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In this episode UW Tacoma Professor Katie Baird talks about her new book "Growing Mangos in the Desert." The book chronicles Baird's experience in the Peace Corps. The then twenty-something was sent to Mauritania to teach farmers there how to grow rice. Baird had very little training and couldn't speak the local language. Needless to say things didn't go as planned. Baird talks about her experience in Mauritania, how the transition to rice upended Mauritanian culture and whether or not the project worked. She also talks about the friendships she made and what the experience taught her. 
Still Doing Life

Still Doing Life

2022-04-2641:19

In 1996 Howard Zehr published "Doing Life." The book features photos and stories of men and women serving  life sentences in Pennsylvania prisons. Years later, Zehr partnered with UW Tacoma Associate Professor Barbara Toews on a follow up book. "Still Doing Life, 22 Lifers, 25 Years Later." In "Still Doing Life," Toews and Zehr talked with some of the same men and women featured in the original book. In this episode we talk about the books and the stories of men and women who have spent decades in prison. We also discuss life sentences, restorative justice and how "lifers" keep going and find meaning.
UW Tacoma Professor Heather Dillon and a group of students worked together to get a campus chapter of The Society of Women Engineers at UW Tacoma. Dillon and the students - Anna Wen, Jasmine Davis and Sophia Elmobdy - talk about the importance of having a SWE chapter on campus. The group also discusses the barriers women in engineering face. Finally, the conversation turns to why each student decided to pursue a degree in engineering and how they're hoping to build a welcoming environment at UW Tacoma for women considering a career in engineering. 
The War Back Home

The War Back Home

2022-03-3124:53

UW Tacoma junior Illia Meserenko is an international student from Ukraine. In this episode Meserenko talks about the war between Russia and Ukraine. Meserenko's mother, father and grandmother are still in Ukraine. His mother and grandmother fled Kyiv but his father stayed behind. Meserenko talks about how they're doing and the impact that war has had on him. Finally, he talks about his decision to attend college in the United States and how he plans to use his education to help Ukraine.Ukrainian Association of Washington
Keeping It 100

Keeping It 100

2022-03-2834:58

This is the 100th episode of Paw'd Defiance! We wanted to do something a little different, so we handed over the microphone to alumna Jazmyn Pratt and asked her to interview UW Tacoma Chancellor Sheila Edwards Lange. The two had never met prior to recording, but you'd never know it from the conversation. The pair sound like old friends as they talk about their individual college experiences as well as the role higher education has played in their lives. Chancellor Lange also talks about her first six months on campus as well as her vision for UW Tacoma.
Living With Long COVID

Living With Long COVID

2022-03-2324:101

We're now in year three of the COVID-19 pandemic. Case counts are declining and while we don't know what the future holds, it felt like a good time to stop and reflect on what we've experienced. This is the first in a series of episodes where we ask members of the UWT community to talk about the last two years and the impact it's had on them. First up, UW Tacoma Associate Teaching Professor Cynthia Howson. Howson has been dealing with long COVID since being diagnosed in October of 2021. She'll talk about that experience including what she sees a silver lining and how Young Adult Fantasy Fiction is helping her get through.
Television journalist Michelle Li went viral for a tweet she posted to social media. The tweet showed Li reacting to a message from a viewer who said Li was "being very Asian" during a segment about traditional New Year's Day foods. #VeryAsian became a global sensation and attracted attention from the media, including Ellen DeGeneres. Li used the incident to launch the Very Asian Foundation. In this episode we talk with Li about her tweet and the impact that had on her life.  Associate Professor JaeRan Kim also joins us. Both Li and Kim were adopted by white parents. They talk about their struggle with identity and feeling like an imposter. They also discuss how they made their way in fields that have historically not been open to Asian women. Finally, the pair discuss what they think it means to "be very Asian."UW Tacoma Asian American and Pacific Islander Impact Endowment
Grief is about more than just death. Grief is a way of expressing loss. We may grieve over the loss of a job or we may grieve when a friend moves across the country. Loss and grief are an important part of the human experience. In this episode we talk with UW Tacoma Professor Charley Emlet. Emlet researches aging, particularly in vulnerable communities. For the past several years he's also taught a course on grief. Emlet talks about why grief is important. We'll also discuss how the act of grieving varies across cultures as well as how COVID impacted how we grieve. Finally, Emlet talks about his decision to retire from teaching and how we plans to grieve that loss.
Early libraries in the United States were private and available to only a few. Women played an important role in transforming libraries and turning them into public spaces that can be enjoyed by everyone. UW Tacoma Library Director Annie Downey talks about this history and the racism/sexism these librarians faced. Downey also discusses the overlap between libraries and the feminist movement. 
In this episode we talk with Rabbi Bruce Kadden and Associate Professor Bonnie Becker about what it means to be Jewish.  Our conversation includes a brief overview of some of the basic tenets of the religion. We also discuss anti-Semitism, its history and why this hatred of Jewish people persists to this day. Finally, Dr. Becker tells us why she decided to publish an op-ed about the Whoopi Goldberg controversy. 
In October of 2021, the American Academy of Pediatrics and other medical organizations declared a national emergency in children's mental health. In this episode we're joined by Ashley Mangum, Program Manager of Pediatric Mental Health at Mary Bridge Children's Hospital, Kianna Carter, Youth Engagement Services Behavioral Health Clinician at Mary Bridge and Chris Barrans, Director of Field Education/Assistant Teaching Professor at UW Tacoma's School of Social Work & Criminal Justice. The three discuss how the issues we're seeing now with children's mental health started long before the pandemic. We'll also talk about how the pandemic exacerbated theses issues. We'll also hear about the resources available to children, their parents and caregivers.Kids Mental Health Pierce CountyYES Tacoma
Tacoma recently launched Growing Resilience in Tacoma (GRIT). The guaranteed income program will distribute $500 a month for a year to 110 Tacoma residents. UW Tacoma alumna Abigail Lawson serves as Program Director for GRIT. In this episode we'll talk about guaranteed income, universal basic income and the difference between the two. We'll also talk about GRIT, including how it works and who it benefits. The program has funding for a year. Lawson will discuss program goals and what the next steps will be once GRIT ends. 
Tell Us A Joke

Tell Us A Joke

2021-12-2210:27

We're nearing the end of year two of the pandemic and the news isn't great.  The omicron variant is disheartening. Needless to say, many of us are tired and stressed out. We wanted to do something to help lift everyone's spirits. So, we asked a group of UW Tacoma students, faculty, staff and alumni to tell us a joke, preferably a "dad joke." You know what these are, these are the jokes that make you groan and also make you laugh. Have a listen. We hope the next ten minutes will bring you some joy and a few giggles.
Part two of our conversation about the Labor Solidarity Project with UW Tacoma Assistant Teaching Professor Alex Miller, Assistant Professor Sonia De La Cruz and alumna Teresa Dennerlein . In this episode we talk about the pandemic's impact on work including the "Great Resignation." We also discuss the changing nature of work as well as what it's like to work in higher education during COVID.Listen to The Labor Solidarity Project Part I.
The Labor Solidarity Project at UW Tacoma  consists of faculty and students working to highlight labor studies in the curriculum, in research, and through community outreach. In this episode, the first of two parts, we talk with UW Tacoma Assistant Teaching Professor Alex Miller, Assistant Professor Sonia De La Cruz and alumna Teresa Dennerlein about the LSP, its mission and why an understanding of labor history and current labor issues is important. Listen to The Labor Solidarity Project Part II.
Aboard the Adventuress

Aboard the Adventuress

2021-11-1624:14

The 133 foot schooner Adventuress has been to the Artic and was used by San Francisco Bar Pilots to transfer pilots to and from cargo vessels near the Farallon Islands. Today Adventuress is operated by the non-profit organization Sound Experience, as a platform for environmental education about the Puget Sound. In this episode we board the Adventuress with Associate Teaching Professor Julie Masura as well as a group of current UWT students and recent grads. Masura and Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Cheryl Greengrove teamed up with Sound Experience to provide students with a chance to do some field work. 
A Veteran's Story

A Veteran's Story

2021-11-0937:32

In this episode UW Tacoma student Ashley Young tells her story. Young struggled in high school. After graduation she attended community college for a year but eventually left school and moved to Florida. She got a job selling sport bikes. The 2008 financial crash lead Young to move back to Washington where she eventually decided to join the Air Force. Young talks about her experience in Afghanistan including the injury she sustained. She also talks about life after the military and how she regained a sense of purpose by going back to school and by playing women's tackle football.
Right to Counsel

Right to Counsel

2021-10-2034:44

The Tacoma-Pierce County Housing Justice Project provides free legal aid to low-income Pierce County residents who are facing eviction. In this episode we talk about the status of the eviction moratorium in Washington state. We also discuss the changes to state housing law. Among the changes, providing representation to tenants facing eviction as well as creating fair repayment plans to tenants who have fallen behind on their rent.Rental Assistance in Pierce County: https://www.piercecountywa.gov/7142/Rental-Assistance
For the first time in 18 months, the UW Tacoma community gathered on campus as part of the annual back-to-school celebration called Convocation. In this episode we'll drop in on the event and hear from some of the speakers including new Chancellor Sheila Edwards Lange. We'll also listen as new and returning students talk about life during the pandemic and how they feel about coming to campus, some for the first time.
Returning to Campus

Returning to Campus

2021-09-2939:07

Most of UW Tacoma's students, faculty and staff have been working, teaching and learning remotely for the past 18 months. In this episode we hear from the campus community as the university pivots back to an in-person model of instruction. Students, faculty and staff share their concerns as well as their hopes about returning to campus. They also discuss how the pandemic has changed them and how they'll think about this time years from now.
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