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Farewell

Farewell

2022-02-1405:37

Road to Resilience host and producer Jon Earle signs off with a few reflections from listeners on the past 75 episodes.Stay subscribed for future updates about the podcast.
A Programming Note

A Programming Note

2022-02-0602:57

After more than 400,000 downloads, Road to Resillience host and producer Jon Earle is saying goodbye. For his final episode, we would like to feature you! We want to hear about your favorite guest, episode, or resilience insight. What’s one thing you have you learned from the podcast that has helped you to be more resilient?Share your thoughts in a brief (~30 sec) voicemail to (315) 677-1464  (preferred) or email us at podcasts@mountsinai.org. Deadline: Thurs., Feb 10 @ 11:59PM EasternPlease include:Your first nameWhere you're calling/writing fromOne thing you learned from Road to ResiliencePlease note that by submitting a voicemail or email, you’re agreeing to have your voice and/or words appear on the podcast, including in edited form. Also keep in mind that while we hugely appreciate every message, we won’t be able to include all of them in the episode.Thank you all so much!
Mariana Figueiro, PhD, is director of the Light and Health Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She studies how to use light to improve human health, including for patients with Alzheimer's, cancer, and Parkinson's. On Road to Resilience, Dr. Figueiro explains how to use light to sleep better and feel more alert during the day, including tips on digital device use. She also has specific advice for shift workers.Road to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit.Get Road to Resilience in your inbox.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMhRecorded at the Levy Library at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMusic by Blue Dot Sessions
Rev. Audrey A. Williamson of Harlem's historic Mother AME Zion Church estimates that up to 15 percent of her congregation succumbed to COVID-19, a burden of grief that weighs heavily on the community. Eager to help, Rev. Williamson recently teamed up with Mount Sinai's Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth to facilitate a series of workshops aimed at helping parishioners process grief and build resilience. On Road to Resilience, she shares thoughts on facing fear, sustaining community, and persisting through adversity.Road to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit.Get Road to Resilience in your inbox.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMhRecorded at the Levy Library at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMusic by Blue Dot Sessions
A conversation between Rachel Yehuda, PhD, Director of the Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Bessel van der Kolk, MD, President of the Trauma Research Foundation and author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller The Body Keeps the Score. Recorded over Zoom on Nov. 18, 2021 as part of the MINDSET lecture series hosted by the Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research.Road to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit.Get Road to Resilience in your inbox.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMhTheme music by Blue Dot SessionsVoiceover recorded at the Levy Library at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
The Cancer Dancer

The Cancer Dancer

2021-11-0422:58

Sarrah Strimel Bentley has been singing and dancing since she was three years old. “I would spend hours putting on one-woman shows,” she recalls. “I think we all knew pretty early on what I was destined to do.” Sarrah went on to appear in The Producers, Young Frankenstein, and other Broadway shows. Now a yoga instructor, Sarrah faced the greatest challenge of her life this past year—an aggressive breast cancer that called for an equally aggressive treatment regiment. On Road to Resilience, Sarrah talks about harnessing her experience as a yogi and performer to weather the storm, including by “joy-mining” and staying connected to her body.Sarrah Strimel Bentley is the creator and founder of Damn Good Yoga.Links:Dubin Breast Center of the Tisch Cancer InstituteSarrah’s InstagramDamn Good YogaRoad to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit.Get Road to Resilience in your inboxListen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMhMusic by Blue Dot Sessions
Coming Home

Coming Home

2021-10-2033:50

A ballet dancer's life spirals out of control—to addiction, homelessness, and prison. But with the help of somebody who's walked the road before, Dino is finding his way home.Iris Bowen is a social worker at the Coming Home Program at Mount Sinai Morningside, which provides re-entry support to people returning from incarceration. The program is part of the Mount Sinai Institute for Advanced Medicine.Dino Rivera is a patient in the program. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.Since 2006, the Coming Home Program has worked to improve the physical and mental health and emotional and social well-being of men and women during their transition from prison or jail to the community. Supportive counseling is offered individually and in groups, and case management is provided by formerly incarcerated staff who truly understand the challenges of coming home. In addition, the Coming Home Program team trains all medical providers, clinicians, and staff in the IAM to ensure that formerly incarcerated patients receive their health care in a safe and welcoming environment. For more information about the Coming Home Program, email ComingHome@mountsinai.org.Road to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit.Get Road to Resilience in your inboxListen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
The Resilience Paradox

The Resilience Paradox

2021-09-1531:31

There’s no shortage of tools in the resilience toolkit, and yet resilience remains something of a mystery. We still don’t fully understand why some people respond to challenging situations with resilience, or exactly how to prepare for hardship. In his new book, The End of Trauma, resilience researcher George Bonanno, PhD, argues that flexibility is the missing piece. On Road to Resilience, Dr. Bonanno explains how an adaptive response allows us to use the resilience toolkit to maximum effect.George Bonanno, PhD, is Professor of Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University.Links:Dr. Bonanno’s official bioThe End of TraumaMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiRoad to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the Mount Sinai Health System.Get Road to Resilience in your inboxListen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
7300 Days

7300 Days

2021-09-0132:48

On the eve of the 20th anniversary of 9/11, psychiatrist Sandra Lowe, MD, talks about what she's learned about trauma and resilience from treating responders. Her answers have implications for COVID-19 and beyond. Dr. Lowe is Medical Director at the World Trade Center Mental Health Program Clinical Center of Excellence at Mount Sinai.Links:World Trade Center Health Program at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of MedicineFor photos, links, and transcripts of all our episodes, visit https://www.mountsinai.org/rtrRoad to Resilience brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the Mount Sinai Health System.Get Road to Resilience in your inboxListen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
Jordyn Feingold, MD, MSCR, MAPP, shares three evidenced-based techniques for harnessing the power of the positive in bleak times. Dr. Feingold is a PGY1 in psychiatry at Mount Sinai, working on research and interventions aimed at promoting the well-being of medical students, residents, and physicians.A version of this episode originally aired in June 2020. (Click here to view.)The Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of MedicineMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthCharacter Strengths SurveyPositive Medicine (a program designed to help physicians live better)Follow Dr. Feingold on TwitterGet Road to Resilience in your inboxFor photos, links, and transcripts of all our episodes, visit https://www.mountsinai.org/rtrRoad to Resilience is a podcast that brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the Mount Sinai Health System.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
Polymath of the Soul

Polymath of the Soul

2021-08-0341:34

Thema Bryant-Davis, PhD, is impossible to pigeonhole. She's a psychologist, professor, minister, poet, dancer, podcaster, and more. In every role, she brings a message of relief and empowerment to marginalized people. A trauma survivor and specialist, "Dr. Thema," as she's known, helped pioneer the study of racial trauma. In this conversation, she shares pearls of wisdom from her deep knowledge of science, faith, and art.Thema Bryant-Davis, PhD, is a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Culture and Trauma Research Lab at Pepperdine University.Links:Dr. Thema's official bioDr. Thema’s websiteFollow Dr. Thema on InstagramMount Sinai Task Force to Address RacismFor photos, links, and transcripts of all our episodes, visit https://www.mountsinai.org/rtrRoad to Resilience is a podcast that brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the Mount Sinai Health System.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
Only the Lonely

Only the Lonely

2021-07-2230:02

An alarming number of Americans are lonely. Recent estimates range from 22 percent to as high as 61 percent, and that was before the COVID-19 pandemic made "social distancing" a household term. According to Louise Hawkley, PhD, an expert on loneliness and social isolation, the loneliness "epidemic" has serious consequences for our health as individuals and as a society. On Road to Resilience, Dr. Hawkley explains what happens when our hardwired social "hunger" isn't satisfied, and how loneliness can become a vicious cycle. Plus, she weighs in on the role of social media and offers advice on breaking pandemic-related social isolation.Dr. Hawkley is a Senior Research Scientist at NORC at the University of Chicago.For photos, links, and transcripts of all our episodes, visit https://www.mountsinai.org/rtrRoad to Resilience is a podcast that brings you stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the Mount Sinai Health System.Listen and subscribe to Road to Resilience on:Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/2Nve2KtSpotify https://spoti.fi/2UbuTVYGoogle Podcasts http://bit.ly/3aWL5AgStitcher http://bit.ly/2UarLcQPocket Casts https://pca.st/VW6AYouTube http://bit.ly/2RH5ZMh
For the estimated 2.8 million Americans suffering from treatment-resistant depression (TRD), the arrival of esketamine nasal spray in 2019 couldn’t come soon enough. The FDA’s decision to approve the drug, the first ketamine-based antidepressant, was the latest chapter in ketamine’s journey from anesthetic to club drug to antidepressant. It was also the result of two decades of research, including by Dennis S. Charney*, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and James Murrough, MD, PhD, Director of the Depression and Anxiety Center for Discovery and Treatment. On Road to Resilience, Dr. Murrough explains about how ketamine differs from existing antidepressants and shares actionable insights into the neurobiology of depression. Dr. James Murrough, MD, PhD, is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Director of the Depression and Anxiety Center for Discovery and Treatment at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.Links:Five Things to Know About Esketamine (with Dr. Murrough)Depression and Anxiety Center for Discovery and Treatment (DAC)Follow the Depression and Anxiety Center on TwitterDepartment of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of MedicineFollow Mount Sinai Psychiatry on TwitterFor photos, links, and transcripts of all our episodes, visit www.mountsinai.org/rtr*Dr. Charney is a named co-inventor on several issued and pending patents filed by Mount Sinai related to ketamine and pharmacologic therapy for treatment-resistant depression, suicidal ideation, and other disorders. Patents have been licensed by Mount Sinai to Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (manufacturer of Spravato) and the medical school, and Dr. Charney as a faculty co-inventor, has received and will receive future payments from Janssen. Dr. Murrough has no financial interests related to ketamine.
Heart to Heart

Heart to Heart

2021-06-2534:34

Anu’s story begins with a pulse. She’s 12 years old, holding her grandmother’s wrist, feeling the heartbeat’s rhythm—bounding or thready, slow or fast. “I was so taken by how much you could learn from touching someone, feeling the rhythm of their life, literally,” she recalls. Now a cardiologist at Mount Sinai, Anu Lala, MD, cares for patients with heart failure. Her work often places her at the border between life and death, which has challenged her to think deeply about questions both clinical and spiritual. In this conversation, Dr. Lala reflects on what she’s learned about uncertainty, healing, purpose, and what it means to live a good life.Anuradha Lala-Trindade, MD, is Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), and Population Health Science and Policy at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is also Deputy Editor of the Journal of Cardiac Failure.Links:Mount Sinai HeartHeart Failure and Transplantation at Mount Sinai Heart Journal of Cardiac FailureFollow Dr. Lala on Twitter
Is it better to be self-critical or self-compassionate? Until 20 years ago, when Kristin Neff, PhD, began pioneering the empirical study of self-compassion, most high-achievers would likely have answered “self-critical.” Indeed, being hard on yourself can seem like the path to success. But Dr. Neff’s research has shown that self-compassion is actually the surer and healthier road. In this interview, Dr. Neff explains what self-compassion really means—hint: it’s not for the faint of heart—and how it supports mental health. She also describes “fierce” self-compassion, in which kindness toward ourselves becomes a force for change in the world. Kristin Neff, PhD, is Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her new book is Fierce Self-Compassion: How Women Can Harness Kindness to Speak Up, Claim Their Power, and Thrive.Links:Self-Compassion.orgThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth
Beyond Sleep Hygiene

Beyond Sleep Hygiene

2021-05-2521:59

Like exercise and nutrition, sleep is central to good health. And yet, so many of us—Road to Resilience producers included—don’t get enough high-quality sleep. So we called sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, MD, for advice. Dr. Pelayo is the author of “How to Sleep: The New Science-Based Solutions for Sleeping through the Night." In this episode, he explains how sleep keeps us resilient and offers science-backed tips that go beyond “sleep hygiene.” We also talk about Ancient Egyptian dream chambers, dreaming robots, napping, mattresses, and more!Rafael Pelayo, MD, is a Clinical Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Division of Sleep Medicine.Links:The Mount Sinai Integrative Sleep CenterDr. Pelayo’s official bio“How to Sleep” by Dr. Rafael Pelayo
Wise Up

Wise Up

2021-05-1324:36

Sociologist Monika Ardelt, PhD, has spent her career studying an ideal that’s as universal as it is elusive: wisdom. And like many wisdom researchers, she’s concluded that we don’t necessarily become wiser as we age. Many people even become less wise. It’s a troubling thought, not only because wisdom is associated with resilience and life satisfaction, but also because if we’re not becoming wiser, what exactly are we becoming? Dr. Ardelt explains why wisdom matters and offers thoughts on how to cultivate it, including in moments of adversity.Monika Ardelt, PhD, is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Florida.Links:Dr. Ardelt’s official bioThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth
Toxic Apocalypse

Toxic Apocalypse

2021-04-2828:17

We’re in the midst of a fertility crisis. Worldwide fertility has dropped more than 50 percent in the past 50 years, and the decline shows no sign of slowing. Shanna H. Swan, PhD, a leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologist, has spent more than two decades studying the impact of environmental chemicals and pharmaceuticals on reproductive tract development and neurodevelopment. In this episode, she explains how endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as phthalates and BPA, are harming fertility and endangering the future of the human race. It’s scary stuff, but it’s too important to ignore. And, as Dr. Swan explains, there are steps we can take to protect ourselves and our children.Shanna H. Swan, PhD, is a Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her new book is called “Count Down."Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links“Count Down” by Shanna H. Swan, PhD Resources for reducing your chemical exposure The Institute for Exposomic Research (Mount Sinai) Children's Environmental Health Center (Mount Sinai)New research challenging some of Dr. Swan's conclusions (The New York Times)
If you live in a WEIRD society—Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic—chances are you aren't getting enough exercise. And it's not because you're bad or lazy; it's because you're normal. On this episode, Harvard paleoanthropologist Daniel E. Lieberman, PhD, explains how evolution designed humans to avoid unnecessary physical activity, i.e. "exercise" in the Western sense. In his new book, "Exercised," he busts 10 common myths about sleep, sitting, and physical activity, using the latest scientific research. If you've ever wondered whether sitting is the new smoking, or if you're getting enough sleep or exercising enough, this episode is for you.Dr. Lieberman is the Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links:"Exercised" by Daniel E. Lieberman, PhDMount Sinai Orthopedics Division of Sports MedicineRehabilitation and Human Performance at Mount SinaiSports Medicine Fellowship at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
The Man Box

The Man Box

2021-03-3028:23

Ted Bunch is co-founder of A Call to Men, an organization dedicated to preventing violence against women and promoting healthy manhood. Mr. Bunch is also co-author of "The Book of Dares," which contains 100 challenges for boys based on the work of A Call to Men.Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links:A Call to Men"The Book of Dares"Mount Sinai Parenting Center
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