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Some of the most important news doesn’t make big, splashy headlines. That can be because developments unfold slowly or are super-wonky, or simply get overlooked in a busy news cycle. That’s why the Political Climate team is creating a new Newsflash series, a monthly episode in your Political Climate feed in which we’ll bring you a behind-the-scenes look at a news story you might have missed.In this inaugural episode, host Julia Pyper and producer Maria Virginia Olano bring you snippets from an interview with Lisa Garcia, a regional administrator at the EPA, about the work the agency is doing to deploy funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passed last year. It’s a huge, important topic that’s gotten far too little media coverage. As Garcia put it, “The infusion of funding for infrastructure is certainly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or pretty much wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary Media: Q&A with Lisa Garcia: Getting environmental justice right at the EPAEPA Fact Sheet: EPA & the Bipartisan Infrastructure LawElectrek: Biden administration kicks off $5 billion electric Clean School Bus programThe Hill: Congress needs to support EPA’s environmental protection infrastructure
Faced with record-high gas prices, more and more American consumers are looking to dump the pump. In the first three months of 2022, electric vehicle registrations shot up 60 percent, even as the overall car market shrunk. EVs have experienced steady sales growth over the past decade but are still far from being mainstream. Could the combination of expensive gasoline and exciting new plug-in models see the U.S. turn a corner on mass EV adoption?On this episode of Political Climate, hosts Julia Pyper, Brandon Hurlbut, and Shane Skelton talk about the policies and innovations unlocking greater transportation electrification – as well as the challenges ahead. From manufacturing bottlenecks and raw material supplies to high up-front costs and political opposition, there are still bumps on the road mainstreaming EVs. Plus, the hosts make a new bet – and need your help!Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or pretty much wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary Media: EVs can be cheaper on a monthly basis than gas-powered carsCanary Media: Electric heavy-duty trucks are hitting the roads in California and beyondAxios: Ford F-150 Lightning review: A watershed moment for electric vehiclesPolitico: The gasoline price-gouging fight to nowherePolitical Climate: Mineral Security and Implications for the Energy TransitionPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org
A major push is underway to onshore energy production and manufacturing in America now that Russia’s attack on Ukraine has highlighted the vulnerabilities of global energy supply chains. But the undertaking is complicated by competing political priorities, as U.S. leaders seek to strengthen the country’s energy security while advancing its climate goals. On this episode of Political Climate, our hosts talk through efforts to boost American-made clean energy through executive action. They also check the status of Democrats’ budget reconciliation bill as the midterm election season approaches, and examine a new push to cut a bipartisan climate deal.Also on the show (33.30), a conversation with Abby Hopper, CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association, about a trade case launched in the name of boosting American clean energy manufacturing that threatens to derail U.S. solar deployment – putting jobs at risk and climate goals out of reach. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or pretty much wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Politico: Dems grimace at Manchin’s bipartisan energy detourCanary Media: Will the Biden administration let one company kill US solar?DOE Fact Sheet: The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal Will Deliver For American Workers, Families and Usher in the Clean Energy FutureClimate Solutions Lab: Mapping U.S. Military Dependence on Russian Fossil FuelsPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org
The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act — a historic $1.2 trillion investment package, passed by Congress on a bipartisan basis — has received little fanfare since President Biden signed it into law last November. The bill contains more than $80 billion to advance the clean energy transition and respond to climate change, but where exactly will those dollars go?On this episode of Political Climate host Julia Pyper and producer Maria Virginia Olano speak with Leah Rubin Shen, who leads federal legislative and political engagement at Advanced Energy Economy, about how the rubber is hitting the road on infrastructure spending in states across the country. Plus, they discuss what’s next for President Biden’s climate agenda amid soaring gas prices and push for greater energy independence, which is fueling a national debate around increasing domestic fossil fuel production versus enhancing domestic clean energy manufacturing and deployment. We want to learn more about Political Climate listeners and how we can make this podcast better. Please take a couple of minutes to fill out this short survey and enter to win a $100 Amazon gift card!Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:AEE: Advanced Energy Infrastructure: A Roadmap for ImplementationUtility Dive: Biden invokes Defense Production Act to bolster domestic battery manufacturing for EVs, energy storageCanary Media: Here’s where things stand with climate legislation in CongressCanary Media: How the infrastructure bill will fight climate change and advance clean energyPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org
The Paris Agreement of 2015 set the target of limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. This week’s release of the latest climate assessment report from the U.N. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change underlines, once again, the need for deep decarbonization as quickly as possible for that goal to be met — even as world leaders rethink their energy policies amid the ongoing Russia/Ukraine conflict. On this episode of Political Climate, Julia Pyper hosts a discussion between renowned climate policy experts Laurence Tubiana, Rachel Kyte, David Sandalow and Adnan Amin about the progress toward meeting the Paris goals. They also discuss how to achieve equitable climate solutions and mobilize more climate finance. This conversation was originally recorded for the Zayed Sustainability Prize’s Voices of Sustainability series and republished with approval. We want to learn more about Political Climate listeners and how we can make this podcast better. Please take a couple of minutes to fill out this short survey and enter to win a $100 Amazon gift card!Recommended reading:The Guardian: IPCC report: ‘now or never’ if world is to stave off climate disasterCanary Media: COP26 finance pledges are not as great as they seemZayed Sustainability PrizePolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fis​chtankpr​.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mce​CleanEn​er​gy​.orgListen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.
Minerals and metals have a critical role to play in a low-carbon future — and a potentially controversial one, too. Conversations around extractive industries are complicated by supply chain issues, social impacts and national security concerns. This is a particularly pressing issue right now as Russia, one of the world’s top suppliers of metals and minerals, continues to wage war on Ukraine.  The clean energy transition will require using a lot of raw materials, such as nickel, cobalt and uranium. And those materials will need to be mined and processed to make things like electric vehicle batteries, wind turbines and power nuclear plants. While clean energy is currently responsible for only a small share of global mineral demand, it is projected to grow rapidly. Jael Holzman, mining reporter at E&E News, joins our hosts this week to discuss the hard conversations many are still avoiding on the social, environmental and security risks of mining for substances needed to build decarbonized economies.We want to learn more about Political Climate listeners and how we can make this podcast better. Please take a couple of minutes to fill out this short survey and enter to win a $100 Amazon gift card!Recommended reading:Politico: Could Russian sanctions hobble U.S. clean energy push?E&E News: Cobalt poses human rights test for Biden on clean energyE&E News: Could Russia’s invasion of Ukraine revive U.S. uranium mining?Canary Media: What you need to know about minerals and the clean energy transitionCanary Media: Here are the minerals we need for batteries, solar and other clean energy techPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.
Russia’s brutal war on Ukraine has shone a spotlight on the complex web of energy, climate and geopolitical issues — and has arguably already changed the global energy landscape in profound and lasting ways.The crisis has resurfaced debates on energy security and how to achieve it, with some rushing to call for increased oil and gas extraction to make up for Russian supply, while many others underscore the urgent need for renewable energy build-outs as a way to achieve energy independence.On this episode of Political Climate, our hosts discuss President Biden's new ban on Russian oil and gas imports and what it means for the U.S. energy mix. Plus, we examine the energy security aspects of Biden's first State of the Union Address and renewed efforts to pass a reconciliation bill.Then in the second half of the show, we turn to an interview with Anca Gurzu, a Brussels-based correspondent for the news outlet Cipher, to discuss the European perspective on the Ukraine crisis and what it means for the future of clean energy in Europe. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Foreign Affairs: Green Upheaval: The New Geopolitics of EnergyCanary Media: How fast can Europe wean itself off Russian gas?E&E News: Manchin outlines energy demands as Dems mull next stepsPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org 
State legislatures around the country have a major impact on climate policy, and yet state political races often go unnoticed. Caroline Spears says that needs to change. Caroline created Climate Cabinet Action to help state leaders develop strong platforms and communication strategies that embrace climate as a priority. Recently, the group published a Climate Cabinet Scorecard — the first national tool to hold state legislators accountable for their climate votes. On this episode of Political Climate, our hosts speak with Caroline Spears about the scorecard and how voters and donors can help candidates run, win, and legislate on the climate crisis. Recommended reading:Climate Cabinet ScorecardQuartz: Which US state legislators have the best records on climate-change policy?Canary: The top 6 ambitious state climate laws passed in 2021Political Climate: Electing Climate CandidatesPolitical Climate is brought to you by FischTank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org 
Senator Alex Padilla recently wrapped up his first year in the U.S. Senate as the first Latino to represent the state of California. It's been an eventful year, to put it mildly. On this episode of Political Climate, Sen. Padilla sits down with Julia, Brandon and Shane to discuss energy equity, infrastructure, prospects for the Build Back Better bill, and the future of political discourse in the U.S. The senator outlines legislation he introduced to help address the growing threat from wildfires in the West and his work to expand domestic U.S. production of cleantech mineral resources. Plus, he shares his outlook on voting rights legislation, filibuster reform and the upcoming midterm election. When it comes to addressing top Democratic priorities, the Sen. Padilla's message: "We're not giving up that easily."Recommended reading:Padilla Bill to Improve Federal Wildfire Response Gains Momentum in the SenateTimes of San Diego: California Senators Seek to Expand Federal Authority Over Threatened Salton SeaPV Magazine: Ossoff bill would address rooftop solar’s cost burden on LMI peoplePolitical Climate is brought to you by Fischtank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org
President Joe Biden campaigned for the White House on a number key climate promises. When he officially took office, hopes were high that bold climate action would be at the center of the Biden policy platform. One year later, where does his record stand? On this episode of Political Climate, our hosts look at what the Biden administration has achieved during the president’s first year in office.Of course, a big component of President Biden’s climate agenda is still in limbo. The Build Back Better Act would devote $555 billion to clean energy and climate measures, along with a suite of social programs. Prospects for passing the full bill in the Senate were quashed late last year. But now there’s talk of moving some provisions forward in a trimmed down version of BBB, one that could get the 50 Democrat votes needed to pass. To kick off the show, hosts Julia Pyper, Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton evaluate the odds of a climate focused Build Back Better Act making it across the finish line. Recommended reading:Politico: The climate kinks in BBBWhite House: President Biden Signs Executive Order Catalyzing America’s Clean Energy Economy Through Federal SustainabilityNature: Has Biden followed the science? What researchers sayCanary Media: How the infrastructure bill will fight climate change and advance clean energyGrist: Executive Reaction: Biden vowed to undo Trump’s toxic legacy. We’re tracking his progress. Political Climate is brought to you by Fischtank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy for bringing your work not only to wider audiences, but to the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org 
California Governor Gavin Newsom proposed spending $22.5 billion on tackling the climate crisis this week, as part of his $286.4 billion budget proposal. The so-called California Blueprint includes funding for everything from electric buses and building retrofits to support services for firefighters.As other states have stepped up on climate, some have accused California of falling behind. Could Newsom's plan reclaim the Golden State's title as climate change leader?On this episode, we discuss the climate and clean energy provisions in Newsom's budget proposal with Lauren Sanchez, the governor's Senior Advisor for Climate and former advisor to the Biden-Harris administration.Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:LA Times: COVID-19, children, climate change are focal points in Newsom’s budget planSacramento Bee: Gavin Newsom seeks to reclaim California’s status as climate change leader in his budgetCNBC: California’s blueprint budget has $6.1 billion for electric vehicle initiativesCanary Media: California’s Gov. Newsom says ​‘changes need to be made’ to the state’s polarizing net-metering proposalPolitical Climate is brought to you by Fischtank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy of bringing your work to not only wider audiences, but the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice the amount of renewable energy compared to the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org 
2021 was a productive year for climate policy – particularly for U.S. states. Both red and blue states passed ambitious climate bills last year. Several of the new laws address emissions from multiple sectors of the economy, include strong labor provisions and center environmental justice in meaningful ways.In the first Political Climate episode of 2022, we look at some of the biggest political wins of 2021 that took place around the country. From Oregon and Illinois joining the party on 100% emissions-free electricity, to a wide-ranging cap-and-trade bill in Washington and a net zero goal in North Carolina, there was no shortage of action.Host Julia Pyper speaks with Canary Media’s Jeff St. John about key elements of these new state policies, how they came to pass, and why they’re so significant. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary Media: The top 6 ambitious state climate laws passed in 2021Political Climate: Winning political messages with David RobertsCanary Media: Washington state now has the nation’s most ambitious climate policyCanary Media: Illinois’ new climate bill is ambitious, justice-focused and a model for the nationPolitical Climate is brought to you by Fischtank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy of bringing your work to not only wider audiences, but the right audience. To learn more about FischTank’s approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice the amount of renewable energy compared to the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it’s the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org 
Is Build Back Better really dead? Could the climate and clean energy provisions live on? Political Climate weighs in on the timely issue of Senator Manchin’s “no” on President Biden’s marquee legislation. Plus, Brandon, Shane and Julia share some 2022 predictions.In the second half of the show we look at the troubling rise in global methane emissions. Methane is 80 times more potent as a global warming gas than carbon dioxide, and is responsible for roughly one-quarter of the climate warming we see today. Recognizing the scope and scale of the issue, the United States and European Union recently spearheaded a Global Methane Pledge at COP26, which has been signed by around 100 countries. In addition, the U.S. EPA has proposed new rules to tackle methane leaks from oil and gas production. To round out the episode, we speak to Sarah Smith, program director of super pollutants at the Clean Air Task Force, about why methane emissions are such a big problem and what’s being done to address it. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.P.S. All we want for Christmas are your Apple Podcast reviews! If you have a moment over the holidays, we’d love to get your feedback. Your ratings help us grow and if there’s a topic you’d like the podcast to cover, please let us know!Recommended reading:NYT: What the Stalled Build Back Better Bill Means for Climate, in One ChartCanary Media: The US oil patch is the Wild West. We need regulation to control the sector’s methane emissionsCNN: Biden announces new methane rules and launches global pledge to slash planet-warming emissions
The clean energy transition is accelerating — but progress isn’t always smooth. The global energy crisis and related price spikes have raised some difficult political questions around the push for decarbonization. At the same time, local opposition to clean energy projects threatens to undermine meeting national net zero goals. Similarly, complexities around accessing materials needed to make cleantech solutions threaten to disrupt the sector.These are the kinds of tough issues that longtime climate and energy journalist Amy Harder is used to covering — and continues to cover in her role as executive editor at Cipher, a recently-launched news publication backed by Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy. In this episode, podcast host Julia Pyper, with co-hosts Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton of policy firm Boundary Stone Partners, speak to Amy about some of the latest trends and challenges in the race to net zero emissions.Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts. Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Cipher: What’s really driving the energy crisis and how cleantech fits inCipher: U.S. climate and energy laws push rest of world, IEA chief saysCipher: What happened in Main matters in Glasgow
As we enter the holiday season, our hosts run through 10 powerful stats that will help you navigate the inevitable question from a curious family member: “So, what’s going on with the climate?” As a listener of this podcast, you are probably no stranger to these conversations with loved ones. But this year in particular — amid more in-person visits and a slew of recent headlines on climate policy, climate impacts, and global climate summits — there is a lot of catching up to do. These stats will equip you with the content you need to deliver a brief climate keynote address over the third helping of potatoes. To kick things off, we catch up on the big ticket items in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill and what’s next for the Build Back Better Act, which together could be the most significant pieces of American climate legislation passed in our lifetimes. (And that’s a good thing, should your aunt ask).Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:White House: The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal Fact SheetPrinceton University's REPEAT ProjectCanary Media: The vast majority of Americans love solar and wind powerE2: Clean Jobs AmericaIHS: Corporate US renewable procurement outlookIEA: COP26 climate pledges could help limit global warming to 1.8 °CBBC: How China shapes the world's coalInside EVs: Global Plug-In Car Sales Doubled To A New Record, September 2021California Solar and Storage Association: An S.O.S. In The Sand – Governor: More Solar, Not OilArs Technica: Natural gas customers in Texas get stuck with $3.4 billion cold-snap surcharge
Climate finance has been center stage at COP26. Meeting the globe’s climate goals will require mobilizing trillions of public and private dollars. So what exactly does that look like?During the first week of the UN climate summit, 450 financial institutions with $130 trillion in assets under management pledged to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. The announcement from the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero (GFANZ) led by UN Special Envoy Mark Carney represents a massive commitment to shift funds out of fossil fuels and into creating sustainable economies.But will the promise live up to the hype? We break down the significance of this and other major finance pledges made at COP26 with Justin Guay, director for global climate strategy at the Sunrise Project.Plus, a commitment from wealthy countries to spend $100 billion per year on helping poorer nations mitigate and adapt to climate change remains a sticking point in the global climate negotiations. But even if rich nations deliver more money in climate aid, many countries will see little benefit because they face enormous hurdles accessing the funds available.In the second half of this episode we speak to Benjamin Bartle, project director with RMI's Climate Finance Access Network (CFAN) about what it really takes to put these climate dollars to work.Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Bloomberg: Carney Unveils $130 Trillion in Climate Finance CommitmentsScientific American: U.S. Agrees to End Fossil Fuel Financing AbroadAP: UK sets net-zero plan for its financial sectorRMI: The Crisis of Climate Finance: “Access Means Survival"
Where are the offshore wind projects in America? While turbines have become a familiar sight in states across the country, offshore wind is virtually non-existent. Even with thousands of miles of coastline, the U.S. only has around 40 MW of offshore wind production, most of it from a single wind farm. This pales in comparison to other parts of the world, particularly Europe, which has more than 25 GW of offshore wind capacity from more than 100 offshore wind farms.But the market landscape for offshore wind in the U.S. is poised to change dramatically, with industry and policy efforts aligning to finally access this untapped clean energy resource.In this episode, we discuss this new frontier in the U.S. energy transition with Heather Zichal, Chief Executive Officer, of the American Clean Power Association.Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Heather Zichal: Testimony House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Energy Subcommittee “Offshore Wind, Onshore Benefits: Growing the Domestic Wind Energy Industry”USC Schwarzenegger Institute: California’s Offshore Wind Electricity OpportunityCanary: Could the US lead​​ the world in floating offshore wind? Canary: California offshore wind could save billions and help prevent blackouts. What’s holding it back?Axios: Biden plan expected to include at least $500B for climate
Policy debates on Capitol Hill today fit into a bigger political picture. In Part 2 of this conversation with David Roberts, hosts Julia Pyper, Brandon Hurlbut, and Shane Skelton talk about political sentiments, campaign messaging, and things Democrats don’t want to hear — as well as asymmetry in the media landscape and its impact on electoral politics today.Plus, David shares what he’s genuinely excited about when it comes to clean energy technology and how Illinois recently passed a big, bold climate bill that offers a new model for the nation. David Roberts is the founder and writer of the newsletter Volts, host of the podcast by the same name, and Editor-At-Large at Canary Media. Check out Part 1 of this conversation on last week's episode. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary: The unstoppably good news about clean energyCanary: Illinois’ new climate bill is ambitious, justice-focused and a model for the nationNYT: David Shor Is Telling Democrats What They Don’t Want to Hear
David Roberts is worried. Democrats have control of the House, Senate and the White House and an opportunity to pass bold climate policy and political reform — perhaps their last opportunity for a long time — but are stuck in political gridlock. The stakes are high, with procedural deadlines and the COP26 global climate summit looming. On this episode, Julia Pyper, Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton speak to clean energy and politics reporter David Roberts about the state of play in Washington D.C. and why he’s both anxious and (surprisingly) optimistic. Roberts is the founder and writer of the newsletter Volts, host of the podcast by the same name, and Editor-At-Large at Canary Media. Part 2 of this conversation will air on the podcast feed next week! Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Politico: Dem tension keeps spiking ahead of make-or-break 3 weeksCanary: What’s in the latest version of House Dems’ proposed clean energy legislation?Axios: Pondering Biden's Plan(et) BVolts: The most important job ahead for DemocratsMSNBC: All In with Chris Hayes, 10/12/21
With several major deadlines looming, U.S. lawmakers remain divided on how to move forward with the bipartisan infrastructure bill and Democrats’ larger $3.5 billion spending package — both of which contain critical funding and programs to fight climate change and promote clean energy. At the same time, Congress must immediately pass a spending package to avoid a government shutdown. Also (because there isn't enough going on) lawmakers must act quickly to raise the debt limit, with the nation’s borrowing authority set to expire on October 18, which would be devastating for the U.S. economy.On this episode of Political Climate, hosts Julia Pyper, Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton discuss the rifts on Capitol Hill and what to expect from Congress in the coming days. Plus, they talk through some of the most significant commitments made by governments and the private sector during Climate Week NYC — a stepping stone to the UN’s COP26 climate summit.Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:The Guardian: Fate of Biden’s economic agenda at stake as House faces crucial voteCNN: Why we're willing to put our votes on the line for the Build Back Better ActNYT: Biden Administration Makes First Major Move to Regulate Greenhouse GasesCanary Media: Climate Week NYC 2021
Comments (3)

Dan Herscher

Really appreciate the board nature of this podcast and the willingness of both co-hosts to respectfully consider the others thoughts and change their minds. the playful banter is also amusing. Refreshing to hear friendship from politically opposite people.

Mar 12th
Reply

Zach Lawton

Absolutely great interview! Need more vocal Republicans that support stewardship for the environment and fight against pollution

Apr 25th
Reply

Ed Johnson

We should hold Nancy peloci and the dems accountable for her actions and non actions. By holding her personall liable for the violent crimes that illegal immigrants commit in our country moving forward? maybe shell open her eyes then and quit playing games. By hitting her in her pocket book...

Jan 4th
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