Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
21 November 2022 | Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary | Menlo Park, Calif. I’m back from my classmate’s diaconate ordination (the last of our class to be ordained!) with some thoughts on the virtue of “unassuming authority,” as the Rite of Ordination calls it. In this week’s Carmelite conversation, Daniel and I conclude our series on the dark night of the soul with some personal testimonies and closing reflections. Opening music: “Christus vincit,” arr. Martin Baker, sung by the Choir of King’s College Cambridge, dir. Daniel Hyde, 2021. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
14 November 2022 | XXXIII Monday in Ordinary Time | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, recording in a brief break between classes, I share what it’s been like to practice saying Mass and hearing confessions, and beginning to prepare for priestly ordination! Daniel Murphy joins us again to share his insights on the dark night and the gift of faith. Opening music: “Kyrie,” Mass for Voice Voices, composed by William Byrd, sung by the Choir of Christ Church, Oxford, 2010. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
7 November 2022 | XXXII Monday in Ordinary Time | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, amid the falling leaves that mark the changing of the seasons, we discuss transitions: the “dark nights” of the senses and the spirit, and the active and passive movements, in the theology of St. John of the Cross. In the Dickens segment, Dcn. Matthew, Rachel and Boze continue last week’s discussion of Oliver Twist through the theme of memory. Opening music: “Gratias agimus tibi,” 4th movement of “Gloria in D major,” composed by Antonio Vivaldi, dir. R. Mlkeyan, sung by the National Chamber Orchestra of Armenia, 2012. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
31 October 2022 | Vigil of All Saints | Menlo Park, Calif. I may not have managed to get it up by 6:00, but I’m delighted to be back this week with a new episode of In Your Embrace podcast! This Hallow’s Eve, we join the founders of the Dickens Chronological Reading Club to discuss Oliver Twist: how lost souls find a home, how hospitality can be a double-edged sword, and just why this novel is tremendously compelling and relevant for readers today. Plus, what is the dark night of the soul, and how can St. John call it “more lovely than the dawn”? Opening music: “Gaudeamus omnes,” composed by WIlliam Byrd, dir. John Rutter, sung by The Cambrige Singers, 2021. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
17 October 2022 | St. Ignatius of Antioch | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, I share my experiences teaching my first confirmation class of the year, and some thematic resonances between Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites and Dickens’ Barnaby Rudge. In our latest Carmelite conversation, Daniel Murphy returns to discuss some of the basic virtues and dispositions necessary for progress in prayer, and shares one tip for beginners who want to set out into the deep. Opening music: “Ave Maria,” act II of Dialogues des Carmélites, composed by François Poulenc, dir. Yannick Nézet-Séguin, sung at the Metropolitan Opera, New York, 2019. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
10 September 2022 | XXVIII Monday in Ordinary Time | Menlo Park, Calif. As its first season draws to a close, let’s return this week to Amazon’s Rings of Power: the highs, the lows, the reasons I’m cooling on the show, and why I’m still holding out hope for a surprising conclusion. We also welcome back friend of the podcast Daniel Murphy to discuss the distinctive Carmelite “style” of prayer and how it stands as a sign of contradiction to certain modern tendencies in spirituality. Opening music: “Ecce quam bonum,” sung by the Discalced Carmelite Friars of Czerna Monastery, 2016. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
26 September 2022 | Ss. Cosmas and Damian | Menlo Park, Calif. We’re four and a half years old, and this is our one hundredth episode! This week, I share some new things I’m trying for better sleep and intentional rest, and some thoughts on the commandment to rest on the Sabbath. Rachel and I discuss the themes of friendship and fatherhood in the Pickwick Papers, including celibate love and the motif of the benevolent bachelor. Finally, we rejoin the Prophet Elijah in the cave and consider what it means to wait for God. Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you’re listening! Please note there will be no new episode next Monday. The podcast will resume the following Monday, Oct 10. Opening music: “The Lord’s Prayer,” from the Mass in Honor of Saint Isaac Jogues, composed by Jeff Ostrowski, sung by Corpus Christi Watershed, 2022. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
19 September 2022 | St. Januarius | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, I’m excited to welcome Rachel from the Dickens Chronological Reading Club to talk about Dickens’s high-contrast fiction and that Pickwickian light that shines all the more brightly in darkness. We also consider the Prophet Elijah, leader and father of Carmelites, and what it means to go up the mountain to meet God. Plus, one simple lesson I learned about vocal technique can have a positive impact on every area of our lives! Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you’re listening! Opening music: “Caritas abundavit in omnia,” composed by St. Hildegard of Bingen, sung by Gregoriana Amsterdam, 2010. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
Episode 98: Little Ways

Episode 98: Little Ways

2022-09-1301:01:40

12 September 2022 | The Most Holy Name of Mary | Menlo Park, Calif. This week on the podcast, I share more about what its’s like ministering as a deacon in the seminary, then take a first look at Barnaby Rudge and the Gothic mood. What one spiritual truth can we learn from Gothic horror? Last but not least, friend of the podcast Daniel Murphy and I share our personal testimonies of encountering St. Thérèse and our different lay and clerical styles of living out her little way. Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you’re listening! Opening music: Psalm 91, sung by Harpa Dei, 2022. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
Episode 97: Unlikely Heroes

Episode 97: Unlikely Heroes

2022-09-0601:11:40

5 September 2022 | St. Teresa of Calcutta | Menlo Park, Calif.  This week, I share some initial experiences from my new pastoral assignment in South San Francisco, where I am learning to breathe with both lungs! We take a look at the character of Galadriel in Amazon’s newly-released Rings of Power series, asking: is she in continuity with Galadriel as we know her from the books? Finally, I am joined by my friend Daniel Murphy for the first of many Carmelite conversations to come. We discuss St. Thérèse, an unlikely hero, through the rubric of the Hero’s Journey, and try to glimpse the summit of Mount Carmel through the prism of her unique life.  Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you’re listening!  Opening music: “The angel cried,” megalynarion of Great and Holy Pascha from the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, sung by Archangel Voices, 2010. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
29 August 2022 | Passion of St. John the Baptist | Menlo Park, Calif. Welcome to a new season of In Your Embrace Podcast! In this episode, I share some very brief thoughts about my ordination this summer and what it’s like to be back in seminary as a deacon, as well as what new kinds of conversations you can expect on the podcast this year. Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you’re listening! See the new schedule of the Dickens Chronological Reading Club at https://wreninkpaper.com/2022/05/13/updated-schedule-the-dickens-chronological-reading-club-2022-24/ And see you back here next week for further conversations. Opening music: “Beatitudes - Ancient Chant,” arr. P. Kappanadze, sung by St. Tikhon's Seminary & Monastery Choirs, South Canaan, PA, 2018. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
13 February 2022 | Septuagesima Sunday | Menlo Park, Calif. Beneath the moon and stars this Sunday night, let’s talk about obedience, sacrifice, and self-knowledge. What is the theological basis for Christian obedience? Does it have any inherent limits? I share some thoughts from my thesis research. In the Pickwick Papers, Sam Weller illustrates what it means to make a sacrifice: “to make something holy by giving it away for love.” Finally, St. Catherine of Siena gives us an important lesson on looking in the mirror. Opening music: “They ate and had their fill,” arr. Josquin des Prez, adapted and sung by Heath Morber and Ruth Kenney, Champaign, IL, 2015. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
7 February 2022 | St. Romuald | Menlo Park, Calif. Returning after a two-week break, I share my reactions to a friend’s priestly ordination, some thoughts on Dickens’ genre-crossing and the role of ghost stories in the Pickwick Papers, and one more practical suggestion on prayer. Plus: why do we do so many things three times in the Roman Rite? Opening music: “Gospodi pomiluj,” arr. Grigory Lvovsky, sung by Choeur d'hommes Phoneomen, dir. Roman Imamutdinov, 2011. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
22 January 2022 | St. Vincent of Zaragoza | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, we dive headlong into the Pickwick Papers, meet the eponymous gentleman and his erstwhile compatriots, and hear an unexpectedly bleak story in the midst of a merry evening! What might the clergyman’s tale have to tell us about Dickens’ own relationship to the Church? Also in this episode: the anthropological, historical and cosmic dimensions of liturgy, and what it all means for the music you hear at Mass. Opening music: “Tota pulchra es, Maria,” sung by Harpa Dei, 2021. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
16 January 2022 | II Sunday after Epiphany | Portola Valley, Calif. On this winter hike beneath the pine trees, I’m excited to tell you about a new homiletical method I’m learning in class, what Dickens can teach us about the extraordinary in ordinary faces and places, and one tip for giving thanks after Holy Communion! (Apologies for the audio issues in this episode.) Opening music: “Nuptiae factae sunt,” from the Antiphonale Monasticum, sung by Alberto Rocco, 2012. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
11 January 2022 | Tuesday after the Epiphany | Menlo Park, Calif. I’m back to school, and the Dickens 2022 Project has begun! In this episode, I share what it’s like to go on two silent retreats in one month or less, some surprising background on Dickens - the man, the myth(-maker), the legend! - through the eyes of G.K. Chesterton, and a theology of prayer based on the Book of Revelation (credit to Rev. Dennis McManus). Opening music: “Ecce sto ad ostium,” sung by Voces Aequales, 1998. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
2 January 2022 | The Epiphany of the Lord | Roseburg, Ore. At the dawn of the new year, I share 3 questions I’m using to prepare for 2022, as well as wrapping up last year’s Tolkien project and looking ahead to Charles Dickens! Plus: just what is the feast of the Epiphany, and what does it have to do with Christmas? Links referenced in this episode: Monk Manual 2022 Vision + Planning Journal: Download Full Workbook Opening music: “Tribus miraculis,” antiphon for the Epiphany of the Lord, sung by the University of King’s College Chapel Choir, dir. Paul Halley, 2014. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
19 December 2021 | IV Sunday of Advent | Menlo Park, Calif. Friends, we've come to the last episode of 2021! Returning renewed from my five day retreat, I share one Christmas grace (among many the Lord gave me this week) and consider how poverty of spirit prepares our hearts to receive immense blessings. Also in this episode: Tolkien’s take on the heroic northern spirit in a historical-fictional play, “The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth,” and some of his thoughts on the beauty of language, to which he was extraordinarily sensitive. Finally, what is the Church teaching us through these four Sundays of this short season? We savor the four entrance antiphons of the Sundays of Advent as the hors d’oeuvres of the coming feast. Links referenced in this episode: ShiffletCast: www.shiffletcast.com Dickens 2022 Project: www.inyourembrace.com/dickens Opening music: “Rorate caeli,” antiphon for the IV Sunday of Advent, sung by Schola Gregoriańska, Theological Seminary of the Diocese of Toruń, Poland, 2020. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
5 December 2021 | II Sunday of Advent | Menlo Park, Calif. With finals week upon us and the end of the semester in sight, we discuss just why there must be monsters in Beowulf - and another Tolkien tale dealing with dragons! Also: 3 points for meditation during this brief and beautiful season as we hurtle headlong toward Christmas. Opening music: “There is no rose,” composed by Phillip Stopford, sung by Truro Cathedral Choir, dir. Christopher Gray, 2018. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
Episode 87: Deus Creator

Episode 87: Deus Creator

2021-11-2101:16:02

21 November 2021 | Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe | Menlo Park, Calif. On this last Sunday of the liturgical year, we discuss the ending of The Hobbit, the eucatastrophe at the Battle of Five Armies, and the homecoming of Bilbo. What is the difference between deus ex machina and the providence of Deus Creator? What does it mean that Christ is King “already, but not yet”? And while we’re asking big questions: what is the purpose of life? Listen to hear Tolkien’s answers (and mine) to these and more than these! Opening music: “Christus vincit (‘Laudes regiae’),” sequence for the feast of Christ the King, sung by Sequentia (dir. Benjamin Bagby) and Dialogos (dir. Katarina Livljanić), 2012. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store