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Our guest in this 35th interview with a unicorn start-up leader is Verbit CEO and founder Tom Livne.  The Verbit Company serves as an essential partner to 2,000+ businesses and institutions. Verbit’s vertical-built voice AI transcription solution that provides its partners with the tools they need to offer engaging and equitable experiences that not only meet accessibility guidelines, but make verbal information searchable and actionable.   Tom started his career as a lawyer, so he was directly facing the transcription problem in his profession. Eventually, his eagerness to solve the problem came from being a frustrated customer, so he imagined there was a better way of doing things. In just a few years since its founding in 2017, Verbit has grown into a unicorn company with a $2B valuation and a global presence. Verbit employs the largest professional captioner workforce in the world and has emerged as the leader in the $30B transcription industry.  In this episode, Tom explains how Verbit, which has a workforce of 600 employees and +35,000 freelancers across the globe, approaches communications and engagement. According to Tom, one of the most important lessons he has learnt over the last five years is you cannot build a company alone: it’s all about the people. He says, “always hire people that you feel you could work for them too.”  Two of the most critical areas that Verbit’s culture focuses on are creating more jobs for people to work from home and accessibility. Tom is excited about the opportunity that his business generates for people with disabilities and, curiously, that’s where his company name comes from too. He thought about the process of looking for verbal information, just as a transcription is, and “just Verb-it!” came to him. And the rest is history, he says.   Finally, Tom shares a piece of communications advice for those who want to succeed in business: patience is key. When he was younger, he states, he didn’t have as much patience, and he believes this ability to choose balance over impulsiveness in communications is one of the key factors that affect the performance of the business. Tom also explains that especially when working remotely, “you need to make sure you’re investing in tools, and you know how to communicate as a professional.”  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here. 
In this special episode of Without Borders in collaboration with the csuite podcast we talk about influence and technology trends in Europe with a panel of experts including  three key European influencers identified in our Tyto Tech 500 Power List: Sophie Proust (CTO of Atos), Dr. Andreas K. Maier (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg), and Jonathan Symcox (Editor of BusinessCloud).   What does it take to have influence in today’s world? What trends will continue to shape the European tech landscape? What can we conclude about the representation of women in tech from this report? These and other questions are answered in this episode in which we look at the point of view from these three highly influential individuals featured in the Tyto Tech 500, our annual report on the tech sector, from our 3 focus countries: the UK, Germany and France.   Sophie Proust, our France business leader representative, has been the Chief Technology Officer of Atos since early 2019. Dr. Andreas Maier, our academic representative from the German Influencer list, is a researcher, professor and Head of the Pattern Recognition lab at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Jonathan Symcox is a journalist and our UK list representative. As an editor, he leads tech publications BusinessCloud and TechBlast UK.  Sophie, Andreas and Jonathan are joined by our own Zoë Clark, Head of Media and Influence at Tyto.  As well as presenting their point of view with these relevant questions, our selected country experts share how COVID has changed their outlook on tech or has impacted their work, from a business, journalist or academic perspective. Sophie, Andreas and Jonathan also share their predictions on future technology that will change the tech landscape in France, Germany and the UK respectively.   The interview was hosted by Graham Barreth of the csuite podcast.  Interested in the 2021 edition of the Tech 500? Here you can see the top 50 influencers in each country and download the full report: https://tytopr.com/tyto-tech-500-power-list-2021/   
Our guest for the 23rd interview with unicorn start-up leaders is Erez Galonska, co-founder and CEO of Infarm.  Infarm is a global vertical farming company that revolutionises the food supply chain and helps make cities self-sufficient in their food production. It was founded in Berlin in 2013 by Osnat Michaeli and the brothers Guy and Erez Galonska, who turned a 1955 Airstream trailer into the world's first mobile vertical farm. From this humble beginning, Infarm has since partnered with more than 30 of the world's top retail chains and is available in more than 1850 stores worldwide, servicing more than 2 million customers in 11 countries.   Infarm is the world's fastest-growing vertical farming company. By 2030, 20 countries in North America, Asia and the Middle East will enjoy Infarm's fresh, highly nutritious, chemical pesticide-free, locally-grown produce year-round, without fluctuation in quality or pricing. The company reached unicorn status in December 2021, having raised $200 million in Series D funding, and that took the total raised to more than $500 million from world-leading investors.  Erez believes that, for you and your business to excel in communications, you must build everything around transparency. Galonska says culture, for him and his company, is also about ownership clarity and helping people to build what they’ve been hired for. This is especially important in a start-up ecosystem, where rapid growth is a constant experience. This has led to Infarm to reorganise the business every half a year to create even more clarity around its needs. They are slowly structuring their culture and establishing a mission-oriented business that will also help them build a better farming network.  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here. 
This is the third episode of our DE&I series. In these conversations, we want to explore issues related to diversity, equity and inclusion, and our hope is that these help build a world in which people from all backgrounds and with different views can thrive. Our aim with these series is to chat with inspirational guests who can encourage us all to look at the industries we work in (media, comms and tech) from different perspectives.  Our guest for this episode is Léa Lejeune, a French business journalist engaged in topics around equality. Léa recently left a leading business title in France to launch her own media outlet called Plan Cash, where she aims to educate and raise awareness on financial management targeting a female audience. She has also just published a book on what she calls “feminism washing”, “Féminisme Washing: Quand les entreprises récupèrent la cause des femmes”.  In this interview hosted by Tyto’s Shamina Peerboccus, Léa summarises some of the main aspects of her book, such as what "feminism washing" really is. She also gives concrete examples of this practice from large multinationals such as Dior, Amazon Web Services, McDonald's, IBM and BNP Paribas. But Léa also talks about the progress that is being made to achieve equality and points to the case of L'Oréal in France as an example to follow. If you are interested in how to improve equality in your company, Léa also provides tips on practices and policies that can be implemented. Finally, Léa shares her motivation for leaving her job to create her own media, Plan Cash, which is currently a newsletter and will soon also be a podcast.  You can watch the recording on our YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/iWXvxKPRbu0
Our guest for the 23rd interview with unicorn start-up leaders is James Taylor, co-founder and CEO of Electric Last Mile Solutions (ELMS).  ELMS is redefining the fleet transportation industry with its vertically-integrated approach to designing, manufacturing and customising electric last mile delivery vehicles. With proven technology, seasoned leadership and a vision of a sustainable future, they’re moving the needle when it comes to the expectations of fleet managers and business operators.   James Taylor is an experienced leader who co-founded ELMS in August 2020 and has served as ELMS’ Chief Executive Officer since its inception. Prior to co-founding ELMS, James served as Chief Executive Officer of SERES from May 2019 until August 2020. Prior to SERES, James served as an executive in various automotive companies, including positions of increasing responsibility at Karma Automotive, Dura Automotive Systems and General Motors Company (including with world-renowned General Motors’ brands Hummer and Cadillac).  Among his advice on how to excel in communication, James believes you must train your abilities like with any sport and always be ready for game day. Practice, practice, practice. He reveals why brand reputation is extremely important in the automotive industry, and, in many cases, the difference between making money and not making money. He also points out how you can invent some markets, but in the car business often if it doesn't exist, there might be a good reason for it. According to James, the biggest fundamental in his learnings is to make sure you're starting out with at least a shot by asking yourself: is this product sound, and is there a customer demand?  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here. 
Who were the most influential personalities in tech in 2021? What trends have shaped the sector? What role do journalists play in this area? Have we seen a greater representation of women in tech in the last twelve months? These and other questions are answered in this special episode of Without Borders in which we look at the key findings of the Tyto Tech 500, our annual report on the tech sector in the UK, Germany and France.  Sabrina Horn, award-winning CEO, tech communications expert, advisor/board member, and author of "Make It, Don't Fake It: Leading with Authenticity for Real Business Success", is in charge of moderating this discussion featuring a Tyto expert from each of the countries analysed: UK's Zoë Clark, Head of Media and Influence at Tyto, Germany's Silke Rossmann, Head of Practice, and France's representative, Shamina Peerboccus a Senior Consultant at the agency.  As well as presenting the highlights of the Tech 500, our Tyto experts share what a US communications person or marketer looking to bring their brand to Europe should take from the ranking, what an individual needs to do to be able to get onto this list, and what aspect from this year’s trends really caught their attention.  You can watch the recording on our YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nQLHYmLcG0  Interested in the 2021 edition of the Tech 500? Here you can see the top 50 influencers in each country and download the full report: https://tytopr.com/tyto-tech-500-power-list-2021/  
This is our second episode from our new series of interviews with inspiring individuals from across the globe. Our aim with these series is to chat with inspirational guests who can encourage us all to look at the industries we work in (media, comms and tech) from different perspectives. Our guest for this episode is Rebecca Vincent, an American human rights activist and currently Director of International Campaigns and UK Bureau Director for our pro bono client Reporters Without Borders. Based in Paris, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is an independent NGO with consultative status with the United Nations, UNESCO, the Council of Europe, and the International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF). Its foreign sections, its bureaus in ten cities, including Brussels, Washington, Berlin, Tunis, Rio de Janeiro, and Stockholm, and its network of correspondents in 130 countries give RSF the ability to mobilise support, challenge governments and wield influence both on the ground and in the ministries and precincts where media and Internet standards and legislation are drafted. You should listen to Rebecca Vincent if you want to learn about the work Reporters Without Borders is doing across the world, their World Press Freedom index, the Julian Assange case, and how the state of press freedom stands today. In the interview hosted by Tyto’s CEO, Brendon Craigie, she explains why there is a worrying trend of violence against journalists in countries that are meant to be at peace, such as the UK, The Netherlands, Greece, Malta, and more. Countries seen as standard setters in terms of freedom of the press should be doing better, according to Vincent. You can watch the recording on our YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/M2nOIOFEOJI
Our guest for the 21st interview with unicorn start-up leaders is Job van de Voort, co-founder and CEO of Remote.  Remote helps companies of all sizes hire top talent all over the world, in full compliance with local laws. A global platform for distributed teams, Remote makes it easy to onboard, pay, and delight remote employees and contractors, anywhere in the world. The company was founded in 2019 by Job and his co-founder Marcelo Lebre, in what was their second venture together. 18 months later Remote raised $150m and became Portugal’s fifth unicorn.  A neuroscientist by training, Job admits that the scientific world was too slow for him so he left it to found his first startup and then work at GitLab to the point where he ran their product for five years. For him, GitLab is a role model of a fully remote company and inspired him to create Remote and help other companies overcome the challenges of setting a remote. According to Job, he does not need to convince companies to make this change because "the weight of the decision does not lie with the employers anymore". He adds, "it's either you go remote in some capacity or you're going to lose out on a lot of good talent." For him, South America and Africa will boom immensely and benefit most from a remote working world.  Among his advice on how to work efficiently remotely, he acknowledges that most meetings are a waste of time. He reveals that one of the best ways to make people productive is to teach them how to avoid meetings. Job also stresses that being brutally honest and open about any issue has been his life hack. For him, this is vital to successfully leading a company. He also points out that the biggest mistake an entrepreneur can make is not following up and fixing things, to just sit with that and let it be - you should always deal with the issue as fast as you can.  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here. 
Our guest in this 20th interview with a unicorn start-up leader is Amperity CEO and co-founder Kabir Shahani.  Amperity was born out of a poor customer experience he had with Alaska Airlines. At the time, Shahani and the company's other co-founder, Derek Slager, decided to create a platform to help consumer brands get a single, actionable view of their customers. Five years later, Amperity has become a unicorn with a $1 billion valuation.  In this episode, Shahani explains how that milestone has helped give them staying power credibility, attract talent and anchor on who they want to be and the kind of organisation they're trying to build. According to him, data is imperfect and will get messier and harder to wrangle so getting a single, actionable view should be a commodity for enterprises. Furthermore, Shahani points out that the pandemic has accelerated two trends: the push to digital customer relationships and the recognition that if you don't have a first party digital customer relationship with your consumer, then you will be obsolete as a brand, and the recognition that loyal customers move the needle.  Shahani confesses that during his career he has learned that the boldness of ambition and focusing on building a great team are the keys to success as an entrepreneur. According to him, it is impossible to have a point of view on everything, the hardest part of running a business is finding the balance between what to manage and what to delegate to the team and recruiting leaders who then have the autonomy to take charge of their roles and create the system so that everything runs smoothly.  Finally, here are Shahani's three pieces of advice for those who want to succeed in business: be incredibly self-aware of your strengths and weaknesses, seek feedback and mentorship aggressively - or as his friend Seahawk's QB Russell Wilson puts it 'You don't have to be sick to get better' -, and putting in the work.  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here. 
In this 19th interview with a unicorn start-up leader, we are joined by Mark Lee, CEO and co-founder of Splashtop. In 2006, Mark co-founded with Robert Ha, Thomas Deng, and Philip Sheu, three MIT colleagues, DeviceVM, designing and selling the industry's first browser OS that allowed PC users to get online, securely, in less than 5 seconds. That OS product was named Splashtop and, as of 2010, the company pivoted, changing its name to Splashtop and becoming the company it is today: a provider of Remote Access software. In this episode, Mark highlights the importance of building a reliable team from the ground up and explains the trust relationship he has with those university colleagues he met over three decades ago who are, in large part, the key to the company's success. Several VCs have even demonstrated their blind trust in Mark and his fellows in his entrepreneurial journey, providing funding without even seeing a business plan, based solely on the experience they had working hand in hand with Mark, Robert, Thomas and Philip’s previous startup. After years of bootstrapping, they decided to seek funding for Splashtop to achieve unicorn status. Not because they needed the money, as the company was generating millions of dollars of cash flow per month, but to position themselves in the market. For them, being a unicorn allowed the company to have greater visibility, attract talent and move towards an IPO. In fact, Mark says they have yet to touch a single dollar from that round. However, Mark also acknowledges that one of the hardest moments of his career was having to lay off dozens of employees with whom he had close relationships when DeviceVM had to pivot at the start of the past decade. Our guest also discusses the unstoppable evolution of the Remote Economy with remote becoming the new norm and how the pandemic accelerated the demand for its products by companies of all kinds, but also by educational and medical research institutions, to, among others, combat Covid-19. The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast. We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here.
New episode of our series of interviews with unicorn leaders on Without Borders. This time our guest is Zeb Evans, founder and CEO of ClickUp.  Created in 2017, ClickUp is a customisable workplace productivity platform that has experienced tremendous growth in a brief period of time. In June 2020, the startup raised a Series A and in December 2020 it raised $100 million in Series B funding, reaching a valuation of over $1 billion. In this interview, Zeb explains how challenging it is to manage a company that has grown from 60 to 600 employees in just a few months and highlights the importance of hiring employees who match the company's culture. For Zeb, the ideal ClickUp employee is someone who is optimistic and wants to grow.  Our guest acknowledges that he is not a natural communicator and has learned the secrets of communication as he has progressed in his career, but that the most key thing to communicate successfully is to be authentic, really believe in what you are doing and get the passion across. He also points out that, simple as it sounds, the biggest communication mistake leaders make is assuming that people know what they are thinking. According to Zeb, it is necessary to over communicate and continually repeat the core messages and vision of the company in order for them to resonate, whether with employees or with any audience.  Zeb also recounts his meeting with Richard Branson, whom he considers his biggest entrepreneurial idol, and tells us the two main lessons he learned after several hours of talking about how to be a successful entrepreneur.  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.  We have distilled the most valuable, actionable insights from our first 15 interviews with leaders of unicorn companies and bottled them in our book ‘Growing without borders: The unicorn CEO guide to communication and culture’. You can download it here.
In this episode of the Without Borders podcast as part of our series speaking to unicorn leaders, we are joined by the co-founder and co-CEO of VTEX, Mariano Gomide de Faria. VTEX, a provider of fully integrated end-to-end omnichannel commerce platforms to major global brands, reached unicorn status in September 2020 at a $1.7 billion valuation, becoming one of the few existing Brazilian unicorns. Mariano speaks about how the Brazilian tech ecosystem compares to Europe and North America and how he believes there will be far more Brazilian unicorns in the short term as the country is transitioning “from being the country of the iron and the mill to the country of the digital commerce.” Mariano is also very vocal about the need to transfer knowledge, not sell it, and has a real laser focus on education and the development and nurturing of the next generation of talent. One key lesson from Mariano is that chaos crafts a very creative and productive environment and that companies should not try to control chaos, but instead try and put structures around it and harness it in order to drive the greatest benefit for the company. Mariano shares the secret to long-lasting success and suggests that clients do not want support, they want guidance. He also talks about the trends that retailers need to look out for and how diversity is one of the biggest communications challenges in any business.  The interview, as usual, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.
We are kicking off a new series of interviews with inspiring individuals from across the globe. Our aim with these series is to chat with inspirational guests who can encourage us all to look at the industries we work in (media, comms and tech) from different perspectives.    Our first guest is Molly Watt, a passionate usability and accessibility consultant and motivational speaker, with a powerful personal story. Molly, who has Usher Syndrome, was born deaf and began to lose her sight at age 12. She credits technology with being the thing that transformed her experience of the world and enabled her to live a full and rich life. Molly specializes in assistive technology and design for those with sensory impairment and is the founder of the Molly Watt Trust, which raises awareness of Usher Syndrome. She is also an ambassador for Sense, the charity for people with complex disabilities, including deafblind people. Molly is considered one of the 100 most influential disabled people in the UK.    You should listen to Molly if you want to learn about accessibility in tech - what is it, why it matters and what you need to know about it. During the interview hosted by Tyto’s Senior Partner, Zoë Clark, she explains why accessibility must never be considered an add-on and highlights the importance of having an open mind, never assuming and of asking the right questions.    You can watch the recording on our YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/wP7ZbJ31AbA
New episode of our unicorn leaders series on the Without Borders podcast. This time, we interview Pedro Bados, co-founder and CEO of Nexthink, a pioneer in digital employee experience.    Nexthink's story is one of resilience, something Pedro believes is key to any successful company and entrepreneur. Bados created the firm in 2004 as a result of his research project at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne and 17 years later it has reached unicorn status. As a football lover, he believes becoming a unicorn is equivalent to playing in the Champions League and that the next step should be to become the winner.    Bados's communication tips for successfully leading a start-up include the importance of letting people know that there is a solution to their problems and being mindful about the things you say and standing behind your words. He also acknowledges that being an engineer makes him more conservative in his promises but that to be successful it is necessary to take risks and sell the dream, especially when communicating internally.    The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.
The founder and CEO of Workato, Vijay Tella, joins us in this new episode of our unicorn leaders series on the Without Borders podcast.   Workato, the leading enterprise automation platform that helps organisations work faster and smarter without compromising security and governance, is Vijay Tella’s fourth start-up. After around three decades as an entrepreneur in the integration space, Vijay is able to share some great advice on how to build a successful company. He selects culture as the most important element and stresses the value of thinking deliberately about the founding team as it is going to establish the cultural cornerstones of the company. Vijay also suggests prioritising core guiding principles over values – having some guardrails for how things can operate in the company.   Another key lesson from Vijay is that communication and being connected is the hardest challenge a company faces. In his own words, ‘you can never communicate enough’. That is why for him it is so important to always be on the front foot looking for new ways to enhance the connectedness of the team and have everyone on the same page. Not for nothing, Workato has a highly engaged workforce – they are the number one computer software industry company for whose employees are amplifying their presence on social the most. Workato employees are consistently sharing their company's content within their own networks, increasing awareness, website traffic and generating new business.   The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.
In this episode of the Without Borders podcast as part of our series speaking to unicorn leaders, we are joined by Mario Ciabarra, Founder and CEO of Quantum Metric. The CPD (Continuous Product Design) company claimed to be the first unicorn of 2021 after raising $200M in Series B financing in January, a unique achievement for a Colorado Springs-based company. Yet, Mario explains why he would rather be a dragon than a unicorn. Throughout this inspiring interview with Quantum Metric’s leader, Mario reiterates the importance of hiring the best talent wherever it is and the three attributes that he hires on: passion, persistence and integrity. Mario elaborates on why ‘it’s mission-critical to have a mission’ -especially when your company grows at scale-, how his number one company objective is “happy people, healthy culture” and what his 13-year-old daughter taught him about friction points in eCommerce during the pandemic. We even had time to talk about Braveheart, carpentry and skiing on Colorado slopes. The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast. 
In this episode of the Without Borders podcast as part of our series speaking to unicorn leaders, we are joined by the founder and CEO of Collibra, Felix Van de Maele.   After creating the data governance category more than a decade ago, Collibra is now on a mission to make data more human and help people become data literate. Van de Maele reflects on the significant role communications plays in educating the market and standing out from the crowd.   Collibra’s CEO discusses how starting with your communications journey and putting a real focus on it early on will pay dividends and highlights the utter importance of surrounding yourself with a team of experts to be successful.   Listen today to hear why growing Collibra can be compared to a climb and why Van de Maele decided to move the company headquarters from Belgium to New York.   The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast.
Chen Amit, Co-Founder and CEO of Tipalti joins Tyto CEO Brendon Craigie and csuite podcast host Russell Goldsmith in a new episode of our series of exclusive interviews with unicorn start-up CEOs.    Reaching unicorn status in October 2020 following a $150m Series E round, Chen analyzes the impact of becoming a unicorn company and Tipalti’s plans for the future. In this episode, we also chat about the importance of hiring the right people to have a consistent company culture and how ‘being yourself’ is key to demonstrating authenticity and gaining people’s trust.    Tune in to hear expert communications advice alongside a discussion about the future of the accounts payable software industry.
This episode’s unicorn interview sees us joined from Utah by Clay Wilkes, CEO of Galileo.With Galileo being acquired by SoFi in April 2020, Clay talks about the successes Galileo has seen during the pandemic, and that working with SoFi has been an incredible opportunity for business.Clay also discusses the importance he places on reading regularly, outlining that learning from great minds is the key not only to personal success, but fostering a company wide culture of self-improvement.Listen to this episode for a fascinating insight into how a global payments company is run and how Galileo dealt with the Covid-19 pandemic.The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast
In this episode of the Without Borders podcast, we speak to the CEO of Flywire, Mike Massaro. After raising $120 million in a Series E round of investment, led by Goldman Sachs, earlier in 2020, we discuss life as an American unicorn, communications challenges and the future of transactions. This episode also covers what makes the high-value payments business a success and how it merges software with transactions in a fast and friction-free way to help organisations. Listen today to hear expert communications advice alongside a discussion about the future of payment tech. The interview, as ever, was co-hosted with Russell Goldsmith of the csuite podcast
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