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The Gloaming

Author: Angelo & James

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A podcast about the future of Gippsland and the people who are creating it, featuring conversations with the region's crepuscular creatures.
21 Episodes
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In this episode, we spoke to Morag Gamble, a global permaculture and ecovillage ambassador, speaker and educator. Morag spoke to James and Angelo about her family’s journey into eco-village life and how the new patterns of life she wove in that place over the course of two decades have provided abundant nourishment and resilience for her family and community during the COVID-19 pandemic.About our guestMorag Gamble is a global permaculture and ecovillage ambassador, speaker and educator. For over 25 years she has been working with community gardens, school gardens, permaculture projects and ecovillages, and teaching in universities around the globe including Schumacher College in England, and leading a Food Politics course at Griffith University.Morag lives amidst an award-winning permaculture education garden in a UN recognised permaculture village and mentors hundreds of new permaculture teachers on 6 continents through the online Permaculture Educators Program of the Permaculture Education Institute. With a group of young people from around the world, she has created the global Permayouth that meets weekly, and engages directly with refugee youth in East Africa. She also leads the Ethos Foundation, a registered permaculture charity supporting permaculture education in the global south particularly for youth and women.Morag is an avid permaculture YouTuber, podcaster and blogger. Her free permaculture materials have been accessed millions of times. Thousands tune in every month for her free Monday Masterclass, and she’s a regular on ABC radio, sharing ideas for a regenerative way of being and a one-planet life.Find out more about Morag’s work:Morag’s websitePermaculture Educators Program & Permaculture Education InstitutePermayouthEthos FoundationOur Permaculture Life YoutubeOur Permaculture Life BlogFacebook: @ourpermaculturelifeInstagram: moraggambleWe'd love to hear what you think. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.Subscribe to The Gloaming.
In this episode, we spoke to Rhia Nix about the challenges created by COVID-19 for small business and the call to simplicity that some are responding to aid the crisis. Rhia and her husband, Francesco Laera are the owners of Trulli Woodfire Pizzeria, Gusto Gelateria and the Meeniyan Pantry and Cellar. in Meeniyan in South Gippsland.Subscribe to The Gloaming.Rhiannon Nix, along with her husband Francesco Laera, is the owner of Trulli Woodfire Pizzeria, Gusto Gelateria and the Meeniyan Pantry and Cellar. in Meeniyan in South Gippsland. She’s also involved in the the Meeniyan Traders Association and local community.Stuff we talked about in this episode:We talked about their involvement in the Meeniyan Traders Association and the amazing work that they've been doing putting Meeniyan on the Map.Learn more about everything going on in Meeniyan.We covered some of the popular local events that bring many tourists to Meeniyan including the Garlic Festival.We discussed how they were adapting to the changing environment and the kinds of things they are doing in their businesses to continue to trade.Trulli will be taking their mobile oven to locations throughout South Gippsland and selling take away meals as well as offering delivery. Order online here.Support your local businesses and be a hero....stay at home!Stay up to date with what they are doing on social media via their facebook pages.https://www.facebook.com/TrulliPizzaMeeniyanhttps://www.facebook.com/gustogelateriawonthaggi/https://www.facebook.com/meeniyanpantryandcellar/We'd love to hear what you think. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, we were joined again by Professor Daniel Aldrich of Northeastern University in Boston to discuss how communities might get through the tough times ahead during the COVID-19 pandemic. Professor Aldrich reminded us again of the unparalleled importance of caring for the ties that bind us together during times of uncertainty.Subscribe to The Gloaming.Stuff we talked about in this episode:Daniel P. Aldrich is professor and director of the Security and Resilience Program at Northeastern University in Boston (USA). He is a political scientist who earned his PhD from Harvard University. He has published four books (including Building Resilience: Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery), with another forthcoming, more than forty peer reviewed articles, and written op-eds for The New York Times, CNN, Asahi Shinbun, along with appearing on popular media outlets such as CNBC, MSNBC, NPR, and HuffPost. His research has been funded by the Fulbright Foundation, the Abe Foundation, and the National Science Foundation, and he has carried out more than five years of fieldwork in Japan, India, Africa, and the Gulf Coast.You can learn more about Daniel’s work on his website or follow him on Twitter.We spoke to Daniel about social capital and its role in helping communities recover from shocks, be it earthquakes, economic crises or floods.Special thanks...... to Professor Daniel Aldrich for joining us in this episode!Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In the second part to their conversation, James and Angelo spoke to regenerative farmer and sustainability consultant, Jason Alexandra about some of the big issues affecting the future of Gippsland. Jason drew on his deep knowledge of the region, the economy and governance in a chat that ranged from a more adaptive approach to strategy, the food and fibre prospects for Gippsland, the circular economy, and the nature of cooperation. If you love digging into the big issues, this episode is for you.About our guest in this episode…Jason is the owner and creator of Hazeldean Forest Farm, which was designed as a demonstration regenerative permaculture farm over three decades ago. Located in Ellinbank at the foot of Mt. Worth, the farm has been Certified Organic for over thirty years and uses permaculture, agro-ecology systems & regenerative farming techniques. The property boasts thirty apple varieties, plums, peaches, persimmons & nut orchards and also produces apple cider vingegar and apple cider.Jason is also the Managing Director of Alexandra and Associates, a small sustainability focused consulting company and an independent researcher. His work and interests are wide ranging spanning natural resources management, public policy and governance. Read some of Jason’s work on these topics.Also check out articles Jason has published on The Conversation.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.
In this episode, James and Angelo spoke to regenerative farmer, Jason Alexandra. As the creator and owner of Hazeldean Forest Farm in West Gippsland, Jason and his partner, Marg, were one of the pioneers of the regenerative approach in Gippsland. We spoke with Jason as he gave us a tour of the farm about how they regenerated the landscape and created a sustainable business at the same time. Just listen to those sounds in the background - the place is teeming with life!About our guest in this episode…Jason is the owner and creator of Hazeldean Forest Farm, which was designed as a demonstration regenerative permaculture farm over three decades ago. Located in Ellinbank at the foot of Mt. Worth, the farm has been Certified Organic for over thirty years and uses permaculture, agro-ecology systems & regenerative farming techniques. The property boasts thirty apple varieties, plums, peaches, persimmons & nut orchards and also produces apple cider vingegar and apple cider.Jason is also the Managing Director of Alexandra and Associates, a small sustainability focused consulting company and an independent researcher. His work and interests are wide ranging spanning natural resources management, public policy and governance. Read some of Jason’s work on these topics.Also check out articles Jason has published on The Conversation.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.
In this episode, James spoke with Nora Bateson, an award-winning filmmaker, writer, systems thinker and driving force behind Warm Data. Nora discusses her work in experimenting with new ways of perceiving the world so that we might find other species of information and new patterns of connection not visible though current methodologies. She calls this information ‘Warm Data’, and explains how ordinary citizens are using Warm Data to build stronger communities.Nora is visiting Melbourne and Perth in November 2019 to train some of Australia’s first Warm Data Lab hosts. Check out www.warmdatalab.net for more information on the course.About our guest in this episode…Nora Bateson is an award-winning filmmaker, writer and educator, as well as President of the International Bateson Institute, based in Sweden. Her work seeks to answer the question: “How can we improve our perception of the complexity we live within, so we may improve our interaction with the world?”. An international lecturer, researcher and writer, Nora wrote, directed and produced the award-winning documentary, An Ecology of Mind, a portrait of her father, Gregory Bateson. Her work brings the fields of biology, cognition, art, anthropology, psychology, and information technology together into a study of the patterns in ecology of living systems. Her book, Small Arcs of Larger Circles, released by Triarchy Press, UK, 2016 is a revolutionary personal approach to the study of systems and complexity.If you want to learn more about Nora and her work on Warm Data, check out www.warmdatalab.net.Nora also keeps a blog where she shares essays and explorations on complexity and Warm Data.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingSubscribe to The Gloaming.Web: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, James spoke with Euan Semple during his brief jaunt to Gippsland. Euan is where zen and social media intersect. In a world where public discussions seem increasingly polarised and rage-filled, Euan suggests a more humble, gentle and mindful use of digital communications technologies. He brings a healthy dose of humanity back to the digital realm with his message: the game-changers aren't in connecting things, but in connecting people.About our guest in this episode…Euan Semple is an author, speaker, blogger, podcast host and don of digital media. Formerly with the BBC in London, he has helped large organisations around the world to make best use of digital communications technology. Thanks to Jobs Australia and Committee for Gippsland, Euan ventured to the Latrobe Valley recently where he delivered a workshop to local leaders.If you want to hear more of Euan, check out his TEDx Talk and the podcast he runs with Paolo Valdemarin called State of the Net.Euan also keeps a brilliant blog where he shares musings and insights on everything from digital tech, zen, and truck-driving.Stuff we talked about….James mentioned Explorations in meaning, a video conversation between philosopher-entrepreneur Jordan Hall and psychologist John Vervaeke. Worth a listen if you want to go deep into the sensemaking rabbit hole!We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingSubscribe to The Gloaming.Web: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, Angelo and James joined the gang at Earthworker Energy Manufacturing Cooperative at their Morwell factory for a chat about how the cooperative business model challenges the idea that we have to choose between the economy and the environment. Our guests were three legends of the Valley, Dan Musil, Chris Barfoot and Dickie Savva, who gave us the low-down on the state of the Valley and how the Earthworker Energy Manufacturing Cooperative isn’t waiting for a fairer and more sustainable future to arrive - they’re building it (and you can, too!).About our guests in this episode…Dan Musil is a Morwell local, Secretary of the Earthworker Energy Manufacturing Cooperative, PhD candidate at Western Sydney University, and a spectacular musician (you’ve gotta check out Dan on the lapsteel!)Chris Barfoot is the project officer for the Latrobe Valley Community Power Hub. Chris has worked in the energy sector in the Valley for over thirty years, which primed his passion to pave the way for a just transition.Dickie Savva was born and bred in Morwell. He’s a stainless steel welding and fabrication specialist and coordinates operations at the Earthworker factory in Morwell.Other stuff we talked about….The Earthworker Cooperative is the mothership for cooperatives, including the Earthworker Energy Manufacturing Cooperative in Morwell, and the Melbourne-based Redgum Cleaning Cooperative.The Earthworker Energy Manufacturing Cooperative is now in production, building high quality solar hot water systems. If you’re in the market for an upgrade, you can learn more at https://earthworkerenergy.coop/.And The Gloaming’s co-host James mentioned an essay he published recently on Medium, which you can check out here: Pontoon Archipelago, or: How I learned to stop worrying and love collapse.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingSubscribe to The Gloaming.Web: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, Angelo and James spoke with three leaders in the Gippsland art world: Mark Themann, Rob Robson and Anton Vardy. Our conversation meandered through some of the big questions about art, like what art actually is, the important role it plays in our personal and public lives as well as supporting the social and psychological resilience of Gippsland communities.About our guests in this episode…Dr. Mark Themann is an artist who creates visual and time-based art. He has been exhibiting his work for over thirty years across Australiasia, Europe and the USA. He is also the Director of the Latrobe Regional Gallery located in Morwell, a gallery operated by Latrobe City Council.Rob Robson is the Manager of Arts and Culture at Baw Baw Shire Council where he has been for over eight years. He recently oversaw the redevelopment of the West Gippsland Arts Centre, which re-opened in late 2018.Anton Vardy recently completed a stint as the senior curator of the Latrobe Regional Gallery and was also the former director of the Gippsland Art Gallery in Sale where he built the space into a premiere regional arts facility over the course of twelve years.Where to find art in GippslandArt is everywhere in Gippsland, which is home to some superb galleries and performing arts centres including:Latrobe Regional Gallery in MorwellLatrobe Performing Arts Centre in TraralgonWest Gippsland Arts Centre in WarragulGippsland Art Gallery in SaleEast Gippsland Art Gallery in BairnsdaleKrowathunkooloong Keeping Place in BairnsdaleTown & Country Gallery in YarragonMeeniyan Art Gallery in MeeniyanPort Albert Art Gallery in Port AlbertCowwarr Art Space in CowwarrAnd many many more! (just google “art & Gippsland” and you’ll see!)You might also find something interesting among these Gippsland art hubs:Baw Baw Arts Alliance - sign up today!Creative Gippsland - your gateway to artists, creatives and experiences.Gippsland Artists - a listing of some of the great artists who call Gippsland home.Thanks to Baw Baw Shire Council and Latrobe City Council for lending us these legendary guests. And thanks also to Will Kulich of the Baw Baw Citizen for the Neerim Bower photograph we’ve used for this episode’s cover art.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The Gloaming
In this episode, Angelo and James spoke with Corrinne Armour, a Gippsland born-and-bred leadership specialist and author of Leaders who ask: Building a Fearless Culture by telling less and asking more. We spoke to Corrinne about fearless leadership, how vulnerability makes for better leaders, and how to tell if you may be the leader your community or organisation needs right now.Subscribe to The Gloaming.Stuff we talked about in this episode:Corrine Armour is a Gippslandian and leadership expert who helps leaders and teams develop fearless leadership and deliver transformational results. Known for her energy, empathy and results focus, Corrinne is a sought after speaker and leadership coach.We spoke to Corrinne about her latest book, Leaders who ask: Building a Fearless Culture by telling less and asking more.Her previous books include Developing Direct Reports: Taking the Guesswork Out of Leading Leaders and Cracking the Code for Workshop Performance.You can learn more about Corrinne’s work on her website or connect with her on LinkedIn.We'd love to hear what you thought of this episode. Get in touch with us on social media or via email.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, Professor Daniel Aldrich of Northeastern University in Boston joined us to discuss how social capital can help get communities through tough times, be it earthquakes, economic crises or flooding.We so are excited to bring you this conversation because it excavates some of the foundational ideas on which The Gloaming rests: As Gippsland strides forward into an uncertain future, Professor Aldrich reminded us of the unparalleled importance of caring for the ties that bind us together.Subscribe to The Gloaming.Stuff we talked about in this episode:Daniel P. Aldrich is professor and director of the Security and Resilience Program at Northeastern University in Boston (USA). He is a political scientist who earned his PhD from Harvard University. He has published four books (including Building Resilience: Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery), with another forthcoming, more than forty peer reviewed articles, and written op-eds for The New York Times, CNN, Asahi Shinbun, along with appearing on popular media outlets such as CNBC, MSNBC, NPR, and HuffPost. His research has been funded by the Fulbright Foundation, the Abe Foundation, and the National Science Foundation, and he has carried out more than five years of fieldwork in Japan, India, Africa, and the Gulf Coast.You can learn more about Daniel’s work on his website or follow him on Twitter.We spoke to Daniel about social capital and its role in helping communities recover from shocks, be it earthquakes, economic crises or floods.Stuff we mentioned included:The role of social capital in saving thousands of lives during the 2011 tsunami in Japan.Professor Robert Putnam’s research and writings on trust, including his books, Making democracy work and Bowling Alone.The decline of trust in AustraliaOrganisations that are successfully building social capital including the Wellington Regional Emergency Management Organisation, Boulder Colorado Strong (BoCoStrong), Ibasho in Japan, and Safecast, a global volunter-centered citizen science project working to empower people with data about their environments.The late American kids TV personality Fred Rogers, and how his ethos build social capital. Of interest, a documentary about Mister Rogers called Won't you be my neighbour? was released in 2018. You can view some of Mister Rogers’ best moments on YouTube.Third places, those anchors of community life and facilitate and foster broader, more creative interact like street parties, town squares, parks, places of worship, clubs, etc.Special thanks...... to Professor Daniel Aldrich for joining us in this e
BONUS!Here's a little prezzie for you all! Angelo joined the Binary Shift after party at Hogget Kitchen for a chinwag with some of the good folk who attended the conference. In between chowing down on some of Chef Trevor Perkin's finest work and maybe a splash of vino courtesy of local winemaker, William Downie, Angelo got a download on the conference from its participants, speakers and founders.
In this episode, Angelo & James continued their conversation with Erika McInerney (Mac & Ernie Social Media Training) and Elena Kelareva (GippsTech), two of the founders of the Binary Shift conference.Elena and Erika mapped out Gippsland's digital technology and innovation landscape for us - it turns out it doesn't all hinge on ones and zeros, but also some very human skills and connections. We talked all things startups, technology, artificial intelligence and education. We even dabbled in a few robot chicken and paperclip doomsday scenarios. Eeek!Stuff we talked about in this episode:Mac & Ernie Social Media Training, Erika's company.GippsTech, Elena's company.Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author of The Black Swan and frequent party-goer.Co-work spaces like ReActivate in Morwell and collocated with Lauren Murphy Photography in Warragul.Tech education providers including Federation University, Federation Training, and Online is Easy, who run training workshops including to build a website in a day.ReD Associates, who use a human-centred approach to design and ethnographic methods of collecting data that informs design.Real Bread by George, a West Gippsland-based artisan sourdough baker and teacher.Saturn's Childen, a novel by Charles Stross, as recommended by Elena.KND Services (road maintenance)Marc-O-Metic (Gippsland artist, Augmented/Virtual Reality Storyteller and Creative Technologist).Mimetic and robot chickensGeom Chat, founded by local chatbot developer, Hugo Richard.DysTech, also a Hugo Richard endeavour, which uses tech to help diagnose dyslexia early.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In this episode, Angelo & James spoke to Erika Mcinnerney (Mac & Ernie Social Media Training) and Elena Kelareva (GippsTech), two of the founders of the Binary Shift conference, due to take place on 27 August at Lardner Park. Binary Shift is all about supporting the growth of Gippsland's startup community, building our capacity to ‘hack’ problems and innovate, bring talent together to generate and synthesise ideas, and use appropriate technology to deliver real solutions to real challenges.Buying tickets? Don’t forget to use our show code to nab a discount. The code is: THEGLOAMINGStuff we talked about in this episode:Mac & Ernie Social Media TrainingGippsTechRegional pitchfestKND Services (road maintenance)The Rural Woman (Rebel Black)Marc-O-Matic (Gippsland artist, Augmented/Virtual Reality Storyteller and Creative Technologist).Centre of Drone ExcellenceMimetic and robot chickensBuying tickets? Don’t forget to use our show code to nab a discount. The code is: THEGLOAMINGTranslation of what George Saridis said during the conversation:“Is it me? Could I be the good boy? Could it be me?”Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
The Gloaming's own cohost, Angelo, gives the low-down on what went down at a recent public conversation hosted by Gippslandia and Creative Victoria. The theme was 'Shaping a new narrative for the region', and featured special guest Aaron Foley, the Chief Storyteller for the City of Detroit (USA).Stuff we talked about in this episode:The public conversation was called 'Shaping a new narrative for the region: a conversation with Aaron Foley'. The event was held at The VRI in Traralgon on 18 June 2018, by Gippslandia and Creative Victoria.Aaron Foley is the Chief Storyteller for the City of Detroit (USA), a city that is on a mission to reinvent itself - kinda like Gippsland, yeah?The conversation also featured a group of Gippslandians, including Laura Poole (ABC Gippsland), John Calabro (Gippslandia Publisher), Aunty Doris Paton (Aboriginal elder), and Marc-O-Matic, (Gippsland artist, Augmented/Virtual Reality Storyteller and Creative Technologist).Of course, Gippsland has its own scattered tribe of emerging storytellers. Among them are Gippslandia, Faces of Gippsland, the Baw Baw Citizen, Bruce Pascoe, and of course, The Gloaming.Visual storytellers are also popping up, including Peter Yacono and Anissha Vijayan who recently made feature length documentary about the Latrobe Valley called Our Power, as well as some folk from Barefoot Pathways Transitional Training Centre who are working on an eight-part documentary on employment in the Latrobe Valley.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
Angelo & James continue meandering through the Baw Baw Sustainability Festival, this time focusing on food. They spoke with Terry Avery from the West Gippsland Permaculture Group, and Yvonne Noble, a volunteer with the Baw Baw Food Hub.Stuff we talked about in this episode:1) 3:54 - Terry Avery, a leading member of the West Gippsland Permaculture Group.Terry explained what permaculture is and how it can benefit your health and your community. You can learn more about permaculture on David Holmgren's website.Keen to join the local crew? You can meet Terry Avery and his band of merry retrosburbanites for the monthly meeting of the West Gippsland Permaculture Group. They meet on the first Wednesday of every month at 7pm at the Baw Baw Skills Centre in Wills Street in Warragul. Join the WGPG Facebook group to keep in the loop. Or you can also catch up with our local permits at the Rokeby market (second Saturday of every month) where they host a market swap table - bring your excess produce, seedlings, seeds and swap for other organic goodness.James raved on (and on... and on...) about permaculture co-founder David Holmgren's latest offering, Retrosuburbia: The downshifts guide to a resilient future. The book and website is a goldmine of ideas for people keen on building a resilient community, starting in your own street.David Holmgren was also recently interviewed on the Subtle Disruptors podcast. If you like The Gloaming, you'll love Adam Murray's Subtle Disruptors!Angelo's inner policy wonk crawled out of hiding and reviewed the UN Sustainable Development Goals.Check out the Transition Network, which brings together permaculture concepts and systems thinking around our long-term energy prospects (as per Richard Heinberg's work with the Post Carbon Institute). We need more of these groups in Gippy!2) 17:18 - Yvonne Noble, a volunteer with the Baw Baw Food Hub.Yvonne spoke to us about making the household a place of production again. She also gave us the low down on the benefits of the Baw Baw Food Hub, ranging from supplying high quality local produce, ensuring farmers get a fair price, connecting farmers to consumers, and bringing the community together through something we all need: good tucker!If you're in South Gippy, then you can check out another great local food cooperative called the Prom Coast Food Collective.James name-dropped some other great local food producers including the Butterfly Factory (delicious butter, yogurt, cream and milk!) and Real Bread by George (for all your sough dough mastery needs).Angelo also mentioned Naked Wines, a digital platform which connects small-scale independent winemakers with lovers of wine.
Angelo & James take a wander through the Baw Baw Sustainability Festival and chat all things renewable energy in Gippsland with Imogen Jubb from Beyond Zero Emissions, Lorraine Bull from the Latrobe Valley Sustainability Group, and Anthea Merson from the Baw Baw Sustainability Network.Stuff we talked about in this episode:1) 3:22 - Imogen Jubb, National Manager of Zero Carbon Communities program with climate think tank, Beyond Zero Emissions.We talked about alternative energy models, including community power hubs. And guess what? Sustainability Victoria recently funded the Latrobe Valley Community Power Hub, which will be hosted by the Gippsland Climate Change Network. The Hub will be the first locally-based and community owned renewable energy project of its kind in Gippsland.2) 19:39 - Lorraine Bull, President of the Latrobe Valley Sustainability Group.Lorraine gave us a great tip: if you’re interested in learning about cooperative community energy models, check out Frontier Impact Group’s Community Renewable Energy Financing Toolkit.If you’re keen to source some local renewable energy manufacture and install expertise, then check out Gippsland Solar and AusGeothermal.3) 31:40 - Anthea Merson, Project Officer with the Baw Baw Sustainability Network.Check out home base for the Baw Baw Sustainability Network down at Fozigobble Cafe in Yarragon, learn a few sustainable tricks and grab a delicious meal while you’re at it!And stay tuned in future episodes for more exploration of the appropriate technology movement and how it could help Gippsland in the future.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcastOur RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
Liz Meggetto & Nikki Robinson from the Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership join us for a chat about food security in Gippsland, the real price of food, and the many projects underway that are building resilience into our food systems.Keep up to date with some of Liz and Nikki's efforts to raise awareness of food security and promote the richness of the Baw Baw food bowl by following the Baw Baw Food Movement on Facebook.Stuff we talked about in this episode:Curious about food security in Baw Baw? Check of the Central West Gippsland PCP's Food Security Coalition report.Soil is critical to food security in the long term, yet the UN Food & Agriculture Organization have issued findings indicating that globally we have only 60 years of top soil left.Meanwhile, some big chain supermarkets continue to throw out unfathomable amounts of food due to consumer cosmetic food standards, according to ABC’s War on Waste (with Craig Reucassel).What to do with all that waste? Well, Secondbite food bank has some ideas. Just ask the Longwarry & District Lions Club, whose food relief program is working wonders in West Gippsland.In our discussion about fair prices for food, the ol' two-dollar 2L milk gets the gong while Liz promotes the virtues of new business models like Gippsland Jersey that promote a fair price for the farmer.Finally, we talk about the importance of food culture in promoting a demand for good food and a distaste for the packaged and processed stuff. But you need a place to join together with your friends and family to enjoy that tucker right? That's where our chat takes a tangent out to Meeniyan Square.Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcast Our RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe. 
Leni & Paul Mirams live and breathe the philosophy of being the change you want to see in the world. We spoke with Leni and Paul in their home in Hill End where they are building an off-grid homestead, and doing it in ways that strengthens their connections with community.Follow Leni & Paul Mirams on Facebook on the Willow Grove Natural Home Garden page.You can buy fresh veggies and seedlings from Leni & Paul from Warragul Farmers Market (3rd Saturday of every month) or Rokeby Market (2nd Saturday of every month).Stuff we talked about in this episode:Learn more about the idea behind nine meals to anarchy and how close the U.K came to the edge in September 2000.One of Leni and Paul's future collaborations for an on-site self-reliance traineeship program includes working with Hayden, founder of Curvatecture. Hayden is the brains behind the magnificent Willow End Round House.If you're not growing your own tucker, consider signing up with a local food cooperative to ensure you get the best local produce and help local farmers get a fair price. Cooperatives include the Baw Baw Food Hub in Warragul and the Prom Coast Food Collective.With land prices hiking quickly in many parts of Gippsland, the SAGE Project from southeast NSW may well be worth emulating. The project partners land-owners with tenant farmers at an affordable rent to ensure that farming remains an economically sustainable business into the future. But you don't need to have acres of land to start growing your own. Check out David Holmgren’s latest book, Retrosuburbia, for some great ideas about how you can partner with your neighbours to form your own local, low-input collaborative food production system. Maybe you've thought of going off-grid with solar at home? Notch it up and take your whole township off-grid like Yackandandah!Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcast Our RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
In our first ever interview, we speak to Steve Ronalds and Sallie Jones, the co-founders of Gippsland Jersey.  We discuss the genesis of a new and more resilient dairy business model, founded in the wake of the 2016 dairy crisis.Follow Gippsland Jersey on Facebook or Instagram.Stuff we talked about in this episode:For background on the 2016 dairy crisis, watch Waleed Aly’s summary of the crisis on The Project.The ABC also published an excellent explainer on why the bubble burst and what it means for milk in supermarkets.Sallie was also involved in founding the Warragul Farmers Market, which became a centre of gravity for community engagement and activism in support of dairy farmers during the 2016 crisis.The most tragic consequences of the crisis, and of rural hardship more broadly, is the human cost of suicide which devastates rural families and communities. Check out the Ripple Effect and find out how you can help beat rural suicide.Check out Steve's Virtual Farming experience on YouTube.Oh and remember that time when Costa Georgiadis took a Gippsland Jersey milk bath?Stay tuned to The GloamingWeb: www.thegloaming.com.auFacebook: The Gloaming - PodcastInstagram: @thegloamingpodcast Our RSS url is: http://thegloamingpodcast.squarespace.com/podcast?format=rss. Copy and paste it into your favourite podcasting app to subscribe.
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