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Language of God

Author: BioLogos

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BioLogos brings you a podcast about science and Christian Faith. Featuring the voices of experts & thinkers, scientists & theologians, and stories from people who are finding a harmony between faith and science.
43 Episodes
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In this episode, Jim Stump is joined by author, speaker, and professor Sean McDowell. They talk about how apologetics has changed from his father’s original work a generation ago and how to reach those leaving the church today. But their conversation centers around the science of evolution and whether Christians should accept it. They don’t necessarily see eye to eye on this topic, so what follows is a hearty discussion about where those disagreements come from. Sean McDowell is an Associate Professor in the Christian Apologetics program at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University. He speaks at churches, universities and conferences throughout the United States and abroad. He is the co-host for his own podcast, Think Biblically, and has authored numerous books. Original music in this episode is from Carp. Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
It’s not every day that we come face to face with science in such a drastic way as we have with the coronavirus, sweeping through our communities and upending our routines. Many of us feel a great deal of anxiety and worry and we want to respond to some of that by reaching into the science with three interviews from scientists in the fields of microbiology, biochemistry, and infectious disease, all of them speaking from the Christian perspective.  Ben McFarland teaches biochemistry and chemistry at Seattle Pacific University in Seattle, Washington. Stephen Schaffner is a senior staff scientist and computational biologist at the broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and a visiting scientist at the Harvard Chan school of public health. Praveen Sethupathy is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences and Director of the Center for Genomics at Cornell University Find conversations about this episode or other topics on science and faith including the coronavirus on the BioLogos Forum. Find Ben McFarland's moving article on the coronavirus here. Check out Ben McFarland's Youtube Channel here.  
Katharine Hayhoe is a climate scientist. And she’s a Christian. You may have noticed that climate change is not a topic that is often brought into the church because it often seems to divide people more than bring them together. But Katharine wants to change that. Her science doesn’t come in spite of her faith but because of it. She sits down with Jim Stump to talk specifically about some of the common misconceptions about climate change, the science of how we know about past climate changes, and the effects we see in the world today. She ends with some practical solutions and a call for rational hope.  Katharine Hayhoe is the Political Science Endowed Professor in Public Policy and Public Law in the Department of Political Science, a director of the Climate Center, and an associate in the Public Health program of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Texas Tech University. She and her husband wrote A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions, a book that untangles the complex science and tackles many long-held misconceptions about global warming. Her TED talk titled “the most important thing you can do to fight climate change: talk about it” has been viewed over 2.5 million times. Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum. Find Katharine on Twitter for any follow-up Recommended Resources: Climate CaretakersClimate StewardsThe Evangelical Environmental NetworkGlobal Weirding with Katharine HayhoeLIT Consulting for energy auditsProject DrawdownWorld Evangelical Alliance Clean Energy InitiativeYoung Evangelicals for Climate Action
In this episode, Jim Stump is joined by Professor Emeritus of Biology at Point Loma Nazarene University, Darrel Falk. Darrel reminisces about some of his experiences with the early genetic sciences as well as his role in the beginnings of BioLogos as an organization. They then dive into human identity, and how cooperation has had a role in shaping our genetic makeup. Darrel Falk served as BioLogos’ president from 2010-2012. He recently wrote The Fool and the Heretic with Todd Wood. He is also the author of Coming to Peace with Science: Bridging the Worlds Between Faith and Biology and speaks frequently on the relationship between science and faith at universities and seminaries. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Genetics Society of America, and the American Scientific Affiliation. Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum! Music in this episode is by Joseph McDade Want to hear more from Darrel? You can find the articles he’s written for our website here.
Kutter Callaway started leading youth ministry in Theater 5 with the big screen as a backdrop. Film, music, and art have always been one of his main entries into spirituality and led him to his position as Associate Professor of Theology and Culture at Fuller Seminary.  In this episode, Jim Stump and Kutter Calloway discuss how art and pop-culture have become an underlying meta-narrative for our culture and lens through which we understand our spirituality. They ask the question, how should a Christian participate in this culture of media and technology and art? Kutter proposes that rather than cutting ourselves off from the world, we engage and participate, being aware of where God is present and active. This episode was made possible in part by the TheoPsych Project, hosted by Fuller Seminary’s office of Science, Theology, and Religion.  Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
In a small laboratory, a participant sits with electrodes attached to her brow and a heart rate monitor humming in the background as she considers a time in her life when someone did wrong to her. This is a glimpse into a study of forgiveness. The results of a study like this teach us a lot about what forgiveness is and how it works. And although it is a scientific endeavor, it has direct effects on our spiritual lives.  Jim Stump sat down with Charlotte vanOyen-Witvliet, a psychologist from Hope College who has run studies like this, to learn about what forgiveness is, the increased health benefits of forgiveness and how this psychological pursuit can be fruitful toward a theological and spiritual journey.  This episode is the third in a three part series we’re calling TheoPsych, an exploration of the intersection of psychology and theology. These episodes were made possible in part by the TheoPsych Project, hosted by Fuller Seminary’s office of Science, Theology, and Religion. Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum. Find more information about the TheoPsych Project here. Music in this episode is by Joseph McDade Charlotte mentions the suicide hotline in this episode. If you're thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved one, or would like emotional support you can go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org or call 1-800-273-8255.
From marriage and parenting to managing life in a world of social media, relationships are very central to our lives, and in some cases to our happiness and wellbeing. So what happens when problems arise in these huge aspects of our lives? In this episode, Jim Stump is joined by clinical psychologist Mari Clements whose work focuses on helping real people in real relationships with real problems. The conversation focuses on how the tools of psychology can be useful for working through some of these problems, in order to ensure the health of ourselves and our relationships with those we’re closest to. Mari Clements is currently the Provost of Fuller Seminary. She has conducted research on the impact of marital conflict on family members. Her recent research has examined marital conflict in intact families, models of satisfaction and stability in marriage, and the effects of marital conflict on parent-child relationships and children’s peer relationships. Her work has appeared in numerous scholarly journals, and she has also authored several book chapters and presented at various psychology association meetings around the country. This episode is the second in a three part series we’re calling TheoPsych. These episodes were made possible in part by the TheoPsych Project, hosted by Fuller Seminary’s office of Science, Theology, and Religion.  Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.Find more information about the TheoPsych Project here.
Science helps us to explain many things in the natural world. When it comes to psychology, it may even be able to help us understand why we think, behave, and believe the way that we do. Sometimes people fear these explanations, and even psychology itself, because of the perceived potential to be used to explain away their belief in God. Experimental psychologist Justin Barrett joins Jim Stump in this episode to discuss why he believes in the opposite. He also tells all about the new project he’s directing, the TheoPsych Project which aims to bring theology into contact with the mind sciences by bringing theologians and psychologists together to learn and think and talk with each other. Justin L. Barrett is the Thrive Professor of Developmental Science and Director of the Thrive Center for Human Development at Fuller Theological Seminary. He came to Fuller from the University of Oxford, where he taught and served as senior researcher for Oxford’s Centre for Anthropology and Mind. This episode is the first in a three part series we’re calling TheoPsych. These episodes were made possible in part by the TheoPsych Project, hosted by Fuller Seminary’s office of Science, Theology, and Religion. Find more information about the TheoPsych Project here. If you want to hear more from Justin, there’s another resource from him on our website. Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum. Original music in this episode is by Carp.
April Maskiewicz Cordero joins Jim Stump and BioLogos’ Resources Editor, Kathryn Applegate, to discuss what it’s like to teach college biology at a Christian college. She touches on her personal experience with the climate of conflict between science and religion, and how that helps her to meet her students where they are. She shares some stories of students that give her hope and touches on her research that looks at teaching controversial issues like climate change and evolution to Christian students. April and Kathryn also talk about BioLogos INTEGRATE, the high school biology curriculum supplement that they’ve been working on. April Maskiewicz Cordero, PhD, is a professor of biology at Point Loma Nazarene University. She gave a TEDx talk on evolution and faith and she was featured in “From the Dust,” a BioLogos sponsored documentary. She is also active in several professional development projects with schoolteachers as well as university biology faculty, and was one of four professors coordinating the PLNU/BioLogos Biology by the Sea Christian school teacher program. Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum!  Find more information about BioLogos INTEGRATE here. We have a few resources from April Cordero on our website. You can find them here & here.
Alister McGrath is one of the iconic voices in the dialogue between science and faith. After receiving his doctorate in biological sciences from Oxford University he decided to pursue theology with the same gusto that he approaches all of his intellectual work. Today, he brings his wisdom on these topics that is backed up by multiple doctoral degrees, many books on the subject, and several decades thinking, teaching, and writing about science and faith.  Jim Stump talks to him about two of his recent books: A Theory of Everything (that Matters) and Narrative Apologetics. The conversation ranges from talking about Einstein’s religious beliefs and how they open a door for exploring the relationship between science and theology to the importance of storytelling for Christian Apologetics.  Thanks to Tyndale Publishing for helping to set up our interview with Alister McGrath.  Find out more about his book A Theory of Everything (that Matters) Find out more about his book Narrative Apologetics Jim recommends this book: Enriching our Vision of Reality: Theology and the Natural Sciences in Dialogue.  Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
In this episode we tell two stories of finding harmony in faith and science. The stories come from Garrett and Amanda, two young people who were deeply connected to young-earth creation—that is, until they started to see some cracks developing in their reasoning which sent them on a journey to discover how to reframe their scientific view of the world while holding closely to their Christian faith. Both found their way through the next phase of their spiritual journey in different ways but their stories help us all to appreciate the humility that is required to change one’s beliefs, and the wisdom that comes from realizing that we can’t know the answers to all of life’s questions. Thanks to Rick, Ruth, Frederick, Jody, Brian, John and Barbara and to everyone else who shared their stories of harmony with us at our conference in Baltimore. If you like this episode you might want to read the book How I Changed My Mind About Evolution. Join a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
This is Part 2 of our dialogue with Reasons to Believe For many years BioLogos and Reasons to Believe have been having a dialogue about faith and science. The two organizations agree about the scientific conclusions on the ancient age of the Earth, but disagree on the science of evolution. But we have built a fruitful relationship together. In the second half of our live dialogue, Hugh Ross and Deb Haarsma talk about how a background in astrophysics led them to their current work as leaders of Christian organizations. They also talk about how their faith might hold up to new scientific discoveries. Hugh Ross is the President and Founder of Reasons to Believe. Deb Haarsma is the President of BioLogos. To learn more about the views of BioLogos and Reasons to Believe you can find an in depth conversation in the book Old Earth or Evolutionary Creation: Discussing Origins with Reasons to Believe and BioLogos Part 1 of our dialogue with Reasons to Believe with Fuz Rana and Darrel Falk is available in your podcast feed now.  Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos forum. Help support the work of BioLogos and this podcast with a charitable donation at biologos.org/give.
This is Part 1 of our dialogue with Reasons to Believe.  For many years BioLogos and Reasons to Believe have been having a dialogue about faith and science. The two organizations agree about the scientific conclusions on the ancient age of the Earth, but disagree on the science of evolution. But we have built a fruitful relationship together. In the first half of our live dialogue, Fuz Rana and Darrel Falk talk about how this relationship developed and then discuss how they have come to such different conclusions when working with the same data. Fuz Rana is the Vice President of Research and Apologetics at Reasons to Believe. Darrel Falk is the previous president of BioLogos and is Emeritus Professor of Biology at Point Loma Nazarene University. To learn more about the views of BioLogos and Reasons to Believe you can find an in depth conversation in the book Old Earth or Evolutionary Creation: Discussing Origins with Reasons to Believe and BioLogos This article is referenced in the episode: Understanding Randomness by Kathryn Applegate Part 2 of our dialogue with Reasons to Believe with Deb Haarsma and Hugh Ross is available in your podcast feed now.  Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos forum Help support the work of BioLogos and this podcast with a charitable donation at biologos.org/give.
Mike McHargue, aka Science Mike, is the cofounder of The Liturgists podcast and host of the podcast Ask Science Mike. In this episode he shares the story of his own faith journey, which involves leaving the church and eventually finding his way back after a mystical experience. Since then, he has made an effort through his podcast and writing to help others going through faith transitions.  In this episode, Jim and Mike discuss the trends of faith transitions in the United States and how science can be both fallible and trustworthy at the same time. Near the end of the episode Mike shares a powerful personal story of how he has found a personal God in a world of scientific explanations.
Theology is a tool we use to better understand God. But how does it work? How do we know when a theological claim is true? Jim asks these questions to professional theologian Oliver Crisp. Oliver’s search for theological truths has led him think and write about topics like Adam and Eve, sin, and the fall and he talks to us about how other disciplines, including science, have informed this theological work.  Oliver Crisp is professor of analytic theology at University of St Andrews in Scotland.He was born and raised in West London, England, and educated at Wimbledon School of Art; the University of Aberdeen (BD, MTh); and King’s College, London (PhD). He is the author of nine books as well as over 80 articles and essays. His most recent publications are Deviant Calvinism: Broadening Reformed Theology (Fortress, 2014), and Jonathan Edwards Among the Theologians (Eerdmans, 2015). Join a discussion about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.  This interview was made possible as part of the TheoPsych Project, hosted by Fuller Seminary’s office of Science, Theology, and Religion.
Adam & Eve

Adam & Eve

2019-11-0751:04

Jim Stump is joined by BioLogos president Deb Haarsma to talk about one of the perennial science and faith topics—Adam & Eve. They lay out some of the different perspectives on Adam & Eve and also some of the problems that come along with each perspective, bringing in science where it’s appropriate but also finding that science won’t lead us to definitive answers on many of the questions that arise.  Because this is a complex topic with many different perspectives, we asked several experts to join us in this episode and to respond to some of the different viewpoints on Adam and Eve. You’ll hear William Lane Craig, Ken Keathley, Anjeanette Roberts, Andrew Torrance and Dennis Venema who each provide their own take on some of these different Adam and Eve perspectives. We have lots of resources on this topic at our website. Just search “Adam and Eve” in the search bar. Or here’s a couple places you could start: The Common Question, “Were Adam and Eve Historical Figures?” Or check out the series by Dennis Venema called “Adam and Eve and Human Population Genetics” Finally, join in a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum
Jim Stump and Templeton Award winning physicist, Marcelo Gleiser dive into the ocean of the unknown, discussing the nature of science and how we know what we know. Since he was a child, Gleiser has been fascinated by the biggest questions about life and existence. Those questions led him to physics and cosmology and he has spent a significant part of his career communicating science to the general public. While Gleiser considers himself a religious agnostic, he has consistently pushed back against the extreme scientism views that leave no place for religion. Jim and Marcelo find some disagreement about their understandings of faith, but find that a conversation across disagreement can be fruitful and productive. Marcelo Gleiser a professor of natural philosophy physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. He is a frequent contributor to the 13.8 blog at Orbiter Magazine and his most recent book is The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher's Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything. Gleiser was named the Templeton Prize winner for 2019, which is awarded annually to a person who has made exceptional contributions to affirming life’s spiritual dimension. Find Marcelo Gleiser’s writing at Orbiter Magazine’s 13.8 Blog Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
The question of faith and science has often been posed in only one direction—how does faith affect science? As Christians, this question is more comfortable because it plants our religious beliefs in the center, keeping them untouched. But what about when the question is flipped—when science affects faith? Rick Lindroth joins producer Colin Hoogerwerf to describe how this latter question has played an important role in his life. They also discuss the dangerous reality of insect collapse and the lonely grief of the ecologist. Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum. Read more about the insect collapse here.  
In this bonus episode, Language of God Producer Colin Hoogerwerf brings a short reflection on finding hope in the outdoors.  Find more articles and resources about caring for creation at biologos.org or join a discussion about this episode at the BioLogos Forum, A good place to start is Why Should Christians Care for Creation?
On today’s episode, Lynette Strickland joins Jim and producer Colin Hoogerwerf to ruminate on her love for creation. Lynette shares how her childhood curiosity in the natural world grew into a passion for doing science, why variation in a species could help it adapt to changing environments, and how studying beetles has helped her understand God’s creation.  Lynette Strickland is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute PreDoctoral Fellow. She received her B.S. in Marine Biology from Texas A&M. Her research, focusing on how ecological factors and genomic factors shape a naturally-occurring color polymorphism in a species of Neotropical tortoise beetle, has been published in journals including Science and Hereditary. Find a conversation about this episode at the BioLogos Forum.
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Comments (2)

Johnathan

Wow 5 at once starting out... Guess I have some listening to do :) thanks for this channe!

Mar 27th
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Lane Mattox

Thanks for starting a podcast Biologos! Really looking forward to it.

Feb 23rd
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