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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

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Mark Kenny takes a weekly look at politics and public affairs with expert analysis and discussion from researchers at The Australian National University and beyond.
94 Episodes
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What does it take to be a political leader? What’s the magic mix of talent and time? And do Australia’s treasurer and shadow treasurer have that mix? Joining Mark Kenny to talk about what it takes to do the top job are commentator Niki Savva and Marija Taflaga. After botching the bushfire response, many argue Prime Minister Scott Morrison has performed strongly in the pandemic. But while he’s riding high in the polls, showing flexibility in policy, and moving quickly to sure up a struggling economy, the real political test will come with the predicted deep and long recession to come. If he or opposition leader Anthony Albanese struggle, both government and opposition have potential leaders in waiting in Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers. But what does it take to lead? Do you need 20 years’ experience in politics? Or has the accelerated rate of change that has afflicted Australian politics over the last two decades changed the political paradigm? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to talk leadership, recession, and recovery are journalist and commentator Niki Savva and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Niki Savva is an Australian journalist, author, and former senior adviser to Prime Minister John Howard and Treasurer Peter Costello. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Is Trump cooked?

Is Trump cooked?

2020-08-0640:59

Days after a presidential interview with one US-based Australian correspondent went viral, Mark Kenny chats with another stateside Aussie journalist Matthew Knott about the Jonathan Swan interview and Trump’s chances of reelection in November. Electoral surprises may have become the norm in recent years, so US presidential hopeful, Joe Biden, may not be resting as easy as many think. But with postal voting set to open soon in some states, is President Trump’s window to shake up the campaign closing too fast for the surprise 2016 victor to secure a second term? Plus with the president decrying ‘mail-in’ voting as opening the door for fraud, will the election results be seen as legitimate by his rusted on supporters? And does the US need an independent, non-partisan, federal electoral service like the Australian Electoral Commission to sure-up its famous democracy? In a week for Australian correspondents in the US, we talk to Matthew Knott from The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald about Trump’s electoral prospects, Biden’s options for running mate, and that interview. Matthew Knott is North America correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Understanding China

Understanding China

2020-08-0352:28

On this special Democracy Sausage we launch a new book on governance systems in China, Taiwan and Australia with its co-editor Andrew Podger and ANU Chancellor Julie Bishop, and discuss how COVID-19 is affecting Australia’s elderly. What does reform look like in China and how does the country’s governance stack up against Australia’s? Has reform in the country actually gone backwards under Xi Jinping? And how can business navigate the increasingly tense relations between China and other countries? On this Democracy Sausage Professor Andrew Podger, ANU Chancellor and former Foreign Minister the Hon Julie Bishop, and Dr Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to launch and discuss the new book, Designing governance systems for performance and accountability, co-edited by Professor Podger. The panel also examines COVID-19 in the aged care sector and whether Australia is doing enough to protect its elderly people. The Hon Julie Bishop is Chancellor of The Australian National University and was Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs. Andrew Podger AO is an Honorary Professor of Public Policy at ANU, former Australian Public Service Commissioner and former secretary of several government departments. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mark Kenny talks with Annika Smethurst about the police raid that changed her life and her new essay, On Secrets. On 4 June 2019, Federal Police raided the home of Walkley award-winning journalist Annika Smethurst, changing her life forever. Smethurst was expecting a cleaner - instead it was the federal police with a warrant. Five of them turned her place inside out, including going through her underwear drawer. In this special Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny speaks to Annika Smethurst about the raid, its impact on her personally and professionally, and her new essay, On Secrets. A year before the raid, Smethurst had written an article about a proposal to allow the Australian Signals Directorate to spy on Australians. The AFP was investigating the possibility of the communication of classified material. Smethurst became the accidental poster woman for press freedom with her employer calling it a 'dangerous act of intimidation'. On April 15 2020, the High Court ruled the warrant invalid and on 27 May 2020 the AFP announced that Smethurst would not be charged over her stories that "... relied on classified intelligence documents". But the impact of the ordeal remains, and Smethurst joins us in this episode to discuss the raid that changed her life, and its implications for journalists all over the country. This discussion was recorded as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series. Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny is joined by actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and performer-producer Tracy Bourne, as well as regular guest Marija Taflaga, to talk about how COVID-19 has affected the dramatic arts. Few industries have been impacted as severely by the coronavirus restrictions as the performing arts. And while the government has set aside $400 million to attract foreign film and television productions to Australian shores, far less is on offer for the country’s home-grown productions. So will COVID-19 spell the last act for local film, television and theatre? Mark Kenny is joined by an A-list cast of actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and actor and teacher Dr Tracy Bourne, as well as regular co-star Marija Taflaga. Listen here: David Wenham is one of Australia's most well-known and respected actors, having appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions in Australia and abroad. He is known in Hollywood for his roles in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, Van Helsing, and 300, and in Australia for his role as Diver Dan in SeaChange. Caroline Stacey is Artistic Director and CEO of The Street Theatre, Canberra’s leading creative producer dedicated to ambitious contemporary live performance. Dr Tracy Bourne is a singer, singing teacher, writer and director, and is Artistic Director of SEAM (Sustainable Environment Arts Movement) Inc, an organisation that aims to engage people with the issue of climate change through community art and performance projects. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve Mark Kenny and Peter Martin discuss today’s economic update from the Treasurer and the impact of the corona-crunch on the nation’s future. The economic update given by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg today made for a sobering read, with net debt expected to rise to $677 billion by 30 June 2021, GDP down seven per cent in the June quarter, and unemployment expected to hit more than nine per cent at the end of the year. So has the coronavirus crisis led Australia into a debt and deficit disaster? And with the pandemic far from over, what does the future hold for Australians in this bleak economic climate? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to crunch the numbers is The Conversation’s Business and Economy Editor Peter Martin.  Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Peter Martin is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at how the arts world has been impacted by COVID-19, plus whether the crisis has changed what Australians want from their governments, with historian Paul Pickering and composer and musician Kim Cunio. Even before the coronavirus crisis struck, artists were doing it tough – with crushingly-low salaries, and a sector withering from low funding, a reliance on philanthropy, and a workforce who have to take on additional skill sets to survive. But lockdowns around the world have highlighted how reliant we all are on the escapism and diversions that art of all kinds provide. So what could and should governments be doing to provide the support our creative artists need? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this and more are historian Professor Paul Pickering and head of ANU School of Music Associate Professor Kim Cunio. Kim Cunio is an Associate Professor studying composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music. Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Far from being private correspondence, the Palace Letters – finally released to the public this week – detail the long road to one of the world’s great constitutional crises. On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by Frank Bongiorno and Chris Wallace to discuss what we now know about The Dismissal. On 11 November 1975, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was dismissed from his role by the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr. Nearly 25 years later and after a lengthy legal battle, the correspondence between the Governor-General and the Queen’s Private Secretary is now public. The letters, dating back more than a year before that historic day and running to more than 1,000 pages, shed new light on a political and constitutional crisis. Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss what we’ve learned from the Palace Letters are historians Dr Chris Wallace and Professor Frank Bongiorno. Dr Chris Wallace is a Visiting Fellow at ANU School of History. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020. Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage we take a look at the rising infection rate in Victoria, the optics of Scott Morrison going to the football on the weekend, what the modelling tells us about the virus’ trajectory, and Trump’s troubles in the US. With Melbourne in lockdown and rising rates of community transmission in Victoria and beyond, did Prime Minister Scott Morrison play it badly by going to the football, or would staying away have sent the wrong message? Do the COVID-19 numbers suggest that Australia has missed the boat on going for a policy of elimination? And with the economy likely to struggle for some time, will there be a move to raise the rate for those left unemployed? On this episode of Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Quentin Grafton and News Corp Australia’s Annika Smethurst. Professor Quentin Grafton is an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum. Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by former long-time public servant Allan Behm to discuss community values in the COVID-19 crisis, the “serious vacancies in leadership” around the world, and learning the lessons of history to understand China’s behaviour. In launching Australia’s new Defence Strategy Update recently, Prime Minister Scott Morrison drew parallels between the strategic and economic threat Australia currently faces with that faced by the world in the 1930s and 40s. While China’s growing assertiveness is not the only cause of this uncertainty, it is likely front of mind for many in the Australian government. But is this analogy with contemporary Western history useful, or should we be digging deeper into China’s own history to better understand the present? What does the recent lack of ‘subtlety’ in the actions of the Chinese government say about its self-perception? And, with many major Western democracies struggling to cope with the COVID-19 crisis, how fit are their leaders to navigate this changing global order and prevent major conflict? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we’re joined by experienced former public servant, now head of The Australia Institute’s International and Security Affairs program, Allan Behm. Allan Behm is Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute, CEO of FearLess - a charity that works with people living with the consequences of post traumatic stress - and Chair of the Canberra Writers Festival board. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This time on Democracy Sausage we take a look at Southeast Asia: how the governments of the region are responding to Australia’s new defence stance, how they have responded to COVID-19, and how they are balancing the great powers of the US and China. The panel also takes a look at the outcome of the weekend’s Eden-Monaro by-election. Just as Australia is carefully calibrating its relationship with China, the countries of Southeast Asia are having to balance their role now and into the future between two great powers, and do this while battling a pandemic. So how does the region view Australia’s new defence stance, and can the countries of ASEAN walk the strategic tightrope in this era of volatility? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these issues, as well as the outcome of the Eden-Monaro by-election, are Associate Professor Bjoern Dressel, James Massola of the Sydney Morning Herald, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Associate Professor Bjoern Dressel is a Senior Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. His research focuses on issues of comparative constitutionalism, judicial politics and governance, and public sector reform. James Massola is Southeast Asia Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He has been a Walkley and Quills finalist on three occasions, won a Kennedy Award for outstanding foreign correspondent, and is the author of The Great Cave Rescue. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The success of the National Cabinet has shown politicians the value Australians place on political cooperation. But can the government use this changed landscape to tackle the policy challenges facing the country and disarm the weaponised political disagreement of the climate wars? Mark Kenny talks to Annabel Crabb of the ABC about how the country’s politics has changed as a result of the coronavirus crisis. After a sluggish response to Australia’s bushfires and a resulting brush with political mortality, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been informed by the science on COVID-19, brought state and territory leaders together with the National Cabinet, and shown Australians a different way to do politics. On this episode of Democracy Sausage Second Serve, Professor Mark Kenny talks to Annabel Crabb of the ABC about how the country and its politics have changed as a result of the crisis, and whether Morrison can turn his political capital into substantial lasting policy reform. Annabel Crabb is the ABC’s Chief Political Writer and presenter of Back in Time for Dinner, The House, and the highly acclaimed Kitchen Cabinet series. She is also a regular contributor and presenter on ABC's Insiders and The Drum. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at tackling the climate crisis as Australia is still battling the coronavirus. Mark Kenny is joined by Kieran Gilbert, Frank Jotzo, and Marija Taflaga. Australia’s attempts to tackle climate change have been a catastrophic failure of public policy. But can Labor and the Coalition park partisanship to find policies that tackle the problem without stumbling on the politics? Joining Professor Mark Kenny at the Democracy Sausage hotplate are Professor Frank Jotzo, Sky News’ Kieran Gilbert, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. The panel also look at how the upcoming US election might affect international pressure to address the climate crisis, and whether Australia has the potential to be a green energy superpower. Kieran Gilbert is Chief News Anchor for Sky News Australia where he hosts AM Agenda and First Edition. Professor Frank Jotzo is Director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at Crawford School of Public Policy and an ANU Public Policy Fellow. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Stopping the presses

Stopping the presses

2020-06-2541:54

In the decade to 2018, 106 local and regional newspapers closed in Australia. As a consequence, 21 local government areas are now without a local newspaper. On this episode Mark Kenny talks to Associate Professor Kristy Hess about the high price of losing local newspapers, and how communities are responding. From death notices to court reporting and holding councils to account, local newspapers and the journalists working for them play an essential role in serving and informing communities. But around Australia, local newspapers are in crisis – suffering a long-term decline in advertising revenue, falling sales, and battered by the impact of COVID-19. So what’s the price of losing local papers, and are there new business models that could ensure their survival? Joining Professor Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Second Serve is Associate Professor Kirsty Hess of Deakin University. Kristy Hess is an Associate Professor at Deakin University whose research focuses on local and community media. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Are you job-ready?

Are you job-ready?

2020-06-2234:25

The government is changing university funding to encourage students into ‘job-ready’ degrees and away from humanities and the social sciences. But with research showing that humanities graduates do better in terms of employment than maths or STEM graduates, is this about meeting future employment demands or something else? Joining Mark Kenny to discuss the changes are Dr Jill Sheppard and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Dr Jill Sheppard is a political scientist at the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems. Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
From white settlement of Australia and the massacres of Indigenous peoples that followed, to statues commemorating slave traders, around the world protesters are starting important new conversations on history. Joining Mark Kenny to discuss the lessons we really should be learning from the past are journalists Stan Grant and Julia Baird, and historian Professor Paul Pickering. From the blowing up of sacred Indigenous sites by a mining company, to the removal by an angry crowd of the statue of slave trader Edward Colston, around the world history is being destroyed, revisited, contested, and reassessed in real time. But is pulling statues down erasing history, or a necessary reckoning against the trauma of the past? And are the statues scattered in our cities and towns reinforcing a version of history that needs to be challenged? Joining Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Second Serve are journalist and Vice-Chancellor’s Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University Stan Grant, author and journalist Julia Baird, and Professor Paul Pickering of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Julia Baird is an author, broadcaster and journalist, currently hosting The Drum on ABC 24. Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly ABC's Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Hey, big spenders

Hey, big spenders

2020-06-1501:02:28

The coronavirus crisis has thrown the rule book out on what it means to be a better economic manager. On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at what it will take to chart an economic road to recovery with The Australia Institute’s Dr Richard Denniss. The government is keen to paint the options for economic recovery as a choice between spenders and enablers. But with both Labor and the Coalition willing to splash the cash – albeit on different policy priorities – isn’t it really a battle between big spenders? And would economic growth be better served by continuing free childcare, or by major construction projects? On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny takes a look at Australia’s economics with Dr Richard Denniss of The Australia Institute and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga. Dr Richard Denniss is Chief Economist and former Executive Director of The Australia Institute. He is a prominent Australian economist, author and public policy commentator, and former Associate Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny chats with Barbara Pocock AM and Trish Bergin about the government’s decision to roll back free childcare and the impacts of Australia’s COVID-19 policy responses on women. The Federal Government’s decision to roll back free childcare has caused much consternation in the community. Still undertaking a disproportionate amount of the unpaid caring responsibilities, what will be the impact of this decision on women? What are the economic impacts of the crisis on women? And how can Australian governments ensure their policy responses are equitable? On this week’s Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we talk to economists Barbara Pocock AM and Trish Bergin about the rolling back of free childcare and why women are bearing the brunt in Australia’s policy responses to COVID-19. Barbara Pocock AM is an Emeritus Professor in the Business School at the University of South Australia. Barbara founded and was Director of the Centre for Work and Life at the University of South Australia and has been researching work and employment in Australia for more than thirty years. Trish Bergin is Co-Director, Governance of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation at University of Canberra. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mark Kenny is joined by New Zealand experts Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment and Professor Janine Hayward to talk about the upcoming New Zealand election, and the panel discuss the global Black Lives Matter protests. On this episode we head across the Tasman to talk about New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, arguably the world’s most successful anti-Trump leader. Will her high popularity in New Zealand and overseas translate into votes at the upcoming election? And we discuss the recent Black Lives Matter protests in Australia, why Indigenous incarceration rates and deaths in custody demand urgent policy attention, and whether politicians’ criticism of protesters is tone deaf. Joining Professor Mark Kenny at the hotplate are Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment, Professor Janine Hayward, and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga. Jennifer Lees-Marshment is an Associate Professor in political science at The University of Auckland in New Zealand. Jennifer is an expert in political marketing and leadership. Professor Janine Hayward is the head of the department of politics at the University of Otago. Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Australian Government faces some big choices ahead about how to get the economy flying again. Will that include a new ‘Accord’ struck with the unions, and if so, what should be in it? The coronavirus crisis has hammered global economies, including Australia where for the first time in 30 years it has slumped into recession. But the crisis also offers opportunities to rethink the Australian economy, and there has been talk of a new ‘Accord’ between employers and unions. On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we speak to the Airport Economist, Tim Harcourt, about rebooting Australia’s economy and the future of industrial relations. Tim Harcourt is the JW Nevile Fellow in Economics at University of New South Wales Business School. His best-known book The Airport Economist is an international business bestseller and has been translated into several languages and television projects across Asia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (7)

Lis Stanger

Great podcast

Jul 30th
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Lis Stanger

Fantastic podcast

Jun 18th
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Lis Stanger

My favorite economist.

Jun 16th
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Lis Stanger

Great discussion

Apr 28th
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Lis Stanger

thanks for another great Podcast

Apr 26th
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Lis Stanger

Excellent podcast

Mar 22nd
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Nov 26th
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