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In today’s episode, I talk to Will Fung, head chef at China Chilcano in Washington, D.C. With his extensive cooking experience, plus an educational year spent learning the art of high-end Japanese cooking in Kyoto, he brings a wide range of influences to his menu. You’ll learn the concept of the Hot Pot and how you can put one together, the cultural influences behind the menu at China Chilcano, and what it’s like to work with Jose Andre. He also shares his eye-opening experience working in Kyoto and breaks down what it’s like managing near-constant change with the concept of Kaiseki. He also shares his favorite way to make fried rice at home, and his special recipe for XO sauce. What you'll learn with chef Will Fung Smells from chef Will Fung childhood (3:20) The gingery fish dish he grew up on (3:56) Breaking down the concept of the Hot Pot (5:29) How hot pot flavor profiles vary by region (7:25) The story behind Fat Choi Hot Pot (8:48) The cultural influences of China Chilcano (9:47) Dishes you’ll find on the menu at China Chilcano (10:36) Chef Will Fung experience working with Jose Andre (12:27) The menu creation process (15:26) Learning to pivot when supply issues happen (15:35) How chef Will Fung incorporates seasonal themes into his food (17:29) Understanding Kaiseki, the art of fine dining in Japan (21:56) The resources required to manage a 12-month changing menu (24:09) What floral arrangements and plating food have in common (24:48) Lessons from Kaiseki cuisine (25:35) A Kyoto food experience he’d like to see more of in America (27:03) Chef Will Fung favorite piece of cooking equipment (28:03) How to make fried rice at home, Will Fung-style (29:49) 5 spots to eat in DC (32:19) His guilty pleasure food (34:23) Cookbooks he’s been inspired by (34:49) One kitchen pet peeve (36:00) The sauce he always has on hand at home and how to make it (36:46) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in the DMV area Conversation with Chef Opie Crooks Conversation with Chef Matt Conroy Interview with Chef Masako Morishita Conversation with Chef Declan Horgan Conversation with Private Chef Chris Spear Covid-19 – Top Chefs Respond (with Chef Ian Boden) Conversation with Chef Hari Cameron Conversation with chef Johnny Spero Interview with chef Drew Adams Interview with chef Edward Lee Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland Chef Erik Ramirez Chef Sheldon Simeon Nick DiGiovanni #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Ceviche Nikkei: Big Eye Tuna, Soy-Cured Egg Yolk, Ponzu, Puffed Quinoa, Avocado, Jicama, Red Onion, Furikake Ensalada de Quinoa: Quinoa, Choclo, Cucumber, Okinawa Potato, Fresh Cheese, Lettuce Cups Concolón: Crispy Fried Rice Pot, Pork Belly, Egg, Lap Chong Sausage, Shitake Mushroom, Bok Choy, Rocoto Siu Mai Pollo: Chicken, Scallion, Cloud Ear Mushroom, Aji Amarillo, Black Vinegar Chica de Jora Dipping Sauce Click to tweet Asian people don't like very sweet desserts. So the best dessert compliment you can get from an Asian person is that it's not too sweet. Click To Tweet The first week [of a new menu], you don't really know how much of each dish you're going to sell. So you don't know how to prep. In the second and third weeks, you adjust and fine-tune how to prep things. And the last week, it is cruise control now. Click To Tweet
In today’s episode, I talk to Opie Crooks, chef at No Goodbyes at The Line Hotel located in DC.  The restaurant honors the traditions of Mid Atlantic food culture, exploring seasonality and harnessing relationships between chefs and local producers.  You’ll hear how Opie got his start with some of the most well-known chefs in the industry, and what he learned from his experience at Le Cordon Bleu. He explains why his connection to the local producers is so important, and how seasonality inspires creativity.  What we covered in this episode Chef Opie Crooks' culinary school experience (3:20) How the restaurant at Le Cordon Bleu stacked up (4:36) Perspective on going to culinary school or not (5:34) How chef Opie Crooks became part of the team at Roy’s (7:15) Advice for aspiring restaurateurs (12:39) The inspiration behind No Goodbye’s (14:51) Why chef Opie Crooks is not selling a “concept” (15:52) What farm to table cooking looks like in the Mid Atlantic (16:11) How seasonality inspires creativity (16:45) Creating relationships with local producers (19:31) Ingredients inspiring him right now (23:17) How the hotel restaurant experience differs from other restaurants (24:55) Cooking food that needs to travel (26:24) Comparing creativity between breakfast, lunch, and dinner (28:00) Seasonal dishes to prepare at home (30:13) The current food scene in DC (31:04) A food tour through the city (31:45) Chef Opie Crooks' guilty pleasure food (31:59) Cookbooks to inspire you (32:15) Kitchen pet peeves (33:03) His condiment obsession (33:29) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in the DMV area Conversation with Chef Matt Conroy Interview with Chef Masako Morishita Conversation with Chef Declan Horgan Conversation with Private Chef Chris Spear Covid-19 – Top Chefs Respond (with Chef Ian Boden) Conversation with Chef Hari Cameron Conversation with chef Johnny Spero Interview with chef Drew Adams Interview with chef Edward Lee Click to tweet Being a chef requires that hands-on instinctive approach and discipline. It's like being a woodworker; you can read all you want about how to make a boat from wood, but until you actually go do it, it's not really feasible. Click To Tweet I can cook a dish, but it doesn't matter if I can cook it. It matters if the cooks, who are going to be cooking it every single night, know how to cook it. Click To Tweet We don't want restaurants to continue in the way that they were. So, No Goodbyes was kind of a way to say we're not saying goodbye, but we want to welcome people back into something new, something different, something that is going to be sustainable for the future. Click To Tweet I hate the word concept because No Goodbyes isn't necessarily a concept. It's not like, ‘Let me get some investors, let me pop up a couple of these all over the United States, and then I'll go to Tokyo, and then I'll go to Vegas.’ It's not one of those things. It's a way of thinking and cooking. Click To Tweet When you cook in a way that's fixated on the landscape, it's a way of thinking. What is the best possible way that I can cook this food to number one, make it delicious, number two, make it nutritious for the guests, and number three, return as much value to the local food economy as we can? Click To Tweet Social media Chef Opie Crooks Instagram Linkedin Social media No Goodbyes Instagram Facebook Social media The Line Hotel Instagram Facebook Twitter Links mentioned in this episode The Line Hotel No Goodbyes restaurant
In today’s episode, I talk to Jorge Guzman, a 2022 James Beard chef award finalist. He’s in charge of the culinary magic behind Petit Leon in Minneapolis, Sueño in Dayton, Ohio, and pop up Pollo al Carbon. Mid-pandemic, he found himself in a job he no longer wanted to be in. A phone call changed everything, and today he’s the chef and owner of a handful of highly regarded restaurants in the midwest.  You’ll hear about the unusual restaurant concept at Petit Leon, what was behind his motivation to open his own restaurant, and his unique creative process that brings together influences from Mexico, Spain, France, and all over the world. He also shares memories of his Yucatan childhood, his penchant for leadership, and why the way he chooses to lead matters. What you'll learn with chef Jorge Guzmán Why chef Jorge Guzmán decided to open his own restaurant (3:16) Advice for anyone wanting to open their own place (4:50) Where the food influence came from (6:15) Why they had to have a burger on the menu (7:46) What makes Yucatan food so distinctive (9:44) The worldly history of El Pastor (11:14) Chef Jorge Guzmán's top 3 Yucatan favorites (11:59) How Sueño differs from Petit Leon (14:16) Flavors from Jorge Guzmán's childhood the Yucatan (14:54) Where his creative process starts (16:37) The Petit Leon take on El Pastor (17:13) Why collaboration is key (19:35) The special spice paste they use to add flavor (21:29) How Pollo al Carbon was born (24:04) Why finding funding is so challenging (25:19) Chef Jorge Guzmán's experience of going to Culinary School (27:08) The key skill you’ll get in culinary school (28:03) His intuitive hiring process (29:08) His one regret coming up as a chef (29:54) How he influences a positive work culture (31:28) Why managing by fear doesn’t work (33:51) A dish to try at home (36:02) The eclectic restaurant culture in Minneapolis (37:28) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland Nick DiGiovanni Chef Sheldon Simeon Chef Erik Ramirez Click to tweet With me being the chef-owner, you're gonna get a lot of Mexican influences with the food, and it's something that I wasn't willing to budge on.
 Click To Tweet We didn't want to have our restaurant defined as a cuisine. We wanted it to be a great space with great food, and when you vocally talk about it, it almost doesn't make sense. But when you go and experience it, it all just kind of comes together.
 Click To Tweet In Minneapolis, if you don't have a good burger, you're dead in the water.
 Click To Tweet One of the reasons that I cook is because it reminds me of home. And it's one of the ways to kind of transport myself back home. I think as immigrants, that's one of the main visceral ways to be reminded of home.
 Click To Tweet I don't want to surround myself with people that aren't like-minded or that are going to waste my time or my staff’s time. If I feel like you won't be a good fit personally, I don't care where you've worked. We just won't hire you. We just hire people based on attitude and demeanor. Click To Tweet Social media Chef Jorge Guzmán Instagram Facebook Twitter Social media Restaurant Petit León Instagram Facebook Social media Restaurant Sueńo Instagram Facebook Links mentioned in this episode Restaurant Petit León Restaurant Sueńo
In today’s episode, I talk to Honolulu native, Chef Chris Kajioka. His French-Japanese inspired restaurant Miro Kaimuki and his more casual concept Papa Kurt’s have quickly become popular local institutions in Hawaii.  You’ll hear him share his passion for Japan, his experience attending the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, and what it was like coming up next to some of the greatest chefs in the business. He shares his unique Japanese-Hawaiian culinary influences and reveals his favorite food spots in Honolulu. What we learned from chef Chris Kajioka Where the name Miro Kaimuki originated (3:11) The concept behind the menu (4:49) His experience in culinary school (5:56) Why the discipline at CIA was good for him (7:37) Why he prefers to hire cooks with no experience (9:03) What it’s like to work with Thomas Keller (10:57) The important role Roy Yamaguchi played in his career (13:22) The city he can’t stop returning to (18:08) The Japanese influences in his food (18:28) The flavors he’s infusing with his Dashi (19:39) Why the menu at Miro is vague (21:51) Where to find the “best” bread in the country (22:55) A peek into his creative process (24:14) What makes Hawaiian food stand out (25:55) Why ingredients matter (26:47) Why technique wins over creativity (27:20) The list that shaped his career (30:29) What longevity can teach you (31:26) The challenges he faced during the pandemic (33:33) Where the name Papa Kurt’s comes from (35:33) The secret ingredient that gives their mayo a punch of flavor (38:05) A restaurant tour of Honolulu (38:58) His kitchen pet peeve (43:24) A goal he’s aiming for one day (44:08) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast  Links to other episodes in Hawaii Interview with chef Sheldon Simeon Conversation with chef Roy Yamaguchi Conversation with chef Jean-Marie Josselin in Kauai #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Ahi Brioche/ Taro Paillasson with aged maple, Kaluga caviar by chef Chris Kajioka Kusshi Oyster, seaweed mignonette by chef Chris Kajioka Panisse Spanish octopus. saffron. by chef Chris Kajioka Butternut squash. black sesame. urfa. golden raisin, and sourdough. salted butter. “za’atar” at Miro Click to tweet The older I get, the more I’m inspired by Japan. I'm Japanese and I've been traveling there now off and on for about eight years, pretty religiously.
 Click To Tweet I always think that the only time that you really grow is when you're uncomfortable.
 Click To Tweet I hire on attitude. And that's pretty much it. We can teach people the basics, we can teach them skills. You can't teach a good attitude.
 Click To Tweet The way we print our menu is very vague. Normally we just state a protein and a few flavor profiles. It doesn't lock us into a specific ingredient necessarily. If a farmer grows only so much, then that's what we'll use, and then we'll change it. That flexibility is really what has made the restaurant a little bit more dynamic.
 Click To Tweet If you don't start with good ingredients, no matter what you do to it, it's not going to work out.
 Click To Tweet This generation wants instant gratification. They want to work in five different places in five years, and then open their own restaurant when they're 26. You're building a resume, but you're not really becoming a good cook. Click To Tweet Social media Chef Chris Kajioka Instagram Facebook
In today’s episode, I talk to Matt Conroy, chef and partner at “neo bistro” Lutèce in Georgetown, Washington D.C. Previously of Michelin-starred Mexican restaurant Oxomoco in Brooklyn, he’s taken what he knows about Mexican food to this revamped French-inspired concept.  You’ll hear his unique take on what connects these two worldly cuisines, and how both styles influence the menu and his creative process. He defines the modern concept of a neo bistro, shares his journey to becoming a chef, what inspires his menu, and the importance of always staying curious in the kitchen.  What you'll learn with chef Matt Conroy The definition of a “neo-bistro” (3:11) How he creates French traditions with a modern twist (4:44) The variety of influences you’ll find at Lutèce (5:45) Chef Matt Conroy's process for coming up with a new dish (7:20) Transforming comforting classics into modern dishes (8:24) Chef Matt Conroy's collaborative process (9:35) Why foundation should come before creativity (11:56) How Matt Conroy built technique without going to culinary school (13:13) The importance of curiosity in the kitchen (14:02) Why he became a chef (15:18) Influences that made him pursue the culinary profession (16:32) Tips for aspiring restaurant owners (19:13) Why the kitchen should always take the time to sit down and eat their food (20:35) The challenges of researching Mexican food versus French food (22:24) Similarities and differences in Mexican and French cooking (24:33) Chef Matt Conroy newest passion and how it’s driving his travel plans (26:37) The tradition of Birth Year Wine (27:30) How we got interested in natural wine (29:03) The best way to start exploring natural wines (30:33) Recipes to try at home (32:10) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in the DMV area Interview with Chef Masako Morishita Conversation with Chef Declan Horgan Conversation with Private Chef Chris Spear Covid-19 – Top Chefs Respond (with Chef Ian Boden) Conversation with Chef Hari Cameron Conversation with chef Johnny Spero Interview with chef Drew Adams Interview with chef Edward Lee Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Soleil Cocktail with Bourbon at Lutéce dc Steak Tartare Neo Bistro from chef Matt Conroy Rabbit from chef Matt Conroy Chef Matt Conroy, pastry chef Isabel Coss, and Emmanuel Click to tweet I really think the technique is the most important part. I've been to restaurants where he cuisine is very creative, but not enjoyable because the foundation part of it is missing.
 Click To Tweet No one's gonna hold your hand to show you every little thing in the kitchen. You have to put in the time and want to learn and ask questions. If you're a cook, and you're not asking questions in the kitchen, you're missing out on a big percentage of knowledge there.
 Click To Tweet Opening a restaurant is stressful, there's no way around it. You can prepare as much as you possibly can and have many checklists, but there's going to be things on opening night that are not going to go the way you thought. Click To Tweet If I'm sourcing organic vegetables,
In today’s podcast episode, I talk to Chef Suzanne Goin, a Los Angeles native who has worked with Alice Waters at Chez Panisse. In 1998, she and business partner Caroline Styne opened Lucques restaurant. In 2002, they followed up with a.o.c. and today, they recently opened two new hotel restaurant concepts: Caldo Verde and Cara Cara. Suzanne was awarded Best Chef by the James Beard Foundation in 2006 and in 2016 she was recognized as outstanding chef of the Year at the James Beard Foundation Awards. In 2021, she received StarChefs’ Mentor Award.  You’ll hear about the culinary inspirations behind a.o.c., Goin's new hotel restaurant concepts, and how she’s forging a close connection with local farmers in both the kitchen and bar programs. She also shares how she uses seasonal produce in her unique creative process and the rewards and challenges of running restaurants.  What you'll learn with chef Suzanne Goin How the business at Lucques inspired a.o.c. (3:30) Why the cheese course comes first at a.o.c. (5:21) The inspiration behind my favorite dish at a.o.c. (8:29) Why Suzanne Goin doesn’t use the term mixologist (10:23) How they incorporate kitchen ingredients at the bar (11:12) What stands out about their cocktails (11:59) The origins of Suzanne Goin’s love for pastry (13:52) How a.o.c. Brentwood came to be (15:00) Suzanne Goin’s first job (16:24) How the style of food in NY compares to the west coast (17:46) Why you probably won’t see her opening restaurants outside of LA (19:08) The concepts behind Suzanne Goin's two hotel restaurants (20:12) Suzanne Goin's love for Portuguese food (21:50) Why they decided to close Lucques after 22 years (25:34) What brings her joy in her work (26:28) Suzanne Goin advice to people who want to be in the restaurant business (27:05) The hardest parts of running a restaurant (27:44) Her mentors coming up in the business (28:25) Training new cooks in the kitchen (35:55)  Her thoughts on the stereotypes of men and women in kitchens (39:35) How she gathers inspiration (42:22) Why the gift of honey is always appreciated (46:14) How to cook her favorite Brussels sprouts (47:04) LA restaurants on her “Want-to-try” list (49:52)  Cookbooks to inspire you (52:42) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Los Angeles Conversation with Chef Elizabeth Falkner  Conversation with Coffee Roaster Zayde Naquib Interview with Chef Tim Hollingsworth Conversation with Chef Brad Miller – Food Truck Nation Interview with Chef Alison Trent Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ a.o.c. restaurant by chef Suzanne Goin Arroz Negro at a.o.c. by Chef Suzanne Goin Focaccia at a.o.c. by Chef Suzanne Goin Veggies, muhamarra, and hummus at a.o.c. Click to tweet It's interesting how things with us [Suzanne Goin and Caroline Styne] tend to happen very organically. There's no sort of master plan of what we're going to do.
 Click To Tweet I just love the camaraderie. I love working with people who I like. I love the adrenaline. I still like the crazy Saturday nights. In the end, it's like warriors that have made it through to the other side together. Click To Tweet
In today’s episode, I talk to Masako Morishita, the creator of Otabe pop-up restaurant in Washington DC. Otabe specializes in Japanese comfort food, unique flavors that are exciting taste buds in the capital city. Morishita has recently taken on the role of chef at Maxwellpark Wine Bar where she’s serving up pairing-friendly dishes like the Teriyaki Wagyu Burger, Edamame and White Anchovy Toast, and Okonomiyaki Pancakes tinged with togarashi. You’ll hear how Morishita arrived in the US for one career, but ended up cooking instead. You’ll also learn about the flavors of Japanese comfort food, the different types of dashi and how they’re made, how to make a great Okonomiyaki, and the essential cornerstones of Japanese cuisine. What you'll learn with Masako Morishita Popular street foods in Japan (3:02)Variations of okonomiyaki (4:25)How to make okonomiyaki at home (6:28)The difference between katsu and karaage (8:28)How Masako Morishita ended up in the US (11:36)The goal behind her cooking (13:08)The potluck where her Japanese foods wowed guests (14:38)Masako Morishita's family’s 90-year-old restaurant in Japan (15:39)Why the smell of dashi reminds her of family (16:23)The meaning of “otabe” (17:57)Street foods on the menu at Otabe (18:31)Unique twists linking Japanese food with wine pairing (19:56)The most popular dish at Maxwell (20:57)The surprising fast-food burger Masako Morishita is trying to replicate (21:13)How she uses her favorite vegetable (23:37)Who inspires her cooking (27:39)The Cornerstone Ingredients of Japanese Cuisine (29:01)Masako Morishita favorite brand of soy sauce (30:03)Where to start if you want to make dashi at home (32:49)The most important cooking techniques in Japanese cuisine (34:28)5 restaurants to visit in DC (36:08)Top 3 cookbooks where she finds inspiration (36:49)Must have kitchen condiments (37:26)Series of rapid-fire questions.Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in the DMV area. Conversation with Chef Declan HorganConversation with Private Chef Chris SpearCovid-19 – Top Chefs Respond (with Chef Ian Boden)Conversation with Chef Hari Cameron  Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Baked Uni Mac & Cheese from Masako Morishita – Cheddar, Gruyère, cream sauce with Tamari, Uni and garlic bread crumbs Masako Morishita’s Slow cooked Daikon with melted Brie & Dashi Onigiri at Otabe d.c. by Masako Morishita Lightly fried lotus root, peppers, eggplant, green beens marinated into house made cold sweet dashi broth by Masako Morishita Click to tweet My goal is to introduce Japanese culture, which people don't really know about, through food. Click To Tweet People have a perspective of Japanese people being ‘so quiet’ and ‘too stiff’ and I think I kind of broke that stereotype. Click To Tweet Every time I make Dashi, it immediately brings me back to my grandma's house. Click To Tweet Daikon is actually one of my favorite vegetables ever, especially around the winter time.
In today’s episode, I talk to chef Fermin Núñez, an Austin-based chef who was recently named one of the Best New Chefs of 2021 by Food & Wine. His restaurant Suerte (meaning good luck in Spanish) celebrates the traditional art of made-from-scratch masa, the culinary backbone of his restaurant concept.  You’ll hear about his longtime obsession with masa, what inspired him to become a chef, and how the food his team are dreaming up at Suerte both respects and helps shape tradition. He explains why Mexican cuisine is still in the discovery phase, and how the diversity and abundance of ingredients across Mexico allows for countless interpretations of familiar dishes.  What you'll learn with chef Fermin Núñez What it felt like to be named as one of the best new chefs of 2021 (2:49) The inspiration behind Suerte (5:46) How masa is made (7:20) Why Mexican cooking breaks the usual rules of cooking (8:20) How each variety of corn performs differently when you cook it (9:25) Pairing your tortillas based on the type of corn and fillings (11:44) What it takes to produce restaurant-portions of masa (13:17) How Fermin Núñez learned the art of making masa (14:39) The mystery and excitement that defines Mexican cuisine (16:23) Why Mexican cooking is largely undocumented (17:23) The cultural influence and variety that shapes Mexican food (17:53) Countless ways to make salsa (19:12) Why Fermin Núñez became a chef (20:09) What he’s learned from chef Rick Lopez (22:00) Why a great chef has a well-stocked pantry (23:40) The importance of collaboration (25:24) How ingredients lead the direction of the menu (27:08) Chef Fermin Núñez most recent food fetish (28:57) Food memories that awaken with the smell of fresh masa (31:20) Where to eat in Austin (31:55) Cookbooks to add to your collection (33:03) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Austin Panel Discussion with chefs Andre Natera, Rick Lopez, and Edgar Rico from Austin Conversation with Pastry Chef Philip Speer from Comedor in Austin Leadership  with Chef Andre Natera – What Every Senior Executive Can Learn From Top Chefs Conversation with 3 Chefs in Austin (Chef Andre Natera, Chef Kevin Fink, and Chef Fiore Tedesco) – Vol 1 Conversation with 3 Chefs in Austin (Chef Andre Natera, Chef Kevin Fink, and Chef Fiore Tedesco) – Vol 2 Interview with Chef Andre Natera – The Culinary Yoda Chef Fiore Tedesco – L'Oca D'Oro Chef Michael Fojtasek – Olamaie Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Suadero Tacos by chef Fermin Núñez Chips and Salsa at Suerte Pan de Elote from Suerte Fermin Núñez & Emmanuel Click to tweet The beauty about Mexican cooking is in the way that you have to go against the grain with everything that you've learned.
 Click To Tweet You create something great by teaching somebody and then letting them do it over and over again. Because you don't get worse at doing something every day.
 Click To Tweet Everybody has a different technique on how to do things. My method is different than what someone showed me in the past and whoever I show that to, they'll probably make some tweaks and changes.
In today’s episode, I welcome Chef Sheldon Simeon of Maui’s Tin Roof restaurant. After his success on Top Chef as a two-time finalist, he decided to commit his kitchen skills towards bringing the flavors of Hawaii to the masses. Through his restaurant and his cookbook, Cook Real Hawai'i, his passion for these uncomplicated cultural staples reveals itself while introducing cooks around the world to the unique flavors of his homeland.   You’ll hear about his experiences on the TV show Top Chef and how he was inspired to open his own restaurant in Maui. He also talks about his experience blending together several cultural influences from China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines, and how those blending cultures have influenced Hawaiian cuisine. He shares his culinary inspirations and influences from childhood to today, and his experience putting together a bestselling cookbook.  What you'll learn with chef Sheldon Simeon Defining the aloha spirit (4:14) What to expect from the book (5:56) How he’s helping feed his local community (6:29) Legends from the 90s era of Hawaiian cuisine (9:25) Misconceptions people have about Hawaiian food (11:04) Why so many cultures helped shape the food culture of Hawaii (11:58) Dishes from a changing cultural lens (15:29) The origins of poke (18:12) How to make a great poke at home (20:12) Traveling the islands through various tastes (23:19) Where the name Tin Roof came from (25:05) Inspirations that make up the menu (26:47) Why it’s important to support small, community restaurants (29:07) Upcoming changes to expect from Tin Roof (30:25) His spur of the moment decision to return to Top Chef (31:33) How his second Top Chef experience was different from his first (34:10) The smell that reminds him of childhood (35:19) An important Hawaiian condiment (36:32) What and where to eat the next time you’re in Maui (37:53) The guilty pleasure he can’t stop eating (40:08) Cookbooks to add to your collection (40:46) Condiment must-haves (41:50) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Hawaii Conversation with chef Roy Yamaguchi Conversation with chef Jean-Marie Josselin in Kauai Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Spicy chicken sandwich by Chef Sheldon Simeon Poke Bowl at Tin Roof Maui Garlic shrimp by Chef Sheldon Simeon Tin Roof Emmanuel and Chef Sheldon Simeon Click to tweet That is the basis of all things in Hawaii is respect the land, respect your community, respect your neighbor. Respect each other, that's the aloha spirit. And Aloha goes both ways, in order to reach Aloha, you gotta give Aloha.
 Click To Tweet Cook Real Hawaii is my experiences from when I was born until now. I wanted to represent our food to the fullest. The realness comes from the feeling of putting my heart into this book and sharing my history. That is just as real and raw as it gets.
 Click To Tweet Today, we have the opportunity as chefs to showcase the food of our grandparents and the food of our community and the things that we want to preserve.
 Click To Tweet The media has painted Hawaii as this paradise of tropical goodness,
In today’s episode, I talk to Craig Laban, a restaurant critic and columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Since falling into his satiating career reviewing restaurants, he’s made a name for himself (albeit undercover) exploring the unique flavors of the city.  You’ll hear how Craig’s career first began, and the perks and pitfalls of life as a restaurant critic. He shares the stories behind the down-to-earth food trends taking place in Philadelphia, and exactly how a food critic goes about creating a “best of” restaurant list. What you'll learn with Craig Laban The day to day life of a restaurant critic (2:35) Food Critic Craig Laban explains difference between a food columnist and a food writer (3:36) The birth of the Liberty Bell rating system (4:56) How Craig Laban's job changed during the pandemic (8:52) Why he tries to remain anonymous (11:34) How Craig Laban got into food writing (14:53) The effect of social media on the food world (20:30) How the internet is inspiring a more global perspective among chefs (21:06) Choosing restaurants to review (22:49) How the Dining Guide differs from the year-round reviews (24:10) How you narrow down the Top 10 best restaurants (25:20) Finding the spark of magic in a restaurant experience (27:03) Why investing in a food critic as a publication is worth it (29:05) What makes restaurants in Philadelphia unique (30:18) The biggest food trends influencing the city right now (31:41) Philly’s top 6 must-try restaurants (35:36) Food Critic Craig Laban's most inspiring cookbooks (40:31) The best and worst aspects of being a food critic (41:28) Blowback after negative reviews (43:12) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Philadelphia Conversation with Celebrity Chef Jose Garces Conversation with Chef Richard Landau Interview with Chef Brian Duffy Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Nick DiGiovanni Click to tweet My mission is to essentially size up Philadelphia's food scene. All corners of the food scene, from fine dining to food trucks to neighborhood places, and tell people what's out there and where they should be spending their dining money. Click To Tweet The best thing about being a food critic is just this privilege of being able to explore the magic talents of the food in how people express themselves through food and restaurants. Click To Tweet I don't think I've changed my central mission, which is to really explore a region through the lens of food and restaurants and tell the stories of where we live and how we live. Click To Tweet I think the minute you remove that veil and you put your picture out there on top of your column, you're saying ‘I am a celebrity, and I want you to to engage with me on that level’. I'm just uncomfortable with it. Click To Tweet We're not exactly a trendsetting city. We don't invent a lot of things. But we have a lot of talent that has been able to find its way here, and the quality and the diversity that we have is really exceptional. Click To Tweet Social media Craig Laban Instagram Twitter Links mentioned in this episode Philadelphia Inquirer
In today’s episode, I talk to Chef Tiffany Derry of Roots Chicken Shak and Roots Southern Table. From the comfort of these Dallas, Texas kitchens, she’s taken Southern food to new heights. Inspired by the dishes her family made when she was young, she always felt that this cuisine deserved a place at the table. And since no one else had done it to the level she was searching for, she sprung into action.  You’ll hear about the concept behind Roots Southern Table and her smaller operation Roots Chicken Shak, and you’ll get a little taste of the Chicken Sandwich that’s making them famous. She also talks about the misconceptions people have about Southern cuisine, what makes it so unique, and why it deserves to be honored and shared. She also talks about what it’s really like to be a chef on TV and a prominent voice for the long-held traditions of Southern food.  What you'll learn with chef Tiffany Derry The phone call that changed her life (3:31) How being on Top Chef changed her (4:55) What drives her towards the adrenaline rush of competition (7:43) How she learned to appreciate her Southern roots (8:31) The misconceptions of Southern food (9:30) The best fried chicken sandwich in Dallas (11:00) Why she keeps the menu small (12:50) How Roots Southern Table was finally born (14:00) The family memories that inspired the menu (15:20) What “Southern food” means to her (17:07) Representing as Black female chef when there were few others (20:12) How she’s paying it forward to other aspiring female chefs (22:21) The fresh angle of her new TV show on PBS (23:29) The truth about Gordon Ramsay (27:03) Her absolute favorite ingredient to cook with (27:56) How the menu is divided at Southern Kitchen (29:11) The one thing everyone tries to steal from the table (30:25) Her other sources of culinary inspiration (31:29) How to make her mom’s Bacon, Egg & Rice dish (33:33) The Southern dish that most reminds her of childhood (35:19) Her top food stops in Dallas (36:11) Her favorite guilty pleasure and how enjoys it without blowing her diet (39:02) A French-inspired Southern duck dish (40:41) Her most influential cookbooks (42:04) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Dallas Conversation with Chef Misti Norris from Petra and The Beast Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Scallops, Corn Ravioli by Chef Tiffany Derry My Mother’s Gumbo by Chef Tiffany Derry Heirloom Tomato Salad from Roots Southern Table Roots Southern Table Cornbread Click to tweet There are just so many different people who make up the south and created what we consider to be Southern cuisine. Southern cuisine is not anywhere else in the world. They didn't bring that from somewhere, it was a melding of all of these different people coming together.
 Click To Tweet I wanted Southern Table to be almost like an homage to the way I grew up, the things that I love the most about my family's farm, and picking greens and being able to transition that into something so delicious.
 Click To Tweet The one thing I wanted and I craved was the foods I grew up eating that were not being represented well.
In today’s episode, I talk to Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü who’s currently responsible for the eye-catching, artfully plated dishes at Amorette in Lancaster, PA. His culinary credentials include having worked at Michelin starred restaurants such as Heston Blumenthal, Marco Pierre White and Thomas Keller. His unique style focuses on ingredients that lead the creative process of the food while generating no waste, and leveraging science in his cuisine.  You’ll hear about his humble beginnings growing up in the UK, and how his grandmother’s love for fine foods influenced his passion for cooking from an early age. He talks about the dumb luck of scoring his first job with a local Michelin starred restaurant, his philosophy of creativity, surprise, and sustainability that drives the menu at Amorette, and the importance of positivity and respect in the kitchen.  What you'll learn with Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü How Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü's early life influenced his love for cooking (4:05) His family cooking hero (5:22) The luck of finding his first restaurant job (6:57) Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü biggest mentor in the restaurant world (10:55) How he learned to merge his chemistry degree and his love for cooking (11:47) The food philosophy that drives Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü's creative process (13:39) Why a sharing culture among chefs is good for everyone (15:28) Behind the scene secrets of MasterChef UK (18:27) How Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü earned the nickname “The Viking Chef” (20:18) The surprises you get from a blind tasting (22:25) Why Ramen is so rogue (25:01) *The importance of marketing your food concept the right way (27:02) The backbone of the menu at Amorette (31:18) What sustainability really means (31:46) A sustainable Caprese salad (33:46) The difference between molecular and science-driven gastronomy (36:21) His primary sources of inspiration (38:13) How to balance technique and creativity (40:14) The fruit that reminds him of his childhood (41:08) How Chef Rikku Ó’Donnchü was beaten by a leek (41:52) Why the “yelling chef” way of managing a kitchen isn’t productive (43:10) How to start the day with positivity in any kitchen (44:32) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in and near Philadelphia Conversation with Chef Richard Landau Conversation with Private Chef Chris Spear Interview with Chef Brian Duffy Interview with Chef Hari Cameron Conversation with Celebrity Chef Jose Garces Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Heroes In A Half Shell* Oysters, pomegranate, egg yolk purée, soy, fennel It’s Not an Ashtray with black garlic, onion, onion seed and wheat ‘Bonsai Bites’ with a caviar, chive and flower tartlet, a ‘ramen’ quail egg nest and fossilized herbs in purple potato. The flower is a close up of this dish as well. ‘Capresé’ ‘Burrata’, Olive oil & balsamic caviar, frozen whey, basil tigers milk, heirloom tomato Click to tweet Forget about the flavor and forget about the way it looks for a moment and let's start thinking about why it tastes like that.
 Click To Tweet Rather than just having food for foods sake, eating a prepared meal that looks beautiful, I wanted to connect a little bit more to it.
After 13 years in business, Muddy’s Bake Shop has become a local favorite, built on the stilts of hands-on help and encouragement from Kate Gordon’s community.  You’ll hear her optimistic and quirky personality come through as she talks about her experience opening a bakery during the 2008 financial crisis, and what it’s been like living and operating through the COVID-19 pandemic. She shares her passion for all things baked and sweet, as well as a few secrets and pro-tips for the best pie’s you’ve ever tasted.  What you'll learn with chef Kelly English What it was like opening during the financial crisis of 2008 (3:58) Where the idea to start a bakery came from (5:17) What she learned about “emergencies” from starting her business (8:22) How community helped her business survive and thrive (10:10) The home-style concept of Muddy’s (11:05) Best sellers to whet your appetite (12:42) The birth of her now legendary Pecan Pie (16:12) Where she sources inspiration for her menu (20:17) Seasonal favorites, and the secret of her Peach Pie (22:28) The “best thing you can do with ginger” (24:41) Ingredients she refuses to work with (27:10) What makes her Chicken Pot Pie so good (29:33) Pie advice for beginner bakers (32:33) A culinary tour through Memphis (36:15) The cookbook she can’t put down (39:21) What she’ll bring if you invite her over for dinner (42:17) Why you won’t see her in TV cooking competitions (44:19) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in Tennessee Conversation with chef Levon Wallace from Fatbelly Pretzels in Nashville Interview with Chef Kelly English from Memphis Conversation with chef Matt Bolus from the 404 Kitchen in Nashville Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Muddy’s Bake Shop Chocolate Dream Pie Muddy’s Bake Shop icing process Pie selection at Muddy’s Bake Shop in Memphis Kate Gordon’s Peach Pie Click to tweet You don't know what you don't know. And you know, if you're dumb enough to try doing it, and the height of a recession, well, maybe it'll work.
 Click To Tweet All my family and friends were like, “Are you crazy? I think you should think about this more.” Every single one of them when I said, “Well, I signed a lease and I’m doing it!”... every single one of them said “Okay, well, I think you're crazy, but how can I help? Click To Tweet I'm a home baker at heart. I haven't been to culinary school, I didn't work in a bakery, just self taught from cookbooks, on the internet, and honestly, a lot of trial and error. But that's also the part of it that's maybe a strength and a weakness. For me, and for the business. Click To Tweet I'm a big fan of having limited seasons for things, that way we appreciate it more.
 Click To Tweet Social media Muddy's Bake Shop Instagram Facebook Twitter Links mentioned in this episode Muddy's Bake Shop Spots in Memphis recommended by Kat Gordon: Restaurant Iris Restaurant Beauty Shop Payne's BBQ Bangkok Alley Casablanca restaurant
Chef Declan Horgan talks about his life-changing decision to leave the emerald shores of Ireland to carve out a name for himself in America. His breakout role on Hell’s Kitchen and his engaging personality quickly helped him become a recognizable force within the US culinary scene. You’ll hear what it was like working with celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay, how “Big D” aims to change the way the world sees Irish food, and his passion for all things covered in BBQ sauce. You’ll also get a sneak preview of a few dishes you can expect to see on the menu of his much anticipated rustic + modern Italian restaurant, and the numerous upcoming projects that are keeping this talented chef busy as he continues to make culinary waves in America and beyond. What you'll learn with Chef Declan Horgan What motivated him to get involved in Hell’s Kitchen (2:36) His impression of Gordon Ramsay (4:56) Lessons learned from working on the show (6:29) His personal best dish of his show season (8:09) Who inspired him to start cooking (9:57) What he prepared for his first dinner party at age 7 (10:55) His culinary mentors (12:52) Why he moved to America (13:51) What Irish food could be (15:50) A modern twist on a traditional Irish dish (18:20) His passion for BBQ sauce (20:36) How he came up with the concept for his new restaurant (22:53) The inspiration for his upcoming menu (26:00) An unusual dish that he’ll feature (28:04) The role of local foods and foraging in his restaurant concept (31:19) Upcoming projects to keep an eye out for (33:54) The most important aspect of being a chef (36:19) His guilty pleasure foods (37:37) Thoughts on Austin’s BBQ scene (38:47) A food tour through DC (40:47) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in DMV and Delaware areas Conversation with Private Chef Chris Spear Covid-19 - Top Chefs Respond (with Chef Ian Boden) Conversation with Chef Hari Cameron  Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Wasabi Cucumber Salmon by Chef Declan Horgan Duck wings BBQ sauce by Chef Declan Horgan Orecchiette pasta by Chef Declan Horgan Osso Bocco by Chef Declan Horgan Click to tweet The experience being on Hell’s Kitchen was one of the maddest things I've ever done in my life. It was spectacular because you're behind the cameras and each service was like a proper restaurant service. So all the emotion, the adrenaline, everything is pumping! Click To Tweet I know I'm a strong chef, but I wasn't getting the opportunities I wanted in Ireland. So I took it to America. Click To Tweet Hard work pays off. Don't ever give up on your dream. If you have to make a move at a late stage in your life, make a move! I’m so delighted that I made a move. Click To Tweet Part of the reason that I moved to America was that I saw Irish food on the Food Network from America. And I was like, yeah, that's really bad. Really bad! Click To Tweet People in America believe the Irish were raised on corned beef and cabbage. Actually, we were actually raised on bacon and cabbage. Click To Tweet Italian and Irish cuisines had their roots in feeding poor ...
From The Liquid Chef making cocktails to M Cantina in Dearborn, Michigan,  Junior Merino is  a chef, sommelier, and mixologist originally hailing from Puebla, Mexico. Through his food, guests find not only a wide variety of flavors, but an introduction to some of the lesser-known, pre-Hispanic foods that you don’t see on most Mexican restaurant menus.  As part of our series of episodes honoring Hispanic Heritage Month, today you’ll hear what his cultural background means to him, and the ways in which Puebla-styles and flavors show up in his particular style of food and drink. He shares his personal and professional culinary influences, how they inspire him, and how he incorporates a world of influence on his restaurant menu through the lens of fresh Mexican ingredients.  What you'll learn with chef and Mixologist Junior Merino The impact of Mexican cuisine has had on the US (2:50) How Mexican food is misunderstood in the states (4:00) The various types of Mexican food we experience (5:05) How the Puebla style influences his creative process (6:24) The history and evolution of mole (9:02) One common ingredient misconception about mole (10:59) The traditional preparation of mole (11:34) Defining the concept of “Nuevo Latino” (13:26) Various types of tortillas and how they’re used (14:57) The 30 types of tacos served at M Cantina (15:52) Applying a made-from-scratch philosophy (20:32) Why juicing is harder at home than in the restaurant (21:46) How insects are incorporated on the menu and how they’re served (23:36) The pre-hispanic foods of Mexico (26:14) World-wide sources of inspiration (27:45) Where his biggest inspiration comes from (28:58) How his experience as a sommelier influences his cocktails (30:13) The unusual flavors he sources from Mexico (31:53) A recipe you can make at home (33:27) Where and how Mexican crema is used (35:18) Series of rapid-fire questions. Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes with Latino chefs talking about Hispanic food Interview with chef Erik Ramirez from Llama Inn and Llama San Conversation with Pastry Chef Antonio Bachour from Miami Interview with Pastry Chef Philip Speer from Austin Conversation with chef Levon Wallace from Fatbelly Pretzels in Nashville Interview with blogger and author Mely Martinez Talking Hispanic Heritage Month with 3 chefs from Austin Conversation with chef Shamil Velazquez from Charleston Interview with Celebrity Chef Jose Garces Conversation with chef Jonathan Zaragoza from Chicago Interview with chef Andre Natera from Austin Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Cocktail from Junior Merino Crispy Fish Taco from Chef Junior Merino Salsas at M Cantina Chef Junior Merino Click to tweet Latino cuisine has a huge influence in the US. A lot of the things we eat and a lot of the general market, like the big chains, have always some kind of either Mexican or Latino flavor influence in their cuisine.
 Click To Tweet As Latinos, we bring a lot of our culture and a lot the things that we have in our countries to the US, and it just makes it really amazing because we have so much to share. Click To Tweet I have all these insects on the menu because that'...
In today’s episode, you’ll hear from world renowned pastry chef, author, and culinary consultant François Payard. Born in Nice, he’s a third generation French pastry chef who’s worked in some of the biggest names in hospitality, including Le Bernardin (lebernardinny) and DANIEL (@restaurantdaniel) in New York City. His career was launched in Paris with Michelin Guide favorites, La Tour d’Argent and Lucas Carton. Payard discusses what it was like as a child growing up in a family bakery, and how he was inspired to pave his own pathway into pastry. You’ll hear what he’s learned from working in some of the most revered kitchens in the world, and his perception of the evolution of pastry, and the kitchen work environment, over the past two decades. He also shares how he’s learned to balance the desire for creativity and the need to conform when you’re working for and with others.  What you'll learn with Pastry Chef François Payard François Payard grew up in a bakery (3:13) What it’s like working in the best restaurant in the world (5:32) Thinking like a chef versus thinking like a pastry chef (6:15) Selling pastries in a restaurant versus in a bakery (7:19) The restraints and rewards of consulting (10:34) François Payard lives in the future and accepts challenges as they come (12:32) Pastry chefs worth admiring (15:27) How the art of pastry has evolved (17:10) Advice for aspiring pastry chefs (20:42) Adapting the farm to table concept to desserts (22:31) Francois Payard sources of inspiration (26:32) The current climate of hospitality in New York (30:27) Thoughts on celebrity chef culture and social media (33:05) The inspiration and motivation behind being a chef (36:20) His junk food obsession (37:21) Inspiring cookbooks (38:46) A restaurant tour of New York (40:59) His next big dream (43:41) Links to other episodes featuring Pastry Chefs Conversation with Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux (Brooklyn) Interview with Pastry Chef Antonio Bachour (Miami) Conversation with Pastry Chef Philip Speer (Austin) Interview with Baker Matthieu Cabon (Houston)  Conversation with Pastry Chef Mark Welker Interview with Pastry Chef Emily Spurlin (Chicago) Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Caramel flan by François Payard Orange tart by François Payard Paris Brest by François Payard Sphere chocolate by François Payard Click to tweet That's the problem we have in pastry, we always know how to make a large quantity. And when anybody asks me for recipes for pie, I don't even know- I have to look at the cookbook.
 Click To Tweet As a chef, like most chefs, we like to challenge ourselves. So we can take on a lot of challenges, and that makes the difference. I don’t live in the past, I live in the future. Click To Tweet It’s not about how many followers you have, it’s about how many customers buy your produce.
 Click To Tweet Everything in life you learn from making mistakes, and you cannot blame anybody else for your mistake. You just have to learn and move on and that's it.
 Click To Tweet When you work for someone, what you have to do is fit the concept. Everything has to be in energy and in synergy. Click To Tweet
In celebration of the Hispanic Heritage Month and Hispanic food, today we’re welcoming three accomplished chefs from Austin, Texas with a Mexican heritage.  Chef André Natira from the Fairmont Hotel, Chef Rick Lopez from La Condesa, and Chef Edgar Rico from Nixta Taqueria. They are here to share what this month honoring their cuisine means to them, how they interpret Hispanic cuisine in their respective restaurants, and the importance of corn in the culture. We’ll also take deep dive in mole that demonstrates the vast diversity, complexity, and creativity in this geographically specific sauce category. What you'll learn about Hispanic Heritage Month and Hispanic food Why you should visit Nixta Taqueria, La Condesa, and the Fairmont Hotel in Austin (5:24)What Hispanic Heritage Month means to them (6:01)Where Texas and Mexico meet on the plate (7:41)The expanse of Mexican cuisine (9:41)Chef Edgar Rico explains the important role of corn (12:17)Chef Andre Natera talks about how Hispanic chefs have emerged in recent years (13:17)The hierarchy of high-end Mexican food influences (21:17)Changes to the fine dining ambiance (23:04)Chef Edgar Rico and Rick Lopez share their travels through Mexico for inspiration (27:11)Adopting the Mexican attitude of cooking with love (32:26)Andre Natera talks about the Unique flavors of El Paso (35:26)How US Mexican flavors vary from food in Mexico (36:30)Chef Rick Lopez talks about expressing love through food (40:10)The difference between the French and Mexican cooking styles (40:58)Grilling techniques and working with fire (44:34)Understanding nixtamalization  with Chef Edgar Rico (46:00)A lesson in roadside tortillas (48:26)All about mole (51:41)A rare and unusual mole rosa (56:12)Breaking the mole mold (58:38)Food memories conjured up by smells (1:04:14)Industry advise that should be ignored (1:08:10)Ditching the BOH machismo (1:09:48)Series of rapid-fire questionsLink to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/flavors-unknown-podcast/id1438591377?i=1000536849542 Links to other episodes with Latino chefs talking about Hispanic food Interview with chef Erik Ramirez from Llama Inn and Llama SanConversation with Pastry Chef Antonio Bachour from MiamiInterview with Pastry Chef Philip Speer from AustinConversation with chef Levon Wallace from Fatbelly Pretzels in NashvilleInterview with blogger and author Mely MartinezConversation with chef Shamil Velazquez from CharlestonInterview with Celebrity Chef Jose GarcesConversation with chef Jonathan Zaragoza from ChicagoInterview with chef Andre Natera from Austin Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Andre Natera Edgar Rico Rick Lopez Emmanuel Laroche, Andre Natera, Rick Lopez, and Edgar Rico Click to tweet I didn't realize we were eating Mexican food as kids, until other people called it Mexican food. It was just food. -Rick Lopez Click To Tweet The great part about Mexican cuisine is you keep learning. It's an onion- there's so many layers that are happening right th...
Minneapolis-based forager Alan Bergo is the author of The Forager Chef’s Book of Flora, a culinary companion to a forager’s field guide that highlights the beauty and flavors around us. You’ll hear how foraging gave him an appreciation for the whole vegetable, the most exciting flavors he’s encountered while foraging, and the connection that he’s gained to the land through viewing it as an edible amusement park.  What you'll learn with chef Alan Bergo The beauty of the foraging experience  (3:34)Staying safe when eating in the wild (5:33)The legality serving foraged foods in restaurants (7:31)The wildly diverse world of morels (11:03)Dedication to a wild gardner (13:49)A root to flower concept of cooking (16:19)Looking at foraged plants through a cultural lens (22:28)How to cook with daylilies (28:21)The most exciting foraged flavors (30:25)Debunking the acorn myth (34:27)Extending the shelf-life of wild greens (39:02)Foraging in every season (42:05)Viewing the world as an edible amusement park (44:54)Foraging recipes to make at home (46:46)One must-have cookbook for forager chef’s (48:42)A culinary tour of Minneapolis (49:16)Series of rapid-fire questions.Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Bird Cherry Cake by Alan Bergo Galium Triflorum – Fragrant Bedstraw Sunflower Artichokes Spruce Tip Panna Cotta Click to tweet No one is going to die when you have a forger that knows what they're doing. Click To Tweet Studying wild plants and mushrooms transformed my cooking style. I thought I cooked hyper seasonal before, but I had no idea. It's really just made me a deeper appreciation for what seasonal food is. Click To Tweet If you interact with your environment, you can have fresh wild greens until basically the snow falls.
 Click To Tweet A funny thing about morels is that they're absolutely 100% toxic raw, if you put them on a burger raw, you're going to go straight to the hospital. Click To Tweet One of the best things about foraging is to look at a landscape as not just a landscape, but as an edible amusement park. Click To Tweet Social media Chef Alan Bergo Instagram Facebook Twitter Links mentioned in this episode The Forager Chef website
Erik Ramirez is the creative culinary hit-maker behind New York restaurants Llama Inn and Llama San. In both locations, he explores the historical traditions of Peruvian cuisine, while simultaneously expanding it based on the seasons of New York. As a first generation American, his summer visits to Peru growing up gave him exposure and appreciation for the regional and cultural styles of cooking throughout the country. Today, he talks about the different influences that shaped the Peruvian cuisine, his sources of inspiration, and the food concepts at his New York restaurants.  What you'll learn with chef Erik Ramirez Two factors that define Peruvian cuisine (3:05) The ethnic influences within Peruvian cuisine (3:51)What Peruvian cooks learned from the Japanese (6:20)How Chef Erik Ramirez is adapting his restaurant concept to New York (9:13)His favorite Peruvian food growing up (10:20)When Chef Erik Ramirez changed his mind about Peruvian cuisine (11:33)How his first opportunity to cook Peruvian food came about (13:28)The concept behind Llama Inn (16:00)Balancing tradition with creativity on a menu (17:52)One of the defining ingredients in Peruvian cuisine (20:15)Chef Erik Ramirez creative process when conceptualizing a new dish (21:02)How the pandemic affected his business (27:10)How a new recipe idea makes it on the menu (30:50)Blending classic French technique with Peruvian traditions (34:30)Making Ceviche 101 (36:01)When you can expect a cookbook (42:18)Series of rapid-fire questions.Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes in New York Conversation with Chef Dan KlugerInterview with Chef Silvia BarbanConversation with Executive Pastry Chef Mark WelkerInterview with Chef Gabriel KreutherConversation with Chef David BurkeInterview with Chef Bryce ShumanInterview with Chef Trigg BrownConversation with Pastry Chef Sam Mason (Odd Fellows)Interview with Brand Ambassador Charlotte VoiseyConversation with Flavien Desolin from the Brandy Library Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Madai ceviche, coconut, uni, matcha Aged duck nigiris @ Llama San Pork Tonkatsu, Udon Verde, Pickled Cucumbers Scallop Ceviche from Chef Erik Ramirez Click to tweet I wanted to create something that allowed me to use the seasons and the local from New York. It gave me more of a culinary playing field.
 Click To Tweet In Peruvian cuisine, particularly, you need to know where it stems or comes from. History and cuisine go hand in hand.
 Click To Tweet I knew Peruvian food from my childhood and only certain dishes that I liked or that my mom would make. I didn't have an understanding of all the cultural influences and the ingredients until I went on a culinary trip to Peru when I was 28. Click To Tweet Creativity would come first before technique. Food concept stems from creative. You're brainstorming, you're talking to your chefs, and you're basically creating a concept.
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Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux is a Brooklyn-based pastry Chef who grew up in Japan, Philadelphia, and Oregon. Building on the Pennsylvania-Dutch baking traditions of her family, she went on to study and teach in prestigious culinary institutions like Le Cordon Bleu and the French Culinary Institute. Today, she’s known as the “MacGyver of Pastry” thanks to her deep and thorough understanding of how ingredients work. She’s mastered the creative art of substitutions, and she’s defied expectations by scaling small-batch quality in the high-numbers world of professional catering.  What you'll learn with Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux Why Erin Kanagy-Loux has so many different regional influences (3:15)Her memories of culinary Japan (6:52)What it is about Japanese food that keeps Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux coming back to it (10:28)Miso 101 (11:01)The difference between Western and Japanese sweets (11:53)Traditional Pennsylvania-Dutch foods (15:03)Learning from-scratch-cooking through Erin Kanagy-Loux Amish roots (17:06)How she decided to become a pastry chef (19:54)Mentally constructing a 37 layer cake  (23:59)How to scale quality in the catering world (30:16)What Erin Kanagy-Loux loves about teaching (32:21)Why she’s considered the “MacGyver of pastry” (36:04)Her favorite niche-ingredient of the moment (39:51)A food tour through Brooklyn (41:29)Series of rapid-fire questions.Link to the podcast episode on Apple Podcast Links to other episodes with Pastry Chefs Conversation with Antonio Bachour from MiamiInterview with Elizabeth FalknerConversation with Philip Speer from AustinInterview with Emily Spurlin from ChicagoConversation with Baker Matthieu Cabon from HoustonInterview with Mark Welker Links to most downloaded episodes (click on any picture to listen to the episode) Jeremy Umansky in Cleveland 3 Chefs in Austin - What is more important: techniques or creativity? Misti Norris in Dallas Carlo Lamagna in Portland #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Sake Kasu Chocolate Decadence Erin Kanagy-Loux / Sake Kasu Cake Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux The MacGyver of Pastry Click to tweet I have a huge salty tooth. I love making pastry, and I know I'm good at it. But if I have an option, I want something salty.
 Click To Tweet I draw a lot on my experiences and my memories from Japan. A lot of the time I'll go back to Japanese food because they have such a unique way of imparting saltiness without using salt.
 Click To Tweet I saw pretty much every single variable of things that could go wrong with almost every product you can think of. Figuring out how to problem solve is awesome.
 Click To Tweet I forgot how much joy it brings me to give people the tools to do what I love doing.
 Click To Tweet MacGyver of Pastry - I have a wealth of useless knowledge that is very useful in certain situations, and I’m able to retain a lot of random information, whether it's pastry related or not. Click To Tweet Social media Pastry Chef Erin Kanagy-Loux Instagram Facebook Linkedin Links mentioned in this episode Link to Erin on Tacho ChocolateLink to Erin o...
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