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Sky News Daily

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The Sky News Daily gives you the story beyond the headline. Putting people at the heart of our storytelling with added insight and analysis from our team of specialist correspondents and expert guests, we shine a light on a topic of the day with clarity and authority. Published every weekday.
1034 Episodes
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For over a year, the wedding days people have dreamed of have had to be cancelled, rescheduled or scaled down. But how long will it take to get the wedding industry back on its feet once restrictions are finally lifted? And has COVID changed our outlook on weddings forever? In this episode, host Dermot Murnaghan speaks to Kat Southwell, a bride-to-be with terminal cancer who is determined to have her wedding day; Sarah Haywood, wedding planner and spokesperson for the UK Weddings Taskforce and Sky News’ very own internet sensation bride Sabah Chouhdry.
On this special episode of ClimateCast, guest host Samantha Washington is joined by Dr Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, in the United States, to discuss his new book The New Climate War.Mann is one of the world’s most prominent climate scientists, who first shot to fame in the 1990s when he published possibly the most famous chart in all of climate science - now known as simply the hockey stick graph - which showed how burning fossil fuels and the resulting greenhouse gases, caused global temperatures to rise. Something most of us now take for granted. Sky News' Climate reporter Victoria Seabrook also joins Sam in the studio to discuss all of this week's climate headlines, including a damning report published by the Climate Change Committee which said the government is failing to ensure the UK can cope with climate change already happening, how the UK is using renewable energy from Norway which could power over one million British homes using the world's largest undersea electricity cable, and how extreme weather has caused a worrying shortage of chocolate, coffee and wine.
On the Sky News Daily podcast with Dermot Murnaghan we examine how sightings of unidentified flying objects went from conspiracy theory to US government inquiry – after officials told American media they can’t confirm or rule out alien activity. We hear from Sean Cahill, who was the Chief Master-at-Arms on the USS Princeton in 2004 during a multi-day UFO encounter, plus 'UFO researcher’ Chris Jones and Scotland's Astronomer Royal Prof Catherine Heymans.Daily podcast team:Podcast producer - Annie JoycePodcast producer - Nicola EyersPodcast producer - Lauren PinkneyInterviews producer - Tatiana AldersonArchive - Simon WindsorArchive - Rob FellowesArchive - Nelly StefanovaMusic - Steven Wheeler
It was announced this week that COVID restrictions in England will continue for another month, but what factors does the government base these decisions on? A fortnight ago, the prime minister said "I can see nothing in the data", so what has changed? And how will the government decide when it is 'Freedom Day'? In this episode, host Dermot Murnaghan is joined by virologist and comedian Ria Lina and Isla Glaister from Sky's data and forensics team.
In 2021, Sky News is marking some of the century’s biggest news events through the personal stories of lives defined by unforgettable moments from the last 21-years.In episode 5 of the 21-week series, Trapped: The Chile Miners, Elvis impersonator and electrician, Edison Peña, finds himself entombed almost half a mile underground in the Atacama Desert. Subscribe to StoryCast ’21. New episode every MondayCREDITSTrapped: The Chile Miners was written and produced by Rob MulhernRecordings in Chile by Esteban CabezasInterview co-ordinator for recordings in Chile, Carmen Aguilar GarciaDigital by Tom GillespieSpecial thanks to our contributors, Edison Peña, and Jonathan SamuelsArchive, Simon WindsorSound design, Rob MulhernTV treatment, Victoria Hudson-GrantTV output editor, Emily DeekerHead of Radio, Sky News, Dave TerrisDesign and graphics, Brian GillinghamSocial media, Chris ScottPress and Marketing, Alexandra HortonEmail: storycast@sky.ukFor more on this story log on to www.skynews/storycast21#StoryCast21
Economist Noreena Hertz believes we’re living in ‘The Lonely Century’. Loneliness is fuelling extremism, poor workplace productivity and a booming industry of goods designed to help us feel less alone. So, how should leaders help a disconnected planet come together in a post-COVID world? On the Sky News Daily podcast, host Dermot Murnaghan speaks to Noreena about people-watching in Euston Station, and why public libraries could be a solution to the loneliness epidemic. Plus, Scott Rosenbaum explains why his 'Rent A Friend' website is becoming so popular.
A look into the criminal probe into the Trump organisation's finances, the former president's political intentions and an uncovering of what he has been doing since leaving the White House.Martha Kelner speaks to Trump biographer Gwenda Blair, law professor at the University of Baltimore Kimberly Wehle and Matt Braynard, director of strategy and data for Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.
To kick off the Euros 2020 Championship, hosts Katerina Vittozzi and Sky Sports presenter David Garrido look at what role football can play in the fight against climate change. They speak to Tony Stevens, head of PR at Tottenham Hotspur, the premier league club which scored full points in the 2021 football sustainability league. He shares how Tottenham's stadium is one of the most sustainable in the world and how he hopes other clubs can follow the lead - so they can score the global goal of beating climate change. Plus climate advocate and Lewes player, Katie Rood, tells us how she combines the lifestyle of a footballer with that of a vegan environmentalist. And climate change reporter Victoria Seabrook has this week's climate headlines including what happened on World Oceans Day and what's on the table at the G7 summit in Cornwall.
America’s top infectious disease expert became the face of its pandemic response, and now his recently released emails from early on in the crisis have prompted much debate and speculation – but why?On the Sky News Daily podcast with Dermot Murnaghan, we speak to our Asia correspondent Tom Cheshire and Aaron Blake from The Washington Post about conspiracy theories and decision making last year.Daily podcast team:Podcast producer - Annie JoycePodcast producer - Nicola EyersPodcast producer - Lauren PinkneyInterviews producer - Tatiana AldersonArchive - Simon WindsorArchive - Rob FellowesArchive - Nelly StefanovaMusic - Steven Wheeler
On 6 June, the midterm elections were held in Mexico. The eve of voting saw inactive grenades and a severed head thrown at a polling station, five workers were killed and body parts in bags were found nearby. The lead-up though was the bloodiest campaign period in the country’s history. More than 30 candidates have been murdered since April with many more attacked and receiving death threats. In this episode, host Dermot Murnaghan speaks to mayoral candidate Mario Figueroa, who survived being shot in the chest at the end of last year; Gema Kloppe-Santamaría, assistant professor in Latin American history at Loyola University Chicago about the power of cartels; and Sky News chief correspondent Stuart Ramsay about the Mexican government.
In 2021, Sky News is marking some of the century’s biggest news events through the personal stories of lives defined by unforgettable moments from the last 21-years.In episode 4 of the 21-part series, Migrant Rescue, Sky News Correspondent Mark Stone, receives a desperate text message from Syrian refugee, Bassel Shekhany. The date is January 15, 2016 and Shekhany explains that his family and fiancé, Zanzon, are adrift in the Aegean Sea, after setting out to reach Europe from the Turkish coast earlier that evening. The crossing had already claimed the lives of thousands of refugees, many of whom were fleeing the war in Syria. Could he help?SUBSCRIBE to StoryCast ’21. New episode every MondayMigrant Rescue was written and produced by Rob MulhernDigital and research by Tom GillespieSpecial thanks to our contributors, Bassel and Zanzon Shekany, and Mark StoneArchive, Simon WindsorRecordings and sound design, Rob MulhernTV treatment, Hope YeomansTV output editor, Emily DeekerHead of Radio, Sky News, Dave TerrisDesign and graphics, Brian GillinghamSocial media, Chris ScottPress and Marketing, Alexandra HortonEmail: storycast@sky.ukFor more on this story log on to www.skynews/storycast21#StoryCast21
Evan Smith, who had sickle cell disease, died in hospital at the age of 21 from sepsis. He had called 999 from his hospital bed after staff lacked understanding of his condition. But, why is awareness of sickle cell disorders still so limited? Shingi Mararike talks to Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, who singer Dua Lipa honoured at the 2021 Brit Awards, about how awareness has ebbed and flowed since she was Britain’s first specialist sickle cell nurse. Plus, Evan’s parents, Betty and Charles, speak about the day they lost their son, and how they hope his legacy will be one of lasting change.
Knife crime in England and Wales was at its highest level on record prior to the COVID pandemic and Kiyan’s dad fears numbers could rise again as lockdown restrictions ease. On the Sky News Daily podcast, Dermot Murnaghan is joined by Dr Mark Prince, who shares his personal journey of grief, determination and passion for inspiring the next generation.Daily podcast team:Podcast producer - Annie JoycePodcast producer - Nicola EyersPodcast producer - Lauren PinkneyInterviews producer - Tatiana AldersonArchive - Simon WindsorArchive - Rob FellowesArchive - Nelly StefanovaMusic - Steven Wheeler
Social media influencers are professionals at convincing their followers to buy the latest and trendiest products on the market. But what if influencers encouraged their followers to live sustainably? Will their audience listen? Does it stem from hypocrisy? And could they make a real difference? On this episode of Sky News ClimateCast hosts Anna Jones & Katerina Vittozzi speak to founder of the UK's leading influencer authority CORQ to discover what power a social media influencer has in the fight against climate change. Plus they speak to Love Island contestant Eyal Booker and Strictly Come Dancing pro Katya Jones about how they combine glitz and glamour with climate conscious to become eco-friendly influencers trying to educate their followers about the climate emergency.Plus, we'll have this week's headlines from Katerina who joins us live from Bangladesh where she's been speaking to COP26 President, Alok Sharma.
Boris Johnson has said the COVID-19 pandemic worsened LGBT+ inequality worldwide. Homosexuality is criminalised in 69 countries, causing many to fear violence and arrest if they seek medical help. With the UK appointing a new special envoy for LGBT+ rights, and the US to fill the position soon, what tactics are being used in the fight for equality? Host Dermot Murnaghan speaks to special envoy Lord Herbert about why homophobic laws in the Commonwealth are often a legacy of Britain’s colonial past, his experience as the first out politician to be elected in a Conservative seat, and why he worries trans rights may be caught in a "culture war".
On 6 June 1991 the mother and businesswoman was stabbed more than 50 times in a car park of a leisure centre in west London – yet no one ever reported seeing the attack or killer's escape. Could a new forensic review lead detectives to the culprit? On the Sky News Daily podcast, Jonathan Samuels is joined by Penny's daughter Lauren Bell, plus criminology lecturer Kirsty Bennett tells us how many such cases go unsolved in England and Wales.Daily podcast team:Podcast producer - Annie JoycePodcast producer - Nicola EyersPodcast producer - Lauren PinkneyInterviews producer - Tatiana AldersonArchive - Simon WindsorArchive - Rob FellowesArchive - Nelly StefanovaMusic - Steven Wheeler
In 2021, Sky News is marking some of the century’s biggest news events through the personal stories of lives defined by unforgettable moments from the last 21-years.In episode 3 of the 21-week series, Marathon Man, Kenyan distance runner and decorated Olympian, Eliud Kipchoge, sets out to become the first person to run a marathon (42.2kms) in under two hours — a challenge deemed impossible by many experts in the world of science.New Episode every MondayMarathon Man was written and produced by Rob MulhernResearch and digital treatment by Tom GillespieSpecial thanks to our contributors, Eluid Kipchoge, Valentijn Trouw, Endy Brady and IneosArchive, Simon WindsorRecordings and sound design, Rob MulhernTV treatment, Victoria Hudson-GrantTV output editor, Emily DeekerHead of Radio, Sky News, Dave TerrisDesign and graphics, Brian GillinghamSocial media, Chris ScottPress and Marketing, Alexandra HortonEmail: storycast@sky.ukFor more on this story visit www.skynews/storycast21#StoryCast21
One year ago, the murder of George Floyd sparked a summer of global Black Lives Matter protests. But how are individuals stepping up in their fight against racism? What small actions are being taken to promote inclusivity? And what more must be done?Inzamam Rashid speaks to Rachael Hawk, a Facebook marketing manager who founded #BuyBlack Fridays to support businesses during the pandemic. Charlene Hunter from Coding Black Females reveals why she's optimistic about diversity in the tech industry, and Dr Chamu Kuppuswamy from Mosaic Outdoor explains the barriers for people from ethnically diverse backgrounds wanting to explore the outdoors.
This week on Sky News Climatecast, hosts Anna Jones and Katerina Vittozzi talk about climate lawfare. Using the courtroom as a weapon in the global fight against climate change.Climate litigation is a fairly new tool for tackling climate change. Activists and lawyers describe it as a last resort, yet it’s becoming an increasingly common practice.And the climate activists have had some important wins. This week saw two remarkable cases and we speak to the people at the heart of both.Firstly we speak to Peer de Rijk from Friends of the Earth in the Netherlands, who won their case against fossil fuel giant Shell in the Dutch courts, resulting in the court ruling that Shell must reduce their carbon emissions by 45% by 2030.We also talk to Anjali Sharma, a 17-year-old activist from Melbourne, Australia. At the start of the year, she - along with seven other teenagers and an 86-year-old nun - sued the Australian Environment minister in a bid to stop a coal mine expansion, arguing that the government had a duty of care to protect young people from the effects of climate change. And we get the views of Tessa Khan, human rights and climate lawyer who took on the Dutch government and won. She's also the co-founder of the Climate Litigation Network, so we ask her how these cases might shape the future of using climate lawfare to tackle the environmental crisis.
A video of detained journalist Roman Protasevich appearing to confess to organising anti-government protests has been released. But Boris Johnson has called for him to be let go amidst growing fears the dissident has been tortured. Jonathan Samuels speaks to Franak Viačorka, journalist and friend of Roman, about what life is like for an opponent of President Lukashenko. Plus, NBC Moscow reporter Matthew Bodner breaks down how and why Protasevich was arrested.
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Comments (3)

Robert Mol

These abortion pills aren't safe at all. They are deadly dangerous for the defenseless and voiceless little baby!

Feb 19th
Reply

William Joseph

that chef ruined the podcast.... captain obvious. and referred to himself in third person....worse than when you have rappers on

May 12th
Reply

Alireza Fatthii

Good news

Feb 13th
Reply
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