DiscoverThis Anthro Life
This Anthro Life
Claim Ownership

This Anthro Life

Author: Adam Gamwell

Subscribed: 364Played: 2,317
Share

Description

Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspective. Crafted + Hosted by Dr. Adam Gamwell. From Missing Link Studios in Boston, MA.
140 Episodes
Reverse
TAL Correspondent Sara Schmieder brings us an all new interview about the power of cemetery restoration, race in the American South, and bringing legacy to light. Dr. Ryan Smith is a professor of religious history, material culture, and historic preservation at Virginia Commonwealth University. His latest book Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond’s Historic Cemeteries (2020) explores the history and reclamation of sacred cemeteries through the lens of race. By working with friends groups from various Richmond cemeteries he charts their evolution over time and how abandoned cemeteries have been reborn. Dr. Smith also authored Robert Morris’s Folly: The Architectural and Financial Failures of an American Founder (2014) and Gothic Arches, Latin Crosses: Anti-Catholicism and American Church Designs in the Nineteenth Century (2006). In this episode we discuss: · What it means to be a friend of a cemetery · How cemeteries are being revived and protected · Segregation and cemeteries · The importance of sacred spaces for Black, Jewish, and other marginalized communities Links: https://www.richmondcemeteries.org/ https://friendsofeastend.com/ https://shockoehillcemetery.org/ Episode Art: Sara Schmieder Producers: Sara Schmieder, Adam Gamwell Music: Epidemic Sounds Bam Bam – Yomoti Shades of Purple – Gregory David --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
In today’s episode Adam Gamwell and Astrid Countee are joined by multispecies anthropologist John Hartigan jr. John is an anthropology professor at the University of Texas at Austin. In his latest work, Shaving the Beasts: Wild Horses and Ritual in Spain, John studies the social lives of wild horses in Spain and Catalonia and the Spanish ritual dating back to the 1500s of “Rapa das Bestas”- in which villagers heard wild horses together into public ceremonial rings and shave their manes and tails. Why is an anthropologist studying horses you ask? John’s work dives into the complex social lives of these horses, what happens with human ritual causes violence and social breakdown - in this case amongst horses - and asks the question of how we can learn about human culture from other species? In this episode we focus on: What studying nonhuman species like plants and horses tells us about being human How to do rapid ethnographic fieldwork How the sociality of humans shapes and is shaped by other species Why ecology needs anthropology and vice versa Where to Find John Hartigan: John Hartigan Jr. is an anthropology professor at the University of Texas at Austin who focuses on multispecies ethnography, media, and race. He has done fieldwork in Spain, Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Detroit, Michigan. Hartigan’s latest book is Shaving The Beast: Wild Horses and Ritual in Spain, in which he explores the ritual of rapa das bestas in Galicia, Spain where villagers heard wild horses together to shave their manes and tails. Through multispecies ethnography, Hartigan tells the story of this ritual through the horses’ eyes, experiencing the traumatic event as he tells the story of the horses and their society. Hartigan has also authored Care of the Species: Cultivating Biodiversity in Mexico and Spain (2017), Racial Situations: Class Predicaments of Whiteness in Detroit (1999), Odd Tribes: Toward a Cultural Analysis of White People (2005), What Can You Say? America’s National Conversation on Race (2010), and Aesop’s Anthropology: A Multispecies Approach. Twitter: https://twitter.com/aesopsanthro Music: Epidemic Sounds Tilden Parc - The Weekend (Instrumental Version) Nebulas [ocean jams] Episode Art: Sara Schmieder Leave a Review for our Book Give Away! This Anthro Life - Anthropology Podcast | Podchaser ‎This Anthro Life on Apple Podcasts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
BOOK GIVEAWAY!! Leave a Review of This Anthro Life for a chance to win a copy of Ghost Work! Leave us a written review on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser by May 8, 2021, and email us a screenshot (so we know it's you) at thisanthrolife@gmail.com. We'll randomly pick four winners out of the group from anyone who submits a review by May 8th, 2021.  Now just a heads up: We're only counting serious reviews where you write something thoughtful. We'll take five stars of course if you want to just help out, but please no writing "I'm just doing this to get a free book." Feel free to share what you love about the podcast, why you find it valuable, How long you been listening or what keeps you listening? Remember, reviews help others discover the show and help us shape the content based on what you find valuable, so thanks for participating, we can't wait to hear from you! Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/this-anthro-life-216403 Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id871241283 Mary Gray is an anthropologist whose work explores how technology informs work, a sense of identity, and human rights. Gray applies these concepts as the Senior Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and as the Faculty Associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. Additionally she remains in a faculty position at the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering. Gray has also authored books such as In Your Face: Stories from the Lives of Queer Youth and Out In the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America but her most recent book, coauthored with Siddharth Suri Ghostwork: How to Stop Silicon Valleyfrom Building a New Global Underclass focuses on how task based work is being utilized by bigger businesses and how this represents a change in the way we conceptualize work. In this episode we focus on: What is Ghost Work? The gap between what a person can do and what a computer can do Algorithmic cruelty The future of work and what that means for contract labor Tech not as devices, but as conduits for social connection How to bring empathy into the workplace Where to Find Mary Gray: Website:https://marylgray.org/ Twitter:https://twitter.com/marylgray Linkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/marylgraymsr/ Music: Epidemic Sounds Dylan Sitts - Ice Cold Beverage 91 Nova - Lushwork Blue Steel - Up Here Episode Art: Adam Gamwell Photograph in Episode Art: Adrianne Mathiowetz Episode Production: Elizabeth Smyth, Sarah McDonough, Adam Gamwell --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Oscar Barrera is a Business Anthropologist based out of Veracruz, Mexico who brings a global mindset to helping businesses turn hurdles into opportunities for positive change. He is an expert in innovation, change management, and strategy. In this episode in partnership with Experience By Design podcast cohosts Adam Gamwell and Gary David dig into Oscar's story to learn the steps he took in moving from academia to business. We also dig into follow along case stories of how Oscar used the social sciences to help businesses see and solve organizational problems, find new marketing opportunities, and help people craft new narratives that empower them to be the heroes of their own stories why we believe it is not only ethical to bring the social sciences into business, but why it is fundamentally necessary to do so how to get started learning the world of business This episode is jam packed with great stories and advice! Connect with Oscar on LinkedIn Oscar's website (Spanish): Antropología Corporativa --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Take a walk with anthropologist and consultant Grant McCracken and host Adam Gamwell, as they discuss Grant's new book The New Honor Code: A Simple Plan for Raising Our Standards and Restoring Our Good Names and dig into Grant's uncanny ability to excavate and weave together (American) culture, media, and storytelling, and pull out provocative insights like the need to get more anthropologists and cultural experts into the C-Suite, how we might re-invent honor in the contemporary world, and how setting anthropology free from the academy can reshape it and make the field better for it. In The New Honor Code, Grant draws together ideas from Elizabethan England, insights found while hanging out in people's living rooms interviewing them about their television watching habits for Netflix, the rise of celebrity culture as the closest thing we have to honor today - and why that's a problem - and the seemingly uncrossable gap between American boomers and millennials/GenZ.  In mixing all these ideas together, he asks what is honor, why did it seem to disappear from our culture and what would it look like to create a system of honor in contemporary United States that would dissuade people from acting badly with impunity.  We dig into all these topics in this episode and Grant has some great advice for any social scientist looking to go into consulting or business or if you're in business, how we can be more savvy and practical about infusing anthropological mindsets and thinking into organizations without hitting people over the head with it, especially if they find the idea of culture confusing.  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
In January 2021 armed rioters stormed the US Capitol in a harrowing and politically fomented insurrection. It was an apex of years of divisive and condemnable rhetoric and fear-mongering used to stoke insecurities and desperate action. How do we ensure this never happens again? Or how do we dismantle the social structures that feed hate, fear, and contempt? What this event, and on the flip side, our celebration of Martin Luther King jr. Day (when we recorded this episode 1/18/21), reveal is that understanding what leads to social conflict and how to manage and resolve conflict is more essential than ever. Today Adam Gamwell and Astrid Countee talk with conflict management expert and author Jeremy Pollack about healing a divided nation by learning to talk with our neighbors more. We dig into: Why humans need help managing conflict Cognitive and perceptual biases that prevent us from communicating clearly with one another How to communicate clearly around fears and intentions to find common ground How to understand and disarm Worldview defense That we need to start talking to our neighbors more!  The importance of local leadership in modeling intergroup communication and shared goals Jeremy Pollack is the Founder of nationwide conflict resolution consulting firm Pollack Peacebuilding Systems and author of the new book Conflict Resolution Playbook: Practical Communication Skills for Preventing, Managing, and Resolving Conflict. Jeremy is a fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Conflict and Negotiation, and an expert on human conflict with an academic background in social psychology, evolutionary anthropology, negotiation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremypollack1/ https://www.facebook.com/pollackpeacebuilding/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3K6m_0bO31lD7JUc0th_vQ/featured https://pollackpeacebuilding.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Language warning. We use the word sh*t a lot in this episode, since it is, in fact all about poop.  To wrap up this crappy, some may even say shitty year, host Adam Gamwell and intern Elizabeth Smyth discuss the origin of the word shit, how the way we defecate is culturally constructed, what our poop reveals about us, and so much more in this New Year’s Eve mini-episode of This Anthro Life. Farewell 2020, it’s been real. In this episode we dig into: What poop tells us about culture and our biology Whether to sit or squat? Poop’s superpower for healing gut microbiota and potential energy source How poop in space might tell us if we are, in fact, extraterrestrials ourselves Also check our new blog Voice and Value where we dive deeper into all things human: Voice and Value – Medium Articles referenced: The History of Poop Is Really the History of Technology Poop Worlds: Material Culture and Copropower (or, Toward a Shitty Turn) Poop (Somatosphere) How Fossilized Poop Gives Us The Scoop on Ancient Diets Watching What We Flush Could Help Keep a Pandemic Under Control https://nyti.ms/2J2MJaa Human feces from the developing world could power millions of homes Follow this Anthro Life on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram! Twitter: This Anthro Life Podcast (@thisanthrolife) / Twitter Instagram: This Anthro Life Podcast (@thisanthrolife) • Instagram photos and videos Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisanthrolife/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/this-anthro-life-podcast Website: This Anthro Life Music: Epidemic Sounds No Regrets - Guy Trevino Basmati - Farrell Wooten Episode Art: Liz Smyth --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
In this episode we meet Dr. Stan Thangaraj, an anthropology professor at the City College of New York whose research includes immigration in the U.S, being interviewed by Vyjayanthi Vadrevu, a business anthropologist and ethnographer. Together, the two discuss basketball, community, identity, race relations and so much more. Stay tuned with us as you learn about why race relations are so important and the answers to the following questions: What does sports and their global popularity reveal about race relations in the US? What can we learn from the merging transnational identities? How has the “Black Lives Matter” Movement impacted the nonwhite and nonblack communities? What are the politics within the diasporic communities? Why is it so important to continue research and teaching about these communities? Sponsors for this episode: Check out the world's first Neuromarketing Bootcamp and sign up today with our Affiliate link! Neuromarketing Bootcamp by Neuroscientist Matt Johnson and Marketing Director Prince Ghuman Use offer code ANTHROLIFE for $500 off: Affiliate link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-bootcamp And check out Matt and Prince’s episode on neuromarketing on This Anthro Life https://www.thisanthrolife.org/a-neuroscientist-and-marketer-walk-into-a-bar-neuromarketing-and-the-hidden-ways-marketing-reshapes-our-brains-with-matt-johnson-and-prince-ghuman/ Check out our new Medium Blog "Voice and Value": https://medium.com/missing-link collaborative provocations and stories that get us closer to human and deepen our perspective on society, culture, and our future.  Stanley Thangaraj is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the City College of New York (CUNY).  His interests are at the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship.  He studies immigrant and refugee communities in the U.S. South to understand how they manage the black-white racial logic through gender, how the afterlife of colonialism takes shape in the diaspora, and the kinds of horizontal processes of race-making.His monograph Desi Hoop Dreams: Pickup Basketball and the Making of Asian American Masculinity (NYU Press, 2015) looks at the relationship between race and gender in co-ethnic-only South Asian American sporting cultures. Vyjayanthi Vadrevu is an ethnographer/ design researcher and strategist with a background in anthropology, business development, and nonprofit administration. She works on social impact design projects as well as corporate technology projects, delivering insights to help clients better serve their end users and beneficiaries. Vyjayanthi is also a trained bharatantyam dancer, with additional experience in Odissi, Kuchipudi, Kathak, and West African dance, and uses movement and choreography to connect to the deepest parts of the human experience. Music: Epidemic Sound Show notes: Xin Yao Lin, Elizabeth Smyth Episode art by: Sara Schmieder  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Do you have a sense of how much time you spend each day on social media and smartphone? Whether you can live with them or you can't live with them, we know for most of us, these are ingrained parts of our everyday lives. In this episode, we will uncover the life in the age of social media and smartphones, featuring Dr. Daniel Miller and Georgiana Murariu from the University College of London. Stay tuned as you learn about the ‘Why We Post’ project, ‘Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing, and the ‘AnthroCOVID’ project. We dig into: How do people use social media differently around the world? What are some strategies for making research accessible? What is the impact of smartphones on health? What are some creative ways that people have documented lives during the pandemic? How do you get so many anthropologists to work together globally? What is some advice for researchers who want to do collaborative and comparative work? Daniel Miller is a Professor of Anthropology at University College London and directed the ‘Why We Post’ project, which investigated the uses and consequences of social media in nine different countries around the world. The project resulted in twelve open access books, one about each fieldsite and two comparative ones. He is currently leading a project called ASSA (The Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing) which aims to analyze the impact of the smartphone on people’s lives based on 11 simultaneous 16-month ethnographies around the world. He is also the founder of the digital anthropology program at University College London (UCL). Follow Daniel on @DannyAnth Georgiana Murariu is a public dissemination officer at UCL, working with Daniel Miller and the team of researchers on the ‘Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing’. She is currently developing and implementing a dissemination strategy for the project which includes helping create a MOOC based on the project’s findings as well as using social media and digital tools to encourage the public to engage with the project’s findings and anthropology as a discipline. Follow Georgiana on Twitter: @georgiana_mu Twitter: @UCLWhyWePost EPISODE SPONSOR: Check out the world's first Neuromarketing Bootcamp and sign up today with our Affiliate link! | Use offer code ANTHROLIFE for $500 off: Affiliate link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-bootcamp --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
This Anthro Life is based on lifting up the voices and value of anthropologists and human scientists in all fields through sharing their stories, thought leadership, struggles, and winding paths. Today we've got something special, where we turn the mic around on our host, Adam Gamwell and hear some of his story on how he is building a career as an anthropologist. TAL's Adam Gamwell recently guested on fellow business anthropologist Keith Kellersohn's new YouTube series Anthro Perspectives, where he interviews anthropologists in industry and businesses about their work. This episode has a bit of everything: whether you're an anthropology student in school looking to get your first job,  an academic looking to move into industry,  if you're already working somewhere out there and looking to change careers,  or perhaps if you don't work anthropologists and you want to find out and understand value anthropology can bring to your business.  We cover all of this and more in our conversation.  One of the most helpful things in these scenarios I find is hearing other people's stories about how they did it or are doing it, or even how they just stumbled around in the dark and making it up as they went along and still came out with some kind of experience. I think perhaps the latter is closer to my own story.  So I invite you to join me for a chat about career paths, learning to articulate the value anthropology. Social sciences provide to businesses and a bit about why I do what I do. Thanks to Keith for sharing this episode. Check out the world's first Neuromarketing Bootcamp and sign up today with our Affiliate link! Neuromarketing Bootcamp by Neuroscientist Matt Johnson and Marketing Director Prince Ghuman  | Use offer code ANTHROLIFE for $500 off: Affiliate link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-bootcamp Episode Art: Sara Schmieder Music: Epidemic Sounds --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
When most people think of forensics or forensic anthropology the first thing that comes to mind are TV shows like CSI or Bones, or maybe in Six Feet Under. This may sound overly obvious, but people die every day. And this means that every day someone has to deliver dealth notifications to next of kin, especially when people live apart. Often times coroners are the ones who deliver these notifications. Coroners are elected or appointed public officials whose primary duty is to determine and certify cause of death. and while they have the scientific knowledge to do so, sometimes with the help of apps and digital tools, the social part of dealing with death, both for next of kin and the coroners themselves, is often ignored. We all experience death at some point but across 2020 more people have been directly impacted by death than ever before due to COVID-19. Meaning that more people than ever are receiving death notifications, which was a difficult conversation even before the pandemic. These notifications are challenging to give, Imagine knocking on a door or picking up the phone delivering the news that someone has passed away. It’s essential work. And it’s not easy. It’s also deeply social and cultural. This is why I’m talking to Lilly White a forensic anthropologist who focuses on the cultural side of forensics, especially on the lives of coroners and medical examiners and the best ways to handle death notifications. Lily got her PhD from the University of Montana in 2019 and currently owns and operates Bones and Stone Anthroscience with her husband. So today we’ll be talking about how cultural anthropology can play a role in forensic anthropology especially with death notifications. Top Takeaways We dig into the unseen/secret life of coroners (from a cultural perspective) Death notice work is essential but emotionally difficult so there’s a struggle keeping coroners in the practice The challenges of scientific training and having to deliver the worst possible news; the mix of scientific and social knowledge We’ll open the conversation like I often like to do, with Lily’s story and how she found her way into forensics and forensic anthropology, what life is like training to be a coroner, and her path to running her own forensics business today. Read about Lilly’s work in NYC with COVID-19 deaths (University of Montana) Lilly’s Instagram: Bone & Stone Anthrosciences (@deathphd) • Instagram photos and videos What is a Coroner? Episode art: Sara Schmieder --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Artificial Intelligence. Natural Language Processing. Machine Learning. Big Data. If you've studied Anthropology at all, you'll likely notice these terms don't often get use, unless you happen to be studying one of these areas, like doing an ethnography on artificial intelligence. Yet if these tools are used everyday across millions of applications and software lines of code to make our world run, how might they help us understand ourselves better? Big data often gets used to understand patterns people's behavior and thinking at a high level, and it is common to see people split into segments from this data. So in the world of market and consumer research you may know that people are commonly categorized into segments or generations - you've likely seen people written about as Millennial or Baby Boomers (OK, Boomer). But what limitations to understanding people are present when putting them into segments and generations and only seeing them from a high level? That's often where ethnography comes in, and where anthropologists like to live with and get to know people on their terms. But there's a huge stretch between massive Big Data sets and individual ethnography, right? What if there were a way to do ethnography with big data? That is, what if there were a way to be able to understand the nuances of cultural meaning people assign to things from big data sets? What this entails is, in essence quantifying ethnography. And turns out, the key has to do with focusing on meaning. That and some computer science wizardry. I'm excited today to have on the show one of the pioneers in this field, Ujwal Arkalgud, CEO, cultural anthropologist, and co-founder of Motivbase, a global tech research firm that has cracked the cultural code and developed software and research tools that bring together the analytical power of anthropology and the wide reach of big data. We’ll dig into the concept of micro cultures, which are are a set of meanings that make up a market space, the need to study of meaning and behavior in business, why don’t companies think about meaning as a primary mover? why traditional market research doesn’t effectively get at meaning, how the internet has changed the way we make culture and meaning and that betting on cultural homogenization is a trap Checkout Movitbase here Microcultures: Understanding the consumer forces that will shape the future of your business Ujwal's Medium page If you enjoy This Anthro Life, please consider supporting the show with $5 - $20 a month on Patreon. We're self funded so rely on you to help make the show happen! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
It's no surprise that many of us find ourselves increasingly on mobile devices or the internet. We shop online with ease, connect with friends and family on social media, check the news, and play games. And especially during the era of COVID millions, more people are figuring out if they can work remotely.  In this episode, Adam sits down with Dr. Julie Ancis, one  of the world's leading cyberpsychologists to talk about how digital technology in life online is impacting the ways we think and interact with one another.  As an interdisciplinary scholar, practitioner, and pioneer in the field, Dr. Julie Ancis is starting as Director and Professor of an exciting new Cyberpsychology program at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and currently writes for the new Cyberpsychology blog for Psychology Today where she's been offering advice on how to practice mental wellbeing as so many of us move online, especially during the time of COVID. Digital technology can be a blessing and a curse, right? Connecting us in new ways to old friends, but it can also be addicting, cause people to unfairly compare themselves to one another on social media to feel more lonely even. When it comes to things like the news, it can be more difficult to discern fact from opinion. But don't worry. It's not all zoom and gloom. What we'll find is that it's up to us to become discerning critical thinkers about our own psychology and the psychology of others when it comes to life online. And understanding that we do in fact have the tools each and every one of us to become critical thinkers. And, if you feel like you want to learn and get an even better handle on it, there's a brand new cyber psychology program at NJIT launching just around the corner. Dr. Julie Ancis Ancis Consulting New Jersey Institute of Technology Cyberpsychology Program Psychology Today Cyberpsychology Blog Catch Julie on: Twitter Facebook Instagram  Checkout my This Anthro Life sister project Mindshare And our upcoming panel “Ethics are for Everyone: Four Anthropologists Talk Shop on ethics across design, business and technology” Eventbrite registration here --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Ever wonder why certain new ideas stick while others don’t? We often hear a lot about innovation when it comes to new ideas, but really that’s only part of the equation. Psychology, marketing, neuroscience - and yes - anthropology can help us make sense of why some new ideas stick while others fall flat. On this episode Adam Gamwell talks with neuroscientist Dr. Matt Johnson and Professor of marketing Prince Ghuman about the fascinating role neuroscience plays in our evolving consumer lives. Matt and Prince have a new book out called Blindsight: the (Mostly) Hidden Ways Marketing Reshapes our Brains that explores the emerging field of neuromarketing. This is a fascinating conversation that gets into the neuroscience, marketing, and psychology of why we consume, why certain kinds of advertisements work for different groups of people, and -something long time listeners of This Anthro Life know - the need to clearly communicate our work as human, Neuro, and social scientists to other disciplines and people in general. And speaking of that, we dig into one of Adam's favorite subjects of all time - Star Wars - to figure out why nostalgia marketing can be so powerful. Book link: getbook.at/blindsight Blog link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-blog Bio: https://www.popneuro.com/blog-authors Twitter: @pop_neuro Prince Ghuman’s Twitter @princeghuman248 Matt Johnson’s Twitter: @mattjohnsonisme Instagram: @pop.neuro on LinkedIn: Prince Ghuman and Matt Johnson, PhD. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
What is it about coffee and tea - two simple drinks - that both transcends culture and is intimately bound up by it? In this episode, Adam talks with Independent documentary filmmaker and coffee anthropologist Brooke Bierhaus about her film "The Connected Cup" which explores the heart of coffee and tea as global human connectors across cultures and backgrounds. For the film Brooke traveled to over 9 countries to film and capture intimate moments, stories, and portraits of human life around the connected cup.  We dig into: Brooke's process for filming across 9 countries how coffee and tea provide a window into what makes the good life and happiness cultures of coffee and tea around the globe narrative and ethnographic voice as part of filmmaking https://www.theconnectedcup.com/ https://www.instagram.com/itsbrookebierhaus/ https://www.imdb.com/name/nm10149658/ Brooke's Bio from IMDB: Brooke Bierhaus is an American award-winning documentary filmmaker and visual storyteller. Brooke is known for her feature film, "The Connected Cup", following the heart of coffee and tea around the world as a global language of connection. Brooke has worked and produced stories in 22 countries. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Today we talk with Voltage Control president Douglas Ferguson and we're taking you beyond the prototype. If you ever run a design sprint, or even if you simply sat down at your desk to think through a really cool idea for a product or a new podcast or how do we improve something in your neighborhood. You started the design process. The question is, how do you go from a good idea to putting something out into the world? Douglas helps us find out.  "You gotta slow down to go fast" - Douglas Ferguson Voltage Control president, design thinking facilitator and innovation coach Douglas Ferguson recently published a book called Beyond the Prototype that aims to help teams and organizations (and individuals!) go from generating awesome ideas to implementing them. Over the course of our conversation we cover: the power of systems thinking seeing variables in the design ecosystem facilitation as model through systems thinking The connections between organizations and society. HR departments using design thinking to point the lens inward Caution that when we compress ideas there is opportunity to meaning to be lost Why facilitation is such a crucial role for example, realizing if you’re using one word to mean two things, or two words to mean the same thing - skilled facilitating brings these discrepancies and differences in meaning into focus for teams to help them overcome roadblocks in understanding Why so many start up founders get stuck on the idea of scale rather versus pursuing a smaller, but passion-driven idea How design facilitation sessions are about harnessing the power of the child’s mind - playful energy and debriefing as a crucial stage in any process: can you answer the question of why did we did this? Links and Resources mentioned in today's episode voltagecontrol.com beyondtheprototype.com startwithin.com Beyond the Prototype book Jake Knapp - Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days Greg Satell - Cascades: How to Create a Movement that Drives Transformational Change David Epstein - Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is a next-generation observatory currently under development that has created a watershed moment for the scientific community and Hawaiian society. This is because of its planned location on Mauna Kea… the most sacred mountain in the Hawaiian religion. But the case of TMT and Mauna Kea is not an outlier because mountain summits often have profound meanings to both indigenous cultural practitioners and technology developers. For example, Kanamota is another sacred mountain that is the site of technological development. It's also known as Mount Saint Helena. Ian Garrett is the co-founder and director of the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA) and an Associate Professor of Ecological Design for Performance at York University. He's collaborating with indigenous communities to understand and express how contested spaces are experienced through virtual reality. In this second installment of Starstruck, we talk with him about his ongoing collaborations with indigenous communities and explore the use of diminished reality to make the observatories on Mauna Kea disappear. Starstruck Episode 001 Check out our Prelude episode on the background of the Thirty Meter Telescope, Will We Find God with this Machine? Produced by Adam Gamwell + Missing Link Studios + Mindshare --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Produced in collaboration with Experience by Design.  We are witnessing a moment in our lifetimes that we will hopefully never see again. The world is gripped in a pandemic of a scale unseen for a  century. Beyond the human toll, we are seeing how healthcare systems  people once had trust in crumble before their eyes. In this episode,  Adam and Gary talk with Shelley White and Meenakshi Verma-Agrawal of the  Simmons University Masters of Public Health program on what we learn  from this moment, and how we can design a more inclusive healthcare  system. Shelley White is an Assistant Professor of Public Health and Sociology, and Program Director of the Master of Public Health. Meenakshi Verma-Agrawal is the Assistant Program Director and Associate Professor of Practice at MPH@Simmons. What  a difference a week makes. Or does it? With the expanding pandemic of COVID-19 disrupting more lives, many here in the United States might  feel caught off guard, or that things have changed to rapidly. Now  health care is a constant concern. What Shelley White and  Meenakshi Verma-Agrawal help us put in perspective is that even though  we can all get sick, public health and care has always been political,  and who has access to care, and even what diagnoses one gets, have been  deeply tied to class, race, ethnicity and other socioeconomic  classifications. Public health, in fact, is designed. Moments of  pandemic, where a virus crosses borders and bodies with no care for the  social structures we’ve erected, brings to light the radically unequal  way our public health systems are designed. For middle class families  who find themselves for the first time concerned about the lack of  available health care or beds at a hospital, must now contend with the  fact that this is a common reality for many poorer communities and  communities of color. But moments of crisis like this are also  moments of hope. As Dr. White notes in the conversation, we have to  remember that there are more people who seek equity and change than  those who benefit from the status quo. What's radical is to acknowledge  the racial, social, and economic injustices that frame our public health  system and to then set about to change those inequities for a more just  world. covid-19 public health healthcare design experience design health inequalities --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
Gigaom CEO, publisher and author of "The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the Future of Humanity" stops by virtually to chat with Adam and guest host Astrid Countee to help us make sense of just what Artificial Intelligence is, what are its promises and limits, and what this means for the possibilities of conscious computing and smart robots. Byron breaks down the philosophies behind our ways of thinking about AI in way that gives us new social tools to approach the deep technological revolution we are undergoing in a more human and even optimistic manner.  Website: https://byronreese.com/ Twitter: @byronreese Facebook: @byronreese LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/byronreese --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is a next-generation observatory currently under development that has created a watershed moment for the scientific community and Hawaiian society. This is because of its planned location on Mauna Kea… the most sacred mountain in the Hawaiian religion. Dr. Mindshare been studying this issue from their perspective as a cultural anthropologist for over a decade. This prelude offers a brief history of the controversy. TMT reveals the value of systems thinking — or thinking like a social scientist — for understanding the human experience more fully. Over the course of 2020 Mindshare will be collaborating with anthropologist Adam Gamwell, of This Anthro Life, alongside thought leaders from various disciplines to provide another level of insight as this story unfolds. Everything Dr. Mindshare posts can be used freely under a Creative Commons-ShareAlike license, including the audio version of this paper below. Feel free to register/log in to Mindshare if you would like to follow this project and join this conversation about TMT. Link: Original Article/Transcript: https://www.mindshare.app/home/provocations-public/starstruck-how-science-sparked-an-uprising Twitter: www.twitter.com/drmindshare --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/message
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store