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Radio Baseball Cards

Author: Fred Greene

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Amazing and amusing short stories shared by the greatest Major League Baseball players of the 20th Century with host Don Drysdale (RIP). Created by Fred Greene (Golf Smarter) Radio Baseball Cards was a nationally syndicated radio show that aired ahead of baseball broadcasts across the USA in 1987. Due to our 11 part series on Jackie Robinson, Radio Baseball Cards was accepted by and is listed in the Baseball Hall of Fame & Library.
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Gregory Allen Brock played first base for his entire 10 year MLB career, splitting his time evenly between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Milwaukee Brewers.In 1013 games over 10 major league seasons, Brock posted a .248 batting average (794-for-3202) with 420 runs, 141 doubles, 6 triples, 110 home runs, 462 RBI, 41 stolen bases, 434 bases on balls, .338 on-base percentage and .399 slugging percentage. Defensively, he recorded a .994 fielding percentage as a first baseman. In the 1983 and 1985 National League Championship Series, he hit only .048 (1-for-21) with 3 runs, 1 home run, 2 RBI and 2 walks in 8 games.Brock was born in McMinnville, Oregon, the son of Joe Brock, who coached baseball at Stayton High School. Greg played for his father at the high school, and in 1995 had his jersey retired at the school. Brock attended the University of Wyoming.
Ralph Kiner (October 27, 1922 – February 6, 2014) was a beloved player and broadcaster. An outfielder, Kiner played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, and Cleveland Indians from 1946 through 1955. Following his retirement, Kiner served from 1956 through 1960 as general manager of the Pacific Coast League San Diego Padres. He also served as an announcer for the New York Mets from the team's inception until his death. Though injuries forced his retirement from active play after 10 seasons, Kiner led all of his National League contemporaries in hitting between 1946 and 1952. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.After his death, baseball writer Marty Noble named Kiner "one of baseball's genuine and most charming gentlemen".
Mark McGwire (born October 1, 1963), nicknamed Big Mac, MLB playing career spanned from 1986 to 2001 while playing for the Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals, winning one World Series championship each, with Oakland as a player in 1989 and with St. Louis as a coach in 2011. One of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history, McGwire holds the major league career record for at bats per home run ratio (10.6), and is the former record holder for both home runs in a single season (70 in 1998) and home runs hit by a rookie (49 in 1987).He ranks 11th all time in home runs with 583, and led the major leagues in home runs in five different seasons, while establishing the major league record for home runs hit in a four-season period from 1996 to 1999 with 245. Further, he demonstrated exemplary patience as a batter, producing a career .394 on-base percentage and twice leading the major leagues in bases on balls. Injuries cut short the manifestation of even greater potential as he reached 140 games played in just eight of 16 total seasons. A right-handed batter and thrower, McGwire stood 6 feet 5 inches tall and weighed 245 pounds during his playing career.A part of the 1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase of Roger Maris' 61 with the Cardinals, McGwire set the major league single-season home run record with 70, which Barry Bonds broke three years later with 73. McGwire also led the league in runs batted in, twice in bases on balls and on-base percentage, and four times in slugging percentage. Injuries significantly cut into his playing time in 2000 and 2001 before factoring into his retirement. He finished with 583 home runs, which was fifth all-time when he retired.
Andre Dawson (born July 10, 1954), nicknamed "The Hawk" and "Awesome Dawson", is a Hall of Famer who played for four different teams as a center and right fielder during his 21 year career. He spent most of his career with the Montreal Expos (1976–1986) and Chicago Cubs (1987–1992).An 8-time NL All-Star, he was named the league's Rookie of the Year in 1977 after batting .282 with 19 home runs and 65 RBI, and won the Most Valuable Player Award in 1987 after leading the league with 49 homers and 137 RBI; he had been runner-up for the award in both 1981 and 1983. He batted .300 five times, drove in 100 runs four times and had 13 seasons of 20 home runs. A strong base-runner early in his career, he also stole 30 bases three times. He is one of eight MLB players with at least 300 home runs and 300 stolen bases during his career.Dawson was a center fielder until knee problems – worsened by the artificial surface at Olympic Stadium – forced his shift to right field, followed by his move to a team which played on grass. He led the NL in outfield putouts three consecutive years (1981–1983), and won eight Gold Glove Awards for fielding excellence. Dawson was known for his incredible work ethic and study of the game. He was often seen in the dugout with a clipboard in-hand documenting pitches and pitcher tendencies. This was long before such practices were common-place and such information was readily available. Upon his retirement, his NL totals of 409 home runs and 962 extra base hits both ranked tenth in league history; he also ranked seventh in NL history in games as an outfielder (2,303), and sixth in both outfield putouts (5,116) and total chances (5,366). He set Expos franchise records for career games, at bats, runs scored, hits, doubles, triples, home runs, runs batted in, extra base hits, total bases and steals, all of which have since been broken variously by Tim Raines, Tim Wallach and Vladimir Guerrero. Dawson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on July 25, 2010
William Clark Jr. (born March 13, 1964) played first base from 1986 through 2000 for the San Francisco Giants, Texas Rangers, Baltimore Orioles, and St. Louis Cardinals. Clark was known by the nickname of "Will the Thrill." The nickname has often been truncated to simply, "The Thrill."Clark played college baseball for the Mississippi State Bulldogs, where he won the Golden Spikes Award, and at the 1984 Summer Olympics before playing in the major leagues. Clark was a six-time MLB All-Star, a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner, a Gold Glove Award winner, and the winner of the National League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award in 1989.Clark has been inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame, Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame, Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, and Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame. His uniform number was retired by the Giants during the 2020 season. Clark continues to be active in baseball, serving as a Special Assistant in the Giants' front office.
Dale Murphy played MLB baseball for 18 years (1976–1993), as an outfielder, catcher, and first baseman for the Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, and Colorado Rockies; Murphy is best noted for his many years with the Braves. His entire MLB career was spent in the NL, during which time he won consecutive MVP awards (1982–1983), the Silver Slugger Award for four straight years (1982–1985), and the Gold Glove Award for five straight years (1982–1986). Murphy is a member of the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame, Georgia Sports Hall of Fame, and World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame.
Brooks Robinson Jr. (born May 18, 1937) played 23 seasons for the Baltimore Orioles (1955–1977), the longest career spent with a single team in MLB history (tied with Carl Yastrzemski). Robinson batted and threw right-handed. Nicknamed "The Human Vacuum Cleaner" or "Mr. Hoover", he is considered the greatest defensive third baseman in major league history.Born and raised in Little Rock, Arkansas, Robinson attracted the notice of MLB scouts while playing American Legion Baseball. Signed by the Orioles in 1955, he debuted with them that same year. He was Baltimore's Opening Day third baseman in 1957, and became the team's full-time third baseman in the second half of the 1959 season. In 1960, he was selected to the first of 18 straight All-Star Games. That year, he won the first of 16 consecutive Gold Glove Awards, tied with Jim Kaat for the second-most for any player at any position (behind Greg Maddux's 18).Starting in 1960, Robinson helped the Orioles contend for their first American League pennant since the team moved to Baltimore in 1954, and they remained in contention until late in the 1960, 1961, and 1964 seasons. Third in MVP voting in 1960, Robinson won the award in 1964, one of his finest seasons. In 1966, he finished second in MVP voting to teammate Frank Robinson as the Orioles won the AL pennant, then swept the Los Angeles Dodgers for their first ever World Series title. With his 193rd home run in 1969, Robinson broke Al Rosen's record for AL third basemen. In the 1970 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds, Robinson drew the attention of baseball fans around the United States with his strong defensive play against the Reds, time after time robbing the Cincinnati players of base hits. His performance won him the World Series MVP Award as Baltimore defeated the Reds in five games. He became one of just 12 players to earn over $100,000 annually in 1971, and played until retiring during the 1977 season.Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983 in his first year of eligibility. Following his career, he served as a broadcaster for the Orioles and also joined Opening Day Partners, which owns several minor league teams. Robinson was popular with the Oriole fans for his kindness and patience with them. "Never has a player meant more to a franchise and more to a city than Brooks has meant to the Orioles and the city of Baltimore," said Oriole historian Ted Patterson.
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was a Hall of Fame baseball player who starred in the Majors (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977, and was named to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.Banks is regarded by some as one of the greatest players of all time. He began playing professional baseball in 1950 with the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro leagues. He served in the U.S. military for two years, played for the Monarchs again, and began his major league career in September 1953. The following year, Banks was the National League Rookie of the Year runner-up. Beginning in 1955, Banks was a NL All-Star for 11 seasons, playing in 13 of the 15 All-Star Games held during those years. Banks was the Cubs' main attraction in the late 1950s, the National League Most Valuable Player in 1958 and 1959, and the Cubs' first Gold Glove winner in 1960.In 1962, Banks became a regular first baseman for the Cubs. Between 1967 and 1971, he was a player-coach. In 1969, through a Chicago Sun-Times fan poll, Cubs fans voted him the greatest Cub ever. In 1970, Banks hit his 500th career home run at Wrigley Field. He retired from playing in 1971, was a coach for the Cubs in 1972, and in 1982 was the team's first player to have his uniform number retired.Banks was active in the Chicago community during and after his tenure with the Cubs. He founded a charitable organization, became the first black Ford Motor Company dealer in the United States, and made an unsuccessful bid for a local political office. In 2013, Banks was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contribution to sports. Banks lived in the Los Angeles and Chicago areas.
Charles "Chili" Davis is a Jamaican-American former who played as an outfielder and designated hitter from 1981 to 1999 for the San Francisco Giants (1981–1987), California Angels (1988–1990, 1993–1996), Minnesota Twins (1991–1992), Kansas City Royals (1997) and New York Yankees (1998–1999). His first MLB coaching position after his playing career was with the Oakland Athletics from 2012 to 2014. He also coached for the Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs and the New York Mets. Davis was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He is the first ballplayer born in Jamaica to appear in an MLB game.
Bobby Lee Bonds (March 15, 1946 – August 23, 2003) was a right fielder from 1968 to 1981, primarily with the San Francisco Giants. Noted for his outstanding combination of power hitting and speed, he was the first player to have more than two seasons of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases, doing so a record five times (the record was matched only by his son Barry), and was the first to accomplish the feat in both major leagues; he became the second player to hit 300 career home runs and steal 300 bases, joining Willie Mays. Together with Barry, he is part of baseball's most accomplished father-son combination, holding the record for combined home runs, RBIs, and stolen bases. A prolific leadoff hitter, he also set major league records for most times leading off a game with a home run in a career (35) and a season (11, in 1973); both records have since been broken.
Dennis Rasmussen was a left-handed pitcher for the San Diego Padres (1983 and 1988–91), New York Yankees (1984–87), Cincinnati Reds (1987–88), Chicago Cubs (1992), and Kansas City Royals (1992–93 and 1995). Rasmussen was born in Los Angeles and grew up in San Clemente, California. He nearly lost his left foot at the age of 14, when a speeding car knocked him off of his bicycle on Labor Day in 1973, and the fall severed his foot, which was hanging by the Achilles tendon. An emergency room doctor said they would need to amputate, but an orthopedic surgeon was able to save the foot. As a result, he has no cartilage in his left ankle.Rasmussen attended San Clemente High School. Six months after the injury, he recovered sufficiently to play in the final two games of the season for the junior varsity basketball team. After one year at San Clemente High School, his family moved to Boise, Idaho, and he attended Meridian High School in Meridian, Idaho, for two years. His family moved to Denver, Colorado, and he went to Bear Creek High School in Lakewood, Colorado, for his senior year. He was named All-State in baseball and basketball, and was a member of the doubles team that won the state championship in tennis.The Pittsburgh Pirates selected Rasmussen in the 18th round of the 1977 Major League Baseball draft, but he did not sign with the Pirates. As he wanted to play college basketball, he enrolled at Creighton University, which offered him a scholarship to play for the Creighton Bluejays men's basketball team. The arrangement with Creighton also allowed him to play college baseball for the Creighton Bluejays baseball team. For the basketball team, he was a forward who played as the sixth man off the bench. For the baseball team, he had a 3–6 win–loss record and a 3.38 earned run average (ERA) with Creighton in his junior year, with 84 strikeouts, a school record, in 61+2⁄3 innings pitched. He was named to the All-Missouri Valley Conference's First Team.
Leon "Bull" Durham played first base and outfielder for 10 seasons. Durham was a longtime minor league hitting coach, and most recently served as the assistant hitting coach for the Detroit Tigers during the 2017 season. Durham played with the St. Louis Cardinals (1980, 1989), Chicago Cubs (1981–1988), and Cincinnati Reds (1988). Durham batted and threw left-handed.Durham graduated from Cincinnati Woodward High School in 1976 where he was a high school All-American selection his senior year, posting a .385 batting average with 16 home runs and an 11-3 record as a pitcher.
Robin Roberts (September 30, 1926 – May 6, 2010) was a starting pitcher who pitched primarily for the Philadelphia Phillies (1948–1961). He spent the latter part of his career with the Baltimore Orioles (1962–1965), Houston Astros (1965–66), and Chicago Cubs (1966). He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1976.Roberts was born in Springfield, Illinois, the son of an immigrant Welsh coal miner. Robin arrived in East Lansing, Michigan as part of an Army Air Corps training program. He attended Lanphier High School and after World War II, Roberts returned to Michigan State College to play basketball, not baseball. Roberts led the Spartans' basketball team in field-goal percentage in 1946–1947, was captain of the team during the 1946–1947 and 1949–1950 seasons, and earned three varsity letters in basketball. After his second season playing basketball, Roberts tried out for the Michigan State baseball team, becoming a pitcher because it was the position that coach John Kobs needed most. After playing for Michigan State and spending his second summer playing in Vermont with the Barre–Montpelier Twin City Trojans, he was signed by the Phillies.
Greg Walker played first base from 1982 to 1990. He is the former hitting coach of the Chicago White Sox, the team for which he played all but the last 14 games of his career, until leaving the White Sox to become the hitting coach for the Atlanta Braves, a position he held from 2012 until 2014.
Hubert "Hubie" Brooks played right fielder, third base, and shortstop in fifteen MLB seasons from 1980 to 1994 for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Los Angeles Dodgers, California Angels, and Kansas City Royals. Brooks was selected third overall in the 1978 Major League Baseball draft, and was twice named an All-Star. MLB pitcher Donnie Moore was Brooks' cousin.Originally, Brooks was drafted by the Montreal Expos as a senior at Manuel Dominguez High School in the 1974 Draft but chose instead to attend Whittier College and stayed for 1975 through 1976 before transferring to Arizona State University. With the Arizona State Sun Devils, Brooks appeared in two NCAA College World Series, winning in 1977. The ASU shortstop was drafted fifth overall in the January 1976 secondary draft by the Kansas City Royals, fourteenth overall in the June 1976 secondary draft by the Chicago White Sox, second overall in the January 1977 secondary draft by the Oakland Athletics, and again by the White Sox third overall in the June 1977 secondary draft; however, he did not sign with any team. After he played out his college career, he was drafted by the Mets third overall in the 1978 amateur draft, two selections behind ASU teammate Bob Horner.
Terry Kennedy a former All-Star catcher who played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1978–80), San Diego Padres (1981–86), Baltimore Orioles (1987–88) and San Francisco Giants (1989–91). Terry and his father, Bob, became the first father and son duo to drive in runs in a World Series when Terry drove in two against the Tigers in 1984 in his first at bat.Kennedy was a two-time All-American and Sporting News College Player of the Year in 1976. Kennedy was inducted into the Florida State University Athletics Hall of Fame in 1982.In a 14-year major league career, Kennedy hit .264 with 113 home runs and 628 RBI in 1491 games. Kennedy tied Johnny Bench's NL mark of 40 doubles in a season in 1982. That same year, Kennedy won the Silver Slugger Award. He appeared in four All-Star Games (1981, 1983, 1985, and 1987). He also played in two World Series, with the Padres in 1984 and with the Giants in 1989.
Rick Rhoden (born May 16, 1953) pitched for 16 years in the Majors then became a professional golfer. During his baseball career, he played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974–1978), the Pittsburgh Pirates (1979–1986), the New York Yankees (1987–1988), and the Houston Astros (1989).Rhoden overcame a childhood bone disease, osteomyelitis, and he wore a brace until age 12. He was the star pitcher for his high school's baseball team and was then selected by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first round of the 1971 amateur draft and played minor league baseball in Daytona Beach, El Paso, and Albuquerque until he was called up to the Major Leagues in 1974.(wikipedia)This is our fourth and final season of Radio Baseball Cards. Radio Baseball Cards was originally produced in 1987 and brought back as a podcast in 2017. All 162 episodes were broadcast as a nationally syndicated radio show, and was accepted by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Library due to our dedicated stories honoring Jackie Robinson. Our host is the late Hall of Fame Pitcher and announcer, Don Drysdale. Please follow us wherever you find your favorite podcasts, listen to past episodes, and get updated each Thursday during the 2021 MLB Season. Radio Baseball Cards is a production of SmarterPodcasts.com, a service of Greene Creative, based in Northern California.
Alvin Davis (born September 9, 1960), nicknamed "Mr. Mariner," played first base and DH. Eight of his nine seasons were on the Seattle Mariners where he won the American League Rookie of the Year Award in 1984.The youngest of four sons born and raised in Riverside, California. He was selected in the 1978 draft by the San Francisco Giants, but opted to play college baseball at Arizona State in Tempe. Davis, who batted left-handed and threw right-handed, was later drafted by the Oakland Athletics in sixth round in 1981, but opted to stay in college and earned a degree in finance.(wikipedia)This is our fourth and final season of Radio Baseball Cards. Radio Baseball Cards was originally produced in 1987 and brought back as a podcast in 2017. All 162 episodes were broadcast as a nationally syndicated radio show, and was accepted by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Library due to our dedicated stories honoring Jackie Robinson. Our host is the late Hall of Fame Pitcher and announcer, Don Drysdale. Please follow us wherever you find your favorite podcasts, listen to past episodes, and get updated each Thursday during the 2021 MLB Season. Radio Baseball Cards is a production of SmarterPodcasts.com, a service of Greene Creative, based in Northern California.
Greg Minton (born July 29, 1951), nicknamed "Moon Man", was a right-handed pitcher who played for the California Angels and San Francisco Giants. Minton enjoyed a 16-year major league career, from 1975 to 1990, and was a member of the 1982 National League All-Star Team.A crippling injury in 1979 caused Minton to alter his delivery. Instead of using his high leg kick, Minton shortened his stride to take pressure off his knee. The new delivery gave Minton a 92-mph sinker that batters were unable to drive. Minton went three full seasons (269​1⁄3 innings) without allowing a home run until John Stearns homered against him on May 2, 1982. As of 2021, this is the longest such streak in the period for which game-by-game data is available (since 1904). On August 14, 1986, Minton gave up the last of Pete Rose's MLB record 4,256 career hits.(wikipedia)This is our fourth and final season of Radio Baseball Cards. Radio Baseball Cards was originally produced in 1987 and brought back as a podcast in 2017. All 162 episodes were broadcast as a nationally syndicated radio show, and was accepted by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Library due to our dedicated stories honoring Jackie Robinson. Our host is the late Hall of Fame Pitcher and announcer, Don Drysdale. Please follow us wherever you find your favorite podcasts, listen to past episodes, and get updated each Thursday during the 2021 MLB Season. Radio Baseball Cards is a production of SmarterPodcasts.com, a service of Greene Creative, based in Northern California.
Roland "Buddy" Biancalana Jr. (/biˌɑːŋkəˈlɑːnə/; born February 2, 1960) played for two teams in his career: the Kansas City Royals (1982–1987) and Houston Astros (1987).Biancalana attended Redwood High School in Larkspur and played baseball all four of his years at Redwood, 1975 through 1978, garnering local and national honors along the way. In 1977, he was named to the Mythical National Champion Team, a squad composed of the best high school baseball players in the United States. Biancalana made his MLB debut on September 12, 1982, and played his final game on October 4, 1987.Biancalana was a member of the Royals team that won the World Series in 1985. Although he had only started 35 games all season, manager Dick Howser benched regular shortstop Onix Concepcion in favor of Biancalana on September 20. Biancalana started 13 of the next 15 games as the Royals won the American League West division by one game over the California Angels.(wikipedia)This is our fourth and final season of Radio Baseball Cards. Radio Baseball Cards was originally produced in 1987 and brought back as a podcast in 2017. All 162 episodes were broadcast as a nationally syndicated radio show, and was accepted by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Library due to our dedicated stories honoring Jackie Robinson. Our host is the late Hall of Fame Pitcher and announcer, Don Drysdale. Please follow us wherever you find your favorite podcasts, listen to past episodes, and get updated each Thursday during the 2021 MLB Season. Radio Baseball Cards is a production of SmarterPodcasts.com, a service of Greene Creative, based in Northern California.
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Comments (2)

Eddie’s Auto Parts

There’s some good stories here, but they are ruined by having to listen to 4:00 minute podcast that has more than half of its time spent on Ads. I’ve unsubscribed.

Mar 20th
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