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Books & Rhymes: The Podcast
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Books & Rhymes: The Podcast

Author: Sarah Ozo-Irabor

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We take you on a musical journey through the works of new and classic authors by inviting guests to pair books with songs or albums that spark the same emotional connection. Accompanying playlists of songs for each episdoe are available via link in episode description. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @BooksAndRhymes. Subscribe to our mailing list: http://eepurl.com/gr0kD5

Books & Rhymes: The Podcast is created, produced, and hosted by Sarah Ozo-Irabor



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22 Episodes
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We conclude our conversation with Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi by using Labi Siffre’s song, Something Inside So Strong to unpick the migrant narratives in her collection of short stories, Manchester Happened (published in the USA as Let’s Tell This Story Properly), we explore the ways in which Sweet Mother by Nico Mbaga contribute to conversations on the treatment of indigenous Ugandan feminism in relation to western feminism in the novel, The First Woman (published in the USA as A Girl Is A Body of Water), and we also draw explicit parallels between Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart and Makumbi’s Kintu.Listen to Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi’s curated playlist on Spotify, and Deezer. Follow @booksandrhymes on Twitter and Instagram to stay informed on the latest news on classic and contemporary books by writers of African descent. We would love it if you share your thoughts & tag us in your social media posts of this episode. The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom (Meakoom) link to her music is available on Bandcamp Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi's Bibliography:  -     Kintu-     Manchester Happened (Published as Let's Tell This Story Properly in the USA)-     The First Woman - (Published as A Girl Is a Body of Water in the USA) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What power do editors have in steering a writer’s career? What are the real value of winning literary prizes such as the Kwani! manuscript project? What challenges do African writers encounter when attempting to publish literary fiction that exclude the white gaze? Our guest Jennifer Nansubuga Mamukbi, award winning author whose novels include Kintu (pronounced ChinTu), The First Woman (published as A Girl Is A Body of Water in the USA), and the short Story collection, Manchester Happened (published as Let’s Tell This Story Properly in the USA) situate Ugandan mythology in the fictional narrative of historical and contemporary Ugandan experiences. We use the music of Miriam Makeba, Queen, Eddy Kenzo, Tracy Chapman, Krizbeatz x Teni and more to explore Makumbi’s experience of being published, the real value of winning the Kwani! manuscript project & how it defined her writing career, why writers must to invest in good editors, and we also discuss her response to that introductory essay to the USA edition of Kintu.  Listen to Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi’s curated playlist on Spotify, and Deezer. Follow @booksandrhymes on Twitter and Instagram to stay informed on the latest news on classic and contemporary books by writers of African descent. We would love it if you share your thoughts & tag us in your social media posts of this episode. The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom (Meakoom) link to her music is available on Bandcamp Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi's Bibliography:  -     Kintu-     Manchester Happened (Published as Let's Tell This Story Properly in the USA)-     The First Woman - (Published as A Girl Is a Body of Water in the USA) Books discussed and referenced in this episode:  -     Like A Mule Bringing Ice Cream to The Sun – Sarah Ladipo Manyika-     The Famished Road – Ben Okri-     God's Bits of Wood - Sembene Ousmane-     Lives of Great Men - Chike Frankie Edozien  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is psychogeography? How does architecture affect our emotional, mental, and psychological wellbeing? Caleb Femi, a poet, educator, and multidisciplinary artist whose debut collection of poetry, Poor, celebrate and interrogate youth culture and masculinity, while the articulating the complex lived experiences of working class migrant communities in the UK join us in conversation. We use the music of Burna Boy, J-Hus, Wizkid, Giggs, Sunny Ade, and more to explore the problematic relationship between architecture and social stratification, the importance of finding and reading resonant poetry, the conversational between poetry and photography, and the philosophy that undergirds his work.**win signed copies** of Caleb Femi's debut collection of poetry, Poor, by subscribing to our mailing list here --> http://eepurl.com/gr0kD5. The winner will be selected from our list of subscribers and announced on Monday 16th of November. Listen to Caleb Femi’s curated playlist on Spotify, and Deezer. For more information on Caleb Femi’s work, follow him on twitter and Instagram. I am pleased to announce an international giveaway of two signed copies of Caleb Femi’s collection of poetry, Poor, in collaboration with Ed Public Relations. The giveaway ends on Monday 16th of November. For a chance to win one signed copy of the book, simply subscribe to the mailing list via link in the episode description. The winner will be seleted from our list of subscribers. For a chance to win the second signed copy, follow us on Twitter and Instagram @booksandrhymes, entry details will be posted. The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom (Meakoom) link to her music is available on BandcampBooks discussed and referenced in this episode:  -     Citizen – Claudia Rankine-     Salt – Nayyirah Waheed-     The Light Song of Light – Kei Miller  -     Teaching My Mother How To Give Birth – Warsane Shire-     Surge – Jay Bernard-     The Perseverance – Raymond Antrobus-     My Darling From the Lions – Rachel Long-     Some Bright Elegance– Kayo Chingonyi See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What do writers mean when they say they are ‘possessed’ by a character or a story? How much intuitive freedom does MFA courses offer writers, and hwat is it like to discover and translate a 3000 year old Hieroglyphic Egyptian love story? We discuss these and more with writer and researcher, Ayesha Harruna Attah, author of four books including the recently published novel, The Deep Blue Between -- a multi-directional migration story of a displaced set of twins in 1800s Ghana, and its predecessor, The Hundred Wells of Salaga.We use the music of Mayra Andrade, Les Nubian, Sampa The Great, Nina Simone, Salif Keita and so much more to discuss Ayesha Harruna Attah’s experience of being mentored by, and working closely with the literary giant, Ayi Kwei Armah, her experience of being published in Continental Africa and Europe, and other topics. For more information of Ayesha Harruna Attah’s work, visit AyeshaAttah.com.Listen to Ayesha’s curated playlist on Spotify, Deezer and YouTubeContinue the conversation by posting your thoughts on this episode on Twitter and Instagram by tagging us #BooksAndRhymesAyesha Harruna Attah’s bibliography -     Saturday Shadows (Per Ankh Publisher)-     Harmattan rain-     The Hundred Wells of Salaga-     The Deep Blue betweenBooks published as part of project that translates Hieroglyphics to multiple African languages:-     Sanhat-     Smi n skhty pn: Multilingual Translation of a 4000 year old African Love Story (also known as The eloquent peasant) translated by Ayi Kwei Armah, Ayeesha Harruna Attah et al.-     Skhmkht Ea: On Love Sublime- A Multilingual Translation of an African Love Poem.-     The instructions of PtahhotepBooks discussed and referenced in this episode:  -     One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez-     Daughters of Africa – Margaret Busby-     New Daughters of Africa – Margaret Busby-     The Eloquence of the Scribes: A memoir on the sources and resources of African Literature - Ayi Kwei Armah-     Two Sisters – Ama Ata Aidoo-     Woman who runs with the wolves: Myth and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype – Clarissa Pinkola Estes-     Bird by Bird – Anne... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
We explore why romance genre is generally disregarded or overlooked by literary critics, the privileges of being published by a small independent press, and so much more with Sareeta Domingo, an accomplished author whose third novel, If I Don’t Have You, a love story between a Black British journalist and an Afro-Brazilian film-maker is published as part Jacaranda Books and Arts #Twentyin2020 project. We use the music of ESKA, Prince, Erykah Badu, Neneh Cherry and more to discuss her non-traditional route to publishing, crafting & writing romance stories as an act of resistance, writing ambitious Black women with care, Sareeta Domingo also share her experience for writers who are weighing the option of either the wish to be published by a small independent or an establishment publishing house. For more information of Sareeta’s work, visit Sareetadomingo.comListen Sareeta Domingo’s specially curated playlist for Books & Rhymes: The Podcast on Spotify and Deezer. Continue the conversation by posting your thoughts on this episode on Twitter and Instagram by tagging us @BooksAndRhymesTitles Authored or Edited by Sareeta Domingo -      If I don’t Have you-      Who’s Loving You-      The Nearness of you-      Love, Secret Santa Titles (and Poem) Referenced in the discussion: -      The Ballad of J. Alfred Prufrock (a poem) – T. S. Elliott-      The outsiders - SE Hinton-      Beloved - Toni Morrison-      Little fires everywhere – Celeste Ng-      The sky is everywhere --      Ordinary people – Diana Evans-      My Sister The Serial Killer – Oyinkan Braithwaite-      Stay with me – Ayobami Adebayo-      Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives – Lola Shoneyin-      Behold The Dreamers – Mbolo Mbue-      The Terrible - Yrsa Daley Ward-      Simone is Still Single – Lisa Bent-      Bad Love – Maame Blue Recommended Romance authors: -      Alyssa Cole-      Talia Hibbert Songs Referenced in the discussion: -      Gatekeeper – ESKA-      The Ballad of Dorothy Parker – Prince-      Love Has fallen on Me – Chaka Khan-      The Nearness of You – Ella Fitgerald-      If I Don’t Have You – Gregory Isaac-      If I Don’t Have You (cover)– Sareeta Domingo-      Who’s Loving You – Jackson 5-      Orange Moon – Erykah... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Do writers of African descent have the freedom to write whimsical and quirky stories? How can readers support the works of under-discussed writers during COVID-19 global pandemic? We discuss these topics and more with Tola Rotimi Abraham, whose debut novel, Black Sunday (a coming of age novel set in Lagos, Nigeria, which tells the story of a fractured family coming to terms with an unexpected loss) has been shortlisted for the 2020 Kirkus Prize for Fiction. We use the music of Adekunle Gold, Teni The Entertainer, Shoma Madjozi and more to discuss consent in hyper-patriarchal societies, the inevitable emotional weight of (re)writing and editing traumatic scenes, & linguistic misnomers in the depiction of localised customs in literature published in the West. Listen Tola Abraham’s specially curated playlist Spotify, Deezer and YouTube. Listen to a playlist if sings curated by Tola Rotimi Abraham on Spotify, Deezer and YouTube.Continue the conversation by posting your thoughts on this episode on Twitter and Instagram by tagging us #BooksAndRhymes The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom (Meakoom) link to her music is available on Bandcamp Purchase Tola Rotimi Abraham’s unforgettable novel Black Sunday online and in your local bookstore. Authors & Books referenced: -     We Need New Names - Noviolet Bulawayo-     Helen Oyeyemi-     Tade Thompson-     Nnedi Okorafor-     The Vanishing Half - Brit Bennett Songs Referenced: -     John Cena – Sho Madjozi-     Surrender – Natalie Taylor-     Ire – Adekunle Gold.-     Teni – Uyo Meyo-     Brown Skin Girl - Beyonce See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is Bookstagram and how is it shaping readers' engagement with books? What are the strategies for maintaining a healthy reading habit amidst COVID-19 pandemic? Is the term ‘African literature’ a form of self othering? We discuss these and more in today's episode with Muthoni Muiruri, a Kenyan researcher and literary activist. Muthoni is the founder SomaNami.co.ke, a blog where she promotes and reviews books by Continental and diaspora African writers. She is the co-founder of The African Review, and the recently launched Things Fall Together vodcast that explores the intersection between literature, life, culture and community. She hosts Bookish Pipo Book Club a monthly in-person book club based in Kenya. Follow Muthoni on Twitter and Instagram Listen to playlist of the songs referenced in this episode on Spotify, Deezer and YouTube Tweet your thoughts on this episode by tagging us @BooksAndRhymesTag @booksandrhymes on Instagram Books referenced: -      Americanah - Chimamanda N Adichie RThings Fall Apart-      No Longer At Ease – Chinua Achebe-      Arrow of God – Chinua Achebe-      The Concubine - Elechi Amadi-      Efuru - Flora Nwapa-      The DragonFly – Yvonne Adhianbo-      We Need New Names – NoViolet Bulawaiyo-      What it Means When A man Falls from The Sky – Lesley Nneka Arimah-      The Secret Lives of baba Segi’s Wives – Lola Shoneyin-      Girl, Woman, Other - Bernardine Evaristo-      Kintu – Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi-      The Havoc of Choice – Wanjiru KoinangeSongs Refernced: -      Therapy – India.Arie-      All Night - Beyoncé-      Extravaganza – Sauti Sol-      Read All About It – Emeli Sande-      Africa – Yemi Alade ft. Sauti Sol-      Emotional Rollercoaster – Vivian Green-      What Now– Rihanna-      Brown... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Ebissé Wakjira Rouw, co-founder of the Dutch multimedia powerhouse, Dipsaus (Dipsaus.org) joins us in conversation by using the music of Luther Vandross, Nas, Lil Wayne, City Girls and Mahmoud Ahmed to discuss publishing while Black in the Netherlands and Europe, navigating work-life balance in light of COVID-19, translating writings by Continental and Diaspora African writers and more.We also discuss recent and forthcoming Dipsaus publications such as: the Dutch translation of Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider, Afro-Lit – Moderne Literatuur Uit De Afrikaanse Diaspora, and DeGoede Immigrant (the Dutch iteration of the ground-breaking anthology, The Good Immigrant).The playlist of songs referenced in this episdoe is available on Spotify and DeezerKeep up to date with Ebissé by visiting dipsaus.org. Follow Ebissé @DipsausPodcast on Twitter and Instagram:Get in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.com Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @BooksAndRhymes. The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled Reset Meakoom follow them on BandcampBooks referenced in this episode: -     A Strangers Pose - Enmanuel Iduma -    De Goede Immigrant – Edited by Dipsaus-     Sister Outsider – Audre Lorde-     Afro-Lit – Moderne Literatuur Uit De Afrikaanse Diaspora – Edited by Dalilla Hermans and Ebissé Wakjira Rouw-      Hallo Witte Mensen - Anousha Nzume-      Fikir esle Meqabir - Hadis AlemayehuSongs referenced this episode: -      Never too much - Luhter Vandross is our jam where Noush put a ring-      Stuntin like ma daddy - Birdman, Lil Wayne,-     If I ruled the World - NAS, Lauryn Hill-     Where the bag at - City Girls.-     Tizita – Mahmoud AhmedPodcast referenced in this episode:-      See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Ever wondered what goes on in the judging panels of literary prizes? We speak to Ebissé Wakjira Rouw, an Ethiopian-Dutch literary editor, publisher, co-founder of Dipsaus – a multi-media organisation that specialises in amplifying the voices and lived experiences of Black and People of Colour in the Netherlands. Ebissé was also a judge for the 2020 AKO Caine Prize for African Writing.In the first of our two-part conversation, we use the music of Destiny’s Child, Luniz & Jodeci to discuss the position that literary prizes occupy within the African landscape, and the process of judging the 2020 Caine Prize for Africa Writing. Ebissé also answers listeners questions submitted via our social media handles. Tune in next week for Part Two of our conversation when we discuss in detail, Black Lives Matter & publishing while Black in the Netherlands and Europe.Keep up to date with Ebissé by visiting dipsaus.org. Follow DipsausPodcast on Twitter: Twitter.com/DipsausPodcast and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dipsauspodcastGet in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow us on Instagram and Twitter: @BooksAndRhymes. Tweet your thoughts by using #BooksAndRhymes.Listen to playlist of the songs referenced in this episode on Spotify and DeezerThe song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom (Meakoom) the song is available for purchase on Bandcamp See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
We conclude our one-to-one conversation with the shortlisted writers for the 2020 AKO Caine Prize for African Writing. Today’s guest is Jowhor Ile, a Nigerian writer, author of the novel And After Many Days and visiting professor at West Virginia university whose story, Fisherman Stew is vying for the £10,000 prize.We use the music of Fela Kuti, Sade, Lauryn Hill, Nina Simone, Onyeka Owenu, Cardinal Rex Lawson and more as selected by Jowhor to discuss food as an expression of love in his story Fisherman's Stew - an intimate otherworldly love story. We also explore the process of conveying intimacy in writing, reflecting older women in romantic relationships and Jowhor’s writing habit.Listen to the playlist of the songs referenced in this episode Spotify, Deezer and YouTubeThe winner of the AKO Caine Prize will be announced online. Read the 2020 AKO Caine Prize shortlisted stories here.Get in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow us on Instagram and Twitter: @BooksAndRhymesTweet your thoughts by using the hashtag #BooksAndRhymesThe song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom the song is available for purchase on BandcampListen to Rémy Ngamije's playlist to Fisherman on Brittle Paper Books referenced in this episode: Arrow of God – Chinua Achebe And After Many Days - Jowhor Ile What It Means When A Man Fall From the Sky – Lesley Nneka Arimah Quintessentially Efik Recepies: Foods of Nigeria-- Nky Iweka Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds-- Yemisi Aribisala  Songs referenced this episode: Berebote - Cardinal Jim Rex Lawson Nothing Even Matters - Lauryn Hill ft D’Angelo Iyogogo - Onyeka Onwenu Look before you Cross - Evi-Edna Ogholi Miles Runs the Voodoo Down - Miles Davis Nights - Frank Ocean Sade - The Sweetest Taboo Trouble Sleep Yanga go Wake Am - Fela Kuti (song) Lilac Wine - Nina Simone Listen to the full playlist on:Spotify, See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Neighbourhood Watch is a narrative of five disenfranchised people on their quest for survival on the margins of society. We use the music of Hugh Masekela, Salif Keita, Yemi Alade, Lady Smith Black Mambazo - as selected by Rémy to unpack the intricacies of the story. We address poor representations of female characters in fiction written by men, while Rémy opens up about the triumphs and challenges of spearheading DoekLitMag.com, a literary journal expanding the reach of Namibian literature.We continue our special one-to-one interview with the shortlisted writers for the AKO Caine Prize for African Writing with Remy Ngamije, a Rwandan born, Namibian writer, editor and photographer whose story, The Neighbourhood Watch is vying for the £10,000 prize.Listen to Remy's playlist on Deezer, Spotify and YouTubeGet in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow us on Instagram and Twitter: @BooksAndRhymesShare your thoughts on this episode using #BooksAndRhymesThe song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom the song is available on BandcampBooks referenced in this episode:The Silver Sword by Ian SerraillierAfrican Book of Short Story Writing – edited by Helon HabilaLittle Family – by Ishmael BeahLiterary Journals Referenced:Doek Lit Mag, Lolwe, Bakwa Magazine, Brittle Paper, Johannesburg Review of Books, Songs referenced this episode:Tomorrow – Salif KeitaSound Check - The MuffinzStimela – Hugh MasekelaMbube - Ladysmith Black MambazoAfrica – Salif KeitaAfrica – Yemy Alade ft. Sauti SolMake The Road by Walking - The Menahan Street Band See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
AKO Caine Prize for African Writing shortlisted writer, Erica Sugo Anyadike, the Tanzanian multi-hyphenated creative powerhouse discuss her subversive story, How To Marry an African President.We use selected music curated by Erica to unpack among other things, depictions of female partners of powerful men, Black women with care, and writing against the singular African narrative. We discuss the process of writing the How To Marry An African President, and what it means to truly demystify the process of writing. Read the shortlisted AKO Caine Prize stories including How To Marry and African President online at CainePrize.comListen to playlist of songs exclusively curated by Erica Sugo Anyadike for Books & Rhymes here The winner of the 2020 AKO Caine Prize for African Writing will be announced on Monday 27th of July, the announcement will be accompanied by the screening of a specially commissioned film by renowned filmmaker Joseph Adesunloye. The song you heard in the intro and outro of this podcast is titled: Reset by Meakoom the song is available on Bandcamp: https://meakoom.bandcamp.com/track/reset-books-rhymes-podcast-theme-songGet in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow @BooksAndRhymes on Instagram and Twitter Share your thoughts on this episode using #BooksAndRhymes   Books referenced in this episode: (Available for purchase online and in bookshops)In Live and Trouble – Alice Walker Songs referenced this episode:Suzanna - Sauti SolControl - Janet JacksonDon’t Let Me Be Misunderstood – Nina SimoneTyrone: Live - Erykah BaduIf I Were A Boy – Beyoncé See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the concluding conversation on his memoir, Lives of Great Men, Chike Frankie Edozien offers greater depth into his career as a journalist in the United States of America (USA). We use a specially curated soundtrack as a musical backdrop to discuss Edozien's experience as one of few African Journalists who covered the highly publicised case against the New York police department for the racial profiling and murder of Guinean student, Amadou Diallo. Edozien elaborates on the importance of professional bodies such as the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) in propelling the careers of aspiring journalists. We also discuss dealing with homophobia among family members.Subscribe to the mailing list at Booksandrhymes.comGet in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow @BooksAndRhymes on Instagram and TwitterShare your thoughts on this episode using #BooksAndRhymesListen to playlist of the songs referenced in this episode on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTube Lives of Great Men is published by: Team Angelica (UK & USA), Ouida Books (Nigeria), Jacana Books (South Africa).Books referenced in this episode: (Available for purchase online and in bookshops)The Face: Cartography of the Void - Chris AbaniWalking with Shadows - Jude DibiaShe Called Me Woman - Edited by Azeenarh Mohammed, Chitra Nagarajan and Rafeeat Aliyu Songs referenced this episode: (listen to the playlist on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTube)Lady - Fela KutiDiallo - Wyclef JeanEkwe - Onyeka OwenuSweet Mother - Prince Nico MbagaJohnny - Yemi AladeSweetest Taboo - Sade Moving on Up - M PeopleUmqombothi - Yvonne Chaka ChakaLove Child - The... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Journalist and Lambda award winning author, Chike Frankie Edozien, offers an intimate portrait of his life in his memoir, Lives of Great Men: Living and Loving as an African Gay Man. We begin the discussion with Edozien’s reaction to the attention the memoir has garnered (including winning the 2018 Lambda literary award), after which we reflect on the importance of being reviewed critically by astute readers, coming of age as same gender loving young man in Nigeria, the criminalisation of homosexuality in West Africa, and the circumstances that compelled Edozien to pursue a career in journalism.Share your thoughts on this episode using #BooksAndRhymesSubscribe to the mailing list at Booksandrhymes.comGet in touch with us via email: BooksAndRhymes@gmail.comFollow @BooksAndRhymes on https://instagram.com/booksandrhymes/ and https://twitter.com/booksandrhymes,The playlist of the songs referenced in this episode is available on Spotify and YouTube. Lives of Great Men is published by: Team Angelica (UK), Ouida Books (Nigeria), Jacana Media (South Africa). Songs referenced this episode: (listen to the playlist on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTube.): Taxi Driver (I Don’t Care) - Bobby BensonTaxi Driver (I Don’t Care) - Mandy Brown OjugbanaProud - Heather SmallWork - Masters at WorkReviews of Lives of Great Men referenced:Lives of Great Men by Chike Frankie Edozien by Diana Evans– An African exodusDiriye Osman Reviews Chike Frankie Edozien’s Triumphant Memoir in HuffPost Books referenced in this episode: (Available for purchase online and in bookshops)Sista! An Anthology of Writing by and about Same Gender Loving... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Novuyo Rosa Tshuma provides deeper context to her critically acclaimed novel, House of Stone – a sophisticated, philosophical and darkly humorous (re)telling of Zimbabwe’s history. We explore writing for a specific audience, censorship in Zimbabwean publishing landscape, weaponisation of history, the importance of documenting Gukurahundi massacre in fiction, understanding the ‘Born Free’ generation and so much more. Books mentioned in this episode (widely available for purchase online and your local bookshops). House of Hunger – Dambuzo MarecheraThese Bones Will Rise Again – Panashe ChigumadziStone Virgins – Yvonne VeraMy Sister The Serial Killer – Oyinkan BraithwaiteNervous Conditions – Tsitsi DagarembaA Thousand Years of Good Prayers – Yiyun LiA Strangers Pose – Emmanuel Iduma Songs referenced this episode (listen to the playlist on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTube): Zimbabwe – Bob MarleyDanger Zone – Thomas MapfumoRhodesians Never Die – David ScobieWhat’s Love Got To Do With It – Tina TurnerAboki – Ice PrinceCoffin For Head of State – Fela KutiUmoya Wami – Lovemore MajaivanaKeep It Moving – Empire CastCries of the Motherland - CaiiroReviews: Books & Rhymes’ review on BookstagramHelon Habila’s review in The Guardian NewspaperYiyun Li’s recommendation in Vanity Fair magazine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Celebrated writer and poet, Jumoke Verrisimo, discuss the complexities of fictionalising personal pain in fiction, idealisation of mothers in Yoruba culture, the infliction of emotional traumas on loved ones as coping strategy for much deeper unarticulated psychological distress, and her debut novel, A Small Silence - a quietly disturbing coded novel that humanises historically underserved communities in fiction while inviting the reader to explore the psycho-social implication of loneliness and isolation.Read Brittle Paper's review here.  Songs referenced in the discussion: (listen to the playlist on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTube): A Beautiful Imperfection – AsaThe Way I Feel – AsaI am A Rock – Simon and GarfunkelGravity – John Meyer         Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood – Nina SimoneAin’t No Sunshine – Bill WithersArmy Arrangement – Fela KutiDisturbia – Rihanna This episode was recorded in partnership with Cassava Republic Press at Library - A members only club situated in central London. Share your thought on this episode using the hashtag #BooksandrhymesFollow @BooksAndRhymes on Instagram and Twitter,Subscribe to the mailing list at Booksandrhymes.comEmail your thoughts to BooksAndRhymes@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In celebration of its 10th anniversary launch, Sarah Ladipo Manyika takes us through the musical landscape of her novel, In Dependence, a sweeping love story spanning four decades, steeped in pan-African post colonial politics. We use the playlist curated by Sarah Ladipo Manyika to unpack the reasoning, research and writing process behind the novel, In Dependence. We explore the import of musicians such as Hugh Masekela, Nina Simone, Bob Marley, and many more in bringing literary narratives to life. Sarah Ladipo Manyika also expands on the import of Toni Morrison’s advice to writers in her acceptance speech for the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature. This episode was recorded live at Foyles flagship bookshop in Charring Cross, London, in partnership with Cassava Republic Press. Books and articles mentioned:In Dependence – Sarah Ladipo ManyikaLike A Mule Bringing Ice Cream To The Sun - Sarah Ladipo ManyikaNew Daughters of Africa - Edited by Margaret BusbyWe Need New Names – NoViolet BulawayoLagos Noir – Edited by Chris AbaniThe books are widely available for purchase online and in your local bookshops. Articles referenced: interview with Toni Morrison, On meeting Toni Morrison, and ‘On Meeting Mrs Obama’ Film referenced: Mother of George – directed by Andrew Dosunmu Songs referenced this episode (listen to the extended playlist on Spotify and YouTube):Market Place – High MasekelaWaiting in Vain – Bob MarleyReinfiltrator – FalanaStart Again – FalanaHear Me Lord – Oliver Tuku MtukudziShe’s a Bad Mama Jama – Carl CarltonAmen/ This Little Light of Mine – Etta James See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A special live episode recording with the shortlisted writers for the Caine Prize for African Writing, 2019: Lesley Nneka Arimah (Nigeria)‘Skinned’, Meron Hadero (Ethiopia) ‘The Wall’,  Cherrie Kandie (Kenya) for ‘Sew My Mouth’ Ngwah-Mbo Nana Nkweti (Cameroon) for ‘It Takes A Village Some Say’, and Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor (Nigeria) for ‘All Our Lives’; in partnership with the Caine Prize.The stories can be read in written and audio formats here: http://caineprize.com/the-shortlist-2019Tweet your thought on this episode using the hashtag #Booksandrhymes, follow @booksandrhymes on twitter and instagramA playlist of the songs featured in this episode including a specially curated soundtrack to each story is available on Spotify and YouTubeI’m so thankful for your positive feedback on previous episodes of the podcast. Subscribe to the mailing list at booksandrhymes.com.Do me a favour and subscribe, rate, and review Books & Rhymes on iTunes and your favourite podcast listening platforms.Tell your friends about the podcast and continue the conversation by following @booksAndRhymes on twitter, and instagramThe song you heard at the intro and outro is titled Dismembered by Meakoom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week’s guest is Oyinkan Braithwaite, author of My Sister The Serial Killer, the critically acclaimed debut novel recently shortlisted for the 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction. We discuss her strategies for coping with criticisms, the importance of being grounded in faith, and the eccentricities of Nigerian humour which underpins the novel.In the second half, Oyinkan takes us on a musical journey through several books including Jane Eyre, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, and why she cried uncontrollably after reading A voice in the Wind by Francine Rivers.An extended playlist of Saraiya Bah’s musical pairings is available on Spotify and YouTubeSubscribe to the mailing list at booksandrhymes.com.Tune into next week’s episode with Lydia Levy Kakwera, whose piece “That Idyllic Home” was recently published in Writvism anthology titled: Unbreakable Bonds. we discuss migrant literature and the art of maintaining a consistent reading habit.Subscribe, rate, and review Books & Rhymes on iTunes and your favourite podcast listening platforms. Tweet your thought on this episode using the hashtag #Booksandrhymes, follow @booksandrhymes on twitter and instagram The song you heard at the intro and outro is titled Dismembered by Meakoom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Saraiya Bah, a British poet and cultural producer of Sierra Leonian descent situates Lauryn Hill’s work in Mariama Ba’s iconic novel, So Long a letter. Sarauya also draws connections between The Autobiograohy os Malcom X & Nas Illmatic Akbum, Erykah Badu’s music & teenagers in inner city London as depicted in Courtia Newland's YA Novel, A Society Within. Listen to Saraiya Bah's poetry and find out more about her work on her website: saraiyabah.co.uk.Liaten to an extended playlist of Saraiya musical pairings on Spotify, Deezer, and YouTubeSubscribe, rate, and review Books & Rhymes on iTunes and your favourite podcast listening platforms. Tweet your thought on this episode using the hashtag #Booksandrhymes, follow @booksandrhymes on twitter and instagram The song you heard in the intro and outro is titled Dismembered by Meakoom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (3)

Azeeza Adeowu

😍😍 Books & Rhymes!!!!! 🎶 *insert that sound you make in the beginning of every NA book podcast*

May 30th
Reply

Precious Obiabunmo

This is a lovely idea👌

May 14th
Reply

Amyn Bawa-Allah

Babes!!!! I'm finally here! to God be the glory!!!!!

May 5th
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