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Freelance Pod

Freelance Pod

Author: Suchandrika Chakrabarti

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Stories of news, creativity and the internet, told to Suchandrika Chakrabarti | Shortlisted: Best Host at The Lovie Awards (the European Webby Awards) 2019 | Heard on BBC Radio 4 | Newsletter: suchandrika.substack.com | Instagram: @freelancepod | Twitter: @freelance_pod_
49 Episodes
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Journalist, poet and publisher / writer of media criticism newsletter Conquest of the Useless, Mic Wright guests on this episode. This is the last one of the current second season. Don't worry though, I'll be back with more great guests later in the year!  Mic both works within the media, and makes a living critiquing it, through his newsletter and Twitter feed. Digital platforms have allowed all kinds voices to be heard, and fair criticism of our media industry is vital. On this episode, Mic tells me how he does it, how it impacts upon him and what advice he'd give to a new journalist.  Find Mic on social media: Twitter: @brokenbottleboy Instagram: @brokenbottleboy Mic mentions the journalist Henry Dyer on the episode, find him on Twitter here: @Direthoughts If you would like 50% off a subscription to  Conquest of the Useless, use this link: https://brokenbottleboy.substack.com/freelancepod It expires on 31 July 2020, so you've got until the end of the week from launch day!  And here's the Alana Levinson episode that Mic mentions -- Here are the links to my August masterclasses: - Personal essays - Podcasting -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised their work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Lauren Razavi joins me on this episode to talk about the future of work, how writers can use influencer tools to benefit their careers and what the digital nomad lifestyle might look like post-COVID-19. At a tricky moment when we're gingerly leaving lockdown and wondering how our offices are going to work (or, if you're freelance like me, if you'll ever get to work anywhere other than home, help!) it's helpful to speak to Lauren, who's spent a lot of her career writing and speaking about what work could look like in the years to come. Having worked on content for Google and on the future of work for The Guardian, Lauren has seen how the internet can amplify what we do offline, and how technology has given us the chance to work and live in a location-independent way. Lauren herself has been a digital nomad, and she's been thinking about how that lifestyle will have to adapt to a wary, post-pandemic world. We refer to the great Study Hall piece, The Writer as Influencer: https://www.patreon.com/posts/writer-as-30653019 Lauren mentions this piece by Tiago Forte: https://fortelabs.co/blog/the-rise-of-the-full-stack-freelancer/ And here are some useful links on the filmmaker Ondie Timoner: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0498329/?ref_=nm_flmg_prd_14 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3798628/?ref_=nm_flmg_prd_8 You can sign up to Lauren's newsletter Counterflows here: https://laurenrazavi.substack.com/ You can find Lauren on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/LaurenRazavi And on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/laurenrazavi/ -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised their work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
In 2011, two years after American radio producer and reporter Kim Fox had moved to Cairo to take up a teaching role at The American University of Cairo, the Egyptian Revolution happened, in response to increasing police brutality on what would turn out to be the dying days of President Hosni Mubarak's presidency.  Kim spent time at the demonstrations in Tahrir Square, which involved up to 2 million people. Over a decade later, the scenes she witnessed in Cairo are being repeated in Minneapolis after George Floyd's death, and around the world. Kim also tells me about how her students use social media, in a country that has faced internet censorship both before and after Mubarak's fall, and how podcasting is growing - Cairo's now got its own podcast festival!  You can find Kim on Twitter @ohradiogirl (https://twitter.com/KimFoxWOSU), and you can listen to the Ehky Ya Masr podcast (from Kim’s students).  -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised their work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Alex Bertulis-Fernandes is a comedian and writer. She's been doing stand-up for the past year, and she is writing a memoir while being mentored on the Penguin WriteNow mentoring scheme*.  Alex and I met at the late, much-loved Clean Prose writers' space a few months ago, at a memoir-writing workshop taught by writer Cathy Rentzenbrink. Alex was actually the person who broke some comedy news to me last week - that I was a nominee for the Funny Women Stage Awards 2020 - she had been in the same position last year, and she happened to see this year's announcement before I did!  On this episode, Alex tells me about her 'Dial down the feminism' artwork, which went viral on Twitter, and what that felt like. She goes into how social media helps a comedian's work these days, and how writing stand-up sets has influenced the writing of her book. She rounds off the episode with some great advice on why writers should aim to be vulnerable.  Find Alex on - Twitter: https://twitter.com/alexbertanades - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alexbertulisfernandes/ * Click for more information on the recent report into the lack of diversity in UK publishing -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised their work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Freelance writer and author Flora Baker has combined memoir and a self-help guide in her first book, The Adult Orphan Club. Flora lost her mother at 20, and her father at 30, just a few years ago. We 'met' via the Young Orphans Whatsapp group, although thanks to lockdown we have not yet met in person.  After her mother's death, Flora went travelling for five years, and detailed her adventures on her blog, Flora the Explorer. She admits now that the travelling allowed her to postpone doing the work of grieving, as the day-to-day adventures pushed her mourning aside. She's written the book she needed back then, one which unflinchingly, but kindly, describes the complex aspects of grief that aren't talked about enough, and so arrive as a horrible surprise for the newly bereaved. Flora's blogging has helped build her social media presence, and it's only this week that she's written for analogue media, with a piece in The Telegraph about her book, accompanied by a suitably socially-distanced photoshoot. Self-publishing her book was a very different task, and she describes all the work needed on top of the writing to make a non-traditionally-published book the best it can be. The Adult Orphan Club is available for pre-order now, and on sale from Saturday 20th June. You can find the Young Orphans on social media: Instagram: @Young Orphans Twitter: @YoungOrphans -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised their work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
MEL Magazine's deputy editor Alana Levinson joins me remotely from Los Angeles on this episode, to talk about how necessary editing is for good writing - but it's been devalued in a digital world where any of us can press publish whenever we like.  Sometimes, editing can feel like a judgement on the quality of our writing [bad, we assume], but Alana wants to reassure freelance journalists looking to pitch MEL that editing is a collaboration, to make the article the best that it can be.  And yes, she also delves into the origins of The Great Solicited Dick Pic Experiment by MEL writer Miles Klee, and what the piece revealed about the difference between male and female experiences of the internet. We also talk about his piece on what Frankie Muniz - from Malcolm in the Middle - is up to now, part of a series on '00s nostalgia. He lives in Arizona and own an olive oil company with his wife, as well as tweeting rather cryptically!  Alana also shares tips on how to pitch her, what kind of stories she's looking for and how she works with writers as an editor. Her job as deputy editor at MEL involves overseeing long form features, investigative work, and special issues — in addition to daily editorial direction. She has also been a freelance writer for the past four years, so she knows what it's like on both sides of the fence. Here are three MEL investigations recommended by Alana: - Who are the women of the Manosphere?  - The Doomsday prepper's time has finally come - The trans men who get abortions You can find Alana Levinson on social media here: Twitter: @alanalevinson Instagram: @alanalevinson -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised creativity and work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD   
When I saw Marie Foulston's tweet about the lockdown houseparty that she threw in a spreadsheet, I knew that I had to invite her onto the podcast to hear all about it! Marie is now a freelance creative producer and playful curator, and was most recently Curator of Videogames at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. During her time working there, she was Lead Curator of the 'Videogames: Design/ Play/ Disrupt' exhibition, and you can read more about it in this New York Times piece: 'Playing Games Can Be Hard Work. So Can Choosing Which Ones to Display'. Marie tells me about the anxiety of organising the spreadsheet party and waiting for her friends to arrive - just like hosting an IRL soirée! The theme of feeling anxious links her shared doc party (which went v. well, thanks for asking, they even watched the sun rise, blissed out) to the mandatory nature of Zoom calls under lockdown, and to the huge success of the game Animal Crossing: New Horizons during the pandemic. Her stories of trying to create shared spaces online during the lockdown beg the question: what is the best way to be social when we can't be together?  You can still visit the party on Google Sheets here, but be warned, the document is now locked, and all the cups contain off-brand vodka - sample at your peril...  -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised creativity and work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Joining The Writers' Hour every morning for one week early on in lockdown helped me break through the cobwebs and write the outline of the book that I've been working on for the past year, in fits and starts. I used the hour to write longhand, which always helps unlock my creativity.  The Writer's Hour is a simple idea: every weekday morning between 8 and 9am BST, the founders of The London Writers' Salon, Parul Bavishi and Matt Trinetti, hold a Zoom meeting where writers turn up, enter into the chat box what they want to achieve in that session and then... write. For an hour. With the web cam trained upon them. Meaning that a load of other writers can see them writing too. It helps alleviate the loneliness of writing, which is particularly lonely during lockdown. At the end of the hour, Parul and Matt hang around for 5-10 minutes to chat. Parul, a book editor who's available for consultations on manuscripts, joins me on the podcast to talk about how the publishing world works in a digital age, the questions to ask of yourself before getting started on that book idea - and what it was like to fall for Stieg Larsson's novel The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo before the public did, making it a massive hit. Here are a few links from the episode that you might find useful: https://twitter.com/paruledits https://twitter.com/writerssalon https://twitter.com/trinetti https://londonwriterssalon.com/ https://writershour.com/ -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised creativity and work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
We're tackling some big subjects on this episode of Freelance Pod: imposter syndrome, how social media leads to 'compare and despair' and how living under a pandemic lockdown affects our sense of self. Joining me for this episode is Dr. Richard Orbé-Austin, author and licensed psychologist in the state of New York. He's particularly interested in how freelancers and creatives can build strategies to combat imposter syndrome. Social media shows off everyone's highlight reels, but it doesn't always reflect the hard work that went into that success, or the luck, or the generational wealth and opportunities. Only knowing the person's full story can tell us that.  Dr. Orbé-Austin suggests listening to podcasts as a better way of diving into the story of a person you admire. And if you can't find a podcast episode they're on? Reach out and connect with them!  Imposter syndrome is fuelled by the automatic stories we tell ourselves inside our own heads. These stories com from our childhoods, education, early days in work, passing comments that stung but stuck. We can change those narratives ourselves. Dr. Orbé-Austin's recent book, co-authored with his wife Dr. Lisa Orbé-Austin, is all about tackling imposter syndrome. It's called Own Your Greatness: Overcome Impostor Syndrome, Beat Self-Doubt, and Succeed in Life. Have a watch of his Instagram video, Five Tips for Overcoming Imposter Syndrome as an Artist.  -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Freelance Pod is back after a little break! It's now a monthly podcast, but everything else stays the same. Of course, until the Coronavirus Lockdown is over, it's going to be remote record all the way...  So this episode is the live show from November 2019, when author Gemma Milne joined me onstage at the beautiful Boulevard Theatre in Soho, London.  Gemma's book Smoke & Mirrors: How Hype Obscures the Future and How to See Past It is available for pre-order now, and is out on 23rd April. It comes in audio form too, narrated by Gemma herself.  The non-fiction book takes a look at "bombastic headlines about science and technology," which "are nothing new," but this kind of hype can "be responsible for fundamentally misdirecting or even derailing crucial progress." It's the perfect book for the Age of Covid-19.  Gemma joined me onstage to talk redundancy, branding yourself online, how her early years in advertising informs her work, how the internet has transformed reporting - and, of course, how she wrote a book. Along the way, she drops loads of great advice for budding authors, freelancers and career-changers. Gemma's currently working on her second book, and she was called "inspirational" by more than one person in the audience that night.  Enjoy the episode - hope you're staying very safe and well!  -- On each episode of Freelance Pod, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Author Rachel Vorona Cote joins Suchandrika Chakrabarti on Freelance Pod's first birthday episode, to talk about grieving in a digital age. We first spoke after I read Rachel's Longreads piece, The Fraught Culture of Online Mourning (https://longreads.com/2019/05/21/the-fraught-culture-of-online-mourning/), earlier this year. Rachel had lost her mother 18 months before writing the essay. She took to the internet during her mother's last illness, tweeting updates. Soon after her death, Rachel wrote Dead Mom Soundtrack, or the Top 5 Songs About Losing Your Mother (https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/dead-mom-soundtrack-or-the-top-5-songs-about-losing-your-mother/?mbid=homepage-more-latest-and-video), for Pitchfork.  As someone who lost their parents in an analogue age, I'm fascinated by how the internet has enabled greater visibility for the bereaved. It's possible to find people in a similarly painful and isolating state anywhere in the world, and to have meaningful, cathartic conversations without ever meeting - as Rachel and I have.  I've left in Rachel's side of the conversation, where she talks about my early experiences of grief. Perhaps I'm not ready to get into them on this podcast yet; it's too intimate. She mentions a couple of personal essays I've written, so here are links: Grief doesn’t have five stages (https://theoutline.com/post/6135/unconventional-wisdom-no-stages-of-grief?zd=2&zi=nn56rjpu) The storage unit that became a portal to my childhood home (https://www.curbed.com/2019/10/10/20905310/story-deceased-parents-grief-storage-units) Check out Rachel's book Too Much (https://www.amazon.com/Too-Much-Victorian-Constraints-Still/dp/1538729709/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1EA01G90E9E34&keywords=too+much+rachel+vorona+cote&qid=1559599468&s=gateway&sprefix=too+much+rac%2Caps%2C123&sr=8-1), which is available to pre-order now, and is published in February 2020.  Don't forget that there are still tickets available for Freelance Pod's third live recording of the year, at the Boulevard Theatre in Soho. They're only £12, and what else are you doing this Sunday evening? (https://boulevardtheatre.co.uk/whats-on/sunday-service-podcasts-2/)   -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
It's a Standard Issue x Freelance Pod crossover episode! I met up with Jen Offord, Mickey Noonan and Hannah Dunleavy at the Boulevard Theatre, Soho, to talk about our upcoming live shows there, how the internet has changed journalism, feminism and what their live recording has in store for the audience. Here's the Instagram album containing the picture we talk about in the cold open. It's definitely worth a look, especially if you love neon!  You'll also hear a little bit from writer Gemma Milne, who's guesting on Freelance Pod's live show at the Boulevard on Sunday 17th November. Standard Issue Podcast is the result of live shows that the gang - including their boss and SI founder, Sarah Millican - used to put on to support the original online magazine. So the liveness started first - the podcast second.  Mickey and Hannah are trained journalists with years of experience on newspapers and magazines between them, with a major highlight being Mickey having spent 9 months as a sexpert on a lads' mag. They've also both tried their hands at comedy in the past. Jen came to journalism from the civil service, and in truly early internet tradition, set up a themed blog that caught the imagination, and resulted in articles, TV appearances and a book deal.  We recorded this episode on a landing at the Boulevard Theatre, in true Soho style, between a lift, a loo and a glass bridge by a neon tattooist sign. Cheers to the theatre's Emma Groome for sorting us out!  Look out for Standard Issue's women in TV-themed live show at the Boulevard on Sunday 10th November. You can find SI on the socials here: Instagram: @standardissuepodcast Twitter: @standardissueuk Facebook: @standardissuemagazine -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
This very special episode of Freelance Pod was recorded in front of a live audience at the London Podcast Festival in September 2019!  Pod fave Abdulwahab Tahhan returns for this 90-minute episode, in conversation on-stage at Kings Place with host Suchandrika Chakrabarti. Syrian refugee, stand-up comedian, journalist, lecturer, a person who's now clear on what the word 'loo' means... Abdul's got some good stories to tell. He takes us on a journey from his childhood in Aleppo all the way to opening a comedy set for Romesh Ranganathan at the Southbank Centre , with a bit of border-hopping and latter-making in between. These slides provided the backdrop to the show, and they are referred to, so you might want to take a look. Don't worry, you'll still understand the episode if you can't see them!  Does this episode make you feel like you missed out on the live show? Well, you kinda did... but fear not, there are MORE: - Freelance Pod will next go live to celebrate the Refugee Journalism Project in October - Freelance Pod will go live with a special guest at the newly-reopened Boulevard Soho Theatre in November - Suchandrika will be giving a workshop in how to adapt a podcast into a live show at the Newsrewired conference in November - Here are Suchandrika's thoughts on adapting an audio-only project into a fully visual and interactive experience -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Beth Ashton, The Telegraph's head of social media, kindly invited me over to their offices to tell me about how they do... social media. Traditionally, The Tele's newspaper readers have been amongst the oldest in the UK, which should present a challenge to converting them into online readers. They've also got a metered paywall and Premium content that stops quick and easy reads or sharing. Nevertheless, as Beth tells us, The Tele is one of the few news websites to make Snapchat work, and to harness the power of social media to bring in newer, younger readers. Going niche is good, and allows for a different tone - compare the Telegraph's main Instagram feed to Telegraph Royals, for example. Their columnists and their podcasts also present unique content that convince readers to subscribe.  The endless algorithm changes makes managing a social media team tough, as best practice is always changing, and messaging can get missed - Beth is refreshingly candid about these lesser-known issues on the pod. We first met when Beth was head of audience at the Manchester Evening News, part of Reach Plc, and I was working across the regional publications, while based at the Daily Mirror. Beth and the team worked flat-out on the night of the Manchester Arena bombings, a horrifying event that ended up shining a spotlight on how well the city can come together in a time of need. While we're talking about how the MEN covered this event, we mention former Teesside Gazette reporter Beth Lodge's great work on a memorial Facebook Live that has been watched by over 1.6 million people. p.s. Who's the Romesh that Abdul Tahhan's talking about at the very beginning? Yep, it's the one you think. Abdul's opened for him. -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter:https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
BBC Radio 4 Extra's Podcast Radio Hour has become another way to discover great podcasts, as well as an opportunity for some lucky podcasters to get heard on the radio. Host and producer Amanda Litherland came up with the idea a few years ago, and found herself thrown in front of the microphone. Luckily, her comedy background has helped her presenting, although she is open about only practice can give you interviewing skills - and the confidence to ask those questions. On this episode, we delve into what makes podcasts different to radio, why comedians and podcasts go together and the Eddie Mair advice that helps her show.  Amanda loves podcast recommendations, so do give her tweet @amandalitherland. If it's funny, all the better!  You can hear Freelance Pod on Podcast Radio Hour here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003tnr -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD   
Here it is, the Freelance Pod guide to the London Podcast Festival 2019, with programmer Zoë Jeyes!  Zoë is Deputy MD and Comedy Programmer at Kings Place, and has been working there since it opened 11 years ago. A longtime podcast fan, she first floated the idea of a festival in 2014, with the first one going ahead in 2016. Since then, podcasting as a medium - and an industry - has exploded, and the 2019 festival is set to be the biggest one yet, with 60 live shows and a whole weekend of workshops for anyone who wants to start a podcast, or learn more about the industry. Freelance Pod's live show is at 2pm on Saturday 7th September. I'm also going to see Mostly Lit, The Allusionist and Rule of Three - at least. Tweet me @freelance_pod, or message me at @freelancepod on Insta to let me know if you've booked tickets too!  Listen to the episode to find out the surprising places that Zoë listens to pods (she is *dedicated*), how to transform a good podcast from its oroginal audio form into a visual, interactive show and  -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
"I loved being a journalist," writes Jackie Annesley in a frank essay about losing her last job in journalism, as editor of The Sunday Times Style supplement, where, among many other things, she commissioned the PanDolly podcast from two of her columnists; it's now better known by its second name, The High Low, with journalists Pandora Sykes and Dolly Alderton. Jackie's exit from The Sunday Times is accompanied with euphemisms about 'replacement' and 'commercial decisions'. In the months that followed what she felt was the end of a career in newspapers - editing The Sunday Times' News Review, being in charges of features at the London Evening Standard and editing the Daily Mail's Femail section - Jackie realised that this sudden change in circumstances could, in fact, work for her. She's now Creative Director for start-up Soda Says. 'Soda' stands for School of the Digital Age, and, according to their Instagram bio, they've been "selling tech to you and your mother since 2017." Jackie writes a fun, irreverent weekly newsletter for them, and hosts the podcast Talk Tech to Me, where she asks starry guests to explain their relationships with their mobile phones. The first episode features Anne Robinson of the Weakest Link fame, and it's great fun. What Jackie has to say is packed with wisdom and good advice, as well as an appreciation of how journalistic innovation has sped up thanks to the internet, while the money has drained away... thanks to the internet. A "sunset industry"? Perhaps, but the lessons in communication that journalism teaches you are more important in a digital age than ever before. -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD   
Matt Cooke is Head of Partnerships & Training, Google News Lab, part of the Google News Initiative. Google News has been a major factor in completely changing how news is indexed, distributed, discovered and consumed. That's because the internet has changed news distribution to include you, the reader, the audience, yes you, you control what you want to see, when you want to see it. Alongside sharing and self-publishing on social media, Google indexing news has completely changed the industry.  Matt's now spent almost as much time building Google News Labs as he did working at the BBC, on news and, memorably, as presenter of BBC Three's 60 Second News. He thinks that transparency is the key to winning audience trust, and he cites this well-known BBC Africa Twitter thread as an example of showing the inner workings of journalism for the greater good. Despite working in a very digital world, though, Matt still buys his trusty local newspaper once a week. This episode is packed full of his insights into digital journalism, and his advice for journalists who've reached a crossroads in their careers. -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD     
Did you know that there's a Freelance Pod live event at the London Podcast Festival in September? Yup, alongside big hitters like The Guilty Feminist, Have You Heard George's Podcast and The Allusionist, Freelance Pod is going to have its first live event, and you can be part of the audience! Click this link for more information, and to buy tickets for under a tenner. This episode is a little introduction to the live event guest, Abdulwahab Tahhan. Abdul came to London from Syria as a refugee in 2012, taking a long and tough journey through Turkey. He's now a stand-up - warming up crowds for comedy legends like Romesh Ranganathan - as well as working towards his PhD, writing for The Guardian and developing a podcast to let other refugees tell their stories of settling into British life.  There was a time when Abdul was new to the UK and applied for 100 journalism jobs, without any luck. In 2015, he joined The Refugee Journalism Project's one-year scheme, which transformed his professional life. The workshops and networking helped him get a job as a researcher with the NGO Airwars, and paved the way towards all the exciting things he's doing today. If you like what you hear on this episode, join Abdul and Freelance Pod host Suchandrika Chakrabarti for the live recording at Kings Place in September!  This is also Freelance Pod's 30th episode! Find out why that's an important number to Suchandrika on the pod...  Suchandrika Chakrabarti was also the guest on the launch episode of The Media Insider, with author and PR Helen Croydon. There's a snippet on the pod, and you can find the episode here. -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://suchandrika.substack.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD 
Journalist, author and founder of the soon-to-be-launched Freelance Feels, Jenny Stallard joins me on the podcast to talk about her career moving from print to digital, her freelancing journey and why freelancers need to more vigilant about our mental wellbeing than the more traditionally employed. I've written here about how freelancing got me down, and how this podcast solved it! Love U, Freelance Pod! Along the way, she looks back at the creation of mega-helpful freelancer Facebook Group, The No1 freelance ladies' buddy agency, which has supplied me with work and new contacts among other freelancers and even editors - it's a must-join for all freelancers. Freelance Feels is going to be a blog, podcast and coaching service. As journalism moves from analogue to digital, the need for continual training grows, as the opportunity for ongoing training in or out of a newsroom shrinks. Jenny talks us through her ideas to help that situation. -- How has your industry moved from analogue to digital? Each episode, creative guests tell host Suchandrika Chakrabarti how the internet has revolutionised work. Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/freelancepod Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freelancepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/freelance_pod_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelancePod/ YouTube: https://goo.gl/chfccD
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