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Hang around with enough podcasters who've been at it for a while and you’ll eventually hear many of them ask the same question: “I don't know if my podcast is as big as it should be.” Or perhaps, in rare cases, “I don't know if the quality of the content I'm putting out is as good as it should be.”  The best way to break the complacency trap is by understanding where you could be. You might have aspirations, but quite often they aren’t written down or codified in any way so that you or your podcast team can measure the effectiveness of your efforts.  When you're not really sure what success looks like, you just keep going about the motions. You become complacent. Complacency breeds familiarity. Familiarity becomes habit. And habits develop into ruts. You do the same thing day after day, week after week, or month after month, without any growth or change.  Once you’ve identified where you want to go, you're going to have to work harder. You have to dig in deeper, roll up your sleeves, and spend more time making great content. Can you do that? Can you afford that? Is that really what you want? Are you willing to completely overhaul your show? Are you ready to look at the consumption numbers provided by Apple Podcasts and Spotify to see exactly how much (or little) of your content is being consumed by listeners? Are you willing to make drastic changes when you face evidence that what you are doing right now is not resonating with your audience? I know that’s a heavy set of questions to dump on you on a Monday morning, podcaster. But at some point, if you really do want to move closer to viability, you’re going to have to face the reality those questions present. Because complacency is the biggest mistake that mid-level podcasters are making today. Raise this question with the other podcasters you interface with. Ask them if they’re complacent with where their show is today. Ask if they are happy or if there are things they want to do differently. Just by having this conversation with other podcasters, it’ll help you get over the hump and understand your own ideas around complacency and your podcasting efforts. And while you’re having this conversation, be sure to tell them what sparked the idea. Maybe they're not yet listening to Podcast Pontifications. Maybe they need the regular kick-start I try to provide here on the program. I don't sell ads and I’m not even selling this type of advice, so please tell a friend about PodcastPontifications.com. evo@PodcastLaunch.pro reaches me, and I’m always happy to answer any questions from listeners. Fire away! ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/mid-level-podcasters-biggest-mistake-complacency Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
So today I’m going to think through how COVID-19 could impact podcasting and the lives of podcasters. I’m not a doctor, so we won’t be talking prevention. Not my job. Will people like you and me opt out of attending podcasting events? Will we cancel already-booked travel plans? How will attendance of local events be impacted? How will interview-based podcasts change? Some enjoy doing that in-person, where the host sits face-to-face with the guest. Some prefer to capture the ambient sounds of the venue as part of the show’s flavor. How will they adapt if their guests can’t or won’t meet in person?  Then there’s the economics. What happens to your show’s primary income stream if budgetary constraints cause advertisers to pull back? Or supporters? Or people who normally buy your products/services but are out of a job? I worry a little bit about the global supply chain as well. I've got all of my equipment and you probably do as well. It's more disruption in the global services chain that we podcasters rely on to distribute our episodes everywhere that concerns me.  If you've not been thinking about how COVID-19 will impact your podcast, you probably should start. Yes, on top of the worrying you’re already doing about how the virus might personally impact you, your family, and people that you care about, I need you to also think about the impact COVID-19 may have on your podcasting efforts. It's hard to prepare when we’re in the early stages and really don't know how big the possible impact might be. But thinking through the things mentioned today can only help you as you continue your podcasting efforts through this health crisis.  Pro tip: Reach out to your fellow podcasters and find out what they're thinking or worried about. Tell them you heard this episode of Podcast Pontifications and are bringing up the conversation so everyone in your podcasting circle is as prepared as they can be. Enjoy your Friday tomorrow (I know it’s Thursday, but don't do episodes of this show on Friday) I'll be back on Monday for a short week because of Podfest Expo (no, I didn’t cancel). With that in mind, I shall see you on Monday for yet another Podcast Pontifications.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/podcasting-through-the-covid-19-crisis Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
The decision to put content -- popular content -- behind a paywall is always an agonizing choice for any decent person. Podcasters included.  It’s not a binary choice. Nor is it a choice that any podcaster gets to make. Successfully implementing a switch to directly charging for access is, for most podcasts, completely dependent on the size of the audience. Here’s an easily busted myth: Every single person who currently subscribes/listens to your free podcast will continue to listen to (and therefore pay for) your content when you put it behind a paywall. That’s categorically false. The question really becomes this; how many will, and how much can I make? On average, you’ll be lucky to see 2% of the people who currently subscribe to your show for free switching over to the paid model. Sure, it can be higher. But it can also be lower. 2% is a good number from which you can do your projections.  Nota bene: Subscribing to a behind-the-paywall podcast isn’t any harder than subscribing to any other podcast, with the exception that (for now) these for-fee podcasts don’t show up in podcast apps or directories.  Let’s get back to that 2% number. If you have a thousand people listening to your episodes on a regular basis, you can expect 20 make the for-fee switch. If you're charging five bucks a month for access, that's $100. For me, going to a fee-based model doesn’t make sense for my podcast. I have roughly 300 people who listen to me. 2% means I’d have six people paying, so a paltry sum. But if I had 10,000? Or 100,000? I’d have to consider it. If my thoughts have you ready to jump on the paywall bandwagon, I’d advise caution and some math before you take the plunge. There are many, many things to consider. Choose wisely. This is something you shouldn't rush into.  My advice? Check with your podcasting friends. See if your fellow podcasters are considering this as well, weighing the size of their audience against potential revenue gains to determine viability. And discussing the potential (real, actually) outcry from current listeners if there were to make the switch.  Send your friends this episode and blame me for your bringing up the conversation. That way they can listen to a neutral 3rd party’s opinion and not bring the judgment hammer on your head. I can take the heat!  What do you think about this? Email me at evo@podcastlaunch.pr and tell me where you stand on the topic of putting some or all of your podcast content behind a paywall. ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/paywalls-podcasting-and-prejudice Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Episodic podcasts don’t require the listener to back up to the beginning to get caught up. The most recent episode is sufficient, and even someone does take an immediate shine to your content, they might go back and pick up two or three of your prior episodes. It's not all that common where people download your entire catalog.  Or is it? My bigger concerns when people back and listen to everything ever produced by me are twofold. Dealing with evolved best practices.  Dealing with evolved cultural norms. I am deep in the process of fixing some poor decisions I made when I started this show back in 2018. In short, I’m (finally) combining everything into a single property instead of relying on various disparate systems to present the show and episodes. The hard work is the boring part where I copy and paste content from various platforms to the new platforms. As I do it, I'm seeing some things that I'm not sure should be out there anymore.  Can I trust a listener will know that any bad advice I gave back then has been updated? I don’t think I can. I don't mention the date during the recording. And podcast listening apps don’t go out of their way to show the date when a show was recorded. And I don’t really want them to, as I’m working hard to make evergreen content that is discovered by search engines, so I don’t want someone turned off by thinking the content is old and outdated. Except sometimes it is outdated! Agh! The angst is real. Should a podcast be held responsible for what they said 10 years ago? Or should the responsibility fall on the listener to examine publishing date so that they take the contents with the context of time? That just sounds weasely as I type it!  I don't know the right answer to this question. I want you to think about it. I think everybody has to come up with their own right answer.  What are you going to do? What's your plan with all of this? Maybe you should have this conversation with another podcaster to find out what their plan is. I think these kinds of decisions are best made when we discuss them together. So talk with other podcasts at the next meetup, online chat, or when you go to Facebook or Reddit to see what the various forums have to say. Ask your fellow podcasts how are they dealing with the skeletons in their podcasting closet.  And of course, you can tell them it was an episode of Podcast Pontifications that sparked the question. Yes, this is me asking you to tell someone to listen to this particular episode (and the whole show) because it’s helpful for any working podcaster, right? I mean, that's why you listen.  If you want to tell me what you're doing to address your podcasting skeletons, email me at evo@PodcastLaunch.pro. I shall be back tomorrow with yet another Podcast Pontifications. Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/dealing-with-the-skeletons-in-your-podcasting-closet Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
The promise most low-cost podcast media hosting providers make with you is for “unmetered” bandwidth. It doesn't matter how big your show gets, they say. They’ve got the bandwidth taken care of, and your monthly bill won’t increase.  Well... what if I told you that wasn't always true?  What I’m about to say should not cause the vast majority of podcasters to take drastic action. For the overwhelming majority of podcasts, you’ll always keep paying whatever you're paying right now for podcast hosting.  If you’re successful at growing your podcast into a commercially viable enterprise, to the point you’re getting tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of downloads on your episodes, your podcast hosting company will be forced to make a business decision, because you’re costing them thousands of dollars each month. They’d like that back, and even to turn a profit so they can stay in business. Look at the contract you probably didn’t read that spells out the terms of service with your hosting company. Chances are, you’ll find a clause that states something along the lines of, “If your show gets too big, we're going to reach out to you and find ways to help us recoup our real costs.”  If you really do have designs on growing your show (and a plan to do so) to the point where it's commercially viable, then you need to prepare for this eventuality. Because it will come up. You need to be eyes wide open that someone will have to pay the bandwidth cost eventually.  Because TANSTAAFL.  Do you have a friend in podcasting who needs to know about this? Do me a favor and send them this particular episode. Word of mouth works really well to grow a podcast. There are almost 900,000 podcasts available, but I’m nowhere near having 900,000 people listening to my program, so I’m not facing the reality I just laid out. So don’t worry: You can send me as many listeners as you like!  And if you have questions for me on this topic or anything related to making podcasting better, reach out to me at evo@podcastlaunch.pro.  Enjoy the rest of your Thursday and your Friday tomorrow, as I don’t produce this show on Friday. Instead, I'll be back on Monday with yet another Podcast Pontifications. ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/hitting-the-limits-of-low-cost-podcast-hosting Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Last week at Podcast Movement Evolutions 2020, I paid a lot of attention to the conversations regarding podcast advertising as a business model. Mostly because of the new moves in podcast ad tech (something I’ll dig into in future episodes) that are increasingly interesting to my ex-ad-exec brain. But also to better understand where the threshold is today for having a show with an audience size big enough to be attractive to advertisers. So what’s big enough to be worthy of consideration? For many years, the threshold tossed around the community has been 5,000. No, not 5,000 total downloads over the life of your show. 5,000 downloads of a single episode of your show after it’s been live for 30 days. But according to the people I spoke with and saw on stage last week, that 5,000 download number is woefully out of date. The new threshold floated around was double that. Or quadruple that. Or in the case of one big direct response advertiser who talked about the success his company is having with podcast advertising, it’s 10x that. His team won’t even consider booking ads with shows that have less 50,000 downloads per episode after 30 days. So how much money is that? In the episode, I do a basic formula to show that each download of your show can be worth a dime. So if you have 5,000 downloads, that’s $500. And it’s hard to run a commercially viable business with a revenue stream of $500. $5000 is better… but you still need extra revenue sources to make that a going concern. So here’s a radical thought. Assuming your show is not yet at that level (most aren’t), and further assuming that you aren’t financially ruined if you eschew the $50 or $100 a month of ad revenue you might get from some of the self-service podcast ad providers…  What if you focused on growing your show through word of mouth?   No appeals to donate. No appeals to rate or review. Only a single call-to-action, repeated in every single episode for a year, that sincerely asks the listener to tell one friend about the show each and every time they listen. So let’s try it. If you got this far, you're either a working podcaster or you know working podcasters. Would you find one of them -- just one -- today and tell them about my show, Podcast Pontifications? Shoot them a text, an email, or send them a DM right now and tell them to listen. Thanks in advance! ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/is-selling-ads-on-your-podcast-worth-a-dime Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
When The Podcast Academy was announced last week, the reactions were split. One side was excited to see a solid and amazing professional awards ceremony that could bring the big dogs out to a red carpet event that could elevate podcasting. The other side was worried about the representation of indie podcasters. Would they be left in the cold?  It’s to that second group I want to speak today. If you are worried about the indie voice and wonder why I'm not, it's likely because you and I have a different definition of what “indie podcasting” means.  All amateurs or hobbyists are likely independents, but not all indie podcasters are amateurs or hobbyists. Plenty of indie podcasters produce amazing content that sounds great, is well-researched, and is well-produced. Many amateur or hobbyist podcasters will look at the list of 13 peer groups identified by The Podcast Academy and be puzzled. Director, host, and producers as separate roles? Aren’t performers hosts? And why are all those not-podcasting roles on the list? But independent podcasters who make great content won’t be puzzled at all. Because they know the value of all of those roles -- even if they have to assume many/most of those roles on their own. That’s the kind of indie podcaster I’m talking about: Those who recognize there's more to making a podcast than just grabbing a mic and saying whatever's on your mind.  Not that there's anything wrong with the record-and-release style of podcasting. Nor does this new organization seek to eliminate that type of podcasting. All they want is to elevate the people who are making amazing podcasting content.  There’s a lot of room between being having fun with a hobby and being a commercially viable success. But the good news is that commercially viable success doesn’t negate the efforts of those who have yet to achieve that status. So no, I'm not worried about the truly independent voices who are making amazing content. Nor am I worried about the hobbyist or amateur podcaster. This doesn't stop anyone from doing what anyone wants to do with their own podcast. However, this could provide a roadmap to making better content that stands a better chance of being recognized by this particular group. Before you go, would you go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and rate the podcast? Even better: go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and buy me a coffee to keep the show going in an ad-free format. And finally, if you are in business and you need help figuring out whether or not your company’s podcasting efforts are worthy of being recognized by The Podcast Academy, get in touch with me: evo@podcastlaunch.pro or go to SimplerMedia.pro to see a list of services offered to clients all around the globe. ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/the-podcast-academy-podcastings-usurper-or-savior Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
If Podcast Movement Evolutions 2020 had a theme, it was this: commercial viability is podcasting’s new brass ring.  Commercial viability means that the podcast has to pay for itself. It’s a business term because, for many, podcasting is a real and commercially viable business.  Instead of asking “How do I grow an audience for my podcast?”, rephrase the question to “How do I grow a podcast for my audience?” That change in thinking is at the core of what commercial viability in podcasting means. It starts with having an understanding of an audience and then building something that that audience wants.  But what if you don't have an audience? What if you just have an idea for what you think might be a really great show? Common advice is “just start!”. But that leaving a lot to chance. No, it’s leaving everything to chance. A better option is to put viability first. Take your idea to the audience before you start the podcast. Once you’ve identified the audience, shop your idea around with that audience. Ask them questions. Do interviews to make sure your idea can be crafted into a podcast that the audience truly wants and is something worthy of adding to their busy lives. And if so, go build that podcast!  I’ve more thoughts spurred from talks given and conversations had at Podcast Movement Evolutions 2020, so watch this space over the next few days.  In the meantime, go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a rating for the show. And one way to make sure that I bring you more ideas to help with your shows’ commercial viability is to visit  BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra. Finally, if you have questions about your business podcast and its own commercial viability, get in touch. I'm sure I can help. Reach me at evo@podcastlaunch.pro or go to SimplerMedia.pro to see a list of how we help businesses all around the world.  ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/your-new-podcasting-strategy-viability-first Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Last week a new service launched (not important enough to name or link) that lets anybody see how many subscribers any podcast has. When the buzz hit, many podcasters who checked their own show reported that the public subscriber counts didn’t match up with the private download data provided by their podcast hosting company, the service responsible for serving the media files. So what's going on here? Nothing of importance, other than a chance to remind you that subscriber counts are pointless. My biggest beef with counting podcast subscribers is that they don't represent anything tangible.  Ask any email marketer out there about their open rate. Or do a search for the current average open rate for an email campaign and you’ll be shocked at how few people open emails they have specifically subscribed to. Then reflect on your own inbox. How many un-opened emails from various places do you have?  Take a look at the gigantic YouTube channels, some with tens of thousands of subscribers or more. With few exceptions, those channels don’t see tens of thousands or millions of views on their video. It’s often only a single-digit percentage of subscribers who actually watch any of the videos published by those channels.  Think of all the apps you have on your phone that send you push-notifications that new content is available. How often do you respond to that notification? How easily do you ignore that ever-incrementing number in the little red bubble? Why would you think it's any different for people who subscribe to a podcast?  So yes, list your show everywhere. And yes, encourage people to subscribe. But stop trying to count the subscribers of your podcast. That number just doesn't matter.  What does matter is that you go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and rate this podcast. Also, if you found the information I provided today (or inside any of my 260 other episodes) informative and helpful, please go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and buy me a coffee. If you really love me, you’ll set that system to buy me a coffee every month. And if you need help with the business strategy behind your show, that's what we do here at Simpler Media Productions. Check us out at SimplerMedia.pro. You can also send me an email at evo@podcastlaunch.pro if you have questions.  I'll be back next Monday because the rest of this week I'll be attending Podcast Movement Evolutions this week in Los Angeles. When I return, I’ll do another Podcast Pontifications. ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/podcast-subscriber-tracking-is-pointless Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Everything you think you know about podcasting and SEO is backward. Once you get it in the right order, you will have a much better approach to SEO and your podcast.  Here's what I mean by a backward understanding of SEO. The way most people (podcasters included) approach SEO is by looking at their already-published posts, article, or other pages of their website, and then trying to add some SEO to the work already done. Like it’s table salt or some other seasoning that can improve the flavor.  After-the-fact SEO doesn't tend to work very well.  It’s great that you're spending time writing really in-depth episode details. That’s important. It’s great that you are spending time writing episode titles that are relevant and score high on the emotional scale. That's important. It’s great that you've done the hard work of building a great website that keeps your content all on one domain so the search engines can give you the authority you deserve. That’s important.  But all of those efforts are often for naught if you’re still thinking about SEO at the end of those processes. You need to move your SEO strategy to the front.  Before you do anything at all for your next planned episode: you have to do know what people are searching for.  So how do you find what searchers are actually searching for? There are lots of tools out there, like UberSuggest, SEMRush, and a whole lot more. I'm not personally endorsing any of them, simply because I don't care which one you use. Once you understand what people -- many or a few -- are searching for, you can make an episode about that one thing, that one topic, or that one keyword if that's how it helps you think about the solution. Make answering that search request the primary function of that particular episode. Give people what they are searching for. And do it first, before you start planning or recording, not afterward. Create content that answers the needs of searchers. That's how you get to the first page of Google. Not from doing minor tweaks to your site structure. Not from revamping your titles. Sure, those are important things, but not nearly as important as putting SEO at the beginning of your episode planning process. What’s also super important is that you go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a rating or a review for this show. Don’t worry about where. That service will take care of that. If you found this information valuable, you can buy me a coffee. BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra exists for that. And if you need help with the business strategies for your podcast, that’s what my company does. We’re Simpler Media Productions, and you can find us at SimplerMedia.pro. Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/turning-seo-for-podcasts-on-its-head Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
I podcasted my way right through the 2008 financial crisis. But don't think that I'm some sort of financial genius. I'm also the moron who bought a gigantic house I couldn't afford at the height of the mortgage bubble. So while I’m no help on economic issues, I do have some relevant advice for you and your podcasting efforts on surviving the coming recession  My four pieces of advice will focus on things other than “go find more money”. Though clearly, if your podcasting efforts right now are funded by other people -- sponsors, advertisers, patrons, big VC dollars -- economic downturns are going to be particularly problematic for you. So let’s get into the four ways you can prepare as a podcaster for the coming financial hiccup. 1 - Diversify The Content You Podcast When the recession comes, it's going to impact shows disproportionately. Yes, podcasting will survive, but a lot of shows won’t. With multiple shows or you having roles to play on multiple shows, you spread out your risk. 2 - Differentiate Your Podcasted Content When the recession hits, a lot of those undifferentiated shows will share the same fate. On the surface, that sounds like a good thing. Instead of 3,152 entrepreneur interview shows available today, that number might shrink drastically. If yours is one of the few that survives, that’s more audience for you, right? Maybe. But that’s being hopeful instead of strategic. 3 - Understand Your Podcasting Stack If you rely on other people to keep your podcast running, remember that the recession will hit those service providers too. Some may go out of business. Some may be forced to give up their side hustles and find a more permanent gig. What happens when one of the cogs in your machine or of the links in your chain (pick your metaphor) is taken out of the picture thanks to that recession? What are you going to do? 4 - Built Your Network Now The 2008 recession hit many people completely unaware. Without access to their work email accounts or their contact database from work, they had to start building a brand new network from scratch. Do whatever you can to start networking. Start making connections. Get out of the podcasting bubble that you have created for yourself and make sure you've got lifelines out to other people. Who knows what might happen and who might be able to help you? Or who you might be able to help.  Remember, it's not a question of if the next recession's coming but when. I'm not predicting its arrival. I am saying that to not only survive the next recession but to podcast your way through it, those four tips will help you get there.  And doing one or all of these three things will help me help you: BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra is for people who care enough about this content to support the program financially with tiny, tiny donations. RateThisPodcast.com/podpont is the easiest way to rate the show so others decide to take a chance on the content. SimplerMedia.pro is where you can find out more information about how my firm, Simpler Media Productions, helps professional service providers and businesses make strategic podcasting decisions. Email me at evo@podcastlaunch.pro for more information. I'm off on Friday, so have a great weekend. I will be back here on Monday with another Podcast Pontifications.  ---- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/podcasting-your-way-through-the-coming-recession Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
It's pretty easy to make a podcast. And getting easier by the minute. Not necessarily better, but it’s a lot easier to make a podcast now than it was just a few years ago.  With that easiness comes a false sense of expertise.  If you’re still podcasting today the way you did when you stumbled into podcasting 10 years ago…  there are probably better ways to podcast that you haven’t yet incorporated.  So before you offer your services or advice, I want you to take what you’re doing today a step further. Specifically, I want you to work harder before you offer your advice or services to someone else. In order for you to be a coach, consultant, or generally helpful person who also wants to make podcasting better, you first need to understand that there's more to podcasting than just the way that you do it. Even better, you need to understand how to make all sorts of podcasts. So take your easy-interview show and make it more journalistic. Spend time gathering “field recordings” and incorporate them into your episodes. Do radically different things with your content that may take you 15x the amount of time you spend today. Yes, that does sound like hard work, doesn’t it? But doing so will allow you to learn much more about making a podcast. I really believe that trying your hand at harder things is one of the best ways to grow. And it’s the only way to be worthy of having your own training course or developing a voice in the support forums that is worthy of listening to. Food for thought. Speaking of food, or at least a coffee, how about going to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra to help support the program?  You can also go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a rating for the content that you have heard here.  And if you need some help with the strategy for your business, get in touch with me. evo@podcastlaunch.pro reaches me, or go to SimplerMedia.pro to see a list of services that we offer clients all around the globe. ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/harder-podcasting-makes-podcasting-better Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
There are four levels of podcast planning I want you to think about, and I particularly want you to think of them in sequence so you can see how they build on one another. • Planning For Better Podcast Episodes The first layer of planning you should consider is the planning you do for each of your episodes. You have a plan for your episodes, don't you? A plan for each episode? Even if you’re the kind of podcaster who likes to just get behind the microphone and wing it (I have been that kind of podcaster), you need a plan for each episode. • Planning For Better Podcasts (Shows) You need a solid plan for your entire show. How do the episodes of your show link together? Can you create an arc that allows each episode to be unique, but deliver a payoff for listeners who stick with you episode after episode? Have you worked out a plan for the weeks or months you’ll take a break from podcasting so you don’t overload on stress?  • Planning For Your Involvement On Other Podcasts Can you play a role in other people's shows? Spreading your influence beyond just the episodes of your show is a great way to increase your overall visibility and cause opportunities to happen. It'll also make you better at all aspects podcasting when you're doing more than one thing. • Planning For A Bigger Role In The Podcasting Industry Even if you're brand new at podcasting right now, you won’t always be. And that means you need a plan to have a bigger role in our industry. Are you engaging in constructive conversations with other podcasting leaders, either at conferences or in online communities? Are you well known in podcasting as someone with valuable and worthy opinions? If not, what's your plan to establish yourself at that level? I think we could all use some occasional reminding to not be so focused on our singular podcast that we lose sight of the bigger picture. And almost always, having a plan is better than having no plan at all.  Now, I didn't plan on asking this, but if you wanted to go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and buy me a coffee, you can set it up so that it buys me a single coffee every single month. If money's a little tight and you just want to show your love and appreciation for what I have to say, go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a rating. It’ll customize the choices to just those that work on the device you used to get to that URL. And finally, if you know of someone or you are someone who needs some assistance with a podcast strategy that works with your overall business objectives; that's what my company, Simpler Media Productions, does for our clients. Go to SimplerMedia.pro or just drop me an email and we'll talk: evo@podcastlaunch.pro.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/planning-for-better-podcasting Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Word of mouth not only comes with a recommendation of what you should listen to but why you should listen. It helps to think about other media content to get us out of our head. Imagine that you’ve received a movie recommendation from me that came with all the reasons I loved a movie. But when you sit down in the theater, the following happens: The movie starts and you're fairly certain from the first opening sights and sounds this movie is not what you expected.  Perhaps more importantly, you can tell right away that you're probably not going to like it. Yes, you’ll probably stick it out. You just dropped $15 and you’re committed. But what if you were sitting at home watching the movie on a streaming service? Most people I surveyed said they wouldn’t finish. If it were an episodic television program, like news or a comedy sketch show, most said they wouldn’t stick around the full hour. But if it were a serialized show on a streaming service, most said they’d stick around for an episode (maybe two) before giving it the boot. Which brings us back to podcasting. How does this behavior relate to our world? I’d wager it’s exactly like one or more of those experiences above. And it's a failure on the part of the creators to live up to the hype associated with word of mouth that causes people to give up on episodes, podcasts, or network. Whatever your podcast is hyped with, get to that first! If you have a chatter and talky-stuff segment to stay nice and chummy with your long-term listeners, don’t let that get in the way of the hype new listeners cam to experience!  If you occasionally drop not-normal episodes, preface that! Let your listeners know -- in the audio of the episode-- that this episode is something out of the ordinary, perhaps going so far as to recommend new listeners not listen to this episode first. If you’re making serialized content, make sure you’ve set the tags in your feed so that the first episode of your series shows up first. And check your feed to make sure bonus content or seasons show up the way you want them to for new listeners. Also, make sure your website -- a likely first-stop for people won’t haven’t yet developed the podcasting habit -- showcases your best episodes, not just your most recent one. The same advice holds true if you run a website for a podcast network or collective. Feature the best rather than the most recent. Take time today to make sure your podcasting is living up to the hype associated with its word of mouth, would you? It’s critical to ensure new listeners immediately get what they expected, and it’s the best way to keep growing your audience.  If you love that advice, I would love it if you went to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and bought me a coffee. You can even set up a monthly recurring donation. If a small contribution isn’t possible for you right now but you still want to give me a little something, go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a rating or review of the show.  Finally, if you’d like some help making sure your show or network is living up to the hype so you have the best possible chance to reach new listeners and grow, get in touch with me, as it's what I do. SimplerMedia.pro or drop me an email at Evo@odcastlaunch.pro.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/better-podcasting-by-living-up-to-the-hype Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
The gym or fitness center is a great metaphor for podcasting. The building itself and all of the equipment inside represent the tools and services we working podcasters use to make our podcasts. The people working out -- patrons -- represent working podcasters like yourself. You don't know how serious these patrons are. They could just be in there like me trying to get limber once again (as if I ever was), or they could be training for the next marathon, or they might be professional bodybuilders. Who knows? The same holds true in podcasting. You don’t know how serious they take podcasting when you encounter another podcaster. Some patrons, perhaps most, only use a limited set of equipment for their workout. They check-in, workout for a set period of time, and then they leave. That's the same pattern a lot of podcasters employ: they ply their craft using one or two pieces of equipment to make their podcast episodes, and they’re done.  In-and-out. No muss. No fuss. And that’s perfectly fine. People who approach podcasting like that are why we're approaching 900,000 podcasts.  The second type of people are at the gym are usually not working out, but are instead assisting the patrons of the gym. Personal trainers, you might call them. These people represent the professional service providers found in the podcasting industry. Audio editors. Copywriters. Podcast strategists. Personal assistants. Anyone really who offer ways to help podcasters with their craft. Where the gym-employed trainer can show you how to work any of the equipment, they probably aren’t much help beyond that. The same goes for podcast consultants. Some, perhaps most, can show you how to podcast the way they podcast, but they probably don’t have much experience beyond that.  But beyond the trainers on the payroll of the gym are the “professional” personal trainers who have studied training or physical therapy at university. Maybe they previously worked for a professional sports team or at a sports medicine clinic. These trainers will have a much more complete service offering that goes beyond the confines of the gym they are working in with their clients. So too is it for podcast consultants who do who have been in the trenches for a long time. Truly professional podcast consultants are going to be more qualified to help you make a more well-rounded show or to help you get to the next level with our podcasting. But the problem with working with truly professional personal trainers is that you must follow their routine. If you instead dictate the type of workout you want to do, the type of equipment you want to use, the frequency and the length of the sessions you want to commit to, and then state what outcome you’re looking to achieve… Well, you're probably not going to have a very good time. If anything I’ve written (or said, if you listened) resonated with you, I would appreciate it if you would go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont. It only takes a few seconds and is a free way for you to show your appreciation. If you feel like it, you can BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and slide a couple of bucks my way. A Finally, if you are looking for a personal trainer who knows what they're really doing to help with your business-focused podcast; get in touch with me. Evo@podcastlaunch.pro  or go to SimplerMedia.pro to see a list of the services we offer clients today.  I’ll be at Outlier SLC, so please say hi if you are there. And if not, I’ll be back on Monday for another Podcast Pontifications.  ----- Share this with a friend:  Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
t's a lot easier to record a podcast today than it was 10 years ago. It's a lot easier to post a podcast episode today than it was when I started in 2004. It's a lot easier to manage your RSS feeds. More podcasters are aware of best practices and standards.  So yes: the process of podcasting has gotten easier. Moreover, it will continue to get easier over time to make a podcast.  But it still isn’t any easier to make a good podcast. With few exceptions, all of those products & services that make it easier to podcast are designed to eliminate the rote and repetitive tasks that get in the way of the act of podcasting. While removing those low-level tasks from your brain might leave you with more time to focus on making your podcasts better, that’s not what they were designed to do. Yes, there certainly are some improvements to make your podcast sound better. But if your waiting for a future where you will sit down, talk into a microphone, and everything else will be done perfectly for your good podcast, well…  Keep hope alive. It takes time to create good content, and software probably won’t replace your need to focus on making really good content.  Technology doesn't stand still, and new tech not only requires someone to know how to use it, but it also allows creators to go deeper and make things better. And more complicated. It goes hand in hand. Here’s the rub: better content means audiences are getting more demanding. As they see how good content can be, they become less forgiving of half-assed attempts. You have to step up your game to make your content attractive to them. In the year since I first raised this topic, I’ve done a lot to make this podcast better. I hope you’ve noticed a difference. If you did, I’d appreciate it if you went to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont. It is easier to leave a nice rating or review for this show via that service. Try it out to see how simple it is. After that, you can go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and well, you know… buy me a coffee to show your support for the show.  And if you need help with podcasting for your business or the professional service that you run; my firm is here to help. We do make it easier for our clients to have better podcasts (because we do most of the work!) Evo@podcastlaunch.pro reaches me. You can go to SimplerMedia.pro to see the list of services.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/its-2020-is-it-easy-to-make-a-good-podcast-yet Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
Clients often ask me how they can promote their show to gain more listeners. Not that I’m surprised. That same question is still asked by people who've been podcasting for nearly 16 years. Clearly, some have cracked the nut. When you look at download numbers for the top podcasts --  those that get all of the advertising dollars precisely because they have the majority of the listeners -- you see that overall listenership to those big shows continues to grow.  But the average listenership for the rest of us remains relatively unchanged. That means the big shows are getting bigger, and everyone else is stagnating or is seeing tiny growth. So why is that? Why are we seeing big shows grow, but very little growth at the lower levels? There could be (and likely are) many reasons, but the one I want to talk to you about today a reality you might need reminding of:  The majority of potential podcast listeners aren't hardcore podcast listeners. Candidly, I don’t think there's much that an individual podcaster can do to increase the overall awareness of podcasting to the masses. However, that doesn't mean you should not try. You’re just one person. I'm just one person. Everybody else is just one person. But if our collective voices get loud enough, we just might be better heard by the masses. Right now, most of your podcast promotion probably leverages other podcasts and podcasters. That’s called “fishing where the fish are”, and it’s a super-smart idea. Yes, you should continue to do that. But you also need to branch out to people who aren't yet listening to podcasts. You must make sure your promotional content is attractive enough to appeal to people who are aware of podcasting but decided it's not really for them. You must make sure that what you promote is attractive to anybody who sees the promotional content. Not only do you have to do it, but your podcasting friends also have to do it. I have to do it.  Unrelated but important to me is asking you to go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and say something nice about the show. I’d really appreciate it.  If you found the information in this episode (or the hundreds of other episodes) valuable, go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra. And if you need help making podcasting work well for your company, my company, Simpler Media Productions, can help!  Go to SimplerMedia.pro or send me an email at Evo@podcastlaunch.pro.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/pitching-your-podcast-to-passive-people Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
I sometimes wish podcasting were as simple as sitting down in front of a microphone and talking (and I certainly try to make it that simple for my clients). But you and I know that there's a lot more to podcasting than just talking into a microphone or editing an audio file. There are a lot of processes to process, and most people find that process happens best when you're inside of the zone. It’s smart to establish a zone like that for your own work. But exercise caution: getting too deeply into the zone can lead to a pathological condition. And if you’re podcasting just one thing, like you really just have a podcast instead of being more broadly focused on podcasting overall, it’s too easy to be locked into your zone. That makes you myopic: so focused on your thing that you lose sight of the larger world around you. Make sure that you find a way to get into the zone so that you are more productive. But also make sure that you can break out of that zone from time to time to observe the wider universe around you. Because podcasting changes all of the time. One change is that you can now rate podcasts very simply. All you have to do is go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont, for example. It doesn't matter what app you use to listen to podcasts. It doesn't matter what device you use to listen to podcasts., It doesn’t matter whether you're on mobile or your laptop when you go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont. Try it and see how easy it is to leave a rating for this show. If you thought this information was helpful, you can go to BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and buy me a coffee. You can pick a monthly recurring donation so that you pass a little bit of money my way every month. I don't charge for the show and I don't run advertising on the show, so your support is nice to have. And if you need assistance with your podcast, please get in touch with me. Reach me at evo@PdcastLaunch.pro or go to SimplerMedia.pro to see all of the services that we offer our clients.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/podcasting-in-the-zone-without-zoning-out Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
The intangible benefits you get from your podcast are likely the most important evidence of your success as a podcaster. I can take this fairly complex topic and make it more simple to understand by talking about two different intangibles that you need to be tracking: reputation and resource.  For resource, I'm talking about the content you create. Even more specifically, you need to understand whether or not others perceive your content as resourceful. Is your content referenced by people after you produce it? Do people find your content such a resource that they use it as an example? When I keynote the Outlier Podcast Festival in Salt Lake City at the end of this month, I'm going to reference a lot of podcasts as examples of the things I'm talking about. Will yours be one? Are you making content for your show that other people, whether they are listeners or your peers, view as a resource?  For reputation, I’m talking about your reputation. Not the reputation of your shows or your episodes. This is your own reputation. Are you, personally, seen as someone with a good reputation amongst others in your own industry? Do you get invited to speak at events? Do people bring up your name in conversation when discussing your industry? And when it does come up, do others say nice things about you?  Are you seen as someone with a good reputation in your peer group? One of the mistakes I see a lot of podcasters make, especially in my peer group, is being so focused on making sure that their content is seen as a good resource that they neglect to build their own reputation. So much so that they, the person providing the content, oftentimes disappear. I can't tell you the number of shows that I listen to where I don't know the name of the host, the producer, or anyone involved. I know the name of the show, and I know the content is a good resource. But that person doesn't get any reputation points from me because I don’t know who they are. They failed to say their name enough for me to lock it into my long-term memory. They fail to brand themselves as a part of the content they produce.  As you look and listen back to your own content, ask yourself if it resourceful, and if your effort is increasing your reputation. Those are the things that I want you to understand.  I also want you to understand that you can go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave a nice review. On whatever device you are using, that service will customize the options for you, so check it out. I also want you to buy me a coffee. BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra is an easy and cheap way to show your appreciation for my content by funneling a few bucks my way. I don't run ads and you're probably, as a working podcaster, are not in need of the services that I provide to my clients.  But if you are in need of some strategic podcasting guidance, check out SimplerMedia.pro for a list of the services we offer to clients all around the world. Enjoy your Friday tomorrow. I will be back on Monday with yet another Podcast Pontifications.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/unmeasurable-metrics-tracking-intangibles Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
We live in a world of seemingly non-stop podcast conferences. A flurry of thought-provoking articles about podcasting. Online courses and services for podcasters are coming out on a continual basis. So it’s quite natural for you to want to get even more into the podcasting world. It’s exploding, and you want to increase your chances of being swept up by this movement. To put together a quality show can easily take a significant portion of a day, if not the entire day. And then there are the other things you have to do, you know. Like… your job?  The simple solution for that starts with this realization: There's more to podcasting than the actual physical stuff, like sitting behind a microphone and talking, editing and engineering, writing up episode notes or designing artwork and graphics. On this episode, I’ll give you these four ways to go deeper into podcasting without starting another podcast: Solicit guest appearances on other shows Write about podcasting for other publications Speak about podcasting at conferences and meetups Become part of another podcast In short: Where can you lend your voice in podcasting that doesn't require you to have a new podcast?  And f you liked what I had to say here, you can do a few things for me. Please go to RateThisPodcast.com/podpont and leave me a rating on whatever service you feel like. It’s super easy. if you really thought that this was good value, you are more than welcome to support me by clicking on BuyMeACoffee.com/EvoTerra and pass a couple of bucks my way. And finally, if you are in business and you know that your business needs some help with a podcasting push that’s strategized around your existing business goals and objectives, get in touch. Because that's what we do here at Simpler Media. We make it easy to podcast better for businesses. Go to SimplerMedia.pro for more information.  ----- Share this with a friend: http://podcastpontifications.libsyn.com/how-to-do-more-in-podcasting-without-doing-more-podcasting Podcast Pontifications is published by Evo Terra four times a week and is aimed at the working podcaster. The purpose of this show is to make podcasting better, not just easier. Follow Evo on Twitter for more podcasting insights as they come. And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit SimplerMedia.pro to see how Simpler Media Productions can help your firm. Podcasting is our only business!
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