Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
This is a critical time for the child protection and Children’s Advocacy Center community to be allies for LGBTQ kids. Nearly two dozen states have considered anti-trans bills and some have made it difficult if not impossible for trans youth to receive gender-affirming care. In today’s One in Ten podcast, we speak with Al Killen-Harvey, president and co-founder of the Harvey Institute, about how child abuse professionals can better support LGBTQ youth and families. How can we ensure that child abuse investigations aren’t politicized? How can we identify and overcome our own biases and lack of knowledge to provide better care for these kids and their families? And how do we open our own hearts to create a welcoming and inclusive community where all kids can thrive?Topics in this episode:Origin story (1:46)How welcoming is our field for LGBTQ kids and families? (6:30)Advice for child abuse professionals (10:54)Mental health impact of anti-trans legislation (14:53)Gender-affirming care (19:49)The sense of threat and anger (27:37)Risks to trans youth (35:57)What can child abuse professionals do? (37:25)Be a life raft for kids (44:34)For more information (47:27)Links:Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW, is the president and co-founder of the Harvey InstituteHeidi Stern-Ellis, LCSWChadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital in San DiegoCAC, Children’s Advocacy CenterCPS, child protective servicesFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show
The 1998 CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study helped build public understanding of the consequences of untreated childhood trauma. All these years later, does this tool tell the complete story? In this panel discussion recorded at National Children’s Alliance’s 2022 Leadership Conference, we explore what ACEs can—and can’t—accomplish in terms of influencing public support for policies that benefit kids. How can ACE screenings be used (and misused)? And what’s next for public health messaging that matters. Join Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King and Dr. Jonathan Purtle for a panel discussion moderated by NCA CEO Teresa Huizar in our first live-to-tape episode of One in Ten. Topics in this episode: Origin stories (2:07)What’s good and bad about ACEs (5:39)Public policy messaging (14:15)ACEs and racism (22:42)Protective factors and resilience (24:58)The six messages (29:08)What we’re curious about (36:48)Audience questions (39:54)Links: Ernestine Briggs-King, Ph.D., is a clinical/community psychologist; the director of research at the Center for Child and Family Health; director of the Data and Evaluation Program at the UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress; and an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine Jonathan Purtle, Ph.D., is associate professor of public health policy and management and director of policy research at NYU’s Global Center for Implementation Science CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (1998), Vincent J. Felitti, MD, FACP; et al Previous episodes on related topics: “Reframing Childhood Adversity,” with Julie Sweetland from FrameWorks Institute (April 14, 2022); includes a link to the “Reframing” study“Greater Than the Sum—Multiple Adversities in Children’s Lives,” with Dr. Sherry Hamby (August 6, 2020; originally broadcast February 14, 2020, as “Mending the Tears of Violence”) “The ACEs Message and Its Unintended Consequences,” with Dr. Jonathan Purtle (May 20, 2021) “The Hidden Cost of Resilience,” with Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King (July 17, 2020; originally broadcast January 10, 2020) “Bonus Content: Universal Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences,” with Dr. David Finkelhor (May 21, 2020) “Beyond ACEs,” with Dr. Lisa Amaya-Jackson (December 4, 2019) “The Science of Storytelling,” with Nat Kendall-Taylor from FrameWorks Institute (June 28, 2019) Support the show
Justin Fitzsimmons, associate vice president at the National White Collar Crime Center, joins us to raise the alarm about the way in which technology companies, social media outlets, and online privacy advocates are now purposely pitting adult privacy rights against the protection and safety of children. Think end-to-end encryption is totally innocuous? What if that means that pedophiles can endlessly trade child sexual abuse images online with impunity? And how do we—as advocates for children—keep issues of child protection front and center for policy makers, for tech and social media, and ultimately for all Americans?Topics in this episode:Origin story (1:43)Trends in technology-facilitated crime (2:45)The privacy problem (6:56)Our tech-driven lives (14:22)What law enforcement needs (18:55)What parents need to know (27:17)What child abuse professionals need to do (34:23)Don’t let technology scare you (41:40)For more information (45:52)Links:Justin Fitzsimmons is associate vice president at the National White Collar Crime Center (nw3c.org), former president of the Board of Directors at National Children’s Alliance, and an expert on technology-facilitated crime.CACs: Children’s Advocacy CentersCSAM: child sexual abuse materialsICAC: Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force ProgramNew York Times articles “The Internet Is Overrun with Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong?,” “How Laws Against Child Sexual Abuse Imagery Can Make It Harder to Detect,” and “Tech Companies Detect a Surge in Online Videos of Child Sexual Abuse”NCMEC: National Center for Missing and Exploited ChildrenNDAA: National District Attorneys AssociationCommon Sense MediaThe Connected ParentHealthyChildren.orgSee also our previous episode, “Predators in Our Pockets: The New Digital Hunting Grounds”For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show
If you’ve ever worked anywhere near the criminal justice system, you know how heartbreaking it is when a case goes to trial and you have a clear disclosure and great victim testimony and really solid corroborating evidence—and the jury acquits. In a child sexual abuse case, what would make a jury hear all of that and still acquit? Tayler Jones-Cieminski and other researchers set out to explore that very question, especially one specific aspect of juror beliefs: the myth about the prevalence of false allegations. What would happen at trial if there were an increased fear of false allegations? And does gender have anything to do with it? Topics in this episode:Origin story (3:05)Disparity between evidence and verdict (7:17)Fear of false allegations (11:49)Implications for criminal justice system (24:32)Role for juror education, public education (28:33)Advice for child abuse professionals (31:30)Future research (34:41)Sharing the credit (38:40)For more information (40:35)Links:Tayler Jones-Cieminski is a doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Chicago “Jurors’ Gender and Their Fear of False Child Sexual Abuse Accusations Are Related to Their Belief in Child Victims’ Allegations.” Tayler M. Jones, Bette L. Bottoms, Kajal Sachdev, Jonathan Aniciete, and Karis Gorak (2021): Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, DOI: 10.1080/10538712.2021.1931612Bette Bottoms, Ph.D. OJJDP, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency PreventionTamara Haegerich, Ph.D.  Kari Nysse-Carris, Ph.D.“How Accurate Is Our Memory After 20 Years?” is our interview with Gail Goodman Thomas D. Lyon, Ph.D. Michael E. Lamb, Ph.D.Jonathan Golding, Ph.D. Voir dire “Child victim empathy mediates the influence of jurors’ sexual abuse experiences on child sexual abuse case judgments: Meta-analyses.” Tayler M. Jones; Bette L. Bottoms; and Margaret C. Stevenson. (2020). Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 26(3), 312–332. DOI: 10.1037/law0000231  Also available from the University of Evansville.For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show
Today’s episode is a conversation with author and survivor Stephen Mills about his recently published memoir, Chosen. For those who haven’t yet read his book, which we highly recommend, it recounts Mills’ abuse at the hands of a camp counselor over several years, and his long journey towards healing. While many institutional abuse cases involve boys, there are very, very few published accounts of male survivorship. And, if we’re to help boys who have been abused, then it’s critical for us to understand how this experience may differ from that of female survivorship. Mills’ account is deeply moving, and it challenges all of us to better protect boys in the first place, and better help them heal if they have been abused.Topics in this episode:Why we need this story (1:17)Stigma and shame (3:42)Grooming family and community (6:50)Longing for justice (17:34)Pushing institutions to change (26:17)Public policy wishes (29:45)Advice for child abuse professionals (34:39)Learn signs and tactics (41:46)For more information (47:01)Links:Stephen Mills is the coauthor with Roger Fouts of Next of Kin: My Conversations with Chimpanzees. He has advised and written for an array of public interest organizations in the fields of human rights, civil liberties, and the environment. Since 1983, he has worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council, building campaigns that have mobilized millions of people in support of environmental protection, and he serves as an ambassador for CHILD USA.StephenMillsAuthor.com includes resources for survivors, families, and everyone and information on ways to take action to prevent child sexual abuse“At a Place Where He Was Supposed to Be Safe, He Was Molested,” by Bruce Feiler, The New York Times, April 26, 2022Other memoirs mentioned: Notes on a Silencing by Lacy Crawford; Half the House: A Memoir by Richard Hoffman; and The Tricky Part: One Boy’s Fall from Trespass into Grace by Martin MoranChild Victims Act of 2019 (New York)CHILD USA has information on child protection laws across the country, including statutes of limitation reformU.S. National Blueprint to End Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents from Keep Kids SafeFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, a great time to talk about the way we message around child abuse and childhood adversities. The ways in which we’ve messaged about childhood adversity in the past may have served us very well, helping people come to terms with how important the topic is, the scope of the problem, and the lifelong impacts of it. But they may not be serving us very well now. What if, in describing the problem as enormous and making that the centerpiece of our messaging, we’re making people think that the problem is intractable and they’re powerless as an individual person to make a change? Or, in focusing on the stories of individual families in order to gain empathy for them, what we really seem to be implying to the public is that there’s no room for public policy solutions, that this is a matter for each family to solve by themselves. We talked to Julie Sweetland, senior advisor at the FrameWorks Institute, about how to reframe childhood adversity.Topics in this episode:Origin story (2:21)Common communication traps (6:15)Threat of modernity (14:28)Key recommendations (19:09)Systemic racism (32:16)Hope and resilience (35:45)Collective responsibility (39:55)Evidence-based communication (42:00)For more information (43:52)Links:Julie Sweetland, Ph.D., is a sociolinguist and senior advisor at the FrameWorks Institute.ACEs: adverse childhood experiences “Reframing Childhood Adversity: Promoting Upstream Approaches,” by Julie Sweetland, FrameWorks Institute (February 16, 2021); a presentation of the report is also available on the FrameWorks siteHarvard University Center on the Developing ChildNational Scientific Council on the Developing ChildPrevent Child Abuse AmericaSocial CurrentCDC: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionZero to ThreeAscend at the Aspen InstituteBuilding Better ChildhoodsFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show
Does America believe female sexual abusers actually exist? When we think about child sexual abuse, don’t we automatically picture in our mind a father, a stepfather, a Boy Scout leader, a male neighbor, a coach, or a priest? Our minds go there for a very good reason, and that is that 97% of convicted sexual offenders are, in fact, male. But we know that female-perpetrated child sexual abuse does exist.What are the sort of perceptions—and misperceptions—that abound around this? What are the myths that exist about female-perpetrated sexual abuse? And how do these perceptions differ depending on who the woman is? What if it’s an aunt, or female clergy, or even a teacher? Maybe, most interestingly, as you’ll hear, a teacher most of all. We know from research that the traumatic impacts of female-perpetrated abuse are real and long-lasting. Does the general public actually believe the same? And how do we address the biases around this that may prevent victims from being believed and helped? Take a listen to our interview with Dr. Caitlyn Muniz.Topics in this episode:Why research this topic (1:58)The focus on teacher/student cases (3:59)Effect of authority roles (6:21)Research findings (10:27)What the general public might think (20:00)Disclosures and reactions (24:30)Cultural biases harm victims (34:23)Advice for child abuse professionals (41:19)Future research (44:00)Share the episode (47:16)Links:Caitlyn N. Muniz, Ph.D., is assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at The University of Texas at El Paso“The Influence of Authority Role and Victim Gender on Perceptions of Female-Perpetrated Child Sexual Abuse,” Caitlyn N. Muniz, Ráchael A Powers, Child Maltreatment, July 26, 2021researchgate.net/profile/Caitlyn-MunizFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
When we think about problematic sexual behaviors in youth, we often think of a neighbor child, or someone at school. Someone acting out in the community with a child of our own. But rarely do we think about sibling sexual abuse, which we think of as somehow very rare. As you’re going to hear in this episode, it isn’t. It’s not uncommon.Some of the most difficult cases we deal with at Children's Advocacy Centers are sibling sexual abuse cases. Mom and Dad come in, horribly upset. You have one child who is the victim, and they want to support that child. But at the same time they were terribly concerned about the child who had harmed their other child. The child who had thought it up and acted it out. And trying to think about how to prevent them from winding up and suffering all the pain and indignities of the criminal justice system.What do we do in these cases that can actually be productive? How do we understand them moving forward? And how do we address the research gaps that leave us not always knowing entirely what to do?Topics in this episode:Why there's so little research on sibling sexual abuse (2:15)Key findings about the research (8:00)Poor mental health outcomes (15:26)Risk  factors in large families (23:50)What can we do to protect children? (32:13)For more information (35:36)Links:Nina Bertele is a research fellow at Charité - University Hospital Berlin (Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin)Anat Talmon, Ph.D.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
In recent years, how we look at the Olympics and elite sports has begun to change—driven by cases like that of Larry Nassar, the team doctor who for years and years got away with sexually assaulting and sexually abusing girls and young women. Marci Hamilton, the founder and CEO of CHILD USA, a think tank dedicated to child abuse and neglect, lead a case autopsy, conducted by subject-matter experts to find out how this was allowed to happen. And how can we prevent it from ever happening again? The Game Over Commission explored the toxic culture of sports, which values medals and money over athlete well-being. Hamilton joined us to discuss what the commission discovered, and what must be done to allow children and young adults to experience the joy of sports without the danger of abuse. Take a listen.Topics in this episode:The Larry Nassar case (2:28)Game Over Commission (3:44)Toxic culture in elite sports (7:27)The economics of sports and pressures on athletes (12:41)Near-zero regulation (17:44)What parents need to know (27:17)Total power, zero oversight: Team doctors (29:17)Best child protection policies? (38:55)Bankruptcy used against victims (40:44)   Links:Prof. Marci A. Hamilton at the University of Pennsylvania is the founder, CEO, and academic director of CHILD USA, a nonprofit academic think tank. She is the author of Justice Denied: What America Must Do to Protect Its Children.The biographies of those who testified before the commission are available online, including those of Larissa  Boyce and John-Michael Lander.Footage of the hearings is also available on the CHILD USA site.In January 2022, Game Over Commission released a case study on the abuse perpetrated by Larry Nassar.Bishop AccountabilityAAU – Amateur Athletic UnionIOC – International Olympic CommitteeNCAA – National Collegiate Athletic AssociationUSOC – U.S. Olympic CommitteeUSOPC – U.S. Olympic & Paralympic CommitteeListen to our earlier interview with Dr. Marci Hamilton, “Radically Vulnerable: Achieving Justice for Survivors,” Season 1, Episode 10 (September 30, 2019)For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Over the past 18 months, systemic and structural discrimination have received widespread—and, let’s face it, much-needed—media attention and public discussion. But what hasn’t had the same level of attention is interpersonal discrimination. The nasty comments. The othering. The exclusion—not at the hands of a faceless bureaucracy, but in our own communities, between individual people. Now, many of us were raised with a sort of “sticks and stones can break our bones, but words can never hurt us” sort of bravado. But what if words, and actions, about our personal appearance, race, gender, and age did create long-term harm? What if instead of simple slights that we should shrug off, these were recognized as vulnerabilities for the development of mental illness or substance abuse in young adulthood? We spoke with Yvonne Lei, a medical student at UCLA and lead researcher on a study of interpersonal discrimination and its effects on young adults. Topics in this episode:Interpersonal discrimination (1:43)Adolescents and interpersonal discrimination (6:47)The ah-ha moment (12:39)Research findings (14:33)Frequency and cumulative effect (19:24)Lasting effects (21:45)Implications for health care professionals (25:53)This is our workforce (28:10)A call to action (32:24)Links:Yvonne Lei is a medical student at David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los AngelesLei, Yvonne, et al. “Discrimination and subsequent mental health, substance use, and well-being in young adults.” Pediatrics 148.6 (2021).“Discrimination increases risk for mental health issues in young adults, UCLA-led study finds,” by Evelyn Tokuyama, UCLA Newsroom, November 7, 2021Adam B. Schickedanz, MDFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast. Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Over the past two decades, and in many cases because of statute of limitations reform, many adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse have come forward to seek justice, disclosing painful memories of traumatic events from decades before. And while, thankfully, the general public has grown in its understanding of how and why abused children might delay disclosure well into adulthood, a question that frequently comes up in legal procedures is: How accurate and reliable are memories of events long past? We speak with renowned memory researcher Gail Goodman, who’s also the director of the Center for Public Policy Research at UC-Davis.Topics in this episode:Understanding trauma and memory (1:40)Misperceptions (4:06)Encoding traumatic memories (8:01)Research on memories after 20 years (12:42)Legal implications (30:25)Public policy (35:04)Future research (37:20)Share this episode (41:04)Links:Professor Gail S. Goodman is director of the Center for Public Policy Research at the University of California, Davis.Wu Y, Goodman GS, Goldfarb D, et al. “Memory Accuracy After 20 Years for Interviews About Child Maltreatment.” Child Maltreatment. December 2021. doi:10.1177/10775595211055184Carole Peterson, Ph.D.Mitchell L. Eisen, Ph.D.Karen Saywitz, Ph.D.National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, the Children’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesDeborah Goldfarb, JD, Ph.D.Julia (Yuerui) WuKathy Pezdek, Ph.D.National Institute of JusticeNational Science FoundationFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We're all too familiar with the statistics and issues around child abuse in the U.S. But what do we really know about violence against children globally? Are there approaches other countries take that we should apply in our country? Are there successes we should emulate and pitfalls to avoid?  And what would it mean if thousands of organizations working to keep kids safe really banded together and demanded government changes to better support families and protect children? Together for Girls, National Children’s Alliance, survivor organizations, and many more are doing just that in the U.S. through the Keep Kids Safe Coalition and its blueprint for federal policy action. We're tackling all branches of government in a quest to eliminate sexual violence against children and youth. To find out how you can help, take a listen. Topics in this episode: Dr. Ligiero’s and Together for Girls’ core work (1:31) Why the U.S. lacks comprehensive data (6:24) Surprising results about boys (8:01) Successful strategies, lessons learned (12:01) Keep Kids Safe Coalition (20:50) The blueprint for national action (29:20) How you can get involved (44:13) The end of season 3; see you in January (46:51) Links: Dr. Daniela Ligiero is the executive director and chief executive officer of Together for Girls, a global partnership working to end violence against children and adolescents Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys from the CDC The U.S. National Blueprint to End Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents is from the Keep Kids Safe Coalition at keep-kids-safe.org Gender Policy Council CHILD USA November 30, 2021, article by Lizzie Johnson in The Washington Post about a coach accused of sexual abuse  For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast. Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We’re always very careful to say that poverty doesn’t cause child neglect and abuse. And we don’t want to conflate these things or have people think that we’re blaming people for being poor. Yet we do know that poverty—particularly chronic and extreme poverty—can create an environment in which neglect and child maltreatment can thrive. Given that connection, could investments in anti-poverty programs actually reduce child maltreatment?This is a key question, especially given that rates of neglect have only seen modest reductions in the U.S. over the past 40 years. And it was what Dr. Hank Puls, professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, set out to research.  Are we missing an opportunity to not only reduce poverty but also the suffering that comes from child maltreatment when we don’t invest heavily enough in these programs?Topics in this episode:A pediatrician determined to reduce child abuse (1:55)State anti-poverty programs (3:24)Costs and benefits (11:00)Advocacy, and inequities (29:01)What do child advocates need? (38:04)Share this episode with a friend (45:52)Links:Hank T. Puls, M.D., is a professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine“State Spending on Public Benefit Programs and Child Maltreatment,” Henry T. Puls, Matthew Hall, James D. Anderst, Tami Gurley, James Perrin, Paul J. Chung. Pediatrics November 2021; 148 (5): e2021050685. 10.1542/peds.2021-050685A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty, from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and MedicineFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
In today’s episode, we speak with Dr. James Herbert, senior research fellow at the Australian Center for Child Protection, the first Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) in Australia. Now, for those of us in the CAC movement or on multidisciplinary teams (MDTs), we sometimes take our work together for granted. The teamwork, the support—the conflict!—and the difficult decisions we make together to protect children. But imagine for a moment coming to that work completely fresh and as a research scientist, as Herbert did, and truly trying to unpack what makes it work.Now, we know that research has established that MDTs create better outcomes in child abuse cases. But what is that secret sauce that does make it work? How do teams make their decisions in these high-stakes cases? And what research is still needed to help us better leverage the combined knowledge and skills of the team? Most importantly, how does improving the understanding of the MDT model help us better serve abused children? Topics in this episode:Getting into child abuse research (1:33)A lack of research on multidisciplinary teams (7:20)Current research on MDT effectiveness (9:34)Barriers to service (what caregivers say vs. what CACs say) (21:35)Government funding for child advocates (27:47)Other research needs (31:24)The EU and the Barnahus model (42:47)Our next episode (45:12)Links:James Herbert, Ph.D., is a senior research fellow at the Australian Centre for Child Protection at the University of South Australia“Better together? A review of evidence for multi-disciplinary teams responding to physical and sexual child abuse,” Herbert, JL & Bromfield, L (2019), Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 228–15.Barnahus modelFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show
When we first met Dr. Jane Silovsky years ago, talking about youth with problematic sexual behaviors, it was a pervasive myth in the Children’s Advocacy Center world that CACs could not serve these kids. Somehow they weren’t our kids, somehow they weren’t deserving of help, or somehow they just weren’t ours to serve. But 25% to 30% of our cases each year involve sexually abusing or acting out on other kids. To make any difference at all in that work, we have to serve these kids. This is meaningful prevention work. In today’s conversation, we explore what’s normal sexual behavior in youth—a tough question for any parent or any colleague. How do we identify and stop problematic sexual behaviors? What treatment actually works? How do we involve families in their own healing and success? And how do we get beyond billboards and bus kiosks to doing the kind of prevention work that actually matters?Topics in this episode:What is problematic sexual behavior?What causes it?Myths about problematic sexual behaviorThe importance of caregiversDemographics & treatmentPublic policy and CAC advicePut on your oxygen mask firstAvailable resourcesLearn moreLinks:Jane Silovsky, Ph.D., is a professor of pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. She serves as the CMRI/Jean Gumerson Endowed Chair, director of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, and director of the National Center on the Sexual Behavior of YouthBarbara L. Bonner, Ph.D.20-25% of cases at CACs involve a child hurting another childDavid Finkelhor, Ph.D.Resources for parents from the National Center on the Sexual Behavior of YouthElizabeth J. Letourneau, Ph.D.Military Learning Family Network webinar series is publicly availableNCA’s resources on problematic sexual behavior in youthFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Our guest today is Dr. Maegan Rides At The Door, the director of the National Native Children’s Trauma Center at the University of Montana. Now, many of us know at least some of the historical trauma faced by Native Americans and Alaska Native families, not just the genocide of the past, but also the boarding school abuses of the very recent past.How does this impact children today? And how does racism, which is very much in the present, add to the trauma burden these children face? And how do we appreciate and recognize and leverage the incredible strengths and resiliency displayed by Native families multigenerationally? Most importantly, how do we craft culturally responsive services, not just in word and good intention, but in actuality, indeed?Topics in this episode:Child welfare needs to be culturally responsive (2:09)Historical trauma and structural racism (5:47)Cultural resiliency (11:44)Expanding the original ACEs (17:07)Recommendations (19:24)Public policy (25:32)Culture eats strategy for lunch (28:24)Advice for CACs (35:30)Share this episode! (39:05)Links:Maegan Rides At The Door, Ph.D., LCPC, is director of the National Native Children’s Trauma Center at the University of Montana College of Education. She is an enrolled member of the Assiniboine-Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and a descendant of the Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma.The NNCTC offers a number of resources on trauma.Rides At The Door, Maegan, and Ashley Trautman. 2019. “Considerations for Implementing Culturally Grounded Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Services: Recommendations for Working with American Indian/Alaska Native Populations.” Journal of Public Child Welfare 13 (3): 368–78. doi:10.1080/15548732.2019.1605014. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) original studyRYSE CenterRYSE’s expansion of the ACEs pyramid is available online.For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast. Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
When we think of military families, we rightly think of sacrifice and duty. But do we also think about resiliency, perseverance, and a sense of community? The unique sense of identity that comes with military service comes with a complex set of supports and struggles for service members. Dr. Stephen Cozza, a researcher and professor at the Uniformed Services University, joins us to explore the unique strengths and challenges of military families. What are the risks and protective factors that we should be aware of in working with military families? How does the phases of deployment and re-entry create some points of unique vulnerabilities that we need to attend to? And at a time when many soldiers are returning, how can we support families?Topics in this episode:An interest in the impact of trauma on military families (1:23)Protective factors (2:52)Risk factors (8:37)Support for military families (13:48)Neglect (24:36)Current research (33:26)CAC-military partnerships (38:52)Learn more about our work (47:07)Links:Stephen J. Cozza, MD, is a retired Army psychiatrist who served as chief of the Department of Psychiatry at Walter Reed and is now a researcher and professor at the Uniformed Services University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic StressAttack on the PentagonChild development centers on military bases2019 Demographics Profile of the Military Community  60% of children in the military are under 11 years old, and 40% are 5 years old or youngerMilitary OneSourceFamily Advocacy Program (FAP)New Parent Support Program2020 U.S. Department of Defense report on FAPNCA’s CAC-military partnerships programCAC-military coverage mapFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. And visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Nearly a decade ago, a coalition of national organizations including NCA began strategizing about how to end child abuse fatalities. We passed a bill that established a congressional commission, which issued a report in 2016. Now we're looking at the successes and challenges of that work. What's changed, or not, in five years? What about state reforms? Join us with Amy Harfeld from the National Coalition to End Child Abuse Deaths and reporters Lia Russell and Caitlin Andrews.Topics:2016: The plan (1:45)Transparency (18:05)Public policy (23:56)Advice for CACs (28:00)A cluster of deaths (32:15)Another wave of reform? (48:09)Links:Amy C. Harfeld, JD, national policy advocate and senior staff attorney, Children's Advocacy Institute; coordinator, National Coalition to End Child Abuse DeathsCaitlin Andrews and Lia Russell, investigative reporters, Bangor Daily NewsWithin Our Reach: A National Strategy to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, report from the Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, March 17, 2016State and local reformsChild Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act reauthorizationChild and Family Services Improvement and Innovation ActFamily First Prevention Services ActMaine ombudsman“After a series of deaths, scrutiny starts again for Maine’s child welfare system,” Lia Russell, Bangor Daily News, June 26, 2021“Legislative watchdog to probe issues raised by Maine child welfare ombudsman,” Caitlin Andrews, Bangor Daily News, August 11, 2021Casey Family ProgramsOPEGAVisit us at NationalChildrensAlliance.org and OneInTenPodcast.orgSupport the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Are we solving the wrong problem in child welfare?  When you think of federal child welfare policy, maybe you expect a discussion of foster care and other post-abuse interventions. If so, this conversation with Jerry Milner, former head of the Children’s Bureau at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is going to blow your mind. Because after more than 40 years in child welfare, Milner's leadership of the Children’s Bureau turned a very, very different direction. He explored questions like: What would happen if we turned over our investment and focused on primary prevention instead? And are too many children separated from their parents unnecessarily through foster care? And, more importantly, what role do our own values of equity and belief in family support play not only in the lives of kids but in the life of our public policy? Milner is reimagining the child welfare system of the future. Take a listen.Topics in this episode:Origin story (1:20)Why primary prevention? (4:04)Why it's hard to change (10:38)Systemic inequities (16:44)Different forms of neglect (21:50)The consumer voice (31:54)Our new podcast website (39:28)Links:Jerry Milner, DSW, is director of the Family Integrity and Justice Works at Public Knowledge, and former head of the U.S. Children’s BureauChildren’s Advocacy Centers“$20M diverted from police training facility to mental health facility in Prince George’s,” by Brad Bell, April 19, 2021, ABC7 NewsCASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates)Family First Prevention Services ActFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And come visit our new podcast website at oneintenpodcast.org, or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Years ago, few Americans—even in the field of child abuse—knew or understood child sex trafficking. The media portrayed it as a problem “over there” someplace, far from our shores. Now we know that child sex trafficking is both a global problem and a local one, one that affects children and youth who come across our borders, and youth in schools right down the street. What makes children vulnerable to trafficking, and those who cross our borders especially vulnerable to it? How do we identify those at risk? How do we address the trauma and pain victims of trafficking have survived and carry with them? And perhaps most critically, now that we do know better, how do we do better on this issue? We talk with Dr. Jordan Greenbaum, director of Global Initiative: Child Health and Well-Being at the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children.Topics in this episode:Child sex trafficking is a local problem (1:21)Marginalization and other risk factors (4:26)What CACs can do (11:31)Unintended consequences (14:31)Barriers to referrals (16:43)Core competencies (27:01)A public health approach (29:24)Learn more about our work (37:37)Links:Jordan Greenbaum, MD, is director of the Global Initiative for Child Health and Well-Being at the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children (ICMEC) and an expert on child sex and labor trafficking.Children’s Healthcare of AtlantaFederally qualified health centersNational Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance CenterHEAL TraffickingNational Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP)Core Competencies for Human Trafficking Response in Health Care and Behavioral Health Systems (February 2021)For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store