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Road to Resilience
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Road to Resilience

Author: Mount Sinai Health System

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Stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the best experts in the world.
54 Episodes
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Theater of War

Theater of War

2020-11-1841:09

How can Ancient Greek tragedies help communities build resilience in the face of stress and trauma? Since 2009, Theater of War Productions has used this “ancient technology” to break cultures of silence and spark cathartic conversations. They've performed for soldiers, prison guards, front-line health workers, and many other audiences. In this interview, artistic director Bryan Doerries explains how each performance, which consists of a reading by A-list actors followed by a candid audience discussion, can open a door to healing.Theater of War Productions: https://theaterofwar.comUpcoming shows: https://theaterofwar.com/scheduleIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Over the past few months, physician assistants (PAs) at Mount Sinai have been engaged in a lively discussion about resilience. Their goal: To process their COVID-19 experience together and share strategies for managing feelings of stress, grief, and even guilt. In this episode, two PAs and a clinical social worker talk about why they joined the 11-week resilience workshop and what they’ve learned. Whether or not you’re a healthcare worker, there’s plenty of food for thought here.Links:Mount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthThe Office of Well-Being and ResilienceWell-Being ToolkitDepartment of PsychiatryNYC WELL“Psychological distress, coping behaviors, and preferences for support among New York healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic" (article)If you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Cancer is Me

Cancer is Me

2020-10-2123:10

Tanya Bhatia has had breast cancer for much of her adult life. Her first diagnosis, at age 23, took her by surprise and left her isolated and depressed. “I never wanted to have that experience again,” she recalls. So when her second diagnosis came, she chose to handle it differently. “I’m going to live my life, and I’ll just add chemo to my routine.” Now 33 years old and battling metastatic, triple-negative breast cancer, Tanya shares how she manages the “routine” of living with a life-threatening illness. It’s a fascinating conversation about coexisting with the knowledge that life is fragile and unpredictable.Links: Amy Tiersten, MD (Tanya’s Breast Oncologist)The Dubin Breast Center - Cancer TreatmentThe Tisch Cancer InstituteIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
It was a dark and stormy night … Judith Hunt, 80, slipped and fell rushing down a dark hallway. She wound up in the hospital with a broken hip. It was the beginning of a medical odyssey that would include heart surgery, bowel surgery, and a brush with COVID-19. In this episode, Judith talks about facing death with grit and gallows humor, and the small moments that made her recovery possible.Links: David A. Forsh, MD (Judith’s orthopedic surgeon)Malcolm Reid, MD, (Judith’s rehabilitation doctor)Yamilette Burgos-Quinones, MD (Judith’s rehabilitation doctor)Gabriele Di Luozzo, MD (Judith’s cardiologist)ABC 7 Story on JudithIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
As a teenager, figure skater Gracie Gold won two US National titles and an Olympic bronze medal. But then depression, anxiety, and an eating disorder forced her to withdraw from competition and seek treatment.In this interview, Gracie talks about the pitfalls of pursuing Olympic glory, and how the same qualities that made her an elite athlete also made it hard to spot red flags. “I will just keep going in a way that's admirable until it's destructive,” she says. After a life-threatening mental health crisis in 2017, Gold learned to reject toxic positivity and take a more balanced approach to life. As for her goal of competing in the 2022 Olympics, she says, “This time it's not the fear of failure driving me. It's the pursuit of excellence.”From the postponement of the 2020 Olympic Games, to social isolation and anxiety, the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on elite athletes’ mental health. A recent HBO documentary film, “The Weight of Gold,” spotlights those struggles and features interviews with Gracie Gold, Michael Phelps, Lolo Jones, and other Olympians.Links: "The Weight of Gold" (HBO Sports Documentary) Behavioral Health at Mount SinaiAmerican Foundation for Suicide PreventionCrisis Text LineThe National Alliance On Mental IllnessIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Our Better Angels

Our Better Angels

2020-09-1113:29

Machismo almost killed Neil Carroll. Growing up in the Bronx in the 1970s, he was taught that when bad things happen, real men suck it up. So after experiencing trauma in the Air Force, instead of looking for help, Neil turned to drugs and alcohol. “I had all the wrong coping mechanisms,” he recalls. Then came 9/11 and a host of new challenges, including cancer. To survive, Neil would have to rethink what it means to be a man.Links World Trade Center (WTC) Health ProgramMount Sinai Selikoff Centers for Occupational HealthUmut Sarpel, MD (Neil’s Surgical Oncologist)Federal WTC Health ProgramFealGood FoundationIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Autism has always been a part of Alison Singer’s life. When she was a little girl in the 1970s, she would visit her older brother, who has non-verbal autism with a cognitive disability, at the now-infamous Willowbrook State School on Staten Island. “I just remember hearing a lot of screaming and moaning,” she recalls. “I hated it.” By the time Alison’s first daughter, Jodie, was born with severe disabilities in the late 1990s, society and autism science had evolved, thanks to parent-activists like Alison’s mother. But there was still so much work to be done. Alison quickly became an advocate in her own right. In 2009, she co-founded the Autism Science Foundation, which funds autism research. In this interview, Alison is joined by her daughter, Lauren, an undergraduate at Yale University, who has also devoted herself to improving our understanding of autism and designing interventions to help people with autism thrive. Together, they reflect on their family’s story, including how they’ve turned love and adversity into advocacy, and what they’ve learned along the way.Links: The Seaver Autism Center for Research & Treatment at Mount Sinai 24th Annual Advances in Autism Conference (Sept. 17, 2020)Alexander Kolevzon, MD (Jodie’s doctor)Autism Science FoundationIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
I Am Not My Hair

I Am Not My Hair

2020-08-1316:17

In late March, while coronavirus cases surged in New York City, Shahonna Anderson, 40, was diagnosed with stage three cancer. She’d already had an orange-sized tumor removed from her chest, and now she faced daily radiation and two cycles of chemotherapy at the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai. “After five minutes of crying, I said, ‘Alright, we gotta do what we gotta do. So let’s go!’” she recalls. A born optimist, Ms. Anderson found herself pushed to the limit. To beat cancer, she would have to rely on friends and family like never before—even when asking for help was uncomfortable. In this interview, she talks about how that and learning to accept chemo’s impact on her body helped her become cancer-free. LinksDong-Seok Daniel Lee, MD (Shahonna’s surgeon) Deborah B. Doroshow, MD, PhD (Shahonna’s oncologist) Kenneth Rosenzweig, MD (Shahonna’s radiation oncologist)The Tisch Cancer InstituteCancer Care at Mount SinaiEnsuring a Safe Mount SinaiIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
After the most destructive earthquake in a century struck Puerto Rico on Jan. 7, Hansel Arroyo, MD, and Lyse Aybar, LCSW, joined a team of mental health workers headed for the island. With the ground still trembling, they went door to door, listening to survivors' stories and providing mental health assistance. In this interview, recorded before the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Arroyo and Ms. Aybar share strategies they used to boost survivors' resilience and reflected on how communities respond to natural disasters.Links Behavioral Health at Mount Sinai Emergency Behavioral Health ServicesThe Puerto Rico Administration of Mental Health and Anti-Addiction Services
Neuroscientist Daniela Schiller, PhD, grew up in the shadow of the Holocaust. Her father was a survivor, but he refused to talk about his experiences. Propelled by his silence, Dr. Schiller became an expert on how the brain stores fear memories. In 2010, she published a landmark paper in Nature that shed light on a neurological process called “reconsolidation,” in which memories become subject to change when they are recalled. In recent years, she has explored the power of imagination and mindfulness to alter the intense emotions associated with painful memories. Her research may point the way to new treatments for a range of anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this interview she talks about how learning to see memories as malleable is liberating and about how her research changed her understanding of her father.Links:Schiller Laboratory Friedman Brain InstituteNash Family Department of NeuroscienceISMMS Department of Psychiatry
Rewrite Your Script

Rewrite Your Script

2020-07-0121:48

Lynne Richardson, MD, wanted to become a doctor ever since she was a kid. But society had other ideas for a black girl born in Harlem in the 1950s. "I remember the first time I told my family physician. He said, 'Don't be ridiculous. You'll get married and have children,'" she recalls. Dr. Richardson went on to become an emergency medicine physician and renowned health equity researcher. On this episode, she talks about how rewriting society's "script" helped her build resilience, and explains why she's hopeful that COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter movement will lead to progress on health care inequities. Dr. Richardson is co-Director of the Institute for Health Equity Research, Professor, Emergency Medicine, and Population Health Science and Policy, and Vice Chair for Academic, Research, and Community Programs, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai This episode also features Ernest J. Barthelemy, MD, MA, MPH, Chief Resident, Department of Neurosurgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.Links:Institute for Health Equity Research at Mount SinaiUnited In Solidarity at the Mount Sinai Health SystemAnti-racism resources Mount Sinai’s Office for Diversity & InclusionDr. Richardson’s FemInEM lectureGet Road to Resilience in your inbox
Opening Up

Opening Up

2020-06-1913:23

Emergency physician Erik Blutinger, MD, was in his first year out of residency when the pandemic hit. As COVID-19 patients flooded Mount Sinai Queens, Dr. Blutinger strained to apply his training in an unprecedented situation, where split-second decisions had to be made with an evolving understanding of the virus. Two months after the virus peaked in New York City, and with the number of patients with COVID-19 at Mount Sinai Queens near zero, he reflects on what getting back to “normal” means for him and his patients.LinksErik Blutinger, MD (bio)Emergency Medicine at Mount Sinai QueensFrom the Front-Lines: Video Diary of Dr. BlutingerMental Health & Psychosocial Support During COVID-19 (for Mount Sinai staff)Get Road to Resilience in your inbox
Three Good Things

Three Good Things

2020-06-0516:431

Jordyn Feingold, MAPP, shares three evidenced-based techniques for harnessing the power of the positive in bleak times. Jordyn is a Positive Psychology Practitioner and a Medical Student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.REVAMP: A Novel Approach to Well-Being in Medical SchoolPEERS ProgramThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience@REVAMP_CoV2 on InstagramREVAMP_CoV2 on Facebook  Well-Being Staff Resources During COVID-19Character Strengths SurveyPositive Medicine, a program designed to help physicians live betterGet Road to Resilience in your inbox
The Recharge Room

The Recharge Room

2020-05-2223:44

When COVID-19 hit New York City, David Putrino, PhD, Director of Rehabilitation Innovation at the Mount Sinai Health System, converted his lab into recharge rooms for front-line healthcare workers. Informed by the latest research on the connection between natural environments and stress-reduction, Dr. Putrino and his team created multi-sensory experiences that can reduce stress in just 15 minutes. In this interview, Dr. Putrino talks about the science behind the recharge room and shares tips for creating relaxing spaces at home. Drawing on his work in high-performance sports, he also explains why resilience is best viewed as a social resource. “You may not be the most resilient person on the planet, but if you’re part of a highly resilient team, it elevates you,” Dr. Putrino says.The recharge rooms were conceived by Studio Elsewhere and the Abilities Research Center, part of the Department of Rehabilitation and Human Performance at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, with support from The Office of Well-Being and Resilience.The immersive audio content in the recharge rooms was created by EMBC studio composer Jacob Marshall and violinist Tim Fain. Their music appears at the beginning of this episode. Follow @the_embc on Instagram and Facebook to hear more of their work.Links:A doctor visits the recharge rooms (YouTube)More about David Putrino, PhDAbilities Research Center at Mount SinaiDepartment of Rehabilitation & Human Performance at Mount SinaiThe Office of Well-Being & ResilienceStudio Elsewhere - Front-line Strong ReliefEMBC StudioCoronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & ResourcesWays to Help Get Road to Resilience in your inbox
Writer/producers Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani talk about navigating all the corona-feels. They're the husband-and-wife team behind the hit 2017 film The Big Sick, which was based on their real-life courtship. They're also the hosts of the podcast Staying In with Emily & Kumail, about the up's and down's of being stuck at home during the pandemic.Links:Coronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & ResourcesWays to Help Get Road to Resilience in your inbox Staying In with Emily & Kumail on Apple Podcasts
The Givers

The Givers

2020-05-0917:17

In honor of National Nurses Week, we asked eight nurses from across the Mount Sinai Health System to reflect on their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. They shared their triumphs, struggles, and thoughts on what it means to be a nurse. Links:Coronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & ResourcesWays to Help Get Road to Resilience in your inbox Voices featured: Valerie Burgos-Kneeland, RN at The Mount Sinai HospitalManuel Corpus, RN at The Mount Sinai HospitalHoda Farghaly, RN at Mount Sinai QueensClaudia Garcenot, MSN, RN, Interim Chief Nursing Officer, Mount Sinai BrooklynYasmina Garcia, RN at Mount Sinai WestMadeline Hernandez, RN at Mount Sinai MorningsideSimone Murray, RN at Mount Sinai MorningsideCasey Scott, RN at Mount Sinai Brooklyn
Hospital Chaplain Rev. David Fleenor draws on multi-denominational spiritual teachings to find comfort during the COVID-19 pandemic, including about the importance of rituals and making peace with an unknowable future. Rev. Fleenor is Director of Education at Mount Sinai's Center for Spirituality and Health.LinksCoronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & ResourcesWays to Help Mount Sinai’s Center for Spirituality and HealthGet Road to Resilience in your inbox 
Signs of Hope

Signs of Hope

2020-04-1809:44

On March 1, David Reich, MD, received a phone call that would change the life of every New Yorker. The city’s first COVID-19 positive patient had been diagnosed, and they were at his hospital. Six weeks later, amid signs that New York’s pandemic is slowing, Dr. Reich reflects on the most challenging time of his career, and talks about the pandemic’s next phase. Dr. Reich is President and Chief Operating Officer of The Mount Sinai Hospital.Get Road to Resilience in your inbox: https://www.mountsinai.org/about/newsroom/road-resilience/subscribe-form The Mount Sinai Hospitalhttps://www.mountsinai.org/locations/mount-sinai Coronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & Resource https://www.mountsinai.org/about/covid19Ways to Helphttps://www.mountsinai.org/about/preparedness/coronavirus/donations-supplies 
Parenting was already hard enough. Then came the COVID-19 pandemic. Whether you’re worried about being the best parent right now, or helping your kids cope, developmental psychologist Aliza Pressman, PhD, has reassuring advice for adjusting to the new reality. Dr. Pressman is co-founding Director of The Mount Sinai Parenting Center and host of the Raising Good Humans podcast. Her advice originally appeared on Mount Sinai’s COVID-19 information Facebook Live series. Special thanks to Chloe Politis and Justin Gunn.LinksDonate to Mount Sinai's COVID-19 EffortsCoronavirus (COVID-19) Facts & ResourcesThe Mount Sinai Parenting CenterDepartment of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiDr. Pressman's Podcast – Raising Good Humans 
Our Finest Hour

Our Finest Hour

2020-04-1011:431

What can former POWs, special forces instructors, and resilient civilians teach us about weathering a historic resilience challenge like the COVID-19 pandemic? To find out, we spoke with Dennis Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and President of Academic Affairs for the Mount Sinai Health System. Dr. Charney is helping lead Mount Sinai’s fight against the pandemic. But he’s also a world-leading expert on resilience. Dr. Charney is co-author of Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges, the culmination of almost 20 years of research. In this interview, he describes strategies for weathering the challenge of a lifetime and bouncing back stronger than before.COVID-19 Updates from the Mount Sinai Health System https://www.mountsinai.org/about/preparedness/coronavirusDonate to Mount Sinai's COVID-19 Responsehttps://www.mountsinai.org/about/preparedness/coronavirus/donations-supplies Dr. Charney's Ten-Step Prescription for Resilience (infographic)https://icahn.mssm.edu/files/ISMMS/Assets/About%20the%20School/Leadership/CRTV-3841-ICAHN_Charney_10StepPrescription_Resilience_Infographic_Nov_20.pdf
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