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We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2018: After they were locked out of their own stadium, an unlikely band of supporters came together to save a beloved south London club. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
One Thursday afternoon, I stepped out to cross a city street – and woke up in hospital with broken bones and a brain injury. After I recovered, I started looking into why so many drivers just don’t stop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
In Fiji, the climate crisis means dozens of villages could soon be underwater. Relocating so many communities is an epic undertaking. But now there is a plan – and the rest of the world is watching. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2019: Smartphones and the internet gave the Uighurs a sense of their own identity – but now the Chinese state is using technology to strip them of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Idealising the past is nothing new, but there is something peculiarly revealing about the way a certain generation of Facebook users look back fondly on tougher times. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
A wave of bestselling authors claim that global affairs are still ultimately governed by the immutable facts of geography – mountains, oceans, rivers, resources. But the world has changed more than they realise. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2018: Five years after his last taste of alcohol, William Leith tries to understand its powerful magic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Despite all the warning signs, as I sat down for dinner with friends in Kyiv on 23 February, war seemed unreal. Surely, Putin was bluffing?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
By the end of the century, Africa will be home to 40% of the world’s population – and nowhere is this breakneck-pace development happening faster than this 600-mile stretch between Abidjan and Lagos. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2019: The Gürtel case began with one Madrid mogul. Over the next decade, it grew into the biggest corruption investigation in Spain’s recent history, sweeping up hundreds of corrupt politicians and businessmen – and shattering its political system. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
As the world faces the worst debt crisis in decades, the need for a global lender of last resort is clearer than ever. But many nations view the IMF as overbearing, or even neocolonial – and are now looking elsewhere for help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Across the country, fact-finding teams are tirelessly gathering evidence and testimony about Russian atrocities, often within hours of troops retreating. Turning this into convictions will not be easy, or quick, but the task has begun. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2019: Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
As a civil servant in the 1980s, I had a front row seat as the British government began to lose touch with reality. Since then, things have only got worse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Sisi’s Egypt is making a big show of solar panels and biodegradable straws ahead of next week’s climate summit – but in reality the regime imprisons activists and bans research. The climate movement should not play along. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: The Republican intellectual establishment is united against Trump – but his message of cultural and racial resentment has deep roots in the American right. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Forty years ago, Dr Ray Osheroff sued a US hospital for failing to give him antidepressants. The case would change the course of medical history – even if it couldn’t help the patient himself. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Ben Roberts-Smith v the media is a five-part series available via Guardian Australia’s Full Story podcast feed. All episodes streaming now. In the defamation trial of the century, Australia’s most-decorated living soldier is seeking to defend his reputation against reports in three newspapers that he says falsely accuse him of being a war criminal. His lawyers argue Roberts-Smith has been unfairly targeted by envious comrades and assisted by credulous journalists. The newspapers’ lawyers say their reporting is true, and that Roberts-Smith broke the ‘moral and legal rules of military engagement’, something he denies outright. But who is Ben Roberts-Smith, and how did he earn the military’s highest honour, the Victoria Cross?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
For one of our many adolescent pranks, my friend and I planted tips about an obscure young footballer. Then he suddenly started going places. What had we done?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2019: The traditional right is clinging on to power – but its ideas are dead in the water. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Comments (85)

Lee Gregory

⁰01

Sep 30th
Reply

Peter

The sound design is getting increasingly worse on these long reads. It's like a CBBC show now.

Sep 22nd
Reply

Janet Lafler

Maybe I missed it, but is there anything in the records to indicate that Nancy Harris's frequent abortions were induced, rather than spontaneous (e.g. miscarriages)? Not quibbling with the general thrust of the article, but one of the problems with researching the history of abortion is exactly this vocabulary.

Jul 23rd
Reply

Andrew Browne

A hit job on Joe Rogan, not worth listening to.

Feb 6th
Reply (1)

Richard Fisher

This is a most bizarre article, hardly uses data yet makes many claims. From skipping over the numbers of unarmed black people shot by the US police (its like 20 or 30 a year) to totally ignoring vitamin D levels and comorbidities when it comes to covid fatalities and race, and missing out that the last wave hit whites more. He even skips over the reality that Chinese and Indians do better than white people, he makes out that all races other than white are oppressed. its just not true. not sure he's interested in truth, but more an ideological narrative.

Jan 17th
Reply (1)

Richard Fisher

weird.. they speak of an era of rising fuel costs but don't talk about how they are avoidable. don't talk about nuclear. they seem to want social change for ideology rather than pragmatism.

Dec 30th
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MaPepa

The fact that more amendments to the US Constitution are directed at voting rights than to any other topic is no accident. The lust for power is an insatiable beast. It is about time we start thinking about forming more legitimate forms of government that focus on public service instead of the destruction of other nations and the concentration of wealth. Kids' votes would most likely be capricious or an extension of their parents' votes. Participating in democracy is much more than merely voting.

Dec 18th
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Michael McGrath

"How the Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker became one of the world’s most contentious thinkers" promises the article -but it fails to deliver. Instead, the reader is presented with a cheap, snarky hatchet-job that the writer had obviously decided upon before spending so much time with the man himself.

Nov 18th
Reply

MaPepa

Are we blaming China for doing what the "west" media has been doing all along? No matter the language, there is little originality in any of the items posing as news in regular outlets. Regardless of the language in which they broadcast/publish, they all align with the prevalent empire-maintaining monopolies they work for.

Oct 16th
Reply (2)

Hannah Morgan

This makes some fantastic points

Jul 23rd
Reply

Paul Towning

Beautifully articulated. A revealing but never prurient, personal story of those cross cultural family experiences that illustrates how interconnected our world is and at the same time so separate and distinct. Felt like ten minutes, wished it had been longer. Great tip about the ubiquitous nature of Alipay in China today and the difficulty of registering a phone for this purpose of you're not a resident national.

Jun 12th
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Katy

Ridiculous conspiracy voice :D

May 24th
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Ricky dorazio

Another journalist making out that everybody that has an alternavate view on covid to the one side of the story that the media has been spreading is a crazy, stupid and a conspiracy theorist. In reality lots of intelligent and educated people feel that the reaction to covid has been exaggerated and in the long run will cause more harm that good. Don’t listen. More lazy journalism.

May 6th
Reply

Rebecca Henderson

What did everyone consider the takeaway? I've got ,"Respect the other person. Don't humiliate them. Try to give them an easy out to change their mind." Did others get something else? Or have practical ideas for how to implement?

Apr 13th
Reply

Sepehr Soleyman Fallah

If only the quality was as before....

Nov 9th
Reply

little boxes

Oh the irony. this episode was interrupted by an advert... for Asda.

Sep 26th
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Top Clean

Thanks for the good "article" / episode on how we treat pets and animals. i like this in the wild.!. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AicEBRYFTeI https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SzIb10D_5Rw

Sep 19th
Reply (1)

Bruno Vieira Pereira

Fortunately, as a result of this pandemic, more and more people are recognising the vital role which those who work in ICU play and also, the importance of their job in order to save as many lives as possible.

Aug 18th
Reply (1)

Top Clean

I think the kids in cages deserve more attention, care and there parents. In the long-term view they can be like any normal person with care, if not they can be damaged for life, with a lifetime of suffering. https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/07/11/written-testimony-kids-cages-inhumane-treatment-border

Aug 7th
Reply

Top Clean

During his first State of the Union address, President Donald Trump vowed to keep the Guantanamo Bay detention center open – a move that starkly contrasts the plans of his predecessor. ... Since its opening 16 years ago, the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba has imprisoned nearly 800 people. It has been decried by critics on both sides of the aisle who say the prisoners – alleged terrorists and people with suspected ties to terrorist organizations – suffer from human rights violations within its walls. https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/02/13/guantanamos-ugly-taint-us-diplomacy Definition of gestapo: a secret-police organization employing underhanded and terrorist methods against persons suspected of disloyalty. See, e.g., the Trump/Barr activities in Poland - sorry in Portland. ... And the slavery is still here in the U.S. disguise as the profitable state, federal and private Prison's, where prisoners they work for less so they make outside free working people being a obsolete workforces. ... And yes perhaps one reason detainees are not being released is that over 70 percent of detainees are held in private, for-profit facilities⁠. Two of the largest of those, GEO Group and CoreCivic (Corrections Corporation of America). Despite their failure to provide safe conditions for detainees, the GEO earned $2.3 billion in 2018, mostly from U.S. government contracts, which is more than any other ICE contractor. AmeriKKKa and Canada have the most people incarceration in the world. https://allthatsinteresting.com/private-prisons-us-stats ... We see that Profit is the main game here. Then ask yourself how, during a global pandemic, in the worst economy since the Great Depression, with 45.5 million Americans filing for unemployment, the total net worth of U.S. billionaires has climbed from $2.9 trillion to $3.5 trillion. And a Trillion is freaking BIG.!. https://www.thecalculatorsite.com/images/articles/20170628-trillion-dollars-in 1 million seconds equal 11 and 1/2 days. 1 billion seconds equal 31 and 3/4 years. 1 trillion seconds equal 31,710 years. GOP is Greedy Oppressive Predators! But thanks for a good episode and podcast. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

Aug 7th
Reply
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