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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.
507 Episodes
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What it’s like to run an election in a pandemic. Also, the French president’s crusade to reform Islam.Read more:Chris Anderson is a Florida election official. In the weeks leading up to Nov. 3, he has been trying to administer an election safely, securely and as smoothly as possible. The tools of his trade: 101,000 Q-tips from a local Dollar Tree, a phone constantly pinging with text messages, and an election supervisor’s prayer that begs, “We don’t care who wins — just don’t let it be close.” Another gruesome terrorist attack in France has intensified anti-Muslim sentiment. Instead of fighting systemic racism, France wants to “reform Islam.”  Our colleagues at The Washington Post podcast “Can He Do That?” have spent the better part of four years reporting on the Trump presidency. They have a new series out this week about the ways that the Trump administration’s policies and rhetoric have contributed to a more sharply divided country.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
A snapshot of what’s happening in key battleground states. What we can and can’t learn from polling. And a complicated end to the World Series.Read more:Reporters Jenna Johnson and Amy Gardner have been closely watching the presidential race play out in key states. In some of these states, such as Georgia and Texas, the polls are much closer than expected.The Post’s polling director, Scott Clement, talks about Biden's narrow lead in Michigan, and what we can and can't learn from polling.The Los Angeles Dodgers won the World Series for the first time in more than three decades — but there was a dark cloud over celebrations after a player tested positive for the novel coronavirus but joined his teammates anyway. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
Will your vote count?

Will your vote count?

2020-10-2724:57

What we can learn from a Supreme Court decision on mail-in ballots in Wisconsin. The states where most voters still can’t vote by mail. And why it’s easier to vote from space than from your own home.Read more:On Monday night, the Supreme Court rejected a request to extend Wisconsin’s deadline for counting mail-in ballots. Justice Brett M.Kavanaugh wrote a concurring argument that reporter Philip Bump says is riddled with dubious arguments, including an allegation that late ballots are somehow a suspicious effort to shift the results.Forget the official deadlines: Experts and campaigns say it's now too late to vote by mail. The latest from Jacob Bogage.Coronavirus cases are surging again. But in five states, most voters fearful of infection are not allowed to cast ballots by mail. Reporter Arelis Hernández describes the restrictions leaving tens of millions of people with the risky choice of voting in person or not voting at all. In 2020, casting a ballot from space may be easier than casting one on Earth. Editor Ruby Mellen explains how that could be.Check out The Washington Post’s How to Vote guide for information on your state.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offerIn a new three-part documentary, The Washington Post explores a failed response to the coronavirus pandemic that’s left 225,000 Americans dead, despite decades of preparation in Washington. Watch “America’s Pandemic” here: http://wapo.st/pandemic
Mitch McConnell’s Supreme Court victory. The future of the Affordable Care Act. And a shift in the White House’s thinking on how to tackle the coronavirus.Read more:Trump’s conservative imprint on the federal judiciary gives Democrats a playbook — if they win.‘ACB vs. ACA’: Why Democrats keep bringing up Obamacare during Barrett’s confirmation hearing.With just over a week until Election Day, the White House has signaled that it’s done trying to contain the spread of the coronavirus, setting its chips on therapeutics and vaccines. And, as White House reporter Toluse Olorunnipa explains, that shift in attitude can be seen in how Vice President Pence’s office is handling its own outbreak.Check out The Washington Post’s How to Vote guide for information on your state.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
What record-breaking early-voter turnout means for Democrats and Republicans. How one election official is handling the “tsunami” of ballots in her Texas county. Plus, the latest on foreign election interference. Read more:Across the country, Democratic enthusiasm is propelling an enormous wave of early voting. But reporter Amy Gardner, who covers voting issues, explains that it’s still too early to know what that will mean for Democrat Joe Biden. Meanwhile, election officials such as Dana DeBeauvoir of Travis County, Tex., are scrambling to accommodate the record numbers of voters. During Thursday’s debate, President Trump and Biden were asked about the latest foreign interference in the election. Craig Timberg, national technology reporter, explains the story behind mysterious emails threatening Democratic voters this week. Subscribe to The Washington Post: postreports.com/offer
545 kids

545 kids

2020-10-2224:591

How the government has lost track of hundreds of separated migrant families. Why rural communities still lack reliable access to high-speed Internet. And, forming a ‘pandemic pod’ for the winter. Read more:More than two years after a U.S. district judge ordered that families separated by President Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy at the border be reunited, the parents of 545 minors still haven't been found. Reporter Teo Armus explains why it’s been so difficult to track and reunite families.Read Kevin Sieff’s story about one of the first families separated at the border. Years later, they’re still apart.The coronavirus pandemic has drawn new attention to a long-standing problem – poor Internet in rural communities. “There are people who have to go sit in parking lots, go meet a bus that has mobile hotspots, so they can submit homework or send an email with a large attachment,” says reporter Meagan Flynn, “because they can’t get Wi-Fi in their house.”As winter approaches, many of us who rely on outdoor hangouts to meet our social needs might start to feel a little trapped and lonely. Never fear. Wellness reporter Allyson Chiu has a solution. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The latest on vaccine trials, and who would get a vaccine first. Why personal protective equipment such as the N95 mask is still so scarce. And introducing the mute button to the presidential debate. Read more:As coronavirus cases climb in nearly every state, drug companies are developing prospective vaccines at unprecedented speed. Science reporter Carolyn Y. Johnson has the latest on the search for a vaccine, and she says early data is expected in a matter of weeks. N95 masks are crucial in protecting front-line workers against the coronavirus, but even months into the pandemic they’re still hard to come by. Reporter Jess Contrera covers the supply chain issue America can’t seem to fix.President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden face off in their final presidential debate on Thursday. Political reporter Amy B Wang explains what to expect. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The Senate seats in danger of flipping parties this election. Facebook and Twitters attempt to tackle disinformation ahead of the election. And a Black man speaks out after his image was used for fake pro-Trump Twitter accounts.Read more:Will the Senate flip parties? Reporter Paul Kane explains the Republican seats to watch this election, and the tightrope that senators who are close to the president have to walk to stay in office. Social media companies like Twitter and Facebook are struggling to keep up with the onslaught of disinformation on their sites. Silicon Valley correspondent Elizabeth Dwoskin reports on the latest policies intended to mitigate the spread of conspiracy theories and fake news ahead of the election. On Twitter, the sudden appearance and disappearance of fake Black pro-Trump accounts are a stunning example of how far false messages can spread before companies step in and block them. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
There are just over two weeks until Nov. 3. Election-related lawsuits are flooding the courts, but the army of lawyers filing cases shows little sign of stopping. And a conversation with a pro-Trump Muslim voter. Read more:People are voting early across the country, but courts are facing an unprecedented number of election cases. Martine Powers and Post Reports producer Reena Flores explore the variouselection cases before the court, the lawyering-up by both parties, and how that can play a role in the election and people’s ability to vote. Mike Hacham is a 27-year-old businessman in Detroit. Hacham, who is Muslim, says he plans to cast his vote for Trump for a second time despite the president’s anti-Muslim rhetoric. “Anything that hurts my people, I'm totally against,” he tells “Post Reports” producer Linah Mohammad. “But also, we cannot just judge a person on that aspect.” Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The Life of George Floyd

The Life of George Floyd

2020-10-1601:04:563

“He's everywhere — but he's not here. He's on somebody's wall. He's on somebody's billboard. … He's in a newspaper, but he's not here. He's here in spirit. But he's not here.”George Floyd has become a symbol, and a rallying cry. But what’s missing in our understanding is the man himself: a figure who was complicated, full of ambition, shaped by his family and his community and a century of forces around him.On this episode of “Post Reports,” we explore the life and experiences of the man who sparked a movement, as part of The Washington Post’s series “George Floyd’s America.” The reporting explores the institutional and societal roadblocks Floyd encountered as a Black man from his birth in 1973 until his death, and the role systemic racism played throughout his life. The eight minutes Floyd spent suffocating under the knee of a White police officer became the catalyst for nationwide protests against racial inequality. But it was not the first time that Floyd faced oppression — as a Black man, Floyd spent his 46-year life battling injustices that derailed, diminished and ultimately killed him. “One of the reasons George Floyd has become a rallying cry across the country for racial justice protest is not because his experience was so unique,” says reporter Tolu Olorunnipa, “but in part because his experience and the experience of his family are so common.”The series is based on a review of thousands of documents and more than 150 interviews with Floyd’s friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars.The picture that emerges is one that underscores how systemic racism has calcified within many of America’s institutions, creating sharply disparate outcomes in housing, education, the economy, law enforcement and health care.Read more in this Special Report from The Washington Post: George Floyd’s America. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offerCredits Reporting for this episode from Ted Muldoon. “George Floyd’s America” was reported by Arelis Hernández, Tracy Jan, Laura Meckler, Tolu Olorunnipa, Robert Samuels, Griff Witte and Cleve Wootson. This “Post Reports” episode was produced by Ted Muldoon and Linah Mohammad and edited by Maggie Penman and Martine Powers.
How genetic science can help expose, track and contain coronavirus outbreaks. And your voting questions answered. Read more:In a pandemic rife with confusion, where essential data and clear guidance have been difficult to find, clues to controlling coronavirus outbreaks can be found in the virus’s own genetic code. Sarah Kaplan reports on an undisclosed outbreak in Postville, Iowa — and the genetic evidence it left behind.Your voting questions, answered. One listener asks, how do campaigns get involved in challenging votes? Election law attorney Ben Ginsberg explains. If you have a question about voting, check out The Washington Post’s guide on how to vote in your state. You can also ask Post Reports on Twitter or Facebook — or write us an email at PostReports@washpost.com. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
Why we still don’t have a second pandemic relief bill. What the funding holdup means for schools. And how rushing this year’s census could shape our democracy for years to come.  Read more:Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has announced that the Senate will take up a narrow economic relief bill when it returns to session next week — one that Democrats will probably block. White House economics reporter Jeff Stein reports on the content of the stimulus bill.As talks sour over the economic recovery package, public schools are once again bracing to lose out on tens of billions of dollars of federal aid — money they say they desperately need to reopen as they face mounting costs and shrinking budgets. “We saw a ton of rhetoric, particularly from the Trump administration, about how important it was to reopen schools in order to restart the economy,” says education reporter Moriah Balingit. “There has not been money that has followed that rhetoric.”On Tuesday, the Supreme Court allowed the Trump administration to end the 2020 Census count early, putting an end to the contentious legal battle over the once-in-a-decade household count. Courts reporter Robert Barnes explains the vast implications of an undercount.As the general election draws nearer, millions of people are figuring out how to vote for the first time or vote by mail for the first time. And the rules are changing fast, as states figure out how to adjust to the pandemic. The Post is partnering with ProPublica this fall to report on the problems voters are running into as they cast their ballots ahead of Nov. 3. And if you’re having trouble voting this year, we want to hear from you — about anything from long lines or harassment at the polls, to voter ID confusion and inaccurate ballots. These concerns are really important to voice.To share your experience, message our tip line by texting VOTE to 81380, or fill out this form by ProPublica. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
How Amy Coney Barrett would view her role on the court. How anti-vaxxers are using covid-19 to further their agenda. And when mail ballots get counted.Read more:During the first day of questioning in Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing, she told the Senate Judiciary Committee that she has made “no commitment” to the White House or senators on how she would rule on major cases on the Affordable Care Act, abortion and election disputes. Amber Phillips breaks down how Barrett says she would view her role on the court. The pandemic is amplifying the U.S. anti-vaccine movement — and globalizing it. Foreign affairs reporter Emily Rauhala explains how the movement has weaponized legitimate fears that the vaccine might be rushed, and has leveraged those to further an anti-science agenda.We’ve been taking your questions about voting this year, and how it will be different because of the pandemic. If you have more questions check out The Washington Post’s guide: How to vote in your state in 2020. And if you want to know exactly when mail-in ballots are processed in your state, here’s a comprehensive guide to that.More than a week after we learned the president was sick with covid-19, we still don’t know much more than that. Washington Post podcast Can He Do That? looked at why that matters.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
Opening statements in the Supreme Court confirmation hearing of nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. How Barrett was involved in litigating the 2000 presidential election. And the political battle that led Oregon to vote by mail.Read more:White House reporter Seung Min Kim unpacks opening statements in the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, and what we can expect over the following days.Investigative reporter Beth Reinhard discusses Barrett’s role in the contested presidential election of 2000, and exactly how absentee ballots were involved.Though Oregon’s mail-in voting system is now widely beloved by the state’s voters, it wasn’t always that way. Political journalist Jeff Mapes and former Oregon secretary of state Phil Keisling share their memories of the heated political battle over vote-by-mail in the 1990s — and reflect on why those debates are reemerging on a national stage today.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
Trump’s loyal base

Trump’s loyal base

2020-10-0934:442

The White men without college degrees who love the president more than ever. How evangelical Latinos could swing the vote for Trump in Florida. And, a bakery in Beirut reopens two months after an explosion. Read more:Polls show Biden with a significant lead over the president, but national political reporter Jenna Johnson says there is still one demographic group that can’t be swayed: White men without college degrees. Johnson talked to some of Trump’s most loyal fans. In the battleground state of Florida, an oft overlooked group of swing voters may have the power to sway the election: evangelical Latinos. National features reporter Jose Del Real reports. In Beirut, a beloved Manousheh bakery returns after the Aug. 4 explosion that devastated the city. Foreign affairs reporter Siobhan O’Grady and Beirut-based reporter Nader Durgham with a baker’s tale of struggle and survival. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
What grand jury recordings can tell us about why there was no indictment in Breonna Taylor's death. How the pandemic is scrambling college students’ voting plans. And, how Boris Johnson was affected by contracting covid-19. Read more:During last night’s vice-presidential debate, Vice President Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) were asked about justice, and the grand jury decision not to charge several officers for fatally shooting Breonna Taylor. From reporter Marisa Iati, the questions left unanswered by newly released recordings of the grand jury. It’s a weird time to be a college student. And on top of navigating remote learning and housing during a pandemic, students are now being asked to figure out how and where to vote – many for the first time. Political enterprise and accountability reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee shares advice from campus organizers trying to make the process easier to understand.London correspondent Karla Adam reports that for Boris Johnson, catching covid-19 was a sobering experience. But so far, that is less so for Trump. “Trump is in the middle of the presidential election. So, whereas Boris Johnson disappeared from public view for about a month. That's clearly not happening with President Trump.” Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
How Biden’s presidential campaign is pivoting. The most uneven recession. And, why service industry workers are seeing less in tips.Read more:National political reporter Annie Linskey on how Joe Biden’s campaign for president this year is evolving. From revealing coronavirus testing results to mobilizing Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), the way the Democratic nominee approaches the field is changing.On Tuesday, President Trump announced on Twitter that he was stopping negotiations on another relief package until after the election. He’s since pivoted again. But economics correspondent Heather Long tells us, in the meantime times are tough for many Americans -- and this is the most uneven recession in recent U.S. history.Tips, commissions and bonuses are down across the country, and service industry workers are feeling the loss. As they told retail reporter Abha Bhattarai, while lawmakers are struggling to come up with packages to help the unemployed and others in need, they feel like a last priority.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
How the White House residence staff is responding to the hot spot in their workplace. The owner of a Kansas diner weighs whether to reopen or keep feeding people in need. And the NBA’s push to get out the vote. Read more:National features reporter Jada Yuan reports that as the number of people testing positive for coronavirus at the White House increases, there is growing concern that residential workers are being put at risk. The Ladybird Diner in Lawrence, Kan., has been feeding hungry people since it had to close its doors in March. Now, reporter Annie Gowen explains, the owner is facing a choice: She can reopen, but what will happen to the hungry people if she does?In 2016, only 22 percent of eligible players in the NBA voted in the election. Sports reporter Candace Buckner reports on how the push across the league to get people to the polls this November started with the players themselves. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The White House sends mixed messages about Trump’s condition as at least a dozen people in Trump’s inner circle have tested positive for the coronavirus. The quiet resistance of U.S. Postal workers. And the importance of slow science. Read more:The president says he's leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Centerafter testing positive for the coronavirus. White House reporter Seung Min Kim explains how the White House has been unclear about Trump’s condition, and who in his inner circle has tested positive. U.S. Postal Service workers are quietly resisting the changes Postmaster General Louis DeJoy has put in place since taking over the agency. Business reporter Jacob Bogage explains. The Nobel prize in medicine has been awarded for the discovery of Hepatitis C. Science reporter Sarah Kaplan reports on how the committee has recognized the “landmark achievement” against a viral disease that is responsible for 400,000 deaths annually. Listen to Canary: The Washington Post Investigates, a new podcast from The Washington Post about two women’s refusal to stay silent. Hosted by Amy Brittain.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The second chapter of “Canary: The Washington Post Investigates,” a new seven-part podcast that follows the intertwining stories of two women who came together after one of them publicly shared her story of sexual assault.Lauren Clark is a hair stylist in D.C. When a stranger sexually assaulted her in 2013, it sparked a years-long courtroom saga and a campaign for justice. Her story started The Post’s Amy Brittain on a reporting journey that has lasted for nearly three years — one that played out in the middle of a larger cultural reckoning. When Carole Griffin, a baker in Birmingham, Ala., read The Post’s story about Clark in 2019, it prompted her to reveal an unlikely connection.In an email to The Post, Griffin said that she had information pertinent to that story. And later, she alleged that a prominent figure in the D.C. criminal justice system had committed a sexual assault decades earlier.The Post is out now with all the episodes of its first long-form investigative podcast series, called “Canary: The Washington Post Investigates.” 
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Comments (72)

Carol Reed

Amy Coney Barrett is not merely Catholic. She is part of a secretive, draconian, uber-right sub-group of fundamentalists who believe in a male-dominated society. How can she exercise independent judgment? Why will no one ask out loud -- what is People of Praise and how does that group color your decisions?

Sep 29th
Reply

.45RWBNK

can a snake truly be rich?

Sep 29th
Reply

Ciara G

I've noticed a steady dumbing down in the explanation of topics on this podcast. Give the listeners credit that we can understand things without the hosts saying "like right, totally!" and "it's not a good look!" etc. Feel like I've been listening to two teenagers.

Sep 2nd
Reply

Philly Burbs

this is so stupid..."choose to fight in a different room" good luck with that.

Jul 13th
Reply

Philly Burbs

let's face facts Biden should not be our candidate, he can't finish a sentence without a gaff. If Trump dealt with the Virus-like our allies, Biden would be losing big. never in my lifetime was the VP pick more important for both candidates. they are both old, knocking on heavens door. gone is the Biden of the Obama era. Like the Muller debacle, baby boomers keep picking each other with no regard to age because they don't see themselves as old. that's why we have no strong young leaders boomers refuse to retire despite their frailties. we are heading for a depression. We need a VP with experience that is ready if Biden can't get over the threshold demanding a BLACK WOMEN PISSES ME OFF. Biden should not be our candidate. Clayburn changed things for him because the American people were smart enough to see the truth & he lost every primary race until then. Perez rigged the primary & now we are stuck with another old man who thinks in the past & has no real plans for the future except he's better than Trump. an awful choice. VP must have experience & be qualified I don't care what sex or color they are! i am a women, a boomer, & im putting my country first, these black women need to do that too! the demand for Biden to pick a black woman under the circumstances we are in is outrageous. imagine a demand for a white woman? everyone would be freaking out. I demand Biden pick a white woman! sounds as insane as blacks demanding biden pick a black women.

Jul 10th
Reply

Diane Grillo

what a heartbreaking story! why is it that the truth about this man and how the pardon came about wasn't as public as the pardon? I watch ALOT of cable shows yet I don't remember any interviews with anyone who was there for those few days. This should become available on all the MSNBC, CNN, YOUNG TURKS ETC as a special episode so everyone in or retired from military knows the truth. He took me to that day and I felt the nervousness and now I feel anger that this ridiculous orange idiot can cause so many to suffer that he claims to have an affinity for! Well if anyone can put that interview into the Headlines it you guys. people need to hear that. Especially those in the military

Jul 4th
Reply

Mike

jaw dropping!

Jul 3rd
Reply

Grant TH

Stop taking money from Facebook. Yuck.

Jun 24th
Reply

Adil Sharif

:( :(

Jun 19th
Reply

Elephant Wig

25:00

May 15th
Reply

ncooty

It must be difficult to fill a daily podcast with people who don't know anything, or at least nothing new.

Apr 30th
Reply

ncooty

The economic reporter's manner of speaking sounds to me as if she's sharing high-school gossip.

Apr 28th
Reply

Charlie Pyron

le I'm stoked no ok mom lzllllll l know if the check xlpdoooollo babe can come. v can clear oro o even

Apr 26th
Reply

ncooty

Young people always think they're a political force. They never are. ("Rock the vote.") It's just an inflated sense of self-importance and a belief that if something is new to them, it's new to the universe.

Apr 26th
Reply

ncooty

Did this guy think he was narrating a movie trailer?

Apr 26th
Reply

ncooty

The primary medium of podcasts: vocal fry (typically with up-talk).

Apr 24th
Reply

ncooty

Why can't female presenters on podcasts just speak normally? Why do so many of them growl or have up-talk and vocal fry?

Apr 23rd
Reply

ncooty

Does anyone at the _Post_ pronounce middle ts? (E.g., "John Bol-on", "impor-ant")

Apr 20th
Reply

ncooty

@1:26: Lena Sun seems to have over-estimated her expertise.

Apr 20th
Reply

Chris Snyder

my

Mar 28th
Reply
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