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(Part 2) In January 2015, Martin and Teresa Van Breda were enjoying having their oldest son, 22 year old Rudi home from university in Australia. The family’s other two children, 20 year old Henri and 16 year old Marli, also lived with their parents in the town of Stellenbosch in the south west of South Africa. Marli was nearing the end of her high school education. Like Rudi, Henri had also been studying in Australia, but dropped out of university and moved back home in 2014, to take a ‘gap year’ to reconsider his plans.Like many upper middle class South Africans, the family lived in a secure, gated, luxury housing estate. For all its beauty and cultural diversity, the risks associated with both visiting and living in South Africa are oftentimes confronting. The country is known for its high rates of violent crime, including murder, rape, carjacking, robbery and home invasions. Violent crimes such as home invasions occur not just at night, but at all hours of the day. Many intruders prefer to break into homes when occupants are home, so they can readily hand over concealed valuables while any alarms are deactivated. For many privileged families, opting to live in a gated community with 24 hour security provides reassurance that the risk of home invasions is minimal. Most of the time, that is.CW: family violence, drug use-Visit us online at obscuracrimepodcast.com-Support Obscura on Patreon and unlock the exclusive Black Label episodes: www.patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcastEpisode Sponsors: Match with a licensed therapist when you go to Talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code OBSCURA
In January 2015, Martin and Teresa Van Breda were enjoying having their oldest son, 22 year old Rudi home from university in Australia. The family’s other two children, 20 year old Henri and 16 year old Marli, also lived with their parents in the town of Stellenbosch in the south west of South Africa. Marli was nearing the end of her high school education. Like Rudi, Henri had also been studying in Australia, but dropped out of university and moved back home in 2014, to take a ‘gap year’ to reconsider his plans.Like many upper middle class South Africans, the family lived in a secure, gated, luxury housing estate. For all its beauty and cultural diversity, the risks associated with both visiting and living in South Africa are oftentimes confronting. The country is known for its high rates of violent crime, including murder, rape, carjacking, robbery and home invasions. Violent crimes such as home invasions occur not just at night, but at all hours of the day. Many intruders prefer to break into homes when occupants are home, so they can readily hand over concealed valuables while any alarms are deactivated. For many privileged families, opting to live in a gated community with 24 hour security provides reassurance that the risk of home invasions is minimal. Most of the time, that is.CW: family violence, drug use-Visit us online at obscuracrimepodcast.com-Support Obscura on Patreon and unlock the exclusive Black Label episodes: www.patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcastEpisode Sponsors: Get key nutrients without the BS. Ritual is offering Obscura listeners 10% off during your first 3 months. Visit Ritual.com/obscura to start your Ritual today.
In late 2018, James Gargasoulas was found guilty of six counts of murder, for running down pedestrians almost 2 years earlier in Melbourne’s Bourke Street mall during the busy lunch hour. Questions had been raised as to whether James would be fit to stand trial based on a subsequent mental health diagnosis and his long history of frequent drug use. Thankfully for the victims’ families, justice had been done. Partly, anyway. But they had no way of knowing how James’ mental health and other mitigating factors would affect his sentence. At the same time, the victims’ families had another fight on their hands. Victoria Police were now firmly in the glare of the media spotlight over their questionable judgement and decision making in the 12 hours leading up to the massacre - key decisions which failed to result in James being arrested for earlier stabbing his brother. But it was uncertain whether senior police would be held accountable by the coroner for how their critical incident management protocols did - or didn’t - protect the public when it mattered. US National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7233 (24 hours). -Visit us online at obscuracrimepodcast.com-Support Obscura on Patreon and unlock the exclusive Black Label episodes: www.patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcastEpisode Sponsors: Go to MyBillie.com/Obscura to get the BEST razor you will ever own while supporting this show!
Listen to this full Black Label episode by supporting Obscura on Patreon at www.patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcastWARNING: This episode contains details of child abuse
On 20 January 2017, during the typically busy lunch hour in the Melbourne CBD, 27 year old James Gargasoulas drove along the footpath of multiple blocks of Bourke Street, killing six unsuspecting people and injuring many more. The aftermath of his rampage left the people of Melbourne stunned and grieving. As details of the lead up to the carnage emerged, the public and victims’ families were outraged. Police had been tailing James for 12 hours before the massacre, as he taunted them and led law enforcement on a wild goose chase around the suburbs after stabbing his brother. The big question was, why hadn’t he been arrested sooner when numerous opportunities were available? Media reports soon revealed that James was a repeat violent offender who was out on bail when he ploughed through the city crowds, and answers were demanded as to why. How could the bail system be so fallible as to allow someone so dangerous back onto the streets? But that wasn’t the only concern. As court proceedings commenced, victims and survivors were anxious at the prospect that the man who had destroyed their lives may not even be found fit to stand trial at all.US National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7233 (24 hours)-Visit us online at obscuracrimepodcast.com-Support Obscura on Patreon and unlock the exclusive Black Label episodes: www.patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast
Welcome listener to Season 3, I'm glad you made it. I will have a new episode for you every other week so I hope you're ready to join me by the fire.(Part 1) On 20 January 2017, office workers and tourists were among the throngs of people making their way through Bourke Street Mall amidst the lunch hour hustle and bustle of the Melbourne CBD. But the sunny summer’s day was rudely disrupted by the sound of tires skidding and police sirens blaring. In less than a minute, 27 year old James Gargasoulas had driven along the footpath multiple blocks of Bourke Street, wreaking havoc and creating a terror amongst Melbourne citizens, the fallout of which lingers today. During his rampage, James killed six people, including a three month old baby, and injured many more. But this wasn’t the most shocking aspect of what occurred. James was a repeat violent offender, and was on bail when he ploughed through the city crowds. The cascade of events culminating in what can only be described as utter carnage, led to painful questions. How safe was the Melbourne public in the course of going about their business? And how could they trust that those tasked with keeping them safe - the police - could protect them and their city when it mattered?US National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7233 (24 hours)Support the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast -- This month when you become a Black Label patron you will enter for a chance to win an exclusive hand made tumbler that is full of newspaper clippings of some of the most infamous serial killers being caught!Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comEpisode Sponsors: Go to MyBillie.com/Obscura to get the BEST razor you will ever own while supporting this show!
S2E29: Quick Cuts

S2E29: Quick Cuts

2021-05-0136:37

Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Neutral Bay’s commercial centre is Military Road. One of the busiest arterial roads on the lower north shore, it’s the main gateway to Sydney’s picturesque and world renowned northern beaches. The most popular and historic commercial establishment in Neutral Bay is The Oaks Hotel which opened in 1885. As the social hub of the suburb, The Oaks is an institution where lower north shore residents relax, celebrate, or enjoy a quiet drink. It’s certainly not a place locals go, expecting to not make it home.Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
In Adelaide and around the southern coastline, residents and tourists alike flock to the pristine beaches that offer some respite from the sweltering heat. But if you drive north of the city, the landscape is a different story. Leaving the outskirts of the city, the historic bluestone buildings give way to suburban and industrial sprawl. Aside from the wheat fields, the terrain further inland quickly becomes desolate and harsh. The grass - where there is any - is brown, not green.As you travel along the straight, flat road, the distance between towns becomes greater, and in between there is no sign of human life as far as the eye can see. If you’re unfamiliar with the area, the remoteness of this part of the state seems like the middle of nowhere, and it’s easy to feel completely cut off from civilisation. And while red dirt and flat plains stretch for miles all the way to the horizon, whether in the pitch black of night or the blazing heat of a mid-summers day, there is nowhere to run if you need to make a hasty escape from something. Or someone. In the dead of night, the only light to show the way is the moon overhead. With no one around for miles, the silence is deafening.Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
The chilly midwinter morning of 11 January 1992 in southern Indiana was shaping up to be ideal for quail hunting. At around 10:45am on the outskirts of Jefferson Proving Ground just outside the town of Madison, two brothers caught sight of something off the side of Lemon Road as they drove along. The men jumped out of their pickup and walked through an isolated open field toward what looked like a department store mannequin laying on the ground. It was a strange location to stumble upon something so out of place. But as the men moved closer, their confusion turned to horror...Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
In April 2017, following some months of debate, Charlottesville voted to remove the statue of Robert E Lee. But this stalled in early May, when a temporary injunction issued by the court prohibited the removal of the statue for another 6 months. By this time, the city’s former Lee Park had become the preferred venue for various neo-Confederate and far right wing political groups to hold public events in Charlottesville. This included demonstrations protesting the removal of the statues. These protests were met with peaceful resistance from anti-racism counter-protestors, but tensions between the two groups usually escalated. Attempts to keep them separated weren’t always successful, and intervention by law enforcement only served to further incite backlash from both sides. It’s against this socio-political backdrop that today’s story unfolded.Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
In April 2017, following some months of debate, Charlottesville voted to remove the statue of Robert E Lee. But this stalled in early May, when a temporary injunction issued by the court prohibited the removal of the statue for another 6 months. By this time, the city’s former Lee Park had become the preferred venue for various neo-Confederate and far right wing political groups to hold public events in Charlottesville. This included demonstrations protesting the removal of the statues. These protests were met with peaceful resistance from anti-racism counter-protestors, but tensions between the two groups usually escalated. Attempts to keep them separated weren’t always successful, and intervention by law enforcement only served to further incite backlash from both sides. It’s against this socio-political backdrop that today’s story unfolded.Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
What you’re about to hear didn’t happen all that long ago. Unfortunately for the victim in today’s story, more extensive legislative protection came too late for what transpired one unusually hot June in east Texas. But it proved to be the catalyst for much-needed reform when it comes to prosecuting hate crimes, and for taking a small step towards attempting to address pervasive and entrenched racism. And as we know, we still have a long, long way to go. Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
One adolescent rite of passage where many of these key memories are formed - both good and bad - is parties. For many of us, parties during our teenage years often marked the many ‘firsts’ in a young persons’ life. The first time we could drive after getting our licence. Our first kiss. The first time we experiment with cigarettes, alcohol or harder drugs. For many teens, it’s their first encounter with sex. Unfortunately for some girls, that encounter isn’t always consensual, but instead traumatic. In those situations, we’d like to think that if we, or someone we knew, was raped or sexually assaulted at a party, the person responsible would be ejected and police contacted. Sadly, we know that in reality that doesn’t happen for a range of reasons. It’s cold comfort, but on those occasions, we hope that police will be contacted in the days following the attack, in an attempt to bring the assailant to justice. But that can only happen if the survivor makes it home from the party in the first place. Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
In 1973, three brutal murders were carried out along Interstate 57 in Illinois. The man responsible, with three accomplices, was Henry Brisbon. He was just 17-years-old. Henry Brisbon has been called the poster child for capital punishment. He is a man whose violent history has left a trail of destruction behind him. This story is about the lives he destroyed.Visit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
CW: Homophobic Slurs, Rape, Hate CrimesWriter: Gemma HarrisPerhaps you already know this story - or think you do. But as you’ll hear, what happened just outside a town in the midwest state of Wyoming on a chilly fall night in the late 1990s, had haunting parallels with coyote hanging. What started as a grisly warning would become the catalyst for a watershed movement nationwide. One that would see the LGBTQ community finally make a breakthrough when it came to breaking down bigotry and prejudice.Listener, if anything in today’s story has raised any issues for you, or if someone you know needs help, you can contact the LGBT National Hotline in the United States and Canada on 1 888 843 4564 for confidential support. Canada - Trans Lifeline 877 330 6366UK - Switchboard Helpline 0300 330 0630Australia - Qlife 1800 184 527 If you’d like to support the valuable ongoing work of the Matthew Shepard Foundation by making a tax deductible donation: www.matthewshepard.orgVisit us online at ObscuraCrimePodcast.comCheckout our other podcasts at itsArcLightMedia.comSupport the Obscura podcast and access the exclusive Black Label episodes by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/obscuracrimepodcast(Sources can be found on our website)
Comments (228)

Cristina Corales

Did Rene really believe all that BS? That is the worst soap opera I’ve ever heard.

Nov 29th
Reply

Megan

this guy was probably a very dangerous husband to live with, too.

Nov 26th
Reply

Hannah Bradley

this 911 dispatcher is infuriating. 🤦🏻‍♀️

Nov 8th
Reply

Dave Schwartz

Personal opinion I suppose but this wasn't entertaining in the slightest. I guess I don't quite see the point of having multiple Podcasters reading their own pre written stories with zero amount of their own personality included. Not trying to sound grumpy, but if you feel like you're missing out on something by not listening to these, you'd be mistaken. Pretty easily skippable. 🤷

Nov 2nd
Reply

Robert Plunkett

fantastic podcast. need more black label though

Oct 13th
Reply (1)

Timmy Beasley

so I guess this show is no longer a thing. been a long time.

Oct 4th
Reply

Bexxx

omg...this 911 operator is driving me nuts. Too many comments to post about her but she's painful to listen to. LOVE THIS PODCAST THOUGH!!!

Sep 22nd
Reply

yoyo

weirdo

Sep 21st
Reply

Meg666

Nasty ass pieces of shit pedophiles definitely have a special place reserved for them in hell! People like this disgusting shit eater Nick, should straight up just be Dr. Kevorkian’d…they’re BEYOND help and are a HUGE danger to society!! #legalizeapurge

Sep 15th
Reply

Tara Lacey

Distressing to listen to! My heart was breaking for him

Aug 19th
Reply

Minnich

Just a note on the Wesbecker episode. Prozac is the only reason I am still alive today and the reason I am a recovering addict rather than an active addict. If it wasn’t for this medicine, I would likely be dead by drugs or my own hand.

May 8th
Reply

Bexxx

Is it just me, or is the audio weird on this one?

Apr 27th
Reply (1)

Jay-Tee Taylor

do you do this podcast anymore?

Mar 31st
Reply

Megan

unreal. who did these mean and nasty women f$%^ to get their jobs? who did they blow?

Mar 17th
Reply (3)

Alley🇨🇦Katz

Justin. Someone's cut off your balls. I can't listen to you reading off a page with the enthusiasm of a slug. Once loyal ...now unsubscribed

Mar 7th
Reply

Tim Beasley

recommend 911 calls with the operator if you like to listen to 911 calls. great podcast and also sometimes they trash talk about the 911 operator that answers the phone. highly recommend!

Nov 17th
Reply

Lynzi

anybody else want to throw their phone against the wall listening to the emergency call operator?! GAHHH **ripping hair out in frustration

Nov 1st
Reply

yoyo

the suspect had a delicious dessert in his hand?? lol

Oct 26th
Reply

yoyo

jeez, the emergency operator is a complete loser!!!! moron

Oct 26th
Reply

Mojo Jojo

The reason they changed the protocol in Australia with regards to police chases is that the public got sick and tired of innocent motorists being caught up in the chase and losing their lives. As an Aussie myself, I’m glad they changed it.

Sep 25th
Reply
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