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In 2020, we wrote an ebook called Portraits of resistance: The cinema of Céline Sciamma, after Sciamma's fourth feature (and first Cannes Competition film), Portrait of a Lady on Fire, was released. We were surprised and delighted to see Sciamma gaining a huge following after years of being so underappreciated. On this episode, we talk about Sciamma's greatness and how the industry was slow to catch up with it. We also fall into a long conversation about the wider pattern in the film industry of recognising female writer-directors for their writing rather than their directing, and why these fields are seen as so gendered. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh Get the box set of books about women directors — Kelly Reichardt, Céline Sciamma, and Lynne Ramsay — who have screened films in the Cannes Competition. Sign up for updates on the podcast and other news about women directors at Cannes this year.  On this episode: Who is Céline Sciamma? (4:51) How Sciamma’s films have been misunderstood throughout her career (13:52) How Portrait of a Lady on Fire differs from Sciamma’s earlier films (19:1) Sciamma’s precision (32:06) How the film industry sees women as directors versus screenwriters (35:54) How has Portrait impacted Sciamma’s career going forward? (53:55) Show notes View the history of women directors at Cannes Read Lindsay’s review of Portraits of resistance at Woman in Revolt Read Alex's interview with Sciamma's regular editor, Julien Lacheray Read Alex's in-depth conversation with the women behind Mouthpiece - Patricia Rozema, Amy Nostbakken, and Norah Sadava Read Alex's interview with director Andrew Haigh on the 10th anniversary of Weekend Related episodes Women at Cannes Ep. 1: A podcast on the history of women directors at Cannes Women at Cannes Ep. 2: Kelly Reichardt at Cannes 2022 Ep. 128: Petite Maman and Céline Sciamma’s temporary utopias Ep. 96: Water Lilies and Jennifer’s Body: Girlhood and compulsory heterosexuality (Member's Only)  
On today's episode, we look back on the career of one of our favourite filmmakers, Kelly Reichardt (First Cow, Certain Women), and ask why it's taken until her 8th feature, Showing Up, for her to get a slot in the Cannes Competition. Get the box set of books about women directors — Kelly Reichardt, Céline Sciamma, and Lynne Ramsay — who have screened films in the Cannes Competition. Sign up for updates on the podcast and other news about women directors at Cannes this year.  Find out what we know so far about Kelly Reichardt’s new film, Showing Up. On this episode: About our Kelly Reichardt ebook, Roads to Nowhere (4:22) Who is Kelly Reichardt? (5:52) Why 2022 is The Year of Kelly Reichardt (9:02) Kelly Reichardt’s history with Cannes and other festivals (10:36) Why we love Kelly Reichardt (28:42) Reichardt’s explorations of capitalist systems (37:15) The finances of a Kelly Reichardt film (41:46) Kelly Reichardt is a comedic filmmaker! (59:14) Showing Up and Reichardt’s collaborators (53:41) Related episodes: Women at Cannes Ep. 1: A podcast on the history of women directors at Cannes Ep. 90: Jeanne Dielman and Les Rendez-vous d’Anna: A Chantal Akerman mother’s day (Members' Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
We kick off our #WomenAtCannes podcast season with an episode on the history of women at Cannes. We examine how Cannes works and uncover a number of surprising stats. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Associate Editor Brett Pardy. Get the box set of books about women directors — Kelly Reichardt, Céline Sciamma, and Lynne Ramsay — who have screened films in the Cannes Competition. Sign up for updates on the podcast and other news about women directors at Cannes this year.  On this episode: How Cannes works (2:55) Running the numbers on women at Cannes (10:47) Chantal Akerman and Agnès Varda at Cannes (21:10) The importance of the Cannes sidebars (23:37) Learn more about the Women in the Cannes Competition Box Set (33:14) How Cannes markets itself (34:46) Cannes awards (38:05) The lack of intersectionality in this conversation (42:45) A case study on Cannes 2021 (46:58) Conclusion (55:39) Coming soon (1:00:25) Related episodes: Bonus 28: Portraits of female artists: Part 2 (Members' Only) Ep. 114: Mia Hansen-Løve’s Things to Come and Bergman Island (Members' Only) Ep. 102: Cannes 2021 (Members' Only) Ep. 90: Jeanne Dielman and Les Rendez-vous d’Anna: A Chantal Akerman mother’s day (Members' Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
Cannes 2022 kicks off on May 17, so let’s celebrate the wonderful work by women who have been at Cannes this year and in the past. Join us for a podcast season starting May 11 on women directors in the Cannes Competition, and get the Box Set of books on women directors at Cannes.
The film world has responded to COVID with a surprising indifference. In this episode, we look at the current gold standard of pandemic depiction, examine several half-hearted engagements with COVID, and consider the future of COVID in movies.  This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Associate Editor Brett Pardy Show notes and related episodes: Follow airborne transmission expert Dr. Linsey Marr on Twitter Read Per Morten Mjølkeråen's interview with Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn director Radu Jude Read Brett's review of 76 Days from TIFF 2020 Read Alex's review of Both Sides of the Blade Read Orla's interview with Searchers director Pacho Velez Read Alex's review of Young Plato Read Orla's review of Mija Read Orla's review of The Mission Bonus 27: Empathy on film Bonus 25: This is Going to Hurt and physician mental health Bonus 23: Sundance 2022: Fiction films Ep. 125: Berlinale 2022 Ep. 116: Virtual film festivals: Taking stock of their past, present, and future Ep. 84: Berlinale 2021, Part 2: The Competition Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
As authors of the ebook Portraits of resistance: The cinema of Céline Sciamma, the first book to be written about the French director, we had to talk about her new film, Petite Maman, on the podcast. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, Associate Editor Brett Pardy, and Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh. On this episode: Why we love Céline Sciamma and Portraits of resistance (1:45) Related episodes (2:49) Petite Mamam summary (5:07) Lindsay's history with Céline Sciamma's films (6:37) Céline Sciamma's precise attention to detail (9:02) Why we like this film - a non-saccharine view of childhood (11:03) Petite Maman's relationship to Sciamma's prior films (19:59) Absences and goodbyes (26:26) Time in the film (31:00) The house's space (35:38) The fantasy element (39:29) How Sciamma portrays and directs children (45:15) Temporary utopias (47:00) What would kids think of the film? (59:47) Empathy in the film (1:01:30) Conclusion (1:04:02) Show notes: Read Alex's full review of Petite Maman from Berlinale 2021 As we discuss in the episode, Petite Maman builds upon the themes we discussed in Portraits of resistance: The cinema of Céline Sciamma, the first ever book about French filmmaker Céline Sciamma, her process, her body of work. Portraits of resistance contains interviews with the cast and crew, as well as essays on the film and Céline Sciamma’s career. You can purchase the book for $26.99 Canadian or become a Seventh Row member for $39.99 Canadian per year and choose Portraits of resistance as the free ebook you receive for joining. Related episodes: Ep. 96: Water Lilies and Jennifer’s Body: Girlhood and compulsory heterosexuality (Member's Only) Ep. 90: Jeanne Dielman and Les Rendez-vous d’Anna: A Chantal Akerman mother’s day (Member's Only) Ep. 84: Berlinale 2021, Part 2: The Competition (Member's Only) Ep. 30: Céline Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
We're joined by Lindsay Pugh to continue our ongoing conversation around films about female artists, and how the way these stories are being told is changing, including The Souvenir, Mothering Sunday, Bergman Island, and more. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh Show notes and related episodes: Ep. 44: Shirley and portraits of female artists (Member's Only) Ep. 122: Joachim Trier’s The Worst Person in the World Ep. 121: Ninjababy & Obvious Child: Unwanted pregnancies in romantic comedies Ep. 118: The Souvenir Part I and II Ep. 114: Mia Hansen-Løve’s Things to Come and Bergman Island (Member's Only) Ep. 92: Sugar Daddy and An Easy Girl: Commodifying women (Member's Only) Ep. 89: Spinster and The Forty-Year-Old Version: Coming of age at forty (Member's Only) Ep. 54: I Used to Go Here and Unexpected: Kris Rey’s thirtysomethings (Member's Only) Ep. 45: The films of Anne Émond, from Nuit #1 to Nelly (Member's Only) Ep. 30: Céline Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Member's Only) Ep. 15: Vita & Virginia and the author biopic (Member's Only) Ep. 14: The Souvenir and the films of Joanna Hogg (Member's Only)
We're joined by Andrew Kendall to discuss the new German film Fabian: Going to the Dogs, directed by Dominik Graf, and how it portrays life in a totalitarian state. This episode features  Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and special guest Andrew Kendall On this episode: Related episodes (1:52) Fabian: Going to the Dogs synopsis (4:36) Connecting the past to the present (6:57) Adapting a 1932 novel with the knowledge of hindsight (15:01) The film's tone (33:40) Meret Becker as Frau Moll (47:03) How the film approaches the rise of Nazism (48:56) How this is like Tony Richardson's Tom Jones (54:07) Period costumes (58:48) Pietro Marcello's Martin Eden and masculinity (1:05:35) Conclusion (1:20:27) Show notes: Read Alex's review of A Radiant Girl (Sandrine Kiberlain, 2021) Read an interview with Dominik Graf about making Fabian with Steve Erickson of The Film Stage Purchase our ebook Peterloo in Process: A Mike Leigh collaboration Purchase our ebook Roads to nowhere Kelly Reichardt’s broken American dreams Read Andrew's reviews at Stabroek News Related episodes: Ep. 93: The films of Agnieszka Holland (Member's Only) Ep. 82: Quo Vadis, Aida and Our Lady of the Nile: Genocide on film (Member's Only) Ep. 5: Christian Petzold’s Transit (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
On this episode we dig into how Run Woman Run explores coming of age in your thirties through an Indigenous perspective. This episode features  Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh. On this episode: Coming of age in their 30s episodes (1:42) Run Woman Run (5:16) How the film depicts trauma (13:43) Asivak Koostachin as the spirit of Tom Longboat (19:00) The anti-romcom (24:02) Land depiction (34:37) Health and "tough love" (37:06) Why Run Woman Run should have been longer (1:00:13) What settler critics often miss (1:15:34) Conclusion (1:18:16) Show Notes Read Alex's review of Run Woman Run Read Orla's interview with Kímmapiiyipitssini: The Meaning of Empathy director Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers Read Laura Anne Harris' interview with The Road Forward director Marie Clements Read Alex's interview with Monkey Beach director Loretta Todd Read Alex's interview with Blood Quantum director Jeff Barnaby Read our list of the best Canadian films of 2021, including Night Raiders, Bootlegger, Red Snow, and Kímmapiiyipitssini Pre-order Existential detours: Joachim Trier's cinema of indecisions and revisions, the first book to ever be published on Joachim Trier. Stay tuned for Orla's interview with director Zoe Leigh Hopkins Related episodes Ep. 89: Spinster and The Forty-Year-Old Version: Coming of age at forty Ep. 63: Indigenous YA, part 2 Ep. 62: Indigenous YA, part 1 Ep. 54: I Used to Go Here and Unexpected: Kris Rey’s thirtysomethings Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
Associate Editor Brett Pardy recently defended his PhD about film and empathy. We discuss his research, what inspired him to get into the topic, and how Seventh Row ties in. This episode also features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith. On this episode: Brett's Doctoral Dissertation (0:45) Related episodes (4:48) Brett's origin story for getting into this study (9:36) Cultural perceptions of films as just entertainment (18:24) What does empathy through film look like? (29:03) Having conversations about films (34:36) Expanding people's film horizons (43:31) How Seventh Row relates to this (48:36) Conclusion (1:02:18) Show notes: Read Brett's interview with Stupid Young Heart director Selma Vilhunen and writer Kirsikka Saari Read Alex's interview with Meditation Park director Mina Shum Read Roger Ebert's speech about empathy and film. See the They Shoot Pictures, Don't They Top 1000 film list Related episodes: Bonus 26: Benedict Cumberbatch’s best, worst, and poshest performances (Member's Only) Bonus 19: Who is the poshest actor in Britain? (Member's Only) Ep. 90: Jeanne Dielman and Les Rendez-vous d’Anna: A Chantal Akerman mother’s day (Member's Only) Ep. 86: Una & Slalom: Depictions of childhood sexual assault (Member's Only) Ep. 73: Promising Young Woman and The Assistant: Explorations of rape culture (Member's Only) Ep. 72: Steve McQueen’s Small Axe (Member's Only) Ep. 69: Paddington and Paddington 2 (Member's Only) Ep. 68: Hillbilly Elegy and Down to the Bone: Mothers struggling with addiction (Member's Only) Ep. 46: A conversation between Mina Shum and Philippe Falardeau (Member's Only) Ep. 39: Jeff Barnaby’s Rhymes for Young Ghouls and Blood Quantum (Member's Only)
We discuss Benedict Cumberbatch at his best, worst, & poshest, from The Power of the Dog to The Courier to The Electrical Life of Louis Wain. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and regular guest Caitlin Merriman.  Show notes: The Power of the Dog is streaming on Netflix The Courier is available on VOD and streaming on Prime The Electrical Life of Louis Wain is streaming on Prime Stuart: A Life Backward (David Attwood, 2007) is streaming on Crave in Canada and HBO Max in the US Related Episodes Bonus 22: Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (Member's Only) Bonus 20: Belfast and the self-mythologising of Kenneth Branagh (Member's Only) Bonus 19: Who is the poshest actor in Britain? (Member's Only) Ep. 111: TIFF 2021, part 2 (Member's Only) Ep. 28: 1917 and Jarhead — Sam Mendes’ war films (Member's Only) 21st Folio, Episode 1: Hamlet at the Barbican with Benedict Cumberbatch Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
125: Berlinale 2022

125: Berlinale 2022

2022-03-1601:05:03

Alex and Orla report from the 2022 Berlinale Film Festival, and introduce you to the films they loved, from Laia Costa-starrer Lullaby, to Swedish YA film about grief, Comedy Queen. On this episode: Related episodes (1:10) Joachim Trier challenge (2:14) What we had screeners for (5:22) Berlin's films for young audiences (11:21) Alis (Clare Weiskopf & Nicolás van Hemelryck) (14:31) Comedy Queen (Sanna Lenken) (16:44) Lullaby (Alauda Ruiz de Azúa) (20:56) My Small Land (Emma Kawawada) (28:21) Until Tomorrow (Ali Asgari) and Millie Lies Low (Michelle Savill) 34:16 Stay Awake (Jamie Sisly) 46:00 Coma (Bertrand Bonello) (47:50) We Might as Well Be Dead (Natalia Sinelnikova) 50:26 Creative nonfiction: Nelly & Nadine (Magnus Gertten) and Mutzenbacher (Ruth Beckermann) (52:50) Conclusion (1:01:55) Show notes and related episodes: Read Alex's interview with Little Wing director Selma Vilhunen Take our Joachim Trier challenge, in preparation for our forthcoming ebook on Trier’s work, Existential detours: Joachim Trier’s cinema of indecisions and revisions Ep. 121: Ninjababy & Obvious Child: Unwanted pregnancies in romantic comedies Ep. 84: Berlinale 2021, Part 2: The Competition (Member's Only) Ep. 83: Berlinale 2021, Part 1: The Sidebars (Member's Only)
We discuss This is Going to Hurt, an early contender for best show of the year, the excellence of Ben Whishaw, why Ambika Mod is such an exciting newcomer, and how it brilliantly discusses the mental health of National Health Service workers. This episode features  Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, and Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh Content warning: This episode discusses suicide Show notes and related episodes: Ep. 69: Paddington and Paddington 2 (Member's Only) Ep. 32: Sorry We Missed You and Peterloo (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
Over the course of one month, we challenge you to watch one Joachim Trier feature film per week, in chronological order, to catch up to The Worst Person in the World. Click here for more details.
On today’s episode, we’ll be doing something a little different. Instead of our usual discussions of films with a panel of critics,  Alex interviews British actress Olivia Vinall about performing Shakespeare. In this conversation, we talk about each of Olivia’s four Shakespearean roles: Desdemona, Cordelia, Juliet, and Rosalind. We talk about how she finds a way into the text, what it’s like working with different directors, and why she loves Shakespeare so much. On this episode: Other recent Shakespeare episodes (1:48) Background on Vinall's career (3:55) What Vinall loves about Shakespeare (8:28) Contemporary acting style in Shakespeare (15:50) Performing Shakespeare in different venues (28:28) Rosalind in As You Like It (33:07) Working with directors (37:47) Seeing other performances of Shakespeare as an actor (46:52) Acting in a live recording (51:14) Vinall's next projects (55:32) Conclusion (57:38) Show notes: Follow Olivia Vinall on Instagram (@olivia_vinall) Read Alex's career profile interview with of Olivia Read Alex's review of Sam Mendes' production of King Lear, starring Vinall Vinall's performance in Othello is available through National Theatre at Home Olivia Vinall has narrated 13 audiobooks, including Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd. They are available through itunes and Audible. Related episodes: Bonus 24: Kenneth Branagh’s Much Ado About Nothing (Member's Only) Bonus 22: Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (Member's Only) Bonus 17: Saoirse Ronan and James McArdle in The Tragedy of Macbeth at the Almeida Theatre (Member's Only) 21st Folio, ep. 6: Maxine Peake talks Hamlet Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
We've been harsh on Kenneth Branagh and his self-mythologising, including his recent Belfast. On this episode, we want to be kind and look back to Branagh's amazing Much Ado About Nothing. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, Associate Editor Brett Pardy, and regular guest Caitlin Merriman. Show notes and related episodes: See our 21st Folio podcast page Bonus 22: Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (Member's Only) Bonus 20: Belfast and the self-mythologising of Kenneth Branagh (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
Alex Heeney & Orla Smith discuss the highlight of Sundance 2022: creative nonfiction. We discuss active listening, reframing history, and a risk taking volcanologist couple. On this episode: Related episodes (1:26) Sundance overview (4:22) 32 Sounds (Sam Green) (8:59) Reframing history: Framing Agnes (Chase Joynt), The Janes (Tia Lessin), & Tantura (Alon Schwarz) (29:27) I Didn't See You There (Reid Davenport) (44:10) Fire of Love (Sara Dosa) (47:34) All That Breathes (Shaunak Sen) & Mija (Isabel Castro) (52:51) Conclusion (57:31) Show notes: Read our selections of the 10 best films of Sundance 2022 Read Orla's interview with Director Chase Joynt and co-writer Morgan M Page about Framing Agnes Read Orla's review of Reid Davenport's I Didn't See You There Read Orla's review of Isabel Castro's Mija Read Orla's review of Shaunak Sen's All That Breathes For more on creative nonfiction, purchase our ebook Subjective realities: The art of creative nonfiction film. Subjective realities is a six part ebook composed of interviews and essays. Discover the myriad forms of nonfiction filmmaking, from animation to archival and beyond, and find out what funding structures exist to make them possible. Related episodes Ep. 105: Subjective realities: The art of creative nonfiction film Ep. 95: No Ordinary Man and John Ware Reclaimed: Reclaiming history in documentary (Member's Only) Ep. 78: Sundance 2021, part 1 (Member's Only) Ep. 79: Sundance 2021, part 2 (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
We discuss the ups and downs of Sundance 2022, and chat about some of the festival's fiction films, including Sharp Stick and Living. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith. Become a Seventh Row member and get access to the full episode, as well as all other podcast episodes older than six months. Show notes: Read our selections of the 10 best films of Sundance 2022 Read the source of the "blocking is everything" quote: Alex's 2018 interview with Andrew Haigh See Alex's Sundance Bingo Card Read Orla's review of Fresh Read an excerpt of Lindsay Pugh's interview with The Worst Person in the World star Renate Reinsve Sign up to be the first to pre-order Existential detours: Joachim Trier's cinema of indecisions and revisions, the first book to ever be published on Joachim Trier, and receive the full interview with Reinsve Related episodes: Ep. 122: Joachim Trier’s The Worst Person in the World Bonus Episode 22: Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth Bonus Episode 16: Watching Lena Dunham’s Girls in 2021 Ep. 106: Christine and Kate Plays Christine: Reviving Christine Chubbuck Ep. 78: Sundance 2021, part 1 (Member's Only) Ep. 79: Sundance 2021, part 2 (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
The entire Seventh Row editorial team is here to talk about site favourite Joachim Trier's new film, The Worst Person in the World.This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, Associate Editor Brett Pardy, Contributing Editor Lindsay Pugh, and Editor-at-Large Mary Angela Rowe.  On this episode: Existential detours: Joachim Trier's cinema of indecisions and revisions (2:21) Related episodes (4:15) The World Person in the World and our first reactions (5:39) Is Julie the worst person in the world?(19:31) The film's structure (27:23) The film's style (33:57) Julie's relationships (45:06) The time freeze scene (56:57) The mushroom scene (1:10:42) Intellectualizing and romanticizing (1:18:07) The retroactive Oslo Trilogy (1:33:38) Conclusion (1:49:20) Show notes Read an excerpt of Lindsay's interview with Renate Reinsve from our upcoming email book Existential detours: Joachim Trier's cinema of indecisions and revisions Sign up to be the first to pre-order Existential detours: Joachim Trier's cinema of indecisions and revisions, the first book to ever be published on Joachim Trier. You will also receive exclusive excerpts from the book. Read Alex's review of The Worst Person in the World View our Directors We Love page on Joachim Trier, for extensive information on Trier and his key collaborators, and links to all of our coverage of his films Related episodes Ep. 114: Mia Hansen-Løve’s Things to Come and Bergman Island Ep. 112: Raw and Thelma: Modern female monsters Ep. 107: Another Round and Oslo, August 31st: Are men OK? Masculinity, mental health, & addiction Redux Ep. 54: Used to Go Here and Unexpected: Kris Rey’s thirtysomethings (Member's Only) Ep. 40: Stories We Tell, Louder Than Bombs, & Mouthpiece: Dead mothers (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
Joel Coen's first solo film is an adaptation of Macbeth starring Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand. We wonder why and discuss what makes for a good Macbeth adaptation. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, Associated Editor Brett Pardy and Editor-at-Large Mary Angela Rowe. Show notes: Read Alex’s 2015 review of Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth Listen to the 21st Folio episode discussing Kurzel’s Macbeth Sign up for updates on the first book to ever be published on the films of Norwegian filmmaker Joachim Trier Related episodes: Bonus 17: Saoirse Ronan and James McArdle in The Tragedy of Macbeth at the Almeida Theatre Ep. 108: The Deep Blue Sea(s) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.
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