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ArtCurious Podcast

Author: Jennifer Dasal/Art Curious

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Think art history is boring? Think again. It's weird, funny, mysterious, enthralling, and liberating. Join us as we cover the strangest stories in art. Is the Mona Lisa fake? Did Van Gogh actually kill himself? And why were the Impressionists so great? Subscribe to us here, and follow us at www.artcuriouspodcast.com for further information and fun extras. © 2019 Jennifer Dasal // Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @artcuriouspod

85 Episodes
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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram Sponsors The Great Courses Plus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: it’s our season finale, and this is the story we have been DYING (sorry) to tell you. Did Man Ray inspire the infamous (and infamously unsolved) Black Dahlia murder? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS Audible: enjoy a special offer of 53% off your first 3 months of Audible by visiting audible.com/artcurious or text ARTCURIOUS to 500-500. Feals: Become a member today by going to feals.com/artcurious and you'll get 50% off your first order with free shipping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a photo pioneer goes off the jealousy deep end. It’s Eadweard Muybridge time! Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Away: Visit awaytravel.com/ARTCURIOUS and order by 11:59 on 12/15 for free ground shipping with guaranteed free delivery by 12/20. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a contemporary art conundrum. Who is responsible for the death of Ana Mendieta? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get a free UNLIMITED trial EverlyWell: get 25% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS25) Super Chewer: get 50% off your first Super Chewer box when you visit superchewer.com/ARTCURIOUS and subscribe to a 6 or 12 month plan Audible: get 3 months of Audible for just $6.95 a month.  Visit audible.com/artcurious or text ARTCURIOUS to 500-500. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a revisiting of our popular two-parter from season 1. Was British painter Walter Sickert actually Jack the Ripper? (Part Two) Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Thrive Causemetics: get 15% off your first order (use code ARTCURIOUS) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a revisiting of our popular two-parter from season 1. Was British painter Walter Sickert actually Jack the Ripper? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Away: get $20 off your order (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial EverlyWell: get 15% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Charles and Colvard: get 20% off your first purchase Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a look into our favorite bad-boy artist, Caravaggio— he was a known murderer, but was he himself murdered? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial Charles and Colvard: get 20% off your first purchase Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Welcome to Season 6 of the ArtCurious Podcast! This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. First up: a “degenerate” painter much-hated by Hitler and fingered for his near-murder. Did Otto Dix plot to kill Hitler? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE AUrate: get 15% off your first AUrate purchase (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Phlur: get 20% off your first custom Phlur sample set Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial EverlyWell: get 15% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
We’re back for a bonus episode related to one of our “shock art” shows this past season: who is really responsible for creating the infamous urinal readymade, Fountain? Welcome to one of the art world’s latest scandals, and meet a truly unforgettable woman: the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus (get a free month using our link) ThirdLove (use our link to get 15% off) UTEP (for more details, check out the link)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Courbet’s The Origin of the World. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses (85% off digital course Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance, and more) Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link) ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link) The Citizenry (get a $50 gift voucher for any purchase of $200 or more with promo code ARTCURIOUS) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Balthus’ Thérèse Dreaming. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses  (85% off digital course Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance, and more) Kaboonki: learn what our production partner can do for you!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Gericault’s The Raft of the Medusa. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link) ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Duchamp’s Fountain. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses  (85% off digital course The Genius of Michelangelo, and more) The Thing About France Podcast   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
BANKSY! Love him or loathe him, he’s a contemporary art dynamo, an icon of street art success. He’s also an enigma, a playful mystery. Last week-- on April 30, 2019-- I was asked to participate in a special screening of the 2010 Banksy documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop at the Alamo Drafthouse in Raleigh, North Carolina. Exit was part of Alamo’s Film Club series, curated by Jackson Cooper, and after the film I sat down with Jackson to record a special conversation/Q&A about the film, Banksy, and the legacy of street art. Enjoy— and we’ll be back next week with an all-new episode of ArtCurious. Just a note that there are some spoilers in terms of the fact that we talk about the documentary in general, as well as Banksy himself and the other artist profiled in the doc, a man called Mr. Brainwash.   SPONSOR Myro (use promo code ARTCURIOUS at checkout for 50% off and to get started for just $5)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" David's The Death of Marat. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus (85% off digital course The Genius of Michelangelo, and more) AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase) StoryWorth ($20 off your order) Cove (first month of migraine treatment free with this link) Casper (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for $100 off select mattresses) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Eakins' The Gross Clinic Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase) Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Caravaggio's Sick Bacchus Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS The Great Courses AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase) Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In this bonus episode, we’re revisiting one of our favorite weirdos—Weegee!— whom we featured in Episode 5, alongside Andy Warhol. Today, Weegee gets his full due with a deep dive into his life and work. Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase) Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven't listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy! Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide. No, they say: he was actually murdered.   Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS: The Great Courses Plus Shout-out to Art and Object Zola - get $50 off your registry and your free wedding website Perfect Keto - use promo code "art" at checkout for 30% off sitewide   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy! Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide. No, they say: he was actually murdered.   Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram   SPONSORS: The Great Courses Plus —for a free 30-day trial Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial SimpleHealth —Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your first prescription free Shout-out to Art and Object   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Katy Torgashova

Thank you for your amazing podcast!

Apr 30th
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