Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
If a state government agency wants to avoid complying with N.C. law, it might be able to accomplish its goal through a collusive lawsuit settlement. But state lawmakers could take steps this year to strike back against those settlements. Andy Jackson, director of the Civitas Center for Public Integrity at the John Locke Foundation, explains why the General Assembly should address the issue. The recent addition of Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court has revived discussion of the legal concept of originalism. One ongoing debate among constitutional theorists involves the importance of court precedents for originalists like Barrett. That topic sparked a recent online forum sponsored by the Duke law school’s Federalist Society. Featured speaker Randy Barnett, constitutional law professor at Georgetown University, explained how originalists can and should respond to precedents. Gov. Roy Cooper set up a bipartisan group last year to examine health care access issues. During a recent meeting, John Locke Foundation health care expert Jordan Roberts discussed alternatives to the governor’s preferred policy option: Medicaid expansion. Free trade has faced attacks in recent years from high-profile leaders of both major political parties. Even those who support free trade diverge about how to put that support into practice. Donald Boudreaux, economics professor at George Mason University, contrasts free-trade “multilateralists” and “unilateralists.” He explained the difference during a featured presentation to the Classical Liberals of the Carolinas. After nearly 18 years of weekly programs, Carolina Journal Radio is signing off the air. As the John Locke Foundation and Civitas Institute combine forces to create a new major force in North Carolina’s freedom-forward movement, the new organization will promote its ideas in new ways and through new media platforms. Co-host Donna Martinez has been with Carolina Journal Radio since its earliest days. Mitch Kokai joined the show in 2005, roughly 2 1/2 years into the program’s run. As Martinez and Kokai end the program, they offer listeners new ideas for keeping up with insightful analysis of North Carolina’s top political and public policy stories.
Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson could present very different messages to N.C. voters and taxpayers in the years ahead. The two men previewed a divergent path during their public swearing-in ceremonies in Raleigh. While Cooper complained about the COVID-19 pandemic, racism, unaffordable health care, and unequal opportunity, Robinson emphasized the state’s successes. He pointed to his own story as North Carolina’s first black lieutenant governor. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, assesses the contrast between Cooper and Robinson. Prospective Asian-American students sued the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill over its admissions policies. The suit came as no surprise to Kenny Xu, a political commentator and author of An Inconvenient Minority. The book documents similar race discrimination lawsuits challenging admissions policies at Ivy League schools. Xu shares highlights from his work. He compares the Ivy League story with the situation at Chapel Hill. State Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Newby has taken his oath as the top officer in North Carolina’s judicial branch of government. During his first speech as chief justice, Newby shared details of his judicial philosophy. He also explained why court personnel need to work hard to reopen courtrooms in the wake of COVID-19. Major N.C. universities have problems with pervasive sex discrimination. But it’s not the type of discrimination you might expect when you hear those words. Adam Kissel, former deputy assistant secretary for higher education programs at U.S. Department of Education, documented the problem in a recent report. Kissel shares highlights of the report prepared for the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal. The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges since last spring for parents of school-age children in North Carolina. Some of them turned to “learning pods” to help address students’ struggles with online learning. Terry Stoops, director of the Center for Effective Education at the John Locke Foundation, assesses families’ experience with learning pods and other innovations sparked by COVID-19.
From extended COVID-19 shutdowns to unexpected government fines, owners of alcohol-related businesses in North Carolina have faced special challenges in the past year. John Trump, Carolina Journal managing editor, recaps some of the industry’s key concerns. Bar owners and operators across North Carolina filed lawsuits just before the Christmas holiday. The suits challenge the executive orders Gov. Roy Cooper has used during the COVID-19 pandemic to keep bars shuttered. Jessica Thompson, attorney with the Pacific Legal Foundation, discusses the suit she filed on behalf of owners of a popular Greenville bar. It has been closed for more than nine months because of government mandates. The U.S. House of Representatives recently voted to decriminalize marijuana. Among those objected: U.S. Rep. Dan Bishop, R-9th District. During a speech on the House floor, Bishop outlined his concerns about potential negative consequences of changing marijuana’s legal status. Voters selected Mark Robinson to serve as North Carolina’s first black lieutenant governor. The second-highest-ranking office in state government’s executive branch marks Robinson’s first job as an elected official. During a recent online forum for the John Locke Foundation, Robinson highlighted his top priorities for his new role. The head of North Carolina’s Department of Environmental Quality, Secretary Michael Regan, has been nominated to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President-elect Joe Biden. Former DEQ Secretary Donald van der Vaart, now a John Locke Foundation senior fellow, discusses Regan’s potential impact at the EPA. Van der Vaart also discusses his own reappointment to the EPA’s Science Advisory Board.
After a month of uncertainty, Republican Paul Newby emerged as the eventual winner of the N.C. Supreme Court chief justice’s election, unseating incumbent Democrat Cheri Beasley. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, assesses Newby’s likely impact as the leader of the state’s highest court and top officer in North Carolina’s judicial branch. American history has faced attacks in recent years. But a textbook titled Land of Hope aims to renew interest in the traditional story of American greatness. Author Wilfred McClay, professor in the history of liberty at the University of Oklahoma, explains why he decided to set his scholarly work aside and focus instead on a book for a school-age audience. COVID-19 will continue to present challenges for the University of North Carolina System throughout the rest of the academic year. UNC President Peter Hans delivered a recent status report on plans for conducting spring semester classes at campuses across the state. Voters selected Catherine Truitt as North Carolina’s new superintendent of public instruction. During a recent online forum for the John Locke Foundation, Truitt discussed her priorities. At the top of the list: helping public schools cope with the disruption linked to the coronavirus pandemic. Voters also placed another new face on the statewide elected Council of State: Labor Commissioner Josh Dobson. Having worked with Dobson during his days as a state legislator, Becki Gray, John Locke Foundation senior vice president, discusses his approach to his new role. Gray also outlines some of Dobson’s top priorities, including protection of the state’s right-to-work status.
The N.C. Association of Educators teachers union has been vocal about keeping brick-and-mortar schools closed to students during the COVID-19 pandemic. That’s despite the evidence of major learning loss. The union stance also ignores scientific arguments in favor of returning students to classrooms. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, explores NCAE’s opposition to restoring classroom instruction. The N.C. General Assembly is likely to debate law enforcement reforms as the year moves forward. State lawmakers might want to consult Colorado for clues about avoiding bad reform proposals. John Cooke, assistant Republican leader in the Colorado state Senate and husband of John Locke Foundation CEO Amy Cooke, discusses his western state’s recent experience with law enforcement reform legislation. JLF marks a new milestone in the new year. The 30-year-old foundation and the 15-year-old Civitas Institute are joining forces. They are merging capabilities of the state’s top free-market groups. Amy Cooke and Civitas President and CEO Donald Bryson explain why they decided to work together in one single group. Today’s political scene is plagued by too many episodes of grandstanding. Brandon Warmke, assistant philosophy professor at Bowling Green State University, details the problem in a recent book. He shared themes from his work during a recent online presentation for the John Locke Foundation. Gov. Roy Cooper has used emergency powers repeatedly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, believes Cooper has exceeded his constitutional authority in using emergency powers. Guze is urging policymakers to rein in Cooper’s actions by amending the state Emergency Management Act.
As we look forward to a new year, Carolina Journal Radio reviews some of the most interesting topics from 2020. Amy Coney Barrett has joined the U.S. Supreme Court as its 115th justice. She has said her judicial philosophy mirrors that of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, and supporters characterize her as an originalist. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s record. He discusses the new justice’s likely impact on the nation’s highest court. As Democratic presidential candidate, Joe Biden relied on advice from U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, known popularly as AOC, in developing policies related to energy and the environment. John Locke Foundation CEO Amy O. Cooke, “The Right AOC,” explains why the other AOC’s policy proposals would be wrong for America. COVID-19 has created challenges for everyone, including leaders of the University of North Carolina System. President Peter Hans recently briefed his Board of Governors on budget and access issues linked to the pandemic. If you follow the U.S. Supreme Court and constitutional law, you’ve likely heard the term “originalism.” Until recently, it’s been hard to find a book-length introduction to the concept. Ilan Wurman, visiting assistant professor at Arizona State University’s law school, attempts to fill that gap with the book A Debt Against The Living. Wurman explains why he wrote an introduction to originalism. He also shares its key themes. North Carolina taxpayers would pay the price if the state changes its law against public-sector collective bargaining. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, highlights a new report that tallies the potential costs.
The COVID-19 pandemic has produced both health and economic consequences. A new “misery index” attempts to document how those consequences have played out in states across the country. Joseph Coletti, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, explains why he developed the index. He explains how North Carolina compares to neighboring states and others throughout the United States. Gov. Roy Cooper set up a new bipartisan group to focus on health insurance coverage. The governor is focusing on one aspect of coverage: Medicaid expansion. But lawmakers from both sides of the political aisle want to turn attention to other issues, including relaxation of harmful government regulations. You’ll hear highlights from their comments during the group’s first meeting. Fresh off his re-election win, U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., returned to Capitol Hill for a hearing on potential new regulation of Big Tech companies. You’ll hear Tillis question Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg. The General Assembly could consider law enforcement reforms in 2021. But a draft report of potential reforms produced mixed reviews during a recent hearing. You’ll learn why some lawmakers are concerned that the report’s ideas would harm law enforcement. Others believe the report will lead to little positive change. North Carolina’s teacher turnover numbers continue to improve. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, places the numbers into context.
We still haven’t heard the final word on the 2020 election, but some observers are already looking ahead to North Carolina’s next big electoral contest. Voters will replace Republican Richard Burr in the U.S. Senate in 2022. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, analyzes early announcements and speculation about a contest that could have a major impact on partisan control of Congress’ upper chamber. The federal government will look different under President-elect Joe Biden next year than it does now under President Trump. But some parts of the government will carry on without much change even as the White House sees a major shakeup. Jim Copland, senior fellow and director of legal policy at the Manhattan Institute, devotes a recent book, The Unelected, to the powerful people who play major roles in government decisions regardless of election results. Copland recently highlighted themes from the book in an online presentation for the John Locke Foundation. People of all political persuasions can agree that the 2020 election turned into a mess. Robert Natelson, a constitutional law expert and former Montana gubernatorial candidate, says one reason for the problem is that government officials ignored a key provision in the U.S. Constitution. During a recent episode of the John Locke Foundation’s “HeadLocke” podcast, Natelson shared his concerns. He also offered ideas for improving the current system. The U.S. Supreme Court recently welcomed Amy Coney Barrett as its newest justice. Campbell Law School constitutional expert Greg Wallace recently assessed Barrett’s likely impact on the high court during a presentation for the John Locke Foundation. Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper starts his second term in 2021. He’ll be forced to deal with the same Republican leaders of the N.C. House and Senate who led those chambers during Cooper’s first term. That arrangement could mean two more years of budget gridlock. Or all parties could try to find new areas of compromise. Becki Gray, John Locke Foundation senior vice president, discusses the prospects for cooperation or continued stalemates over the budget and other key issues.
North Carolina welcomes a new state superintendent of public instruction in 2021. Republican Catherine Truitt will take the job after serving as leader of the online-only Western Governors University in this state. Truitt also served as former Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s top education adviser. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and resident scholar, assesses Truitt’s top priorities in her job at the head of the N.C. Department of Public Instruction. Mention the word “environmentalism,” and many people will think of left-of-center activists who oppose development, energy exploration, and other economic activity. But a recent article in the magazine National Review advocated a conservative form of environmentalism. Donald van der Vaart, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, discusses the pros and cons of the arguments put forward in the leading conservative magazine. The new year will generate new congressional and legislative election maps for North Carolina. During a recent news conference, N.C. House Speaker Tim Moore, R-Cleveland, rebutted myths about the impact of election maps during the past decade. Moore also offered clues about the type of mapmaking process he will support in 2021. Though Democrats came up short this fall, they continue to work toward turning North Carolina as blue as possible politically. Scott Walter, president of the Capital Research Center, discussed Democrats’ strategy during a recent online presentation for the John Locke Foundation. You’ll hear highlights from his remarks. When Moore bangs the gavel on the opening day of the 2021 legislative session, he will tie a state record. Only two other men have been elected to four terms as state House speaker. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, highlights some key priorities Moore has mentioned for the new session that starts in January.
There’s an urgent need to return N.C. public school students to in-person instruction. That’s the message Terry Stoops hopes to send. The John Locke Foundation’s vice president for research and director of education studies explains why the science and data suggest that school kids face much more danger of long-lasting negative effects if they remain stuck in forced online learning. Republicans will maintain control of both chambers of the N.C. General Assembly in 2021. After winning key elections this month, state Senate leader Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, and House Speaker Tim Moore, R-Cleveland, offered their reactions to voters’ decisions. Berger and Moore also discussed key issues likely to crop up in next year’s legislative session. COVID-19 has created challenges for everyone, including leaders of the University of North Carolina System. President Peter Hans recently briefed his Board of Governors on budget and access issues linked to the pandemic. The coronavirus has caused headaches for groups working to help military veterans find jobs in the civilian world. During a recent online presentation hosted by the John Locke Foundation, Kimberly Williams of the group North Carolina for Military Employment, NC4ME, discussed COVID-19’s impact on her group’s operations. Some national Democrats are pushing for presumptive President-elect Joe Biden to push a plan for packing the U.S. Supreme Court with new liberal justices. Brenée Goforth of the John Locke Foundation discusses the history of the court-packing debate. She explains why the idea is just as bad now as it was when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt proposed a similar scheme in the 1930s.
Elections for president, U.S. Senate, and governor grabbed the headlines. But North Carolinians addressed many other items during the recent election, including local referendums on issues such as taxes, bonds, and alcohol. Joseph Coletti, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, analyzes the results of local referendum votes across the state. While Democrat Joe Biden has declared victory in the presidential race, President Trump appeared to claim North Carolina’s electoral votes. Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper won re-election, but Republicans secured significant victories in other statewide races. In an online forum nearly one week after Election Day, GOP political consultant Jonathan Felts and Democratic counterpart Brad Crone assessed state and federal election results for a John Locke Foundation audience. You’ll hear highlights. COVID-19 has presented plenty of economic challenges, especially for those who lost their jobs in government shutdowns tied to the pandemic. During a JLF online forum, Ryan Ray of Jobs for Life discussed ongoing job-related challenges linked to the coronavirus. The COVID-19 pandemic has created special challenges — and opportunities — for cities across the country. Co-founder Greg Brooks of the Better Cities Project discussed recently for a JLF audience his group’s efforts to address important issues tied to the life-altering pandemic. With Cooper winning re-election, he’s likely to continue pushing counterproductive energy and environmental policies, Donald van der Vaart, John Locke Foundation senior fellow and former secretary of North Carolina’s Department of Environmental Quality, previews Cooper’s likely approach to energy and the environment in a second term.
Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper will serve a second term as North Carolina state government’s chief executive officer. But voters have added three new Republicans to the group of elected executives making up the Council of State. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, discusses Cooper’s re-election victory, the historic election of Mark Robinson as North Carolina’s first African-American lieutenant governor, and two other newcomers among the council of statewide elected officials. A legislative watchdog group believes North Carolina can help clean up government finances by giving new authority to internal auditors. You’ll learn details of the proposed reform, along with reaction from State Auditor Beth Wood. A former Wake County register of deeds who pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $900,000 from taxpayers has been fighting to keep her government retirement benefits. The N.C. Court of Appeals recently ruled against Laura Riddick in her court fight with the N.C. State Treasurer’s office. You’ll hear highlights from Appeals Court Judge John Tyson’s grilling of Riddick’s lawyer. The number of people with a basic understanding of America’s constitutional system of government is surprisingly low. A group called Constituting America aims to correct the problem. During a recent online forum for the John Locke Foundation, students associated with the group explained why they wanted to help their peers learn more about the nation’s governing document. Republicans will continue to lead both chambers of North Carolina’s General Assembly in 2021. Becki Gray, John Locke Foundation senior vice president, discusses the implications for taxes and spending, school choice, regulations, and other important public policies. She’ll also talk about the legislature’s potential areas of cooperation and competition with Gov. Roy Cooper.
Amy Coney Barrett has joined the U.S. Supreme Court as its 115th justice. She has said her judicial philosophy mirrors that of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, and supporters characterize her as an originalist. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s record. He discusses the new justice’s likely impact on the nation’s highest court. Those who want to reform higher education ought to look at governing boards. That’s a key piece of advice in a recent report from the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal. Report author Jay Schalin, the center’s director of policy analysis, explain how trustees and UNC System governors can play a critical role in improving colleges and universities. During the recent confirmation hearings for Justice Amy Coney Barrett, North Carolina’s junior U.S. senator secured a national spotlight. In addition to his questions for Barrett, Republican Sen. Thom Tillis shared his concerns about pressing national issues such as crime and health care. You’ll hear highlights from his remarks. The latest round of state-level COVID-19 relief featured provisions focusing on small businesses. You’ll hear part of the state Senate’s debate over the best ways to boost small businesses in the wake of the pandemic. COVID-19 has had major impacts on public school enrollment across North Carolina. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, discusses the enrollment numbers on local school systems’ responses to the changes.
The races for president, governor, and U.S. Senate have been dominating N.C. headlines. But voters are making other important decisions in the next week. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, assesses recent developments in races for offices such as lieutenant governor, superintendent of public instruction, state treasurer, and labor commissioner. North Carolina’s popular Opportunity Scholarship program faces a new legal challenge. Plaintiffs challenging the scholarships are tied to the N.C. Association of Educators teachers union. Corey DeAngelis, director of school choice at the libertarian Reason Foundation, analyzed the suit during a recent online forum. North Carolina’s junior U.S. senator secured a national audience during the recent confirmation hearings for a new Supreme Court justice. You’ll hear highlights from Sen. Thom Tillis’ opening remarks in the hearing for Judge Amy Coney Barrett. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause complications for businesses in North Carolina, especially businesses like private bars that have been prohibited from reopening. Zack Medford, founder and president of the N.C. Bar and Tavern Association, recently discussed COVID-19 challenges during an online presentation for the John Locke Foundation. The same online audience also heard a broader perspective on coronavirus-related business uncertainty from Gary Salamido, president and CEO of the NC Chamber. The pandemic also has negative effects on students’ ability to learn material in school. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, explores the learning loss linked to COVID-19 school shutdowns.
Debate about the COVID-19 pandemic has featured plenty of data involving case numbers, deaths, and hospitalizations. Dig into the details, and you learn that the numbers might not be as useful as they first appear. They might even portray a misleading picture. Jon Sanders, John Locke Foundation director of regulatory studies, discusses key aspects of his research into key COVID-19 numbers. Americans are paying much more attention to China these days, largely because of that country’s role in the pandemic. Part of the discussion involves American trade with China. Scott Lincicome, senior fellow in economic studies at the Cato Institute, challenges one popular narrative surrounding trade with China. He shares highlights from his research. One reason voters should pay attention to this year’s N.C. Supreme Court elections involves school choice. A lawsuit challenging the state’s popular Opportunity Scholarship program is heading to a trial court. Most experts expect the case to head eventually to the state Supreme Court, which upheld the scholarships by a 4-3 vote in 2015. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, explains why the new lawsuit should raise concerns for school choice supporters. One of the state’s top government watchdogs recently retired. You’ll hear highlights from John Turcotte’s last meeting as head of the General Assembly’s internal Program Evaluation Division. If North Carolina moves forward with Medicaid expansion, ends its ban on collective bargaining, and adopts the types of spending increases Gov. Roy Cooper has proposed in his budget plans, the state budget could grow by 13%. That’s a key finding in a new report from John Locke Foundation Senior Fellow Joseph Coletti. Coletti discusses report and talks about the potential impact for taxpayers if North Carolina pursues ideas popular among Democratic policymakers and political candidates.
Federal taxpayers cannot afford another bailout of state and local governments. Joseph Coletti, the John Locke Foundation’s senior fellow, explains why in a column he co-wrote for TheHill.com. Coletti contends most state governments have fared better than expected during the COVID-19 pandemic. Throwing more money at them now would lead to waste while continuing to drive up the multitrillion-dollar federal debt. High-profile Democratic politicians have endorsed the Green New Deal. It’s billed as an environmental program, but the deal would extend government’s reach far beyond environmental policy. Kent Lassman, president of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discussed the Green New Deal’s potential impact during a recent online forum presented by the John Locke Foundation. U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., continues to ask questions about the federal government’s response to COVID-19. You’ll hear highlights from Burr’s recent appearance on Capitol Hill with experts such as Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Sticking to Capitol Hill, North Carolina’s other U.S. senator, Thom Tillis, took a break from the campaign trail to question former FBI Director James Comey. Tillis’ query focused on the controversial federal government investigation into Russian influence on the 2016 presidential election. N.C. voters will select three state Supreme Court justices this fall. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, highlights questions voters should ask about judicial elections as they prepare to cast their ballots.
Reaction to the nomination of federal Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court offers a reminder of progressives’ continuing attacks against the U.S. Constitution. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s nomination. He discusses the attacks Barrett faces because of her conservative jurisprudence. As the Supreme Court returns to action, Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute looks back at the court’s key rulings from its last term. Shapiro also discusses recent trends on the high court and looks ahead to major cases for the new term. The COVID-19 pandemic has raised plenty of questions about N.C. public schools, including the best way to address the problems of struggling students. State legislators recently discussed the topic during a debate about pandemic-related legislation. Gov. Roy Cooper is allowing public school systems across the state to reopen school buildings for elementary-age students. Middle and high schools remain shuttered for in-person instruction. During a recent news conference, mothers pleaded with Cooper to reopen all state public schools to students. You’ll hear highlights from their comments. North Carolina taxpayers would pay the price if the state changes its law against public-sector collective bargaining. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, highlights a new report that tallies the potential costs.
Gov. Roy Cooper and other advocates of Medicaid expansion in North Carolina argue consistently that expansion would not cost any state taxpayer dollars. A new analysis from the John Locke Foundation and the Ohio-based Buckeye Institute call that claim into question. A model based on enrollment estimates and Medicaid costs in expansion states suggests N.C. budget writers would face a gap of $119 million to $171 million to cover new Medicaid costs. Jordan Roberts, John Locke Foundation health care policy analyst, highlights key points from the new Medicaid expansion analysis. A Superior Court judge recently struck down Wilmington’s restrictions on vacation rental property. The court decision represents a victory for plaintiffs David and Peggy Schroeder. But it leaves unresolved constitutional claims raised by the Schroeders’ attorneys from the Institute for Justice. Before the ruling, IJ constitutional law fellow Adam Griffin explained why the group had taken the Schroeders’ case. U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., raised recent questions on Capitol Hill about the controversial investigation into Russian influence on the 2016 election. You’ll hear highlights from Tillis’ queries of former U.S. Justice Department official Sally Yates. A nurses union won a recent victory at Mission Health hospital in Asheville. The contest prompted a recent John Locke Foundation online forum about union activity in North Carolina. Among the speakers raising concerns about unions were state Rep. Sarah Stevens, R-Surry, Ray Starling of the NC Chamber, and nurse TiAngela Austin. North Carolina will make history in November when voters select the state’s first black lieutenant governor. Both Democratic nominee Yvonne Lewis Holley and Republican Mark Robinson are African-American. But they approach that fact in different ways. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, highlights key differences driving the lieutenant governor’s campaign.
The outcome of North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race could help determine which party controls the chamber for the next two years. Incumbent Republican Sen. Thom Tillis faces a tough challenge from Democrat Cal Cunningham. Carolina Journal Editor-in-Chief Rick Henderson analyzes recent developments in the hotly contested race. It’s safe to say N.C. colleges and universities did not reopen in the fall in the way they had expected. Some campuses welcomed students back, only to send them home again for online learning within a matter of weeks. Jenna Robinson, president of the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal, assesses university’s preparations for and responses to the challenges of reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic. Among the recent actions state lawmakers have taken to address COVID-19 is a $335 check to be sent to parents of school-aged children throughout the state. State Senate leader Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, explained the checks’ purpose during a recent news conference. In addition to higher education, COVID-19 has forced major changes for K-12 public education in North Carolina. During a recent online forum sponsored by the John Locke Foundation, state Sen. Deanna Ballard, R-Watauga, discussed key education challenges. Ballard explained legislative leaders approach to addressing public education issues during the pandemic. The N.C. Court of Appeals recently overturned a lower court and restored state constitutional amendments requiring a photo ID for voters and lowering the state’s cap on income tax rates. Voters had approved those measures during a statewide vote in 2018. Becki Gray, John Locke Foundation senior vice president, explains the significance of the split 2-1 ruling. She discusses the next steps for the court case that produced the ruling.
A Union County judge has approved a deal calling on the state of North Carolina to boost education spending by more than $400 million a year. It’s the first stage of a plan that would lead to billions of dollars of new spending. The money is tied to the long-running Leandro lawsuit. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, analyzes the latest developments in the quarter-century-old Leandro case. The N.C. Association of Educators teachers union is leading a lawsuit designed to kill the state’s Opportunity Scholarship program. But three families are going to court to intervene in the case. They want to defend the scholarship vouchers. Grandparent Janet Nunn explains why she’s working with the Institute for Justice to protect the vouchers. North Carolina and the rest of the United States recently celebrated the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which guaranteed women’s right to vote in elections. During a recent online forum, John Locke Foundation CEO Amy Cooke helped mark the anniversary. Cooke also shared her concerns about current political debates about women’s role in politics. COVID-19 has generated health care challenges across the country. During a recent online John Locke Foundation forum, North Carolinians heard expert analysis from Rea Hederman, vice president for policy at the Ohio-based Buckeye Institute. Hederman discussed state-level innovations that can lead to better health outcomes during the pandemic and afterward. The N.C. General Assembly recently approved a COVID-19 package totaling nearly $1 billion. They dubbed it the Coronavirus Relief Act 3.0. Joseph Coletti, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, explores the latest package’s pros and cons. He looks at the potential impact on the state’s long-term fiscal outlook.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store