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Deep Astronomy

Author: Deep Astronomy

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Welcome to Deep Astronomy, a podcast dedicated to helping us understand our place in the universe. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
34 Episodes
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Remember all the commotion about the BICEP2 mission back in 2014?  Cosmologist had announced the observation of polarized "B-mode" waves that, if connected to the universal cosmic microwave background, would lend credence and observational support to the Inflationary Theory of Cosmology, this period just after the Big Bang when astronomers think the universe expanded exponentially and faster than light.The story made the front page of the New York Times and we were hearing about it everywhere.  While I doubt that very many people understood what was being said, clearly something big was happening and so everyone paid attention.  Dr. Brian Keating from USCD was a member of the BICEP2 team and talks about that time with me along with other really interesting goings-on in the world of science, including whether having something like the Nobel Prize is hurting science.Brian Keating's Book: "Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition and the Peril of Science's Highest Honor" is available on the Deep Astronomy Amazon Page here:https://amzn.to/2JHl7W4--- This episode is sponsored by · Techathlon Podcast: The Techathlon podcast is a weekly podcast that catches you up on the latest tech news through games, trivia, and (usually) friendly competitions. https://open.spotify.com/show/1HRe3KlPaYUVgs1zTcsztO?si=7f0rYgqhQ5WUmFbpwdKXZwSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
It turns out that NASA and others have been thinking about the inefficiencies of using chemical rockets to go to the Moon, Mars and the Outer Planets.  One very attractive solution is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, a technology that was begun in the 1960's and considered as a viable method of propelling Apollo astronauts to the Moon, but was abandoned in favor of chemical rockets.  Fast forward to the twenty first century and we are back thinking about using this promising propulsion to get humans and space probes to the outer solar system quickly.  This podcast is the audio version of a Future in Space Hangout sponsored by the American Astronautical Society.--- This episode is sponsored by · Techathlon Podcast: The Techathlon podcast is a weekly podcast that catches you up on the latest tech news through games, trivia, and (usually) friendly competitions. https://open.spotify.com/show/1HRe3KlPaYUVgs1zTcsztO?si=7f0rYgqhQ5WUmFbpwdKXZwSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
Let's talk about the potentially hazardous asteroid known as Apophis.  In April, 2029 this 320 meter rock will get so close that it will pass under the orbit of geosynchronous satellites!  Astronomers held a conference in late April of 2019 to discuss the science that can be done as it passes so close to the Earth.--- This episode is sponsored by · Techathlon Podcast: The Techathlon podcast is a weekly podcast that catches you up on the latest tech news through games, trivia, and (usually) friendly competitions. https://open.spotify.com/show/1HRe3KlPaYUVgs1zTcsztO?si=7f0rYgqhQ5WUmFbpwdKXZwSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
In this podcast: an essay on whether the effort that went into making the black hole image in the distant galaxy M87 by the Event Horizon Telescope was worth it; an interview with star mapper Wil Tirion and more!--- This episode is sponsored by · Techathlon Podcast: The Techathlon podcast is a weekly podcast that catches you up on the latest tech news through games, trivia, and (usually) friendly competitions. https://open.spotify.com/show/1HRe3KlPaYUVgs1zTcsztO?si=7f0rYgqhQ5WUmFbpwdKXZwSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
This podcast features science and technology from the Large Millimeter Telescope.  Our guests Nat DeNigris and David Sanchez will be on hand to discuss this amazing facility being operated in Mexico.The Large Millimeter Telescope is the world's largest single-aperture telescope in its frequency range, built for observing radio waves in the wave lengths from approximately 0.85 to 4 mm. It has an active surface with a diameter of 50 metres and 1,960 square metres of collecting area.--- This episode is sponsored by · Techathlon Podcast: The Techathlon podcast is a weekly podcast that catches you up on the latest tech news through games, trivia, and (usually) friendly competitions. https://open.spotify.com/show/1HRe3KlPaYUVgs1zTcsztO?si=7f0rYgqhQ5WUmFbpwdKXZwSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
We've known since Edwin Hubble's time that the universe has been expanding.  What we've only recently learned (like, in the past 10 years or so) is that the universe is accelerating as it expands.  Measuring this expansion rate has been problematic and while there are at least two different ways to make the measurement, they don't always agree.This episode features Ed Macauley from the University of Portsmouth UK, and a member of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.  He and his team have been using a calibrated version of the 'standard candle' method of determining the rate of universal expansion, also known as the Hubble Constant or H0 to get a better answer that agrees with other measurement techniques.You can read Ed's paper on Arxiv.org here: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1811.02376.pdf--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
I'm not convinced that life is everywhere in the cosmos.  It is entirely possible, based on what we know today, that we are the only life there is.  Anywhere.  This episode is a brief discussion of that idea.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
Welcome to the first in a series of monthly discussions about topics in astronomy with Carol Christian, a colleague and friend of mine that has cohosted Astro Coffee Hangouts with me for years.This month we talk about what it's like for women in science.  Why aren't more qualified women in science?  What are the obstacles?--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
Members of the PLANETS Foundation are working hard to secure funding for a telescope specifically designed to look for life on other worlds.  In this episode, we discuss the capabilities and design of this exiting telescope--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
The next generation of world-class ground based observatories are being built right now.  Among them, The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT).  Learn about this amazing telescope that will become the world's largest by mid-2020's--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deepastronomy/support
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Comments (1)

Beatrix Ducz

hi Tony, If I want to read about the news in science, but I want to read only one medium, which one should it be? Nature magazine? Thanks.

Oct 12th
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