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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

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Mark Kenny takes a weekly look at politics and public affairs with expert analysis and discussion from researchers at The Australian National University and beyond.
107 Episodes
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On this Democracy Sausage, Sharon Friel, Helen Sullivan, Meegan Fitzharris, and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny at the hotplate to talk about improving health and wellbeing beyond the coronavirus crisis, and whether Scott Morrison’s gas plan is more than just hot air. As a result of the COVID-19 crisis, more Australians are focused on health policy now than possibly at any point in the country’s contemporary history. But will this increased awareness during the crisis translate into long-term, whole-of-government health reform? How can policymakers ensure Australians receive both equity of access and equity of outcomes in healthcare? And is Scott Morrison’s gas plan meaningful policy or just a political power play? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Sharon Friel, Professor Helen Sullivan, former ACT Health Minister Meegan Fitzharris, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga chat with Professor Mark Kenny about health inequality and the future of Australia’s energy policy. Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). She is also Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance and Co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity. Meegan Fitzharris is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy and Leadership at ANU College of Health and Medicine. She is a former Labor Member of the Legislative Assembly for Molonglo and Yerrabi and was the ACT government's Minister for Health and Wellbeing. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Once an outsider to win the last Australian federal election, Scott Morrison’s ‘miracle’ 2019 electoral victory put him at the helm during one of the most difficult years in the country’s contemporary history. So what has the COVID-19 crisis revealed about the prime minister, and Australian politics and society? Recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Guardian Australia’s political editor Katharine Murphy joins Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Extra to discuss Scott Morrison, pandemic politics, and her new Quarterly Essay, The end of certainty. Katharine Murphy is Guardian Australia‘s political editor. She has worked in Canberra’s parliamentary gallery for 15 years. In 2008, she won the Paul Lyneham award for excellence in press gallery journalism, while in 2012 she was a Walkley award finalist in the best digital journalism category. She is the presenter of The Guardian’s Australian Politics Live podcast and recently authored a Quaretrely Essay, The End of Certainty: Scott Morrison and Pandemic Politics. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National Universit  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mark Kenny is joined by Arnagretta Hunter, Marija Taflaga and Frank Bongiorno to take a look at how conservatives have responded to the coronavirus crisis and how that compares to responses to the climate crisis. Conservative governments have had a mixed record on dealing with COVID-19, from Australia’s relatively good record to public health disasters like in the UK, but underpinning strategies in both countries is the protection of the economy. But if conservatism is about preserving and protecting the status quo, why can’t that approach be taken to protecting the climate and ensuring we have an economy built for the challenges to come? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to take a look at the state of conservatism from Australia to the UK are Dr Arnagretta Hunter, Professor Frank Bongiorno, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School. Professor Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode, Chris Wallace chats with Mark Kenny about Labor’s 2019 election loss, the machinery of politics, and her new book, How to Win an Election. The 2019 Australian election produced a surprise result showing, not for the first time, that every election is there for the winning - including the next one. Labor's surprise loss in 2019, like the Liberal and National parties' defeat in the so-called 'unloseable' 1993 election, showed how careful attention to basic political craft can yield big dividends - and how inattention to it can turn apparently certain favourites into losers. Recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Chris Wallace joins Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Extra to discuss her new book, How to Win an Election. Dr Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode, we chat with Katrine Beauregard and Marija Taflaga about the impact of the crisis on women, truth in political advertising, and political donations. In part two, Peter Martin joins us to talk about Australia’s recession and where to from here. Officially in recession and with households holding onto their money at an unprecedented scale, what does the future hold for the Australian economy? What might happen if spending never recovers? And what impact will the crisis have on women's participation in the political system? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, we discuss Australia’s economic outlook with Peter Martin AM, Crawford School visiting fellow and Business and Economy Editor at The Conversation. Dr Katrine Beauregard and Dr Marija Taflaga also step up to the hotplate to chat about the impact of the crisis on women’s political participation, transparency in political donations, and truth in political advertising. Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. Dr Katrine Beauregard is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her work focuses on political behaviour, and why people vote the way they do. Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. You can register here [https://www.anu.edu.au/events/virtual-live-event-in-conversation-with-chris-wallace] for the live virtual launch of Associate Professor Chris Wallace's new book, How to win an election, where Chris will be in conversation with Professor Mark Kenny. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this special bonus Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by one of Australia’s most preeminent China scholars, Professor Jane Golley, to help us understand China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and what it means for Australia. A three-decade, $1 trillion infrastructure investment plan that currently involves over 60 countries, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is a vast economic and foreign policy initiative led by Chinese President Xi Jinping. But the scheme hasn’t been universally welcomed - indeed Victoria’s 2018 to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with China on the deal has been met with criticism by the Federal Government. But what are the economic and foreign policy factors driving the BRI? How valid are the national security concerns about the scheme, including those about so-called ‘debt-trap diplomacy’? And how should Australia be responding? On this special extra Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by one of Australia’s most preeminent China scholars, Professor Jane Golley, to help us understand the BRI and Australia-China relations. Professor Jane Golley is an economist and Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World at The Australian National University. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode, Mark Kenny chats to former New South Wales (NSW) Greens politician Ian Cohen about his life in politics, Australia’s history of environmental activism, and grabbing onto the front of a US warship in Sydney Harbour.  Rising to prominence after surfing the bow wave of a US Destroyer during a nuclear disarmament protest, Ian Cohen became the first Greens politician to be elected to the NSW Legislative Council. After a political career spanning 16 years, Ian chats with Professor Mark Kenny in paradise on the NSW Far North Coast on this Democracy Sausage Extra. The pair chat about the history of environmental activism in Australia, the importance of protecting and preserving the delicate ecological balance in his local community, and what the future might hold for the Australian Greens.   Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Ian Cohen is a former Australian Greens politician. Ian was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Council in 1995 as its first Green member. He retired from parliament in 2011. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the national interest

In the national interest

2020-08-3101:15:13

On this special 100th episode of Democracy Sausage, we’re joined by Frank Bongiorno, Jacinta Carroll, Marija Taflaga, and Mark Kenny to talk Australian attitudes towards COVID-19 surveillance, security agencies on social media, and accountability for former political figures. What do Australian attitudes towards surveillance amidst the COVID-19 crisis suggest about trust in society? After weeks of icy diplomatic exchanges, what is the Australian government’s long-term goal for its relationship with Beijing? And why are Australia’s security agencies taking to social media? On the 100th episode of Democracy Sausage, we’re joined by national security expert Dr Jacinta Carroll, historian Professor Frank Bongiorno, regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga and, taking a break from his holiday to appear as guest, Professor Mark Kenny. Dr Jacinta Carroll is Senior Research Fellow at ANU National Security College and was the inaugural Head of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre. Professor Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
While the coronavirus crisis in the United Kingdom has abated somewhat in recent months, is life in the country going to get tougher if winter brings about a growing risk of transmission and Brexit negotiations falter? With us this week to discuss the challenges facing Britain are Remainiacs and The Bunker host Ros Taylor, pod regular Elizabeth Ames, and Brexit researcher Georgina Wright. It has been a very tough year in the UK, but some fear that very difficult times still lie ahead. With schools reopening and winter set to force Britons back indoors, will the colder months bring with them another spike in COVID-19 cases? While the country has seen an outpouring of support for frontline workers, is the pandemic actually undermining the social contract in the UK? And with Brexit negotiations forced down the priority list, what impact is the uncertainty about the future of UK-European relations having on British business already struggling? On this Democracy Sausage Extra we’re joined by a top panel of UK-based experts - Ros Taylor, Elizabeth Ames and Georgina Wright - to look at the challenges facing Britain as it tries to manage Brexit negotiations and a global pandemic. Georgina Wright is a Senior Researcher at the Institute for Government, where she focuses on the United Kingdom's engagement and influence in the European Union after Brexit. Her research interests also include Franco-British relations and the future of the European Union. Ros Taylor is Research Manager for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission and Managing Editor of the LSE Brexit blog, and the host of the Remainiacs and The Bunker podcasts. Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is currently Director of the Britain-Australia Society and Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King's College London. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this week’s fry up of politics and public affairs, our outstanding panel of John Hewson, Quentin Grafton and Marija Taflaga join us to talk about the COVID-19 aged care inquiry, tensions over state border closures, and whether or not a coronavirus vaccine should be mandatory. It was a “week of hope” in the words of Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, after signing a letter of intent to access the promising Oxford University coronavirus vaccine and falling infection numbers in Victoria. So after weeks of restrictions in Victoria following its second wave outbreak, is this week another turning point in Australia’s coronavirus response? Should Aged Care Minister Richard Colbeck face sanctions for failing to recall how many aged care residents have died from the virus in a Senate Inquiry? And is making a COVID-19 vaccine compulsory essential to ensure community safety in the wake of the pandemic? With Mark Kenny on a well-earned break, Martyn Pearce fires up the barbeque this week, joined by former Opposition Leader Dr John Hewson, Crawford School’s Professor Quentin Grafton, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Dr John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. Professor Quentin Grafton is an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The coronavirus crisis is posing new questions and serious challenges to Australia’s political leaders. And those leaders are responding assertively – closing borders, slowing the economy, and working hard to keep infection numbers down. But are they making the right choices? On this Democracy Sausage Extra Mark Kenny talks with the insiders who ask the tough questions of those leaders every day – press gallery veterans David Crowe and Phil Coorey. Initial political optimism from an early Federal Government response and subsequent low infection numbers has now given way to fear, with Australia’s internal borders closed, and soul searching and inquiries about community protection and service provision. So what does this unprecedented political time look like to the insiders – the people who report from Canberra’s press gallery? Joining Professor Mark Kenny are Phil Coorey of the Australian Financial Review and David Crowe of the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. The panel discuss the questions the pandemic raises about Australia’s federated system, why every leader gets judged on the numbers, whether Australia’s good performance through the Global Financial Crisis encouraged complacency about the impacts of COVID-19, and the ‘bad men’ in charge of the world.  Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Phillip Coorey is an Australian journalist, currently political editor for The Australian Financial Review. Phillip has covered federal politics since 1998, beginning as political correspondent for The Advertiser. David Crowe is Chief Political Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and a regular commentator on national affairs on the ABC’s Insiders program. In a career spanning 25 years, he has covered federal politics as the national affairs editor of The Australian and the Chief Political Correspondent of The Australian Financial Review. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The crisis in aged care

The crisis in aged care

2020-08-1701:01:51

Has a failure to properly value care led to poor decisions driven by profit, and in doing so entrenched inequality for women? On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at the crisis unfolding in Australia’s aged care sector, the gendered dimensions playing out in the pandemic, and why we need to rethink how we value human beings in society. Even before the coronavirus hit, it was clear that the aged care sector had significant problems - a sector largely privatised and governed by profit, and built on the back of low-paid, poorly-valued, and precariously employed women workers. On this episode of Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny speaks to Meegan Fitzharris, Helen Sullivan, and Sharon Bessell about what the crisis in aged care tells us about how governments deliver the services people need, what we value in society, and what we want society to look like after the crisis. Meegan Fitzharris is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy and Leadership at ANU College of Health and Medicine. She is a former Labor Member of the Legislative Assembly for Molonglo and Yerrabi and was the ACT Government's Minister for Health and Wellbeing. Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.   Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode, academic and author Dr Liz Allen joins us to talk about the myth of the Australian ‘fair go’ and why COVID-19 could be leading Australia into demographic disaster. Political leaders often pitch Australia as the land of ‘a fair go’. But with real social mobility so hard to come by for many Australians, is this more national myth than reality? What can policymakers do to ensure demography doesn’t equal destiny for Australians experiencing disadvantage? And is the COVID-19 crisis creating a ‘perfect storm’ for demographic trouble in Australia? On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by demographer Dr Liz Allen to talk about what demography reveals about Australia’s democracy, why economic uncertainty might be preventing a COVID-19 baby boom, and her new book The Future of Us.  Dr Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What does it take to be a political leader? What’s the magic mix of talent and time? And do Australia’s treasurer and shadow treasurer have that mix? Joining Mark Kenny to talk about what it takes to do the top job are commentator Niki Savva and Marija Taflaga. After botching the bushfire response, many argue Prime Minister Scott Morrison has performed strongly in the pandemic. But while he’s riding high in the polls, showing flexibility in policy, and moving quickly to sure up a struggling economy, the real political test will come with the predicted deep and long recession to come. If he or opposition leader Anthony Albanese struggle, both government and opposition have potential leaders in waiting in Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers. But what does it take to lead? Do you need 20 years’ experience in politics? Or has the accelerated rate of change that has afflicted Australian politics over the last two decades changed the political paradigm? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to talk leadership, recession, and recovery are journalist and commentator Niki Savva and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Niki Savva is an Australian journalist, author, and former senior adviser to Prime Minister John Howard and Treasurer Peter Costello. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Is Trump cooked?

Is Trump cooked?

2020-08-0640:53

Days after a presidential interview with one US-based Australian correspondent went viral, Mark Kenny chats with another stateside Aussie journalist Matthew Knott about the Jonathan Swan interview and Trump’s chances of reelection in November. Electoral surprises may have become the norm in recent years, so US presidential hopeful, Joe Biden, may not be resting as easy as many think. But with postal voting set to open soon in some states, is President Trump’s window to shake up the campaign closing too fast for the surprise 2016 victor to secure a second term? Plus with the president decrying ‘mail-in’ voting as opening the door for fraud, will the election results be seen as legitimate by his rusted on supporters? And does the US need an independent, non-partisan, federal electoral service like the Australian Electoral Commission to sure-up its famous democracy? In a week for Australian correspondents in the US, we talk to Matthew Knott from The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald about Trump’s electoral prospects, Biden’s options for running mate, and that interview. Matthew Knott is North America correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Understanding China

Understanding China

2020-08-0352:34

On this special Democracy Sausage we launch a new book on governance systems in China, Taiwan and Australia with its co-editor Andrew Podger and ANU Chancellor Julie Bishop, and discuss how COVID-19 is affecting Australia’s elderly. What does reform look like in China and how does the country’s governance stack up against Australia’s? Has reform in the country actually gone backwards under Xi Jinping? And how can business navigate the increasingly tense relations between China and other countries? On this Democracy Sausage Professor Andrew Podger, ANU Chancellor and former Foreign Minister the Hon Julie Bishop, and Dr Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to launch and discuss the new book, Designing governance systems for performance and accountability, co-edited by Professor Podger. The panel also examines COVID-19 in the aged care sector and whether Australia is doing enough to protect its elderly people. The Hon Julie Bishop is Chancellor of The Australian National University and was Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs. Andrew Podger AO is an Honorary Professor of Public Policy at ANU, former Australian Public Service Commissioner and former secretary of several government departments. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mark Kenny talks with Annika Smethurst about the police raid that changed her life and her new essay, On Secrets. On 4 June 2019, Federal Police raided the home of Walkley award-winning journalist Annika Smethurst, changing her life forever. Smethurst was expecting a cleaner - instead it was the federal police with a warrant. Five of them turned her place inside out, including going through her underwear drawer. In this special Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny speaks to Annika Smethurst about the raid, its impact on her personally and professionally, and her new essay, On Secrets. A year before the raid, Smethurst had written an article about a proposal to allow the Australian Signals Directorate to spy on Australians. The AFP was investigating the possibility of the communication of classified material. Smethurst became the accidental poster woman for press freedom with her employer calling it a 'dangerous act of intimidation'. On April 15 2020, the High Court ruled the warrant invalid and on 27 May 2020 the AFP announced that Smethurst would not be charged over her stories that "... relied on classified intelligence documents". But the impact of the ordeal remains, and Smethurst joins us in this episode to discuss the raid that changed her life, and its implications for journalists all over the country. This discussion was recorded as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series. Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny is joined by actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and performer-producer Tracy Bourne, as well as regular guest Marija Taflaga, to talk about how COVID-19 has affected the dramatic arts. Few industries have been impacted as severely by the coronavirus restrictions as the performing arts. And while the government has set aside $400 million to attract foreign film and television productions to Australian shores, far less is on offer for the country’s home-grown productions. So will COVID-19 spell the last act for local film, television and theatre? Mark Kenny is joined by an A-list cast of actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and actor and teacher Dr Tracy Bourne, as well as regular co-star Marija Taflaga. Listen here: David Wenham is one of Australia's most well-known and respected actors, having appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions in Australia and abroad. He is known in Hollywood for his roles in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, Van Helsing, and 300, and in Australia for his role as Diver Dan in SeaChange. Caroline Stacey is Artistic Director and CEO of The Street Theatre, Canberra’s leading creative producer dedicated to ambitious contemporary live performance. Dr Tracy Bourne is a singer, singing teacher, writer and director, and is Artistic Director of SEAM (Sustainable Environment Arts Movement) Inc, an organisation that aims to engage people with the issue of climate change through community art and performance projects. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve Mark Kenny and Peter Martin discuss today’s economic update from the Treasurer and the impact of the corona-crunch on the nation’s future. The economic update given by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg today made for a sobering read, with net debt expected to rise to $677 billion by 30 June 2021, GDP down seven per cent in the June quarter, and unemployment expected to hit more than nine per cent at the end of the year. So has the coronavirus crisis led Australia into a debt and deficit disaster? And with the pandemic far from over, what does the future hold for Australians in this bleak economic climate? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to crunch the numbers is The Conversation’s Business and Economy Editor Peter Martin.  Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Peter Martin is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at how the arts world has been impacted by COVID-19, plus whether the crisis has changed what Australians want from their governments, with historian Paul Pickering and composer and musician Kim Cunio. Even before the coronavirus crisis struck, artists were doing it tough – with crushingly-low salaries, and a sector withering from low funding, a reliance on philanthropy, and a workforce who have to take on additional skill sets to survive. But lockdowns around the world have highlighted how reliant we all are on the escapism and diversions that art of all kinds provide. So what could and should governments be doing to provide the support our creative artists need? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this and more are historian Professor Paul Pickering and head of ANU School of Music Associate Professor Kim Cunio. Kim Cunio is an Associate Professor studying composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music. Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (11)

Lis Stanger

Would reducing the tax free threshold be a better option to tax cuts?

Sep 7th
Reply

Craig Peters

Worst one. Don't get Coorey back.

Aug 24th
Reply

Lis Stanger

I don't think the care sector are big political donors, politicians need to support those who directly financially support them.

Aug 18th
Reply

Lis Stanger

Fantastic podcast, exceptional guest

Aug 13th
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Lis Stanger

Great podcast

Jul 30th
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Lis Stanger

Fantastic podcast

Jun 18th
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Lis Stanger

My favorite economist.

Jun 16th
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Lis Stanger

Great discussion

Apr 28th
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Lis Stanger

thanks for another great Podcast

Apr 26th
Reply

Lis Stanger

Excellent podcast

Mar 22nd
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Nov 26th
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