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Good Food

Author: KCRW

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Everything you wanted to know about good cooking, good eating, good food! From LA Chef, author, radio host, and restaurateur Evan Kleiman, at KCRW.com.
60 Episodes
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This week Good Food celebrates Rosh Hashanah. Dr. Sarah Sallon and her colleague have grown date palms using 2,000-year-old seeds excavated from Masada. Recent Los Angeles transplant Shimi Aaron breaks out of the mold to bake babka with new twists. Daniela Galarza talks about the chef trend of developing the perfect Basque cheesecake recipe. Finally, Gustavo Arellano teases what's to come at KCRW & Gustavo’s Great Tortilla Tournament.
The virtual fall school semester begins this week for many students,  which means bringing their  laptops or tablets to the kitchen table. Zach Brooks has a repertoire of meals for lunch breaks. Clemence Gossett makes a shopping list and offers tips on meal prep. Plus,  food-insecure students are getting meals via grab and go options through the LAUSD and the USDA Farmers to Families food boxes. Finally, KCRW takes a virtual vacation to the Greek island of Crete.
Usually on Labor Day, Americans are gathering around the barbecue, celebrating one last gasp of summer before settling into the routine of school or work. Routines are not what they once were during this pandemic. Nevertheless Good Food hopes this weekend is used to take a break from all the laboring — both physical and emotional. As an escape, Good Food offers a “zone out” show. From magical mushrooms on the forest floor to rare pasta shapes in Italy, grab the popcorn, tune in, and prepare to leave hungry. Plus, author Samin Nostrat and illustrator Wendy MacNaughton discuss their collaboration on the award-winning cookbook, “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat.”
Resorting to armchair travel has been the ticket to escapism in 2020, and Good Food journeys across the globe this week. Lindsey Traumuta demystifies the female stereotype in France and shares the women on the rise in the City of Lights. Jacqueline Ngo Mpii invites discovery of African businesses in the French capital. Yemisi Aribisala reflects on Nigerian cuisine. Restaurateur Durkhanai Ayubi accounts her family’s immigration to Australia from Afghanistan. Also, dineLA starts in Los Angeles.
Hot enough for you? This week’s episode of Good Food evokes cold to ward off these blistering temperatures. Richard Park III speaks to the Michelada Papi about the beer cocktail's origins. Cathy Chaplin encourages slurping loudly when sampling cold noodles around Los Angeles. Michael Waters has a tale of the pioneer of ice cream. And yes, there is talk of ice.
This week’s episode of Good Food is devoted to wonder — the soil beneath our feet, the trees growing toward the sky, the marvel of the last wild foods on Earth. Dr. Rattan Lal has devoted his work to the land and describes the connections between soil and terrestrial life. Woodland biologist Artur Cisar-Erlach details his fascination with wood and the flavor it adds to food production. Gina Rae La Cerva traveled the world in search of untamed, wild foods. Plus, a children’s reading about seeds. 
The City of Santa Monica has made it easier for restaurants to return to business by accommodating outdoor seating in parking zones. A new documentary focuses on the threat to the last fully intact salmon run on earth. Inspired by a visit to India, a Great British Bake Off alum has tips on cooking eggplant. Plus, a Fairfax District bakery with a 100-year-old sourdough starter struggles to keep the doors open. 
Rituals often surround food, including the Chinese tradition of caring for new mothers during postpartum recovery. One of Koreatown’s most beloved mom and pop restaurants closed this week. California farmworkers have historically fought for basic accommodations such as shade and clean water, and now they face the threat of rising coronavirus cases. Plus, one food writer offers simple, three-ingredient recipes. 
Good Food continues coverage of innovative moves by chefs and restaurateurs to stay in business during the pandemic. Community refrigerators are popping up across the city to feed those in need. Plus, eggplants are cropping up at the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market, and a battle over apricots is brewing in Moscow.
Restaurants have been a key “third space.” Not home and not work, they’re a gathering place where people can recharge, relax, enjoy some food and drinks between the pressures of work or home. Given socializing constraints, economic pressure, and many adults having to simultaneously work and care for children at home, it’s extraordinary that the industry is still delivering hospitality at all. Today, Good Food focuses on the restaurants — the food, the people, and the pleasure and pain of an industry in the throes of change.
Good Food examines the ways food has been weaponized to create stereotypes and stigmatization. On the flipside, Chef Roy Choi shares how he is spreading love by cooking for teachers with a new food delivery app. Plus, Romanian cuisine is a melting pot where Greek, Turkish, and Slavic cultures converge.
Good Food is taking the day to reflect on the word “independence.” In a 1979 commencement speech at Barnard University, Toni Morrison spoke to the graduating class of women about freedom and power. “You are moving in the direction of freedom. The function of freedom is to free someone else,'' she told them. Fannie Lou Hamer and Audre Lorde famously made this same point: “I am not free until you are free.” Food is a lens. This week Good Food looks through that lens and poses the question, “Who is free?” To write their own story. To record their own recipes. To dine where they want to. To own land. To be crowned the best restaurant in America.
“When a people who have fundamentally defined American barbecue for 300 years in the roughest, darkest hours of America have been overlooked, it’s a tragedy,” says Dr. Howard Conyers. Dr. Conyers is a rocket scientist at NASA, as well as a pitmaster. Good Food explores the men and women who have devoted their lives to slow and low cooking, and preparing meals over the embers, from Carolina barbecue to inspiration from the grills of Bombay and Southeast Asia. Plus, summer vegetables from the farmer’s market are ready for the flames. 
This week has been a roller coaster for the queer and trans community. First, there was the news that the current administration rolled back protections that prohibited discrimination in health care against trans patients. Last weekend, thousands showed support during the All Black Lives Matter solidarity march in Hollywood. On Monday morning, the Supreme Court upheld gay and transgender rights in the workplace, an unexpected jolt of joy during Pride month. Good Food looks at safe spaces in the queer community. Andrea Chang, Deputy Food Editor of the Los Angeles Times, runs down the new rules for restaurants reopening. Plus, tips for building the perfect sandwich at home.
Historically, Black-operated farms have been excluded from USDA relief. Now, similar concerns are brewing with the distribution of funds from the $2 trillion CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act passed in March. Juneteenth, commemorating the end of slavery, is this week and is celebrated through the lens of food. Next, finding inspiration and alternatives now that cooking fatigue has set in after months of quarantine. Also, revisiting the controversy of “Thug Kitchen” and an update on street vending under the al fresco dining initiative.
A note from Evan Kleiman: After 11 full weeks of being told to stay home, the killing of George Floyd stirred Los Angeles to come outside in great numbers to walk in solidarity. This week, I was moved to see the grace and compassion from restaurateurs whose restaurants experienced damage. Instead of being angry at the loss, they posted messages of solidarity for Black Lives Matter. Let’s say that again. Black Lives Matter. Property can be replaced, lives cannot. The only way to talk about food in such times is to acknowledge that food and food media are not free of overt or structural racism. Who am I, an older white woman to give you comfort? I feel like it is about time we owned our own discomfort, sat with it a while, and learned from it. It’s my job to speak, but all I want to do right now is listen.
 Like it or hate it, home cooking is the task that won’t go away during the pandemic. Author Roxane Gay learned to cook while being a vegetarian, and shares her adventures in the kitchen on her Twitter feed. Plus, veganism is finding its place in Mexican cuisine. Also, a visit with Sana Javeri Kadri following the recent turmeric harvest in India.
Food plays a starring role in some stellar movies from last year. Good Food looks back on conversations with the filmmakers of “The Farewell,” “The Biggest Little Farm,” and “Honeyland.” In each film, food brings people together in ways that words can’t. Also, Los Angeles Times restaurant critics give updates on takeout they’re ordering during the pandemic. Plus, where to get California-grown heritage grain tortillas and pasta.
As Los Angeles settles in for additional months of sheltering in place, Good Food cozies up on the sofa for a “zone out” show. From magical mushrooms on the forest floor to rare pasta shapes in Italy, grab the popcorn, tune in, and prepare to leave hungry. Plus, author Samin Nostrat and illustrator Wendy MacNaughton discuss their collaboration on the award-winning cookbook, “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat.”
Meat is a multibillion dollar industry. With the pandemic forcing closures of packing facilities and employees being too ill to work, the availability of cheap meat for consumers is threatened. Good Food is taking a deep dive into the meat system — in response to a friend asking if her family would have to become vegetarians because of anticipated meat shortages. Also, summers in France inspired the latest cookbook from food writer Melissa Clark. She shares how to make classic dishes at home.
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Comments (2)

Teal Brooks

yeah!!! Hsiao-ching!!

Jun 14th
Reply

Oso Wallman

such an excellent show. great useful content

Apr 23rd
Reply
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