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Perfect English with Danny

Author: Danny Ballan

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Learn English with Perfect English with Danny. Daily episodes that cover a wide range of topics from vocabulary to structure, speaking, writing, and listening episodes with both fiction and nonfiction listening practice. Learn English online for free.
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In this episode, we will focus on artists and some details about literature, which we can use when we want to talk about literature. Check the full transcript, the full translations of the keywords in 62 languages, and the interactive and downloadable activities in the link below:  https://www.dannyballan.com/the-arts-and-literature-artists-and-literature
This week, we will be talking about the arts and literature. We will discuss the different types of art, from literature to fine arts and performing arts, we will learn about artists and some details about literature. In this episode, we will focus on the different types of art, literature, fine arts and performing arts. Click on the link below to get the full transcript, full translations of the keywords and interactive and downloadable activities:  https://www.dannyballan.com/the-arts-and-literature-the-arts
In this episode, we will talk about the top ten global issues to conclude our global problems week.  You will learn about: climate change, pollution, violence, well being, lack, unemployment, corruption, malnourished, substance abuse, and terrorism. Use the link below to get the full transcript of the episode and the translations of the keywords in 62 languages. In addition to that, you will find interactive and downloadable activities in the link.  https://www.dannyballan.com/global-problems-top-ten-global-issues
This week in Perfect English with Danny Podcast, we will be talking about global problems. We will talk about natural disasters, the verbs we use with natural disasters, the people involved in disasters and finally the top ten global problems. We talked about natural disasters in episode 136 and episode 137. In this episode, we will talk about people involved in disasters. Check the full transcript of this episode and the translations of the keywords into 62 languages in the link below:  http://www.dannyballan.com/global-problems-people-involved-in-disasters
In this episode, we will continue talking about natural disasters in English, with their translations into different languages and a lot of interesting facts and information about these disasters.  Use this link if you would like to read the whole transcript of the episode and if you want to check the translations of the keywords into  62 languages.  https://www.dannyballan.com/global-problems-natural-disasters-2
This week, we will be talking about global problems. We will talk about natural disasters, the verbs we use with natural disasters, the people involved in disasters and finally the top ten global problems.  In this episode, we will start talking about natural disasters, we will translate the keywords into many different languages.  Click on this link to see the translations into 62 languages and to see the episode transcript.  https://www.dannyballan.com/global-problems-natural-disasters-1  
We are learning words we can use to describe personality this week. Today, we are going to learn: generous innocent ambitious assertive In the episode, you will learn about these four words and more with Danny, Joe, and Ben. The words will also be translated into French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic in the episode, and into 62 languages you can find in the description below.  For a better format and to find the full transcript of the episode, use this link:  http://perfectenglishwithdanny.com/episode-135-vocabulary-builder-describing-personality-1-5 It is the end of the week, so it is time to practice what you have learned, click this link to access interactive activities and a downloadable PDF with activities on the 20 words covered in this week's episodes:  https://www.dannyballan.com/describing-personality Episode Transcript Danny: Welcome to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. Today, we will continue with our theme of the week, describing personality. We will have four new adjectives to learn today. The adjectives are generous, innocent, ambitious, and assertive. We have our friends Joe and Ben to help us out with the words and the translations into 5 languages.   Let me remind you that you can find the translations for these four adjectives in 62 different languages in the description of the episode, and also don’t forget that today is the end of the week, so you will have a link that will take you to a webpage with interactive and downloadable activities you can use to practice the 20 words of this week, retain them and add them to your active vocabulary bank. Let’s get to it. So, Joe, how well do you know today’s words? Joe: I’m familiar with all the words we have today. Danny: That’s great! So, let’s start right away with our first word, generous. It is spelled … generous. I will leave to you Joe to tell me what generous means. Joe: All right. You see, this word is not only related to people who give money to other people. It is a lot more than that. It is true that a generous person gives more of something, especially money than is usual or expected, but a generous person is also friendly, helpful, and willing to see the good qualities in someone or something. You know generous people are givers, they give without expecting anything in return. It is the act of giving that makes them happy. Danny: So generous people are not only those who give money to other people. Anything you give, especially when you give away something you might need; this could be your money, your time, your thoughts, etc. If you just do this to help, you are a generous person. Joe: Yeah. That’s right, Danny. Thank you. I couldn’t have put it better myself. Danny: Thank you. Joe: So, we can safely say that generous is always considered a positive word, right? Danny: That’s right, but sometimes, people confuse generous with a person who spends too much money. If you spend too much money, more than you can afford, you are not generous by any means. If you keep throwing fancy parties, invite so many people, and spend a fortune on fancy gifts you give to your friends and family, especially if you are not that rich, we cannot say you are generous. Joe: I agree. This is not generous by any means, but what do we call a person who does that? Danny: We call him or her extravagant, which is a negative word, of course. Joe: So generous is a positive word, extravagant is a negative word, but they don’t have the same meaning. Danny: No, but I have just put them side by side because people sometimes call an extravagant person generous, which is wrong. Now let’s move to Ben and find out about the translations of generous in French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic. Ben: So, we have generous as our first word for today. In French, it is généreux or généreuse In Spanish, it is generoso In Italian, it is generoso In Portuguese, it is generoso And in Arabic, it is كريم Danny: Thank you, Ben. Now, let’s move to our second word for today, innocent. It is spelled… innocent. Joe: You know what, I do understand what innocent means, but how does it relate to our theme for this week. I mean innocent is like when a person is charged with a crime, but it turns out that this person did not do it, so he or she is innocent. It is the opposite of guilty, but this is not a character trait. How does it relate to describing personality? Danny: That’s a very good question because what you said about innocent is true. We use it in the context you mentioned, but we can use it as a character trait as well, an adjective we use to describe personality without having anything to do with crimes or the law. Joe: Oh really! So… Danny: If someone is innocent, they have no experience or knowledge of the more complex or unpleasant aspects of life. Just like children, for example, we say children are innocent. We do not say that to mean that they did not commit a certain crime, we say that to mean that they are still looking at life without the complexity and corruption filters that we add when we become adults. Joe: But I think people use that to describe a person as stupid or something. Danny: Not really. I mean some people might laugh at innocent people and think they are stupid, but that is again their own point of view, which I personally disagree with, but back to our word, innocent, it does not have to do with being stupid. However, there is another word that is used in a negative way that has a close meaning to innocent. Joe: What’s that? Danny: It’s naïve. If you describe someone as naive, you think they lack experience and so expect things to be easy or people to be honest or kind. And you hear it all the time when people say, don’t be naïve. Joe: So, innocent is a positive adjective to use, but naïve is a negative one. Danny: You see, it’s not exactly negative, but we use it in a negative way. Sometimes, I wish we, humans were all naïve and even stupid. We would love each other more and stop killing each other. Joe: Ain’t that the truth? But come on, don’t get so dramatic now. Let’s check the translations of this word with Ben. Danny: That’s right. Ben, what do you have for us? Ben: Well, so the word is innocent. In French, it is innocent In Spanish, it is inocente In Italian, it is innocente In Portuguese, it is inocente And in Arabic, it is بريء Danny: Thank you, Ben. Now, let’s move to our third word for today, and that is ambitious. Are you ambitious, Joe? Joe: Well, not really. I don’t care if I create the next big thing, or if I save the world, or if I become the most famous person at something. I just want to do what I love and enjoy my life. I cannot say I am ambitious, but I think you are. Danny: That’s right. I am ambitious. So, someone who is ambitious has a strong desire to be successful, rich, or powerful. An ambitious person wants to achieve more than other people. Joe: But sometimes this can go wrong. Danny: That’s right. If you become obsessed with getting more powerful, or richer, for example, you might be willing to do immoral things to get there, and you justify every bad thing you do along the way because you think that is ambition, but it is not. Ambitious is a positive adjective, but we have pushy for example, which is a word that shows our disapproval of a person. If you describe someone as pushy, you mean that they try in a forceful way to get things done as they would like. Joe: So again, ambitious is the positive word and pushy is the negative counterpart, right? Danny: Yeah, you can say that. So, let’s see how Ben is going to translate that for us. Ben: The word is ambitious, let me see. Well, it’s pretty much the same in all other European languages, but of course, with a different pronunciation.   In French, it is ambitieux In Spanish, it is ambicioso In Italian, it is ambizioso In Portuguese, it is ambicioso And in Arabic, it is طموح Danny: Thank you, Ben. And now for our last word for this week, assertive. It is spelled… assertive. Someone who is assertive states their needs and opinions clearly, so that people take notice. Joe: That is a sign of being self-confident, right? Danny: Absolutely, being assertive is a big sign of great self-confidence. Joe: But sometimes it can go the wrong way. People can get carried away and start giving orders all around the office without being entitled to do so. Danny: Yes, sometimes people can behave in a forceful way or they start giving orders to people around them, regardless of being entitled to give orders or not. It’s always a negative thing. We call these people aggressive or bossy, not assertive. Assertive shows our approval of a person’s character, but aggressive and bossy show our disapproval. Joe: Yeah, I know a lot of bossy people at work. All of them are managers, did you know that? I might be the only employee left in the company. All of them are managers bossing around and … maybe, I’d better keep my mouth shut if I want to keep my job. Danny: Or maybe, you should become a manager yourself. This way there will be no more poor employees in the company to take orders. Joe: You think so? Danny: I know so. Anyway, let’s check the translations of assertive with Ben and call it a day. Ben: So the last word for this week is assertive. In French, it is assuré In Spanish, it is positivo In Italian, it is assertivo In Portuguese, it is assertivo And in Arabic, it is جازم Danny: Thank you very much, Joe and Ben, for helping me out in this episode. The four words we learned today were generous, innocent, ambitious and assertive. I hope you understand them better now and you can go ahead and use them in your own conversation the way they are supposed to be used.  Don’t forget to check the other translations of our four words. In the description of the episode, you will find a link that will take you to the podcast post on my website, which has all the translations into 62 languages and the transcript of this episode. And today is the end of the week, so we have our special interactive activities, and downloadable PDF to practice all week long. Don’t skip the activities; they are the only way that will help you remember the words you have learned, retain them and add them to your active vocabulary bank. This is Danny your host saying thank you very much for listening to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. I will see you again in the next episode. Translations English generous innocent ambitious assertive French généreuse innocent ambitieux assuré Italian generoso innocente ambizioso assertivo Spanish generoso inocente ambicioso positivo German großzügig unschuldig ehrgeizig bestimmt Portuguese generoso inocente ambicioso assertivo Chinese 慷慨 无辜 有雄心 断言的 Japanese 寛容な 無実の 野心的な 断定 Korean 풍부한 순진한 거창한 독단적 인 Arabic كريم - سخي بريء طموح جازم Afrikaans ruim onskuldige ambisieuse selfgeldend albanian bujar i pafajshëm ambicioz kategorik Azerbaijani səxavətli günahsız iddialı iddialı Basque eskuzabala errugabea handinahi assertive Bengali উদার নির্দোষ উচ্চাকাঙ্ক্ষী জিদপূর্ণ Belarusian вялікадушны нявінны славалюбівы сцвярджальны Bulgarian щедър невинен амбициозен отстояващ Catalan generós innocent ambiciós afirmatiu Croatian velikodušan nevin ambiciozan deklarativan Czech štědrý nevinný ambiciózní asertivní Danish gavmild uskyldig ambitiøs selvhævdende Dutch genereus onschuldig ambitieus zelfbewust Esperanto malavara senkulpaj ambicia asertiva Estonian helde süütu edasipüüdlik veenva Filipino mapagbigay inosente ambisyoso mapamilit Finnish antelias viaton kunnianhimoinen itsevarma Galician xeneroso inocente ambicioso asertiva Georgian გულუხვი innocent ამბიციური აგრესიული Greek γενναιόδωρος αθώος φιλόδοξος κατηγορηματικός Gujarati ઉદાર નિર્દોષ મહત્વાકાંક્ષી સ્વમતાગ્રહી Haitian Creole jenere inosan anbisye pèsiste mande Hebrew נדיב תמים שאפתן אסרטיבי Hindi उदार मासूम महत्त्वाकांक्षी मुखर Hungarian nagylelkű ártatlan becsvágyó határozott Icelandic örlátur saklaus metnaðarfull assertive Indonesian murah hati tidak bersalah ambisius tegas Irish flaithiúil neamhchiontach uaillmhianach assertive Kannada ಉದಾರ ಮುಗ್ಧ ಮಹತ್ವಾಕಾಂಕ್ಷೆಯ ಪ್ರತಿಷ್ಠಾಪನೆಯ Latin liberalis innocentes ambitiose assertorium Latvian devīgs nevainīga godkārīgs neatlaidīgs Lithuanian dosnus nekaltas ambicingas užsispyręs Macedonian дарежлив невини амбициозни наметливо Malay murah hati tidak bersalah bercita-cita tinggi tegas Maltese ġenerużi innoċenti ambizzjuż assertiv Norwegian sjenerøs uskyldig ambisiøs påståelig Persian بخشنده بی گناه جاه طلب اظهار کننده Polish hojny niewinny ambitny stanowczy Romanian generos nevinovat ambiţios încrezut Russian великодушный невинный амбициозный утвердительный Serbian великодушан невин амбициозан самопоуздан Slovak štedrý nevinný ctižiadostivý asertívny Slovenian radodaren nedolžna ambiciozni samozavesten Swahili mkarimu wasio na hatia kabambe msimamo Swedish generös oskyldig ambitiös bestämd Tamil தாராள அப்பாவி மூர்க்கமான உறுதியான Telugu ఉదారంగా అమాయక ప్రతిష్టాత్మక దృఢమైన Thai ใจกว้าง ผู้บริสุทธิ์ ทะเยอทะยาน แน่วแน่ Turkish cömert masum hırslı iddialı Ukranian великодушний невинний честолюбний ствердну Urdu بے لوث معصوم بلند نظر جارحانہ Vietnamese hào phóng vô tội đầy tham vọng quả quyết Welsh hael diniwed uchelgeisiol bendant Yiddish ברייטהאַרציק ומשולדיק אַמביציעס אַסערטיוו  
This week, we will learn adjectives we can use to describe personality. We have new additions to Vocabulary Builder. We have Ben and Joe to help and we have translations into French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic within the episode and the translation into 62 more languages in the description below.  Or use this link to see the description in a better format and the full transcript of the episode: http://perfectenglishwithdanny.com/episode-134-vocabulary-builder-describing-personality-1-4 Our words for today are:  unconventional  frank broad-minded enquiring   Audio Transcript Danny Welcome to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. Today, we will continue with our theme of the week, describing personality. We will have four new adjectives to learn today. The adjectives we are going to learn today are unconventional, frank, broad-minded, and inquiring. We have our friends Joe and Ben to help us out with the words and the translations into 5 languages.   Let me remind you that you can find the translations for these four adjectives in 62 different languages in the description of the episode, and also don’t forget that at the end of the week, you will have a link that will take you to a webpage with interactive and downloadable activities you can use to practice the 20 words of this week, retain them and add them to your active vocabulary bank. So let’s get to it. So, Joe, how well do you know today’s words? Joe Well, I have to say that I am only familiar with frank, but I am not so sure about the other three. Danny Great! That means you have a few words to learn today. Let’s start with unconventional. It is spelled … unconventional. If you describe a person or their attitude or behavior as unconventional, you mean that they do not behave in the same way as most other people in their society. This is a positive adjective. Joe How is that positive? You just said that an unconventional person is a person who does strange things. Danny Not exactly. I didn’t say strange things. I said this person does things differently. We usually look at unconventional people with admiration because they are not bound by the social norms and rules and they are doing things the way they want rather than the way they are supposed to. Joe But some people hate that. So they do not look at unconventional people with any kind of admiration. Some traditional folks think unconventional people are crazy. Danny You’re right. It depends on your point of view, but usually when we say unconventional, we mean it in a positive way. So if  you want to talk about someone who is different or who behaves in a different way, you say unconventional if you think it is a positive thing, or if you like it. Joe And what if I don’t like it? Danny Well, in this case, you should use negative words that have almost the same meaning, but with a negative connotation. You can use words like eccentric, odd, peculiar or weird. Joe Ok, it all depends on what I think. Danny Of course, almost all the words we have been talking about this week depend on what you think. For example, you may think I am generous, but someone else might think I am not, or even worse; they may think I am mean. It’s all a matter of perspective.   Joe Yeah, I see. Danny So, our first word is unconventional. Ben, how would you translate that? Ben Well, our first word is unconventional In French, it is peu conventionnel In Spanish, it is poco convencional In Italian, it is anticonvenzionale In Portuguese, it is nao convencional And in Arabic it is غير تقليدي Danny Thank you, Ben. Now let’s move to our second word, frank. You said you knew this word, Joe. What does it mean to you? Joe Well, I think I am frank. I always tell the truth. I don’t care if people around will like what I say or not, but I just speak out my mind no matter what. So this is what frank means. Saying whatever comes to your mind as long as it is the truth, even if people don’t like it, or sometimes, even hate it. Danny Well, I can say you are exactly like that, but I will have to be honest, you can be blunt, sometimes, not frank. Joe Blunt? What does that mean? Danny Well, to be frank is to express things in an open and honest way. You do that, and so you are frank, most of the time. I am saying that because frank is definitely a positive character trait, but sometimes, when you say things without caring if you would hurt someone’s feelings, that is not positive, or frank. That is being blunt or abrupt. Joe I admit I do that, sometimes, but I didn’t know we cannot say frank about this. I thought frank only describes a person who tells the truth. Danny It does, but as I told you, in a positive way, it is frank, but in a negative way, the word is blunt, abrupt or brusque. So you are frank most of the time, but sometimes you can be blunt. You see what I mean. Joe Yeah. You’re right. I can be like that, and it is considered rude, isn’t it? Danny I’m afraid it is. But my friend, it doesn’t matter; this is who you are. At least, you do not lie like many other people. Sometimes the truth hurts, but better hurt by the truth than healed by a lie. Joe Now don’t turn philosophical on me now. Danny You see, blunt. Joe Yeah. You made your point. Danny So, Ben, could you help us please with the translations of frank? Ben Sure thing. The second word for today is frank. In French, it is franc, or franche Now I will have to say that I usually provide the translation of a word in either feminine or masculine. Like this word here franc is used to describe a man, and franche is used to describe a woman, but I usually pick only one, so forgive me if I exclude feminine or masculine adjectives, I don’t pick which adjective to use on purpose. Danny I don’t think that is a problem, Ben because we are not providing translations to teach the other languages. It’s just a tool to help people whose native language is one of those we translate into, so it only matters that they know which word we are talking about. In English it’s different, there is no feminine and masculine for adjectives; it’s the same adjective for both, but in other languages adjectives can be feminine, masculine, singular or plural, but not in English. Ben Yeah that’s right. So where was I? In French, frank becomes franc, or franche In Spanish, it is franco In Italian, it is franco In Portuguese, it is franco And in Arabic it is صريح Danny Thank you very much. Now, let’s move to our third word for today, broad-minded. It is spelled … broad-minded. It is usually spelled as two word joined with a dash, but sometimes you can see it joined as one word. Anyway, what does broad-minded mean? Joe, any guesses? Joe Well, I am looking at both words broad and mind. What does it mean to have a broad mind? I think it has something to do with being kind to people, to accept them the way they are, not to judge people, things like that. Danny You are very close. By the way, the way Joe thinks about new words is very important for anyone to learn. Break the words into smaller words, or even syllables, sometimes and try to figure out what these components mean together. It helps most of the time, but of course, sometimes, the meaning is different, especially with idiomatic expressions, but the way Joe thinks about new words is very useful to deepen your understanding of the language. Now back to broad-minded. What Joe said is very close. If you describe someone as broad-minded, you approve of them because they are willing to accept types of behavior which other people consider immoral. For example, we say ‘At 70 she was surprisingly broad-minded. She is always willing to accept other people’s beliefs and ideas.’ Joe But sometimes people just accept anything, even if that is against their principles, if they have any. I mean it’s good to be open-minded or broad-minded, but it is important to have your own set of values and principles. To have a kind of identity of your own, not to drift around from belief to belief. You know what I mean. Danny I agree. To be broad-minded does not mean to accept everything offered to you. You may be offered bad things, ideas, values or ways of life. You cannot accept them all. What if I tell you that I want to rob a bank, and I want you to help me because I consider you as a brother. Joe No offence, but I will say to you, ‘go to hell’ Danny You damn right will. You don’t say yes to everything just to be broad-minded. To be broad-minded, you accept people’s ideas, views, ways of life and you never judge them, but you don’t have to tolerate criminal intentions and you don’t have to embrace their beliefs, or ways of life. You just need to accept them. Joe Yeah that’s right. But what do we call people who are like that? People who just don’t have any moral compass and they may drift around anywhere people tell them to go? Do we have adjectives for that negative side of it? Danny Actually, we do. The positive side is broad-minded, but the negative counterpart is unprincipled and permissive. Joe Yeah, I like these words. Unprincipled, with no set of principles, you can do anything, and these could be very bad things. Danny That’s right. Now let’s see how broad-minded translates into our 5 different languages. Ben Broad-minded in French is large d'esprit In Spanish it is tolerante In Italian, it is di larghe vedute In Portuguese, it is di mente aberta And In Arabic, it is واسع الأفق Danny Thank you, Ben. And now for our last word for today, inquiring. Inquiring can be spelled in two ways; it can start with an -e or an -I then … inquiring. If you have an inquiring mind, you have a great interest in learning new things. Or If someone has an inquiring expression on their face, they are showing that they want to know something. Joe Let me guess. This is a positive thing, isn’t it? Danny Of course it is. Joe But how about people who want to know things that are none of their business. Is that a good thing, too? Danny No, of course it’s not, and that’s why we have other words to describe such people. Inquiring is a positive thing to be; it’s like saying that you are curious, you want to learn, you keep asking questions to understand what’s happening around you. All scientists are inquiring, for example. They have to be to become great scientists. However, some people want to learn about your personal life and your private affairs, things that you do not want to share with anybody, and they keep asking you questions about those things, which as Joe put it, is none of their business. This kind of people are not inquiring, these are called inquisitive or nosy. Joe o the positive side of it is inquiring or curious and the negative side is inquisitive and nosy. Danny  That’s right. Now let’s see how Ben is going to translate inquiring. Ben Well, inquiring in French is curieux In Spanish, it is curioso In Italian, it is curioso In Portuguese, it is curioso And in Arabic, it is فضولي Danny Thank you very much, Joe and Ben, for helping me out in this episode. The four words we learned today were unconventional, frank, broad-minded, and enquiring. I hope you understand them better now and you can go ahead and use them in your own conversation the way they are supposed to be used.  This is Danny your host saying thank you very much for listening to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. Don’t forget to check the other translations of our four words in the description of the episode, and don’t forget the interactive and downloadable activities that will be available at the end of the week. Thanks again and I will see you in the next episode.   Translations into 62 languages English unconventional frank broad-minded enquiring French peu conventionnel franc large d'esprit curieux Italian anticonvenzionale Franco di larghe vedute curioso Spanish poco convencional franco tolerante curioso German unkonventionell frank großzügig fragend Portuguese não convencional franco di mente aberta curioso Chinese 非传统的 坦率 度量大 查询 Japanese 型破り フランク 浩然 問い合わせ Korean 관습을 좇지 않는 솔직한 넓은 마음 미심쩍은 듯한 Arabic غير تقليدي صريح واسع الأفق فضولي Afrikaans onkonvensionele Frank oopkop navraag doen albanian origjinal i sinqertë gjerë me mendje kureshtar Azerbaijani qeyri-ənənəvi səmimi genişqəlbli sorğu Basque ezohikoak diren frank zabal-zabaltasuna Eskaera Bengali রীতিবিরুদ্ধ অকপট উদারচেতা জিজ্ঞাসু Belarusian нетрадыцыйны адкрыты з шырокім кругаглядам дапытлівы Bulgarian необикновен откровен широко скроен питане Catalan poc convencional Franc de ment oberta indagant Croatian nekonvencionalan Frank široko-minded upitan Czech nekonvenční upřímný liberální tázavý Danish ukonventionelle åben frisindet spørgende Dutch onconventionele openhartig ruimdenkend navraag Esperanto netradicia sinceraj larĝa distrita demanda Estonian ebatavaline avameelne salliv abivalmis Filipino hindi kinaugalian lantad malawak ang isipan nagtatanong Finnish epäsovinnainen vilpitön suvaitseva kysyvä Galician non convencional Franco tolerante curioso Georgian არა ტრადიციული frank ფართო მოაზროვნე შეკითხვით Greek πρωτότυπος ειλικρινής ανεκτικός ερευνητικός Gujarati અપરંપરાગત ફ્રેન્ક વ્યાપક દિમાગનો પૂછપરછ Haitian Creole orijinal Frank gwo-èspri bezwen pale Hebrew לא שגרתי גלוי לב רחב אופקים לעמדתו Hindi अपरंपरागत खुलकर व्यापक दिमाग जांच का Hungarian konvenciókhoz nem ragaszkodó őszinte liberális érdeklődő Icelandic óhefðbundið Frank víðsýnn spyrja Indonesian inkonvensional jujur luas pendirian bertanya Irish unconventional frank leathan-minded fiosrach Kannada ಅಸಾಂಪ್ರದಾಯಿಕ ಫ್ರಾಂಕ್ ವಿಶಾಲ ಮನಸ್ಸಿನ inquiring Latin unconventional apertus lata animo inquirentes Latvian dabisks vaļsirdīgs plaša domājošiem jautājošs Lithuanian neįprastas Frankas plataus akiračio teiraujatės Macedonian неконвенционални искрен широк ум прашалник Malay bukan konvensional terus terang berfikiran luas bertanya Maltese mhux konvenzjonali sinċier wiesgħa moħħom tistaqsi Norwegian ukonvensjonell oppriktig vidsynt spør Persian خلاف عرف صریح روشن فکر پژوهنده Polish oryginalny szczery tolerancyjny dociekliwy Romanian neconvențional sincer cu vederi largi întrebător Russian нетрадиционный откровенный с широким кругозором пытливый Serbian неконвенционалан искрен либералан упитан Slovak nekonvenčné úprimný otvorený spýtavý Slovenian nekonvencionalen frank razgledan poizvedovanje Swahili unconventional frank mpana wenye nia wakitaka kujua Swedish okonventionell frank vidsynt frågande Tamil வழக்கத்திற்கு வெளிப்படையான பரந்த எண்ணம் விசாரிக்க Telugu అసాధారణ ఫ్రాంక్ విస్తృత-minded అడిగి Thai แหกคอก ตรงไปตรงมา ใจกว้าง ที่สอบถาม Turkish alışılmadık dürüst geniş görüşlü soran Ukranian нетрадиційний відвертий з широким кругозором допитливий Urdu غیر روایتی فرینک وسیع ذہن پوچھ Vietnamese độc đáo thành thật hiểu rộng rải điều tra Welsh anghonfensiynol gonest eangfrydig holi Yiddish אַנקאַנווענשאַנאַל אָפן ברייט-מיינדאַד ינקווייערינג
This week, we will learn adjectives we can use to describe personality. We have new additions to Vocabulary Builder. We have Ben and Joe to help and we have translations into French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic within the episode and the translation into 57 more languages in the description below.  Or use this link to see the description in a better format and the full transcript of the episode: http://perfectenglishwithdanny.com/episode-133-vocabulary-builder-describign-personality-1-3 Our words for today are:  jealous determined economical confident Full Transcript Danny Welcome to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. Today, we will continue with our theme of the week, describing personality. We will have four new adjectives to learn today. The adjectives we are going to learn today are jealous, determined, economical and confident. We have our friends Joe and Ben to help us out with the words and the translations into 5 languages. Let me remind you that you can find the translations for these four adjectives in 62 different languages in the description of the episode, and also don’t forget that at the end of the week, you will have a link that will take you to a webpage with interactive and downloadable activities you can use to practice the 20 words of this week, retain them and add them to your active vocabulary bank. Now without further ado, let’s get cracking. So, what do you think of today’s adjectives, Joe? Are you familiar with them? Joe Well, I have to say that I am quite sure about jealous and confident, but I think I need to learn more about determined and economical. Danny That’s good. There’s always something new to learn, right? Joe Absolutely! Danny So let’s start with our first word for today and that is jealous. Jealous is spelled … Jealous. Now since you are familiar with the word, why don’t you give us an example from your own experience, Joe. Have you ever been jealous? Joe Well, I guess I have. It happened a while back when I had that beautiful girlfriend, Maria, oh my god, she was so beautiful. I couldn’t help myself not to get angry when people looked at her, especially men. Whenever she talked to a man, I would get crazy and that showed. I kind of felt that because she was so beautiful, everyone tried to take her away from me. I felt I should not let anyone talk to her or let her talk to anyone. I admit I was a little young and crazy back then. I failed to notice because I was jealous all the time, I was not doing anything to help our relationship grow. Danny What happened? Joe Well, after some time, she got tired of me following her around and scrutinizing every single detail of her life, so she broke up with me. I got mad back then and I thought I was right to be jealous, but now I know that I lost her because of my jealousy. If I’d had enough confidence in myself and of course in her, we might have made it together. We were a great couple. Danny I’m sorry to hear that, Joe. It must have hurt, but it’s good that you are looking back and learning something from what happened. So do you think it is always bad to be jealous? Joe Not really. To be jealous is natural, and sometimes healthy to a relationship, but not when it becomes stronger than the trust between the couple, especially when it shows lack of self-confidence in a man, like what happened with me. Danny Thank you for sharing your story, Joe. I really appreciate your openness. I believe now we have a very good idea of what jealous means. If someone is jealous, they feel angry or bitter because they think that another person is trying to take a lover or friend, or a possession, away from them. For example, Jason has several female friends and says his wife has never been jealous. But notice how jealous changes a little when we add the preposition of to it. If you are jealous of another person's possessions or qualities, you feel angry or bitter because you do not have them. So just to make sure we know the difference between jealous and jealous of, let’s ask Joe. Joe were you jealous of Maria? Joe No, not at all. I was proud of everything she did. I wanted her to be the best she could be. I was just jealous, but I think she might have thought that I was jealous of her, and to be honest. I might have given her reasons to believe so. But no I was just jealous; I was never jealous of her. Danny Well, you see there is a difference and before we move to Ben and the translations of jealous into the five languages Ben is helping us with. I would like to compare jealous of with envious, which is a synonym of jealous but while jealous can be both a positive and negative word depending on the intentions of the jealous person, envious is always negative. Joe Why? I thought envious is the same as jealous. Danny Ballan Well, it has a similar meaning of jealous of not jealous. But if you are envious of someone, you want something they have, and sometimes, you would do terrible things to get what these people have. Joe Oh, I see. So, it is more like jealous of. But don’t we say, for example, he/she is so envious without using of? Danny Yes, you can say that. That is to say that this person wants what other people have. It’s like his or her nature, which is really bad, of course. Joe I see Danny So now let’s see what Ben has for us. Hi Ben. Ben Hi guys. So, our word is jealous In French it is jaloux In Spanish it is celoso In Italian it is geloso In Portuguese it is ciumento And in Arabic it is غيور Danny Thank you, Ben. Now we will move to our second word for today, determined. It is spelled … determined. If you are determined to do something, you have made a firm decision to do it and will not let anything stop you. Joe So, this is a positive adjective. It is a good thing to be determined, is it not? Danny Of course, it is. We say, for example, the team was determined to win the match, or he was determined to finish the project by the end of the week, and so on. Actually, it’s very difficult to get anything done without a level of determination. Joe Yes, it’s like stubborn, right? Danny Well, not exactly. Determined is a positive thing to be, but stubborn is negative. You see, stubborn people are inflexible; they want to do what they want no matter what others say, and they are unwilling to change their mind no matter what. Joe But sometimes, this is a good thing, isn’t it? I mean take Steve jobs for example or Edison or any of these creative people. They were stubborn, weren’t they? Danny I would use the word determined here because Steve Jobs, Edison or all the other great people that changed life as we know it today never gave up and followed their vision, but they knew they were right, deep inside, they always had that feeling. Calling them stubborn would be a little unfair because they did change their mind when they realized some of their ideas were not working. They were not inflexible, you see. Joe All right. Now I understand. Stubborn is like determined but it is bad because stubborn people are inflexible. Danny That’s right. Now let’s see what Ben has for us. Ben So our word in English is determined. It is kind of the same in other European languages In French it is déterminé In Spanish it is decidido In Italian it is determinato In Portuguese it is determinado And in Arabic it is مصرّ Danny Thank you, Ben. Now let’s move to our third word for today economical. It is spelled … economical. Well, what do you think economical means, Joe? Joe Well, I think it is related to economics. Someone who loves or studies economics. Danny Actually, this is a common mistake when people confuse economical with economic. Economic is what you said, something related to the study or the field of economics, like economic growth, economic theory, economic development, but economical is different and remember we are talking about adjectives that describe people’s personality, so economic is not related here, but economical is a personality adjective. Someone who is economical spends money sensibly and does not want to waste it on things that are unnecessary. Joe Well, you’re talking about it as if it were a good thing. I hate it when people are like that. Danny Why are saying this? To be economical is a good thing. Joe What are you talking about? Nobody likes cheap people. Danny Oh no you’re confusing economical with stingy or mean. Joe Is there a difference? Danny Of course, there is. Economical is a positive word. It doesn’t mean that people do not spend any money. It just means that they know how to save their money for important things rather than waste their money on unimportant things. It is a useful trait in a world full of unnecessary temptations, like the one we live in today. So, don’t hate the word so much, as far as I know, you are economical, aren’t you? Joe Well. I am just careful not to spend my money on unnecessary things, and sometimes you guys waste your money on stupid things, so… Danny So, you are economical, not cheap. I remember once when I needed money, it was you who came first and offered to give me as much as I needed, right? Joe That’s nothing man. What are friends for? Danny So, you are economical, but not stingy or mean. You see what I mean? Joe Yes, I understand the difference now. So economical is positive, mean and stingy are negative. Danny That’s right. Let’s see how Ben will translate 'economical'. Ben Well, economical in French is économe In Spanish it is económico In Italian it is economico In Portuguese it is econômico And in Arabic, it is مقتصد Danny Thank you, Ben. And now for our last word for today, confident. It is spelled …. Confident. Are you a confident person, Joe? Joe I think I am. I wasn’t always like that, though. When I was younger, I had doubts about my skills and abilities. When I had an idea, I would usually keep it to myself because I was not sure if it was a good idea. And even the story I told you about at the beginning of the episode about Maria. I did not believe a woman so beautiful would love me. So yes, I was not always as confident as I am today. Danny So to be confident is just the opposite of what you said, right? Joe Yeah, sure. To be confident is to have faith in your skills and abilities, to trust yourself and to know you can do whatever you set out to do if you are determined. Danny That’s right, determined. Great example. You are right. For example, we say, She is a confident woman who is certain of her views. She trusts herself and she knows that her views are good enough to be shared and implemented by her and other people. Joe But sometimes, people go too far. Don’t get me wrong, being confident is great, but sometimes people are too confident. Danny I know what you mean. Actually, we use confident as a positive word, but when a person is too confident as you said, we say this person is self-important, arrogant or full of himself or herself, and these are not positive expressions at all. Joe Yeah, for example, my manager thinks he can make no mistakes at all. All of his ideas are great no matter what I say. He never listens actually. I would say he is so full of himself. Not confident. I am confident, but not that creature, he’s not; he’s arrogant. Danny I can see you are in love with your boss. Joe You have no idea Danny All right, so let’s hear the translations of this word from Ben. Ben So our last word for today is confident. It is sur de soi in French It is Seguro or segura in Spanish It is fiducioso in Italian It is confiante in Portuguese And It is واثق in Arabic Danny Thank you very much, Joe and Ben, for helping me out in this episode. The four words we learned today were jealous, determined, economical and confident. I hope you understand them better now and you can go ahead and use them in your own conversation the way they are supposed to be used.  This is Danny your host saying thank you very much for listening to another episode from Perfect English with Danny. Don’t forget to check the other translations of our four words in the description of the episode, and don’t forget the interactive and downloadable activities that will be available at the end of the week. Thanks again and I will see you in the next episode. Translations into 62 languages English jealous determined economical confident Spanish celoso determinado económico seguro German eifersüchtig entschlossen wirtschaftlich zuversichtlich Portuguese ciumento determinado econômico confiante Chinese 妒 决心 经济 信心 Japanese 嫉妬 決定 経済 自信を持って Korean 질투심 많은 결정된 경제적 인 자신감 Arabic غيور مصرّ مقتصد واثق Afrikaans jaloers bepaal ekonomiese vol vertroue albanian xheloz i vendosur ekonomik i sigurt Azerbaijani qısqanc müəyyən qənaətcil inamlı Basque jeloskor zehaztu ekonomikoa ziur Bengali ঈর্ষান্বিত নির্ধারিত লাভজনক সুনিশ্চিত Belarusian раўнівы пэўны эканомны упэўнены Bulgarian ревнив определя икономичен уверен Catalan gelós determinat econòmic confiat Croatian ljubomoran odlučan ekonomičan uvjeren Czech žárlivý odhodlaný ekonomický sebejistý Danish jaloux fast besluttet økonomisk selvsikker Dutch jaloers vastbesloten zuinig zelfverzekerd Esperanto ĵaluza decidita ŝparemaj memcerta Estonian kade kindlaksmääratud ökonoomne kindel Filipino nagseselos determinado matipid nagtitiwala Finnish mustasukkainen määritetty taloudellinen luottavainen Galician celoso determinado económico confiado Georgian ეჭვიანი განსაზღვრული ეკონომიკური დარწმუნებული Greek ζηλιάρης προσδιορίζεται οικονομικός βέβαιος Gujarati ઇર્ષ્યા નિર્ધારિત આર્થિક વિશ્વાસ Haitian Creole fè jalouzi detèmine ékonomi konfyans Hebrew מקנא נחושה בדעתה חסכוני בטוח Hindi ईर्ष्या निर्धारित किफ़ायती विश्वास है Hungarian irigy eltökélt gazdaságos magabiztos Icelandic öfundsjúkur ákvarðað hagkvæmt sjálfsöruggur Indonesian cemburu ditentukan ekonomis percaya diri Irish éad chinneadh eacnamaíoch muiníneach Kannada ಅಸೂಯೆ ನಿರ್ಧರಿಸಲಾಗುತ್ತದೆ ಆರ್ಥಿಕವಾಗಿ ಆತ್ಮವಿಶ್ವಾಸ Latin aemulor determinatae oeconomica audentes Latvian greizsirdīgs noteikts ekonomisks pārliecināts Lithuanian pavydus Atkaklus ekonomiškas įsitikinęs Macedonian љубоморни одлучен економичен уверени Malay cemburu telah dipilih ekonomi yakin Maltese jealous determinati ekonomiku kunfidenti Norwegian sjalu fast bestemt økonomisk Selvsikker Persian حسود مشخص مقرون به صرفه مطمئن Polish zazdrosny ustalona ekonomiczny pewni Romanian gelos determinat economic încrezător Russian ревнивый определенный экономный уверенная в себе Serbian љубоморан одлучан економичан самоуверен Slovak žiarlivý stanovené ekonomický istý Slovenian ljubosumen določi ekonomično prepričani Swahili wivu kuamua kiuchumi ujasiri Swedish svartsjuk fast besluten ekonomisk självsäker Tamil பொறாமை தீர்மானிக்கப்படுகிறது சிக்கனமான நம்பிக்கை Telugu ఈర్ష్య నిర్ణయించబడుతుంది ఆర్థిక నమ్మకంగా Thai อิจฉา แน่นอน ประหยัด มั่นใจ Turkish kıskanç belirlenen ekonomik kendine güvenen Ukranian ревнивий певний економний впевнений    
This week, we will learn adjectives we can use to describe personality. We have new additions to Vocabulary Builder. We have Ben and Joe to help and we have translations into French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic within the episode and the translation into 57 more languages in the description below.  Or use this link to see the description in a better format http://perfectenglishwithdanny.com/episode-132-vocabulary-builder-describing-personality-1-2  Our words for today are:  sociable argumentative cruel rude Translations into 62 languages English sociable argumentative cruel rude French sociable querelleur cruel grossier Italian socievole polemico crudele maleducato Spanish sociable discutidor cruel maleducado German gesellig streitlustig grausam unhöflich Portuguese sociável argumentativo cruel grosseiro Chinese 社交的 争论的 残忍 无礼 Japanese 社交的 理屈っぱい 酷いです 無礼 Korean 간친회 논쟁적인 잔인한 거친 Arabic اجتماعي جدلي قاس فظ Afrikaans gesellige argumentatiewe wrede onbeskof albanian i shoqërueshëm argumentues mizor i vrazhdë Azerbaijani ünsiyyətli argumentative qəddar nəzakətsiz Basque sociable Argudio krudela zakar Bengali মিশুক বিতর্কমূলক নিষ্ঠুর অভদ্র Belarusian камунікабельны аргументаваны жорсткі грубы Bulgarian общителен заядлив жесток груб Catalan sociable discutidor cruel groller Croatian društven polemičan okrutan nepristojan Czech společenský hašteřivý krutý hrubý Danish selskabelig argumenterende grusom uhøflig Dutch sociaal betogend wreed onbeleefd Esperanto societema argumentativo kruela malĝentila Estonian seltskondlik vaidlushimuline julm ebaviisakas Filipino palakaibigan mahilig sa pakikipagtalo malupit bastos Finnish seurallinen väittelynhaluinen julma töykeä Galician sociable argumentativo cruel rudo Georgian კომუნიკაბელური არგუმენტირებული სასტიკი უხეში Greek κοινωνικός διαλεκτικός σκληρός αγενής Gujarati મિલનસાર દલીલયુક્ત ક્રૂર અણઘડ Haitian Creole sosyabl diskisyon mechan grosye Hebrew חברותי וַכְּחָנִי אכזרי גס רוח Hindi मिलनसार विवादपूर्ण निर्दयी अशिष्ट Hungarian társaságkedvelő veszekedős kegyetlen durva Icelandic félagslyndur argumentative grimmur dónalegur Indonesian ramah argumentatif kejam kasar Irish sociable argumentative éadrócaireach drochbhéasach Kannada ಬೆರೆಯುವ ವಾದ ಮಂಡಿಸುವ ಕ್ರೂರ ಒರಟು Latin sociabile contentiosus saeva rude Latvian sociāls strīdīgs nežēlīgs rupjš Lithuanian socialus argumentuotai žiaurus grubus Macedonian друштвени аргументативна сурово груб Malay pandai bergaul bertengkar kejam kurang ajar Maltese soċjevoli argumentattiva krudili rude Norwegian sosial argumentative grusom uhøflig Persian دوستانه استدلالی ظالمانه بی ادب Polish towarzyski rzeczowy okrutny niegrzeczny Romanian sociabil argumentativ crud nepoliticos Russian общительный аргументированный жестокий грубый Serbian друштвен полемички окрутан непристојан Slovak spoločenský hašterivý krutý hrubý Slovenian družaben prepirljiva kruto Nesramno Swahili sociable mbishi kikatili jeuri Swedish sällskaplig argumenterande grym oförskämd Tamil நேசமான வாதாடும் கொடூரமான முரட்டுத்தனமாக Telugu స్నేహశీలియైన వాదనలో క్రూరమైన సభ్యత లేని Thai เป็นกันเอง ชอบเถียง โหดร้าย หยาบ Turkish hoşsohbet münakaşacı acımasız kaba Ukranian товариський аргументовану жорстокий грубий Urdu ملنسار جھگڑالو ظالمانہ اشج Vietnamese Hòa đồng tranh cãi hung ác thô lỗ Welsh cymdeithasol ddadleugar creulon anghwrtais Yiddish סאָושאַבאַל אַרגומענטאַטיווע גרויזאַם גראָב
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