Meeting Skills | TAPP 78   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Order of A&P Topics 9 minutes Ever wonder how the nearly universal order or sequence of A&P topics got settled? The mystery is revealed in this segment!   ❤️ Discount subscription to The A&P Professor Community → theAPprofessor.org/Insider21 (good through Feb 2021)   The Proper Order? 5 minutes Another mystery revealed: the proper order of topics in the A&P course. Really. The definitive answer!   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Allowing students to earn badges in the A&P course provides motivation to master all the concepts and also provides granular documentation of learning beyond the transcripted course grade. Host Kevin Patton shares his experience, along with a discussion of skin color in teaching future health professionals and the use of refresher tests to get students ready for their A&P course. 00:00 | Quotation 00:46 | Refresher Tests 08:49 | Sponsored by AAA 10:13 | Black & Brown Skin 19:48 | Sponsored by HAPI 20:54 | Badges 1: Digital Micro-Credentials 29:06 | Sponsored by HAPS 30:07 | Badges 2: Gamification 38:11 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! “That’s what games are, in the end. Teachers. Fun is just another word for learning.”  (Raph Koster)   Refresher Tests 8 minutes A brief "refresher" on refresher tests, or as Kevin calls them... Test Zero. Pulling together ideas mentioned in past episodes, Kevin describes how he uses initial review tests in A&P 1 and a bit differently in A&P 2 to get students better prepared for their course. And he reveals the learning science behind why they work. Some previous episodes that mention Test Zero Teaching For Long Term Learning | Episode 7 The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24 Promoting Academic Integrity in Our Course | Episode 25 Warnings & Safety Tips in the A&P Syllabus | Episode 57 The Prerequisite Problem | Wi-Fi Effects | Transplant Genomes | Episode 61   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership! Sign up for the new VDD or Virtual Dissection Database. You can access it at www.virtualdissectiondatabase.com   Black & Brown Skin | Book Club 9.5 minutes A&P faculty have the awesome responsibility to "set the stage" for future health professionals. One way we can do this is to start early with an awareness of anatomic variations and how they influence observation of clinical signs. That that starts with the skin, particularly how common clinical conditions appear in a variety of skin colors. A new recommendation from The A&P Professor Book Club may help us (and our students) with that. Black & Brown Skin (Mind the Gap book) www.blackandbrownskin.co.uk/ Pulse Oximeter Devices Have Higher Error Rate in Black Patients (NY Times article) my-ap.us/3q0Gkg7 Racial Bias in Pulse Oximetry Measurement (letter in New England Journal of Medicine) my-ap.us/3jud132 Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching | Resilience | TAPP 74 (where Kevin talks about "setting the stage" in lion taming)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Badges 1: Digital Micro-Credentials 8 minutes Returning to the concept of badges (which are available for podcasts, book readings, seminars, etc., in The A&P Professor universe world), Kevin talks about the value of badges both for us as professional educators and for our students. The example of the latter is Kevin's use of badges in his Pre-A&P course. 86 | What a Year! | Pandemic Teaching & More | A Reflection (episode where I describe TAPP-ed badges) The A&P Professor Community (private online community with upcoming micro-course in micro-credentials) theAPprofessor.org/community (February 2021 subscription discount at theAPprofessor.org/Insider21 Badgr (digital micro-credentialing platform; free for basic badging functions) badgr.com Education | Professional Development (TAPP-ed page that describes & links to all the badges available in The A&P Professor Education program) Pre-A&P Badges | And Why Should I Care? (Kevin's student-facing web page for the badges he awards in his Pre-A&P course; list of badges & criteria; explanation of badges to students, including how to use them) lionden.com/fis-badges.htm   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Badges 2: Gamification 8 minutes The digital micro-credential conversation continues with a discussion of the gamification advantage to using badges in a higher-ed course. And we circle back to the "credential" aspect of badges, too. Duolingo (free app for learning a new language, where Kevin is currently experiencing the advantages of gamification as he learns the Esperanto lingvo, er, language) www.duolingo.com/info Gamifying Education: Motivation and the Implementation of Digital Badges for Use in Higher Education (journal article) my-ap.us/3rxneig The Usefulness of Digital Badges in Higher Education - Exploring the Student Perspectives (journal article) my-ap.us/2MLz4GL The Elements of Gamification Learning in Higher Education: A Systematic Literature Review my-ap.us/36SntfJ Discount subscription to The A&P Professor Community → theAPprofessor.org/Insider21 (good through Feb 2021)   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
In his annual look back at this podcast, host Kevin Patton reviews what we learned this year in A&P teaching. Which was a lot! He also looks ahead to what to expect in teaching—and in the podcast—as we go forward. 00:49 | Looking Back 10:15 | Those Darn Sponsor Messages 14:40 | There's More! 22:49 | Psychic Predictions 38:30 | TAPP Community 47:02 | TAPP Education | TAPP-ed 51:34 | Our Complex Selves 55:35 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Looking back we see with great clarity, and what once appeared as difficulties now reveal themselves as blessings. (Dan Millman)   Looking Back... 9.5 minutes Kevin kicks off his annual debriefing of the last full year of this podcast, which started its fourth year on 15 January 2021. As usual, the podcast seems to have accomplished a lot more than he was thinking. Podcast Archive | 2020 (all the 2020 episode lined up on one page) Podcast List (sortable list of all episodes with topics listed) Pandemic Teaching (all the TAPP resources on pandemic teaching listed in one place)   Those Darn Sponsor Messages 4.5 minutes Sponsor messages are a fair trade when somebody else pays for your podcast listening. And they give important reminders about programs and services available to you and your colleagues! Sponsored by AAA A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Sponsored by HAPS The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   There's more! 8 minutes Some changes and additions over the last year... And listens are up 30% over last year! We moved away from Preview episodes, but till have occasional Word Dissections (22 in 2020) and recommendations from The A&P Professor Book Club (7 in 2020). Kevin's new bestselling book based partly on podcast content: Pandemic Teaching: A Survival Guide for College Faculty. The free eBook was released in April and the paper back is due out any day. books2read.com/pandemicteaching Krista Rompolski created The A&P Professor Journal Club, which offered three special episodes this year. TAPP Journal Club (listing of all the Journal Club episodes)   Psychic Predictions 15.5 minutes Kevin uses his psychic powers (meaning he uses his mind) to predict trends for the coming year and beyond. The current pandemic will extend through the next academic year and there may be more pandemics to come. Fauci says herd immunity possible by fall, ‘normality’ by end of 2021 (news from The Harvard Gazette) my-ap.us/3ceYHtY Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1): a Threat to Human Health (review article) my-ap.us/3pi0CBH 100 Years Since 1918: Are We Ready for the Next Pandemic? (interesting slide presentation published just prior to COVID-19 pandemic, links the 1918 pandemic to current needs for preparedness) my-ap.us/3a1NaeO 10 infectious diseases that could be the next pandemic (post from a vaccination alliance) my-ap.us/36fp27o Changes in staffing, working conditions, contract protections, tenure, etc. As the Pandemic Hits Campus Finances, Faculty Face Layoffs (article from The Scientist) my-ap.us/3cqmtDt Hit by Covid-19, Colleges Do the Unthinkable and Cut Tenure | Schools facing steep drops in revenue scale back the age-old role of faculty in governance (article from The Wall Street Journal) my-ap.us/2M3ZRO0   TAPP Community 8.5 minutes This year, we took The A&P Professor experience to a new level by offering the new online private community away from distracting social media platforms, tangle email threads, and the roiling sea of available webinars. It's still in its embryonic stage, but we wanted to get it out there during the pandemic when faculty need it the most. Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time. No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do! Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrations freely. And find support. No algorithms. You get to choose what you want to see. You curate your own feed, selecting only those topics that interest you. Join subgroups that resonate with who you are—or who you want to be. Access to mentors and like-minded peers. Our community is made up of all kinds of people from all over the world, each with different perspectives and experiences of teaching A&P. Find members near you—or far away. Connect with members online at that moment. Courses, groups, and live events. As the community grows, we'll add mini-courses and micro-courses—some with earned micro-credentials, live virtual office hours with me and other mentors or guests, private special-interest groups, and more. There is a very modest subscription fee to join our community. Deep anniversary discount on subscription to The A&P Professor community (good until end of February 2021) theAPprofessor.org/Insider21   TAPP Education | TAPP-ed 4.5 minutes Now all the professional development—that continuing education—that you do when you listen to The A&P Professor podcast, read the books recommended in The A&P Professor Book Club, watch the online seminars at The A&P Professor website, any micro-courses or networking you do in The A&P Professor Community, can be documented with micro-credentials! It's the new The A&P Professor Education or TAPP-ed initiative. Click this link to claim your credential for listening to this episode: form.jotform.com/210247218258150   Our Complex Selves 4 minutes As we muddle through pandemic teaching, we become more complex. As we cycle through optimism, pessimism, hope, anxiety, triumph, we are changed. Some changes are good; some are not. We'll probably come out of this with some sort of pandemic-related PTSD—at least in terms of our teaching experience. Building resilience and hope are essential. A supportive professional community—and your favorite podcast—can help. The A&P Professor Community It's hard to be optimistic after surviving trauma, but it's not impossible. Here's how to start. | We all say we want to move on after terrible periods in our lives, but it can be more difficult than it sounds. (self-help article) my-ap.us/2NCGlsz   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.  
Host Kevin Patton continues the discussion about student evaluations of teaching (SETs) with a set of strategies to make them work better, or at least mitigate some of the potentially bad or ugly outcomes. There are things we can do proactively before a SET, actively during a SET, and reactively after a SET. Listen to hear them all! 00:00 | Quotation 00:57 | Student Evaluation of Teaching: Part II 04:16 | Sponsored by AAA 05:39 | Proactive Strategies 12:49 | Sponsored by HAPI 14:03 | Active Strategies 29:52 | Sponsored by HAPS 31:18 | Reactive Strategies 46:15 | Cookies! 48:00 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope. (Barack Obama)   Student Evaluation of Teaching II 3.5 minutes A brief intro to this second of two discussions of student evaluation of teaching. It's easier to follow this one if you've first listened to Student Evaluations of Teaching I: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly | TAPP 84.     Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Proactive Strategies for SETs 7 minutes There's a lot we can do well in advance of student evaluations of teaching being administered. For example, speaking up and signing up to facilitate change in our own institutions. Mitigating gender bias in student evaluations of teaching (recent journal article) my-ap.us/3oaDXGG Actual Learning vs. Feeling of Learning | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 83 (mentions value of transparency) The Case for Transparency | Episode 51   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1.5 minutes The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Active Strategies for SETs 16 minutes There are strategies we can implement as SETs are being implemented, such as promoting greater participation by students and training students on how to evaluation courses and teachers effectively. Dr. Amy Simolo (HAPI faculty my-ap.us/2XhAJFP) created a tool for use at NYCC that teaches students how to evaluate courses & teachers in a professional manner. Included are six key tips: Be respectful. Focus on observable behavior. Be constructive. Offer actionable solutions. Stay on point. Give constructive and specific praise. Kevin's briefer message to instruct students on evaluating courses & teachers: First, take a moment to reflect on your hard work—that desirable difficulty—resulting in the progress you've made in refreshing all those forgotten concepts and filled in the gaps for those concepts you somehow missed learning along the way. Then, will you please take a moment now to fill out the super-brief, super-easy CourseEval survey? Please remember to be professional, respectful, and constructive in your responses. If you do that, stay focused on just this course/instructor, note specific things that helped you, and offer actionable solutions that improve learning, then my bosses (and I) will be more likely to understand and value your opinion. And take actions that will help future students in this course. End-of-Term Reviews Help Keep Your Course on Track | Episode 17 Mid-Semester Check-Ins Keep Your A&P Course on Track | Episode 38 Krebs Cycle Horror Story | Anatomy Terms | TAPP 79 (explains that outburst when Kevin mentions the Krebs Cycle)   Sponsored by HAPS 1.5 minutes The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Reactive Strategies for SETs 15 minutes Some things we ought to be doing after SETs are administered include doing our own surveys, debriefings, and/or reflections—and compiling, reflecting upon, and writing a statement analyzing them. This helps us in the moment, as well as if/when we're challenged by our supervisor. And there are even things we can do to mitigate potential problems with those online professor-rating sites! End-of-Term Reviews Help Keep Your Course on Track | Episode 17 For quick jotting down of student comments: Index card wallet Levenger Pocket Briefcase that Kevin uses amzn.to/2Uwmitj Oxford At-Hand Note Card Case amzn.to/2GmixBU Perotti leather card wallet amzn.to/2IwXct2 Moleskine notebooks amzn.to/2PkNsCG OneNote my-ap.us/2Dzy1SD Evernote my-ap.us/2Dq03j4 Where Kevin sends his disappointed students: lionden.com/manuel.htm   Cookies! 2 minutes To prove the point that SETs don't necessarily measure what we are pretending that they measure, it's been proven that supplying students with cookies produces higher scores on SETs. So if we are measuring how pampered students feel, then maybe SETs are indeed the answer! Kevin's Favorite Blueberry-Walnut Oatmeal Cookie Recipe my-ap.us/386hSn6 Availability of cookies during an academic course session affects evaluation of teaching (research article from Medical Education) my-ap.us/34VVsTt   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.    
Student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are problematic in many ways—but perhaps useful in other ways. Host Kevin Patton discusses the good, the bad, and the ugly. What are the issues and what's behind those issues? 00:47 | Student Evaluation of Teaching (intro) 02:28 | Share the Fun: Refer & Earn 05:37 | The Good 08:39 | Sponsored by AAA 10:12 | The Bad 26:10 | Sponsored by HAPI 28:13 | The Ugly 44:15 | Sponsored by HAPS 45:26 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Good teaching cannot be reduced to technique; good teaching comes from the identity and integrity of the teacher. (Parker Palmer)   Student Evaluation of Teaching (intro) 1.5 minutes A brief intro to this discussion of student evaluation of teaching. This is the first of two planned episodes on this subject.     Share the Fun: Refer & Earn 3 minutes You can earn cash rewards—up to $25 for referring other A&P faculty, teaching assistants, and grad students to this podcast. Just go to theAPprofessor.org/refer to get your personal referral URL.     Student Evaluation of Teaching: The Good 3 minutes There is useful, actionable information that can be obtained from valid and fair student evaluations of teaching. When they work.     Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Student Evaluation of Teaching: The Bad 16 minutes A lot can go wrong with student evaluations of teaching. In this segment, Kevin uses a recent research article demonstrating unfairness of valid evaluations as a launching point for discussion. Unbiased, reliable, and valid student evaluations can still be unfair (journal article) my-ap.us/38baMg3 Even ‘Valid’ Student Evaluations Are ‘Unfair' (online article) my-ap.us/34eyAhG Actual Learning vs. Feeling of Learning | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 83 (previous episode mentioned in this discussion)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 2 minutes The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Student Evaluation of Teaching: The Ugly 16 minutes Kevin turns his attention to a few of the potential ugly issues concerning student evaluations of faculty. The 20 Meanest Teacher Evaluations of All Time (an informal list of anecdotes) my-ap.us/3r6WANE Prof Evaluations PART 3 – The Ugly | Evaluations can bring out the least attractive aspects of human nature (online essay) my-ap.us/3p9QFFW Teaching Evals: Bias and Tenure (online essay) my-ap.us/3asoH43 The Frequency of “Brilliant” and “Genius” in Teaching Evaluations Predicts the Representation of Women and African Americans across Fields (research article on bias in online professor-evaluation sites) my-ap.us/3h1r9jc   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community   Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer   Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
Krista Rompolski again joins host Kevin Patton for a Journal Club episode to discuss a study of whether student feelings of how much they learn accurately reflect their actual learning. What were the results and how do they impact the effectiveness of our courses? 00:46 | Kevin & Krista: Journal Club 02:43 | Sponsored by AAA 04:00 | Article Summary 09:52 | Sponsored by HAPI 11:36 | Feeling of Learning vs. Actual Learning 35:39 | Sponsored by HAPS 36:51 | More Discussion: Our Students 47:49 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere. (Chinese Proverb)   Kevin & Krista 2 minutes Krista Rompolski joins host Kevin Patton for another TAPP Journal Club episode!     Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Article Summary 6 minutes Krista Rompolski summarizes the essential content of this episode's journal article. Measuring actual learning versus feeling of learning in response to being actively engaged in the classroom (our journal article of focus) my-ap.us/3mG5gIn   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Feeling of Learning vs. Actual Learning 24 minutes Krista and Kevin discuss what they learned from the article and how that relates to their own experience as teachers and learners. The Case for Transparency | Episode 51 (discusses benefits of transparency in teaching) Desirable Difficulty | More Web Meeting Skills | TAPP 78 (discusses the frustration of effective learning)   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   More Discussion: Our Students 11 minutes Kevin and Krista bring back the discussion to how the new research might apply to our non-Harvard, non-engineering students—or whether it applies at all. Actin & Myosin – A Love Story | Episode 15 Small Teaching (book referenced in the discussion) theAPprofessor.org/bookclub.html#badge-B013   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440 Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!  The A&P Professor community Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:  theAPprofessor.org/refer Tools & Resources Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items Sponsors Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast! Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.
In this episode, we have a chat with Roy Meals, author of Bones: Inside and Out. We discuss what our students should know about bones and how that fits into their journey as learners. And we talk about how to make complex topics make sense to our students. Grab a drink and turn up the volume, we're going to tell some bone stories! 00:46 | Dr. Roy A. Meals MD 03:30 | Sponsored by AAA 04:21 | Student Engagement with Bone 16:52 | Sponsored by HAPI 17:54 | Telling the Story of Bones 32:50 | Sponsored by HAPS 33:39 | The Beauty of Bone 35:20 | Staying Connected   If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone. (Reba McEntire)   Dr. Roy A. Meals 2.5 minutes We meet Dr. Roy A. Meals, orthopedic surgeon, educator, and author. Roy A. Meals (biography) my-ap.us/2UyHrpy Doctors Demystify (Dr. Meals's courses) my-ap.us/DoctorsDemystify Thanks to listener Dr. David Allard, who started me on the path to connecting with Dr. Meals.   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Student Engagement with Bones 12.5 minutes We chat with Roy Meals about what students should appreciate about bones. Bones: Inside and Out (the book) amzn.to/3nniaec About Bone (Roy Meals's blog about bone) my-ap.us/AboutBone   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Telling the Story of Bones 15 minutes Telling the story of bone. And stories about bone. The Storytelling Special | Episode 48 Nine Super Strategies for Teaching the Skeleton | Episode 10   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   The Beauty of Bone 1.5 minutes We wrap up our chat.   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.  
Cheating has become a concern in remote teaching. Host Kevin Patton discusses some approaches and best practices for preventing cheating, detecting cheating, and prosecuting cheating. 00:52 | The Cheater 04:00 | Academic Integrity 20:26 | Sponsored by AAA 21:54 | Consequences 32:22 | Sponsored by HAPI 33:20 | Remote Cheating 42:50 | Sponsored by HAPS 43:41 | Advanced Anti-Cheating 51:34 | Staying Connected 'If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Look out for the Cheater. He's gonna build you up just to let you down …Tough luck for the cheater. Too bad for the fool-hearted clown. (John Krenski)   The Cheater 3 minutes Cheating in remote tests and other online work has become a topic of discussion in higher education recently. Here's an intro to the topic—and to this episode. Promoting Academic Integrity in Our Course | Episode 25 An ed-tech specialist spoke out about remote testing software — and now he’s being sued | Faculty, staff, and students say they’ve had enough (online article) my-ap.us/3n1bOB6   Academic Integrity 16.5 minutes One way to approach "the cheating issue" in our courses is to promote a culture of academic honesty from the start. But how do we do that? Kevin shares some practical tips you can use for a comprehensive approach to creating and maintaining a culture of professional and academic integrity in your A&P courses (or any courses, really). What the Best College Teachers Do (the Ken Bain book mentioned in this episode) The Syllabus Episode (mentioned several times in this podcast) Academic Integrity (A special topic page at The A&P Professor website; includes additional information and links to resources) Why be honest? (about academic integrity; for students) Kevin’s Academic Integrity statement (This is a statement I have used in my course syllabi. You are welcome to adapt it according to your own course and institution’s needs. It’s an example to get you thinking about actively promoting honesty.) Kevin’ Academic Integrity Case Study handout/activity (This document is an example of an in-class activity that I use to promote discussion of academic integrity. It’s a handout used for small group discussions. You can adapt it to fit your needs, per the attribution/share-alike license enclosed in the document.) Frank O'Neill @growgraymatter (Turn on your "Frank O'Neill filter.")     Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Consequences 10.5 minutes Even though we should empathize with students in how we handle cheating, compassion dictates that we also hold them accountable. Using Media in Our A&P Course – Advice From Barbara Waxer | Episode 28 Using copyrightable materials in teaching (Some good practical advice from the University of Minnesota Libraries. But ask your own librarians for help. And don't forget, I've got an upcoming episode with an expert!) Testing as Teaching (this seminar at The A&P Professor website shows you how I use Respondus test editor, one of many available test editors that can also easily produce multiple versions of a test) Caring for Students Helps Them Succeed (the episode where I focused on "that empathy thing") Cheating in College: Why Students Do It and What Educators Can Do about It (a book you might find to be helpful)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Remote Cheating 9.5 minutes In the era of pandemic teaching and post-pandemic teaching, how can we best prevent cheating? Kevin has some ideas. And they're not new. Spaced Retrieval Practice | Episode 1 Revisiting Retrieval Practice | Episode 68 Teaching: Why (Some) Professors Are So Worried About Cheating (Supiano article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/2GE1lfm With No Study Buddies, More College Students Turn to Cheating (online article) my-ap.us/36aqHtX Examination cheating: Risks to the quality and integrity of higher education (journal article) my-ap.us/2IdqA8T   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Advanced Anti-Cheating 8 minutes Perhaps we can use the effective security strategy of misdirection as we try to manage cheating in our course.. And also look at student work inside and out for signs of academic dishonesty, including Rogeting. Anti-Plagiarism Checker vs Rogeting - How do they work? How Plagiarism Detection Sofware and Rogeting tools actually work and what can you use to check if you're dealing with original work or not (online article) my-ap.us/352rvll Rogeting: why 'sinister buttocks' are creeping into students' essays (news article) my-ap.us/354VJEg 10 Free Anti-Plagiarism Detection Checker software tools | A list of 10 free plagiarism detection tools, applications and web-based solutions that can help you check if you're dealing with original work or not (online article) my-ap.us/3k94GR8 If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.  
The news is out: we have a new organ that's been uncovered in the body. Or do we? What's the secret language of A&P? And should we be telling people?! Host Kevin Patton continues his story of cellular respiration with another playful analogy. 00:48 | Word Dissection 04:58 | Sponsored by AAA 06:23 | New Organ 14:41 | Sponsored by HAPI 15:38 | Secret Language of A&P 20:19 | Sponsored by HAPS 21:05 | Dam Protons 32:05 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate. (Seneca) Word Dissection 4 minutes We start with a brief word dissection of a term that Kevin proposes to use someday as a pseudonym. Torus tubarius   Sponsored by AAA 1.5 minutes A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   New Organ 8 minutes A recent paper proposes the existence of a new organ—the paired tubarial salivary gland. It's suggested that this be added as a major salivary gland along with the parotid, submandibular, and submaxillary salivary glands. The tubarial salivary glands: A potential new organ at risk for radiotherapy (original research article) my-ap.us/3khGFZe Doctors May Have Found Secretive New Organs in the Center of Your Head (newspaper article) my-ap.us/31L4RvV Cancer researchers discover new salivary gland (press release about discovery) my-ap.us/3m9mc9w Image: my-ap.us/3jgsO3T (CC license)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Secret Language of A&P 4.5 minutes Another one of those playful little games that Kevin plays with his students. Or is it only a game?   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Those Dam Protons 11 minutes Host Kevin Patton follows up on his analogy about cellular respiration mentioned in the last episode—Krebs Cycle: The Horror. After summarizing the Krebs Cycle story (no! not the Krebs Cycle!), he briefly outlines the sequel featuring those dam protons. Krebs Cycle Horror Story | Anatomy Terms | TAPP 79 Storytelling is the Heart of Teaching A&P | Episode 12 Playful & Serious Is the Perfect Combo for A&P | Episode 13 Actin & Myosin & A Love Story | Episode 15   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.  
Say the term Krebs cycle around anyone who's had a biology course and watch for signs of stress. In this episode, host Kevin Patton provides a way to make the citric acid cycle less scary by playing into the horror of it all. And we revisit the idea of a standard terminology of anatomy. 00:46 | Krebs Cycle Game 15:22 | Sponsored by AAA 16:07| Proof of Concept 25:07 | Sponsored by HAPI 25:54 | Riding the Krebs Cycle 35:25 | Sponsored by HAPS 36:01 | Anatomical Terms Info 42:33 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones. (Stephen King)   Krebs Cycle Game 14.5 minutes In the first season of this podcast, Kevin talked about storytelling—especially playful storytelling—being a key tool for effective college teaching. Especially in A&P. In this first of three segments on part of the story he tells about the Krebs cycle, Kevin talks about leaning into the horror of the Krebs cycle and making a game of that. Storytelling is the Heart of Teaching A&P | Episode 12 Playful & Serious Is the Perfect Combo for A&P | Episode 13 Actin & Myosin—A Love Story | Episode 15 The Storytelling Special | Episode 48 Sigma's poster Metabolic Pathways my-ap.us/36OE9pn Image: my-ap.us/3lz1WOd Credit: Narayanese, WikiUserPedia, YassineMrabet, TotoBaggins   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Proof of Concept 9 minutes Kevin tells the tale about how he came upon proof that people really do react to the Krebs cycle as if it were a horrible monster. At least under certain conditions. And, okay, it's not peer-reviewed evidence.   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Riding the Krebs Cycle 9.5 minutes The pyruvate is forced onto a sort of metabolic Ferris wheel, despite the fact that pyruvates are getting onto this carnival ride, but the cars are empty when the wheel comes back around! But coenzyme A grabs the acetyl and forces the pyruvate into the Krebs cycle. And yes, mayhem and gore ensue.   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Variation in Anatomical Terms 6.5 minutes Tony Weinhaus and Sara Sulaiman recently gave a workshop about variability in anatomical terms and revealed the amazing free tool AnatomicalTerms.info (ATI). AnatomicalTerms.info (the resource discussed in this episode) https://www.anatomicalterms.info/ AnatoNomina (another online resource based on the Terminologia anatomica) my-ap.us/2GIBJOf Terminologia anatomica 2nd edition (updated edition; also has links to other current/updated terminology lists) (TA2) fipat.library.dal.ca/ta2/ UPDATE: TA2 has now been officially approved by IFAA. UPDATE: TA2 viewer (an easy way to navigate Terminologia Anatomica 2nd edition in an online viewer) New Terminologia Anatomica: Cranium and extracranial bones of head (article going through some of the updates in the new edition) my-ap.us/3nw9Utc Understanding Anatomical Latin (short booklet on basic principles of Latin as it's used in anatomical terminology) my-ap.us/3nBvgWc If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.  
Students want things easy. We often make it hard for them. Host Kevin Patton discusses desirable difficulty and contrasts it with undesirable difficulty. Did you know that healthy human cells have little sections of 4-stranded DNA? We can be better in our web meeting skills. And don't forget our new online community of anatomy & physiology faculty! 00:46 | G4 DNA 05:58 | Sponsored by AAA 06:38 | Even More Web Meeting Ideas 18:55 | Sponsored by HAPI 19:55 | Desirable Difficulty 35:35 | Sponsored by HAPS 36:26 | Our New Online Community 39:54 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure. (Colin Powell)   G4 DNA 5 minutes Oh, come on! Is there really a quadruple-strand DNA in our normal, healthy cells? Or is that only in space aliens? Or zombies? Quadruple-stranded DNA seen in healthy human cells for the first time (news summary of the discovery) my-ap.us/2RXp7Vt Single-molecule visualization of DNA G-quadruplex formation in live cells (journal article in Nature Chemistry) my-ap.us/2EwXr6O Image: G-quadruplex by Julian Huppert my-ap.us/3i70AIv   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Even  More Web Meeting Ideas 12 minutes Yep, more Zoom. In this segment, Kevin talks about unintended harmful effects of banter, comments on home webcam locations, and turning off video. Plus some advice on backgrounds, both real and virtual. And stuff. Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55 Pandemic Teaching Zooming While Black | Videoconferencing from our private spaces opens a lens on cultural authenticity, professional image, workplace code-switching and white privilege. (article by Shonda Buchanan) my-ap.us/2S3doEQ Krisp artificial-inteligence noise-eliminator theAPprofessor.org/krisp 4 Tips for Choosing the Best Virtual Backgrounds on Zoom Meetings (blog post) my-ap.us/2EBNN2Z pxhere (free photo site) pxhere.com Unsplash (free photo site) unsplash.com Some sample images suitable for Zoom virtual backgrounds: Dramatic sky my-ap.us/3j6Mk3F Wilderness my-ap.us/2G9yU8z Sunrise my-ap.us/2GcetHU Forest road my-ap.us/2S49P1f Misty my-ap.us/2FXAQ4j Broken sunlight my-ap.us/349gA7w Chalk board (black) my-ap.us/3cA78xW Green chalk boards my-ap.us/338dFwV Geometric shadows my-ap.us/3mWAL1f Wood planks my-ap.us/36dHiPb Book shelves my-ap.us/337maIg Leeds Library my-ap.us/335wwZl Gladstone's Libary my-ap.us/3cz4l86   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Desirable Difficulty 15.5 minutes Robert Bjork proposed that the difficulties posed by retrieval practice, spacing, and interleaving are desirable difficulties that improve learning. But there are undesirable difficulties that do not help learning. Why must learning be difficult? How can we avoid undesirable difficulty? Hey, wait! Aren't we supposed to make learning easy for students?! Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55 More on Spelling, Case, & Grammar | Episode 56 Desirable Difficulties Perspective on Learning (Robert Bjork's brief summary of his concept) my-ap.us/3kM0asE Making Things Hard on Yourself, But in a Good Way: Creating Desirable Difficulties to Enhance Learning (Elizabeth and Robert Bjork's contribution to Psychology in the Real World) my-ap.us/3i1Sv7J   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Our New Community 3.5 minutes Take The A&P Professor experience to a new level by joining the new online private community away from distracting social media platforms, tangle email threads, and the roiling sea of available webinars. Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time. No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do! Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrations freely. And find support. No algorithms. You get to choose what you want to see. You curate your own feed, selecting only those topics that interest you. Join subgroups that resonate with who you are—or who you want to be. Access to mentors and like-minded peers. Our community is made up of all kinds of people from all over the world, each with different perspectives and experiences of teaching A&P. Find members near you—or far away. Connect with members online at that moment. Courses, groups, and live events. As the community grows, we'll add mini-courses and micro-courses—some with earned micro-credentials, live virtual office hours with me and other mentors or guests, private special-interest groups, and more. There is a very modest subscription fee to join our community. All subscriptions include a free trial period! Deep discount on subscription to The A&P Professor community (good all of September 2020) theAPprofessor.org/Insider20 If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  provides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)  
Host Kevin Patton discusses the stress we are all feeling right now and introduces a new community of support. Word Dissection: What, if anything, is an acronym? New research on the use of acronyms in science. Some practical tips for instructional video & web meetings. 0:00:49 | Instructional Media Tips 0:20:54 | Sponsored by AAA 0:21:35 | Acronyms: Enough or Too Many? 0:33:38 | Sponsored by HAPI 0:34:36 | Stress. Yeah. Stress. 0:54:23 | Sponsored by HAPS 0:55:55 | Your New Online Community 1:07:31 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram! Working hard for something we don't care about is called stress: Working hard for something we love is called passion. (Simon Sinek) Instructional Media Tips 20 minutes How can we fix that Kilroy-was-here look in our videos? Review tips on avoiding creepy-face. What are the best microphones to use for teaching online or making videos? Oh come on, do I really need headphones or earbuds? CORRECTION: I misspelled "cardioid" in this segment. Sorry about that. Ring light (one example of many) amzn.to/2A8Z1ts Word Dissection: cardioid = heartlike  Microphones Samson Q2u (USB or XLR, cardioid dynamic mic) used by the announcer (Aileen) in this episode my-ap.us/2DGuzc3 Thronemax MDrill One Pro (USB, condenser, selectabl-pattern mic) used by Kevin in this episode amzn.to/32aPSvz Blue Yeti USB (USB, condenser, selectable-pattern mic) amzn.to/3m3WNP6 Audio Technica ATR2100x (USB or XLR, cardioid dynamic mic) amzn.to/2F8qaz6 Even More Pandemic Teaching Tips | TAPP 72 (more media tips) Krisp (noise-cancelling app) theAPprofessor.org/krisp Images Cardioid image: my-ap.us/2ZnjPqK (credit: Galak 76) Kilroy image: my-ap.us/3hmcqy4 (credit: Luis Rubio)   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Acronyms: Enough or Too Many? 12 minutes In a twist on the usual Word Dissection feature, we explore what an acronym is—and it's a bit more complex than you might think—and some current trends in the use of acronyms in science. There's new research, too! Patton's definition of acronym & list of A&P acronyms (from Survival Guide for Anatomy & Physiology) my-ap.us/2ZnpGvY From ACTH to DNA: the rise of acronyms in research (brief summary article from Nature) my-ap.us/2Fq6WVp The growth of acronyms in the scientific literature (research article from eLife) my-ap.us/32bW4n7 Image is from this article (my-ap.us/2FfIl5L) GGTOTD (good generic time of the day)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Stress. Yeah. Stress. 20 minutes Okay, I kinda got nothin' for you. But I will tell you what I've done about stress that works for me. And emphasize that I"m here for you (and where you can find others to network with).   Doing What Matters in Times of Stress: An Illustrated Guide This is a free downloadable stress-management guide for coping with adversity. The guide aims to equip people with practical skills to help cope with stress. A few minutes each day are enough to practice the self-help techniques. The guide can be used alone or with the accompanying audio exercises. Informed by evidence and extensive field testing, the guide is for anyone who experiences stress, wherever they live and whatever their circumstances. Download here: my-ap.us/33gZ4On Managing Stress and Anxiety Resources form the Anxiety and Depression Association of America Tips for managing anxiety and stress during times of uncertainty. Advice and resources from trusted professionals. Find support today. Up To Date Statistics. 40 Years Of Experience. A Range Of Free Resources. Evidence-Based Advice. World's Leading Experts. my-ap.us/35qdDSG A U.S. Pandemic of Depression, Too? Rates Are Triple Pre-COVID Levels (news article) my-ap.us/3bAz6t4 Mental Health Needs Rise With Pandemic (Rising mental health problems has health advocates worried about the need for additional support for struggling students and the ability of colleges to provide it) my-ap.us/35pZ3u7 Helping Others Dampens the Effects of Everyday Stress (post from Association for Psychological Science) my-ap.us/2Fn0Zsi Management‐related stress in the red‐shouldered hawk (that stress research I did years ago) my-ap.us/35qiFhK   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! 🥂 Congratulations to Valerie O'Loughlin, the recent recipient of the HAPS President's Medal. Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Your New Community 11.5 minutes Take The A&P Professor experience to a new level by joining the new online private community away from distracting social media platforms, tangle email threads, and the roiling sea of available webinars. Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time. No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do! Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrations freely. And find support. No algorithms. You get to choose what you want to see. You curate your own feed, selecting only those topics that interest you. Join subgroups that resonate with who you are—or who you want to be. Access to mentors and like-minded peers. Our community is made up of all kinds of people from all over the world, each with different perspectives and experiences of teaching A&P. Find members near you—or far away. Connect with members online at that moment. Courses, groups, and live events. As the community grows, we'll add mini-courses and micro-courses—some with earned micro-credentials, live virtual office hours with me and other mentors or guests, private special-interest groups, and more. There is a very modest subscription fee to join our community.Deep discount on subscription to The A&P Professor community (good all of September 2020) theAPprofessor.org/Insider20   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! The A&P Professor community   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia Krisp Noise-Cancelling App The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)  
Like it or not, digital textbooks are here and will soon be the primary form of textbook used by students and teachers. Host Kevin Patton discusses this trend and outlines ways to leverage digital textbook features for more effective teaching and learning. Mike Pascoe brings us a Book Club recommendation and Kevin discusses arms, arm-lengths, and legs. 00:48 | Digital Is Here 10:09 | Sponsored by AAA 11:02 | Digital Textbook Love 22:43 | Sponsored by HAPI 23:59 | Book Club: Digital Minimalism 26:29 | Sponsored by HAPS 27:19 | Arm's Length 32:35 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. (Douglas Adams) Digital Is Here 9.5 minutes Like it or not, digital textbooks are here. Whether we call them eTexts, electronic textbooks, eTextbooks, or whatever, many publishers are already in the digital-first or digital-only mode. Before long, digital textbooks will soon be the primary way that students use textbooks. History of the Ebook: The Changing Face of Books (journal article, but dated) my-ap.us/31koutu A Brief History of eBooks (yep, very brief) my-ap.us/30x6Xio Digital Is Coming For Your Textbook (blog post from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association) my-ap.us/3kqkujY   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Digital Textbook Love 12 minutes Digital textbooks have a lot of features that can be leveraged for teaching and learning—including flipped courses, distance courses, or remote pandemic teaching. For many of us, our fumbling first tries are awkward and uncomfortable—but we may eventually fall in love with digital textbooks. Benefits and Helpful Features of eBooks (blog post) my-ap.us/31ngqrR Running Concept Lists Help Students Make Connections | Episode 8 Concept Lists Help Students Build Conceptual Frameworks (online seminar)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 1 minute The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Book Club 2.5 minutes Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport amzn.to/37LHfqP Recommended by Mike Pascoe For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub Special opportunity Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers! Be sure include your reasons for recommending it Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN) For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Arm's Length 5 minutes Two meters or six feet are often given as a minimum safe distance when distancing to reduce the spread of airborne viruses such COVID-19. As a practical guide, some sources state that this distance is about "two arm lengths." But Kevin questions whether "one arm span" may be what these sources really mean—and may be a better practical guide. Otherwise, people may be distancing at only about four feet and not the recommended two meters (6.5 feet)—about 60% of the most effective minimum distance. Because Kevin can never leave well enough alone. In the United States, the CDC recommends, "To practice social or physical distancing, stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms' length) from other people who are not from your household in both indoor and outdoor spaces." my-ap.us/2PBO3AS The Canadian Health Service similarly advises, "keeping a distance of at least 2 arms lengths (approximately 2 metres) from others, as much as possible" my-ap.us/3fAWc32 "The arm span measurement is usually very close to the person's height. For example, a 168cm (5ft 6in) person will have an arm span of about 168cm (66in)" according to an article in Wikipedia my-ap.us/33ChKKp Diagram giving some rough estimates (individual measurements vary) Two metres or one: what is the evidence for physical distancing in covid-19? (review/analysis article from BMJ questions the 2-meter rule; includes diagram showing various levels of risk) my-ap.us/3hzDURI If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)  
The syllabus is an important instructional tool that sets the tone and provides guidance for the entire course. Host Kevin Patton discusses various aspects of a course syllabus in a comprehensive, extended episode featuring classic and fresh segments. 0:00:49 | The Syllabus Special 0:03:32 | Sponsored by AAA 0:04:22 | Weird Word: Syllabus 0:06:41 | Do Students Read the Syllabus? 0:13:23 | Reading & Raiding the Syllabus 0:27:32 | First-Day Activities 0:45:32 | Basic Elements of a Syllabus 0:58:40 | Sponsored by HAPI 0:59:33 | More Things to Put in a Syllabus 1:10:59 | Link to Other Resources 1:18:58 | Sponsored by HAPS 1:19:40 | Professionalism as a Course Goal 1:22:41 | Syllabus Warnings 1:38:03 | Nuzzel Newsletter 1:39:07 | Safety Advice 1:59:35 | Pronouns 2:02:22 | Long-Long Syllabus 2:07:32 | Staying Connected   If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself. (John Dewey)   Weird Word: Syllabus 2.5 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that first appeared in Understanding How We Learn, A Chat with Yana Weinstein & Megan Sumeracki | Episode 27. Which is correct: syllabuses or syllabi? The answer may surprise you! Nevertheless, now's a good time to think about tweaking your course documents for the fall semester. Syllabus at Dictionary.com Quora discussion on syllabus plurals   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership! The Anatomy Now Weekly issue with accessibility resources: my-ap.us/30tnHHH   Do Students Read the Syllabus? 6.5 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. Do students read the syllabus? Maybe half? It's the other half who drive us nuts. Wait! do we always read the directions before asking questions? What is a syllabus? It can be different things, right? Why do administrators seem to love the syllabus so much? Please share the first tweet in my Twitter feed: @theAPprofessor.org That "empathy thing" I'm always harping on: Caring for Students Helps Them Succeed   Reading & Raiding the Syllabus 14 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. Some general considerations when designing a syllabus include make sure that students can both read the syllabus through, and raid the syllabus for key information when they need it. The key is simplicity and logic in syllabus design. READ and RAID your textbook (a link for students; explains the "read & raid principle" as applied to textbooks Storytelling is the Heart of Teaching A&P (the episode where I explain storytelling as a teaching technique) Utilize Clear Language (my take on simpler language to reach students) Temple Grandin, animal science professor and autism spokesperson; someone who "gets it" that we have to try to put our head inside their heads Recommended book: Animals in Translation Recommended video: Temple Grandin (the film starring Claire Danes)   First-Day Activities 18 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. Is it just "here's the syllabus; see ya next class"—or is it an engaged look at important syllabus elements? The first day of class is key to starting things off on a good foot. What I learned from Krista, Michael, and Richard—and my own sideways twist on those first steps. What about a syllabus quiz? Is that a good or bad idea? Krista Rompolski PhD @KristaRompolski Recommended teacher gear: Leather index card wallet or Index card wallet Engaging Students on the First Day of Class (my first-day syllabus activity; adapted from Michael Glasgow & Richard Faircloth; click through to download copies of my handouts) First Impressions: Activities for the First Day of Class (article from Faculty Focus) Why be honest? (about academic integrity) Student Understanding This is what I use for my Pre-A&P course, a self-paced onine refresher course My web-enhanced on-campus courses use a similar list The online quiz turns each item into a multichoice "I understand" or "I do not understand" test item A perfect score unlocks the next item in the LMS, thus making this a necessary gateway to access course activities Test Zero Reviews prior content and syllabus contents Start A&P 2 with a Final Exam (explains my Test Zero for A&P 2) Teaching For Long-Term Learning (episode in which I explain my Test Zero approach)   Basic Elements of a Syllabus 13 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. What exactly goes into a syllabus? Who decides? What are the essentials? This isn't comprehensive, but it gets us started. How to Write a Syllabus (a great online guide from Cult of Pedagogy) HAPS Learning Outcomes - Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS membership is required to access them) Anatomy Core Syllabi (from the Anatomical Society; different flavors [undergrad med, nursing, pharmacy] membership not required to access them) LifeSciTRC Syllabus Resources (free samples of A&P syllabi & related resources)   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 2.5 minutes The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   More Things to Put in a Syllabus 11.5 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. Frank O'Neill recommends video walk-throughs, which have the added benefit of letting students know that you really do care about them. Consider also a table contents, abstract/summary, and/or index if the syllabus is long. How about a disclaimer, some playful tidbits, and links to external resources. And make sure your supervisors know what's in your syllabus! Frank O'Neill @growgraymatter 7 Ways Video Can Enhance the Student Experience (video of Frank's live presentation, in which he addresses how to use a video walk-through of an A&P syllabus to give students a good first impression) Cumulative Testing Makes Learning Last (episode in which I discuss brief video walkthrough; click through for a link to more resources) Professors Are from Mars®, Students Are from Snickers®: How to Write and Deliver Humor in the Classroom and in Professional Presentations (recommended book) Playful & Serious Is the Perfect Combo for A&P (previous episode explaining the value of playfulness in the A&P course)   Link to Other Resources 8 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24. Consider putting hyperlinks or URLs in the syllabus to take students to other resources. Consider linking to a FAQ page, wher you explain your rationals for doing things the way that you do them in your course. Additional links you may find useful Syllabus Resources for A&P (from the TAPP blog) Help Your A&P Students Get Off to a Good Start (from the TAPP blog) Academic integrity in A&P (from the TAPP blog) Search medical errors Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55 (is spelling important?) Some links that your students may find helpful: The A&P Student (Kevin's blog for A&P students; rich source of advice you can give your students; theAPstudent.org) Lion Den (Kevin's website with all kinds of study skills tips and resources for A&P students; LionDen.com) Medical Science Navigator (Margaret Thompson Reece’s website for helping A&P students; she offers mini-courses!) Getting a Good Start in your Anatomy & Physiology Course Why be honest? (about academic integrity) Why deadlines are important Is spelling important? Help significant others help you (getting busy students—especially returning learners—off to a great start) Get Your Head in the Game - 5 Tips for Success in Learning (metacognition for A&P students) 9 Proven Tricks for Reducing Test Anxiety (for A&P students)   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Professionalism as a Course Goal 3 minutes This segment is adapted from the featured segment in Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55. Sometimes a student frets about the A&P course being "not a spelling course" or "not an English course" — but professional communication is an essential skill for health professionals. Why not add this statement to our syllabus and/or other course documents? Here's an example of an item from my syllabus learning outcomes and objectives from my Pre-A&P course related to professionalism: work independently in a self-paced online science course succeed in taking online tests and exams communicate in professional scientific language, including correct spelling and usage of terminology exhibit ethical professional behavior, including academic integrity Useful links: The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24 Promoting Academic Integrity in Our Course | Episode 25 Modeling Professional Integrity | Episode 26   Syllabus Warnings 15.5 minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first published in Warnings & Safety Tips in the A&P Syllabus | Episode 57. Kevin usually has a Warnings! page in his syllabus or other course documents. It contains three warnings about, and rationale explaining, some important things a student should know before continuing in the A&P course. There is shouting involved. The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24 Help significant others help YOU (a brief blog post for students; link to this from your course webpage, learning management system, and/or syllabus) my-ap.us/rgNZ27 Supporting Returning Learners | Episode 9 Bonus handout! Syllabus Warnings Available only in the free podcast app (the TAPP APP) For iOS devices: my-ap.us/TAPPiOS For Android devices: my-ap.us/TAPPandroid   Nuzzel Newsletter 1 minute In the Nuzzel Newsletter for The A&P Professor, host Kevin Patton selects daily headlines that may be of interest to anatomy and/or physiology faculty. This Nuzzel newsletter is published five days a week (more or less). To check out the archives of past Nuzzels, or to subscribe, go to: nuzzel.com/theAPprofessor   Safety Advice 20.5  minutes This segment is adapted from a segment that was first published in Warnings & Safety Tips in the A&P Syllabus | Episode 57. We're held responsible (at least in part) for the safety of everyone in our classroom. How best to prepare for and facilitate safety? Teaching For Long Term Learning | Episode 7 (includes discussion of Test Zero) Active Shooter Booklet (free PDF from Department of Homeland Security) my-ap.us/DHSbooklet Bonus handout! Safety First! Available only in the free podcast app (the TAPP APP) For iOS devices: my-ap.us/TAPPiOS For Android devices: my-ap.us/TAPPandroid   Personal Pronouns 2.5 minutes Introducing our own preferred gender pronouns opens the door for including the personal pronoun preference of student (should that be important to them) and can help connect with our students in ways that improve the learning environment. Gender Pronouns and Teaching my-ap.us/31gbzst The Problem With Pronouns my-ap.us/2CZjrU0   Long-Long Syllabus 5 minutes A syllabus could become massive. As with the massiveness of an elephant, the large size may be "just right." But maybe not. There are ways to reduce the size of a syllabus without losing any important content. And there ways to make a large syllabus easier to read and easier to raid. This segment revisits some ideas brought up in earlier parts of this episode. Yes, Your Syllabus Is Way Too Long (Chronicle of Higher Education article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/33mhP4x The Elephant Episode | Episode 31 (about elephants, not syllabi)     If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)    
Host Kevin Patton uses the analogy of circus animals adapting to new or misplaced props to help him prepare to move courses back to campus. A lesson on resilience is just what we need right now. Book Club: Southwick & Charney's Resilience book. 00:54 | Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching 21:51 | Sponsored by AAA 22:41 | Resilience 30:51 | Sponsored by HAPI 31:55 | Book Club: Resilience 34:13 | Sponsored by HAPS 35:02 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   Episode | Show Notes More than education, more than experience, more than training, a person’s level of resilience will determine who succeeds and who fails. (Steven M. Southwick & Dennis S. Charney)   Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching 21 minutes Kevin uses his experience as a wild animal trainer in introducing sea lions, lions, and tigers to new furniture, props, and behavior as an analogy for how to get used to the new "pandemic teaching" environment as we return to campus. And, perhaps more importantly, how to get our students comfortable in the changed campus environment. Check out the Stealth board at: amzn.to/2X4Q3FI   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Resilience 8 minutes Resilience is something on our minds these days, right? Kevin discusses and article outlining research in what helps us build resilience—and how we can help our students build resilience. What Makes Some People More Resilient Than Others (newspaper article) my-ap.us/2COBkIt   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 2.5 minutes The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Book Club 2 minutes Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life's Greatest Challenges by Steven M. Southwick & Dennis S. Charney amzn.to/3f2sjbF For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub Special opportunity Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers! Be sure include your reasons for recommending it Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN) For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi     Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)  
What causes Zoom fatigue and how can we prevent it? Host Kevin Patton tackles that as well as another nasty effect of pandemic teaching: stress cardiomyopathy. Plus updates in sensory physiology, the value of keeping skill lists, and the Book Club recommends Chris Jarmey's Concise Book of Muscles. 00:40 | Updating Our Skill Lists 01:59 | Updates in Sensory Physiology 07:30 | Sponsored by AAA 08:05 | Book Club: The Concise Book of Muscles 12:05 | Sponsored by HAPI 14:26 | Zoom Fatigue 29:11 | Sponsored by HAPS 30:06 | Pandemic Heart: Stress Cardiomyopathy 39:48 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here. Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The heart was made to be broken. (Oscar Wilde)   Updating Our Skill Lists 1.5 minutes Anatomy professor Amanda Meyer reminded us on Twitter that pandemic teaching has given us a lot of new skills that we should be adding to our skill list in our curriculum vitae (CV). How to describe skills in your CV (some hints) my-ap.us/308zLMR   Updates in Sensory Physiology 5.5 minutes A few content updates to spice up our teaching. Is "water" a primary taste in mammals? Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water (summary of research) my-ap.us/2Zn5uuI The cellular mechanism for water detection in the mammalian taste system (research paper) my-ap.us/3etufcO Do we need cold receptors to feel warmth? Changing how we think about warm perception (summary of research) my-ap.us/2DAV8Pj The Sensory Coding of Warm Perception (research article) my-ap.us/2DyHNqF Can you hear  your tensor tympani? Some People Can Make a Roaring Sound in Their Ears Just by Tensing a Muscle (brief news article) my-ap.us/38Ur7pu Voluntary contraction of the tensor tympani muscle and its audiometric effects (case study) my-ap.us/2CAGxmk   Sponsored by AAA 1 minute A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org. Searchable transcript Captioned audiogram  Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!   Book Club 4 minutes The Concise Book of Muscles by Chris Jarmey amzn.to/3h1GW07 For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub Special opportunity Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers! Be sure include your reasons for recommending it Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN) For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub   Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 2.5 minutes The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out! nycc.edu/hapi   Zoom Fatigue 15 minutes Zoom meetings, webinars, classes, etc., make me tired just thinking about them. I think this is part of Zoom fatigue, that exhaustion we feel from participating in video meetings. Here's a discussion of what Zoom fatigue is and how to combat it. I'm thinking of hosting a virtual telethon to support finding a cure. You in? How to Combat Zoom Fatigue (article talked about in this segment) my-ap.us/3fx0V6O Zoom fatigue is real — here’s why video calls are so draining (brief article) my-ap.us/3fs8USo 'Zoom fatigue,' explained by researchers (brief article) my-ap.us/2AZfv83 ‘ZOOM FATIGUE’ IS REAL. HERE’S WHY YOU’RE FEELING IT, AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT. (brief article) my-ap.us/38XnCyq   Sponsored by HAPS 1 minute The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings! Anatomy & Physiology Society theAPprofessor.org/haps   Pandemic Heart 10 minutes I'm calling it pandemic heart but experts call it stress cardiomyopathy.  It's also called broken heart syndrome and several other names. One of which involves fishing for octopuses. Whatever you call it, it's incidence has more than doubled due to the pandemic. Word Dissection stress cardiomyopathy takotsubo cardiomyopathy apical ballooning syndrome Clarification: The ballooning characteristic of stress cardiomyopathy is often more pronounced in the apical region of the left ventricle.  Incidence of Stress Cardiomyopathy During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic (research article) my-ap.us/3emx0g1 Researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic (news summary of the research) my-ap.us/2ZmkKb7 Stress Cardiomyopathy Symptoms and Diagnosis (disease summary from Johns Hopkins) my-ap.us/2CtjE4x Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (disease summary that include a lot of great still and video images of this condition) my-ap.us/3ekWL09 Ancient catching octopus trap. (video showing one method for using takotsubo to catch octopuses) youtu.be/ac9XSKjabjI Diagram of stress cardiomyopathy (A) compared to a normal ventricle (B) by J. Heuser my-ap.us/303stda   If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page. More details at the episode page. Transcript available in the transcript box. Listen to any episode on your Alexa device. Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440   Tools & Resources  Amazon Text Expander Rev.com Snagit & Camtasia The A&P Professor Logo Items   Sponsors   Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the  American Association for Anatomy. anatomy.org   The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society  aprovides marketing support for this podcast.  theAPprofessor.org/haps   Distribution of this episode is supported by  NYCC's online graduate program in  Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI)  nycc.edu/hapi   Clicking on sponsor links  helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!   Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!   The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)  
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Sarah Dwornik

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Jan 29th
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