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One in Ten

Author: National Children's Alliance

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Engaging the brightest minds working to solve one of the world's toughest challenges—child abuse. Join us for conversations with leading experts on science, law, medicine, morality, and messaging. This podcast is brought to you by National Children's Alliance, the largest network of care centers in the U.S. serving child victims of abuse. Visit us online at nationalchildrensalliance.org.
32 Episodes
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It was after midnight one night in 1983 when young police detective Brad Russ heard the knock on his front door that would transform his career. A 16-year-old girl named Kathy had run through a driving rainstorm to reach the one person in her neighborhood she thought might help her. Russ had never investigated child abuse before, and overnight he got a crash-course in the disjointed way the system handled—or didn’t handle—such cases. It launched him on a lifelong mission to improve his own community’s response to abuse and made him a champion of Children’s Advocacy Centers (CACs) and the multidisciplinary team (MDT) model.Fast forward to today, with communities across the United States confronting problems with our justice system and police-community relations. In part two of our Criminal Justice Crystal Ball Series, “What’s Past Is Prologue,” we talked with Russ about his own experience with systemic reform. What can we learn from the past? How might deep partnerships between the police, MDT members, and CACs set an example and provide a path forward in these community conversations? How can meaningful collaboration and trust form the glue that keeps it all together?Topics in this episode:The past: A siloed approach to child abuse cases (1:53)Common issues in abuse investigations (11:26)Collaboration is difficult and necessary (21:14)How to make things happen (32:20)Our next episode (42:39)Links: Brad Russ, former police chief of the Portsmouth, N.H., Police Department, is executive director of the National Criminal Justice Training Center of Fox Valley Technical CollegeAbbreviations used in this interview: CPS (child protective services); CACs (Children’s Advocacy Centers); DCYF (New Hampshire’s name for CPS, the Division of Children, Youth, and Families); MDT (multidisciplinary team); OJJDP (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention)Seacoast Mental Health CenterBureau of Justice StatisticsInternet Crimes Against Children Task Force ProgramCACs mentioned: Colorado Springs, Colo.; Dallas; Huntsville, Ala.; Rockingham County (Portsmouth), N.H.During his conversation with us, Brad Russ credited a number of people he worked with over the course of his career. Some of the names were edited out when we trimmed the interview. The full list of people mentioned: Joy Barrett, Bill Black, Ed Garone, Wendy Gladstone, Brian Killacky, Ron Laney, Sandy Matheson, Marci Morris, Bill “Mort” Mortimer, Jim Reams, and Kay Wagner.For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
In the midst of a national debate about criminal justice reform, what’s the role of the prosecutor? And how do we transform the system while still centering victims? We spoke to Nelson Bunn, executive director of the National District Attorneys Association (NDAA), about the unique role of prosecutors in leading systemic change. In a time of anxiety in the community about the relationship with law enforcement and with the criminal justice system overall, trust, accountability, and transparency are vitally important. And so are victims—we have to make sure they’re taken care of as well.This episode is the first in a three part series on criminal justice reform: Criminal Justice Crystal Ball. How might the justice system look different moving forward? Let’s find out.Topics in this episode:Prosecutors’ perspective on criminal justice reform (2:11)A shift in thinking over time (6:20)Transparency, accountability, and trust (11:25)Collaboration; the CAC model (17:09)The voice of the victim (21:05)Our next episode (23:32)Links:Nelson Bunn, is executive director of the National District Attorneys Association (NDAA)First Step Act of 2018 (and the NDAA press release about it)Commonswealth’s Attorney Nancy G. Parr is the current president of NDAAPrison Fellowship website has a video on Why Pell Grants MatterThe Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) model and multidisciplinary teams (MDTs)For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Is Abuse Contagious?

Is Abuse Contagious?

2020-10-0857:20

In “Is Abuse Contagious?” we sit down for a conversation with a guest who does fascinating work—Dyann Daley of Predict Align Prevent. As a pediatric anesthesiologist, Dr. Daley was driven by the sight of little kids fighting for their lives in the emergency room because they had been abused. She started a nonprofit that uses existing data to find neighborhoods that are hot spots for abuse—including some places where folks say, “Oh, not, that’s not a problem on this side of town.” How can a family’s environment raise the risk of abuse? And what can we do to get abuse prevention services to the neighborhoods where they’re needed the most?In this episode:Children 0-3 most at risk of dying from abuse (1:45)Environment influences behavior: A place-based approach to prevention (4:28)The Predict Align Prevent model (11:53)Office of Prevention and targeted universalism (16:50)Protecting kids to death (30:31)What the critics say (42:05)There is no evil overlord hoarding data (47:35)What can people do? (51:49)Links:Dyann Daley, MD, is a pediatric anesthesiologist and the founder and CEO of the nonprofit Predict Align Prevent (PAP)Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect FatalitiesThe Richmond, Va., report; an ethical evaluation of the PAP program; and other resources are available online at predict-align-prevent.org/resourcesGary Slutkin, MD, former head of the World Health Organization’s Intervention Development Unit, founded Cure Violence (cvg.org)Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)Nurse-Family PartnershipCasey Family ProgramsRelated episode of One in Ten: “Prediction as Prevention” with Emily Putnam-Hornstein, Ph.D., aired on August 15, 2019The Leadership Conference mentioned is our annual conferenceFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
In “Can a Pandemic Have a Silver Lining?”, we invite Dr. Danielle Roubinov of the University of California to discuss a “research manifesto” letter she and her colleagues published in JAMA Pediatrics in August. Even as a novel coronavirus has upended our world, leading to new public health and safety guidelines that are playing hob with many research projects, it is also fostering innovation. The result has, in some ways, catalyzed research into early childhood adversity.  COVID-19 has also ratcheted up the pressure on parents. Dr. Roubinov has a hopeful message for them, too: Even small positive experiences, and having a strong relationship with a caring adult, can help a child weather adversity.  In this episode: The intersection of childhood adversity and the pandemic (1:32) Why we focus on the negative (4:49) Concerns about disparities and about parents’ mental health (9:51) The absence of a negative is not always a positive (14:12) Polystrengths, and the importance of caregivers (16:48) ABC intervention: Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (27:15) An open letter to policymakers (35:35) A message for parents (37:52) Links: Danielle Roubinov, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco “How a Pandemic Could Advance the Science of Early Adversity.” JAMA Pediatrics. 2020 Jul 27. Roubinov D, Bush NR, Boyce WT. PMID: 32716499. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) “Greater Than the Sum—Multiple Adversities in Children’s Lives,” One in Ten interview with Sherry Hamby, Ph.D., originally aired on February 14 (as “Mending the Tears of Violence”). Rebroadcast on August 6, 2020 Ann S. Masten Ph.D., Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC intervention) was developed by Mary Dozier, Ph.D., at the University of Delaware For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast or email us at oneinten@nca-online.org  Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We're back from our Best of the Best series to talk with Dr. Isha Metzger, a clinical psychologist, a University of Georgia researcher, and head of The EMPOWER Lab. But her real claim to fame: she noticed that the gold-standard treatment for children delivered at CACs wasn't working for her Black clients, dug into it, and came up with a brand-new adaptation to serve Black children and families, build their trust, and see themselves reflected in the work of healing from trauma. In fact, Just as concrete barriers need to be lowered to help families engage with treatment, the messages embedded within that treatment must include racial socialization and messages that include messages of strength, joy, pride, and voice. How can CACs and clinicians ensure they're meeting the needs of Black kids and families, or of other BIPOC kids? What are white clinicians to do to ensure that the messages in treatment fit the experiences of their BIPOC clients? And what are the implications for family engagement? Topics in this episode: What is racial socialization? How social and racial messages affect treatment outcomesCulturally specific treatment strategiesHow racial adaptations for treatment models workRacial trauma and polyvictimizationThe role of celebratory experiences in treatmentRacial justiceDiversity, equity, and inclusionMental health disparityResources: "Healing Interpersonal and Racial Trauma: Integrating Racial Socialization Into Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for African American Youth"The EMPOWER Lab at the University of GeorgiaDr. Metzger's researchUGA Racial Trauma GuideCoping with Racial Trauma (infographic)Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Greater Than the Sum—Multiple Adversities in Children’s Lives (originally "Mending the Tears of Violence") is the third in a three-part series of best-of-the-best episodes. Adversity and violence are common in kid's lives. The cumulative burden creates a lifelong vulnerability to physical and psychological issues. So how do we help kids thrive? What strengths are most important? Sherry Hamby, research professor of psychology at the University of the South, discussed trauma’s cumulative impact and how teachers, parents, and advocates can help kids.Topics:Adversity and violence (2:02)Polyvictimization, dose response (7:20)Resilience, polystrengths (12:30)Symptom relief is not well-being (20:39)Important strengths (23:08)Recovering positive affect (30:14)Helping kids (35:30) Links:Sherry Hamby, Ph.D.,  Life Paths Research Center director and ResilienceCon founderACE studyDavid Finkelhor, Heather A. TurnerNational Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence “Polyvictimization: Children’s Exposure to Multiple Types of Violence, Crime, and Abuse”Juvenile Victimization QuestionnaireAnn S. Masten, Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development“Sense of Purpose—The Most Important Strength?”“From Poly-Victimization to Poly-Strengths: Understanding the Web of Violence Can Transform Research on Youth Violence and Illuminate the Path to Prevention and Resilience” “Poly-victimization, Trauma, and Resilience: Exploring Strengths That Promote Thriving After Adversity”“Health-related quality of life among adolescents as a function of victimization, other adversities, and strengths”MMPI“Developmental Stage of Onset, Poly-Victimization, and Persistence of Childhood Victimization: Impact on Adult Well-Being in a Rural Community–Based Study” Two-by-Ten James PennebakerFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We're taking a short summer break and re-airing several of our most popular episodes that are especially relevant in light of current events. This week, we'll explore how kids fare after abuse: The Hidden Cost of Resilience. Earlier this year, we spoke to Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King from Duke University School of Medicine and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network about resilience in kids who have suffered abuse, and how what we see on the surface isn't always the full story. What does the research tell us about the long-term issues that even the most resilient children may face? And what impact do racism and other forms of discrimination have on kids, both as an adverse experience itself and as it affects their recovery from trauma?Topics in this episode:What is resilience?Factors that help people be resilientAbuse disrupts social connectionsRacism, homophobia, and other compounding factorsThe hidden cost of resilienceTalking to caregiversRacism’s impacts, and the role of caregiversResourcesLinks:Ernestine Briggs-King, Ph.D., Duke University School of Medicine, and the Center for Child & Family HealthMothers Against Drunk DrivingRobert Pynoos, MD, UCLAGene Brody, Ph.D. “UGA Research Uncovers Cost of Resiliency in Kids,” by April Reese Sorrow, May 20, 2013, University of Georgia Columns.“Is Resilience Only Skin Deep? Rural African Americans' Preadolescent Socioeconomic Status-Related Risk and Competence and Age 19 Psychological Adjustment and Allostatic Load,” by Gene H. Brody Tianyi Yu, et al, July 1, 2013, Psychological Science, Vol. 24(7): 1285-1293.“Family Support Buffers the Physiological Effects of Racial Discrimination,” by Gene Brody, March 1, 2016, Association for Psychological Science Observer. “The Hidden Cost of Resilience,” by Leonora Desar, June 6, 2013, Psychology Today.Professor Ann S. Masten, University of Minnesota, author of Ordinary Magic: Resilience in DevelopmentThis New Yorker article, “How People Learn to Become Resilient,” talks about the work of Norman Garmezy and Emmy Werner.Sir Michael RutterNational Child Traumatic Stress Network For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We’re taking a short summer break and re-airing several of our most popular episodes that are especially relevant in light of current events. First up: the pandemic. When schools shut down to help slow the spread of the virus, one of the consequences was kids isolated at home, away from the teachers and other professionals who are most likely to spot the signs of abuse and take action. In 2018, more than two-thirds of reports to child abuse hotlines came from people who had contact with kids as part of their job. What’s good for public health isn’t always good for the safety of an individual child. Across the country, reports of abuse dropped dramatically. That doesn’t mean the abuse stopped. It just disappeared behind closed doors. That makes it even more crucial that people in the community, like us, speak up when we believe a child is in danger. But, far too often, we hesitate. Before we can persuade our friends and neighbors to report suspected abuse, we have to understand why they don’t. One of our very first guests on One in Ten was Wendy Walsh, of the Crimes Against Children Research Center. We spoke about The Bystander Effect—Why People Don’t Report Child Abuse. Listen again as we explore the issues and the policies and practices that could help us keep children safe. Topics in this episode: Why don’t people speak up? (3:30) Are people aware they should report suspected abuse? (7:20) At the heart of people’s concerns about reporting abuse (10:52) Negative perceptions about child protective services (13:16) The SHINE Campaign (17:20) Research priorities, and barriers to research (18:50) Universal mandatory reporting (23:50) What needs to change? (25:34) Catching kids falling through the cracks (28:08) The one takeaway (30:31) Links: Wendy A. Walsh, Ph.D., is a research assistant professor of sociology at the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire  The statistic about who reports abuse is from Child Maltreatment 2018 at acf.hhs.gov Granite State Children’s Alliance, KNOW AND TELL program SHINE Campaign on Facebook and on InstagramFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
We have two guests for you: one offering insights into research on the impact that the coronavirus pandemic is having on mental health, and the other giving us the perspective from the field. First up is Rabah Kamal, a senior policy analyst at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Before COVID-19, about one in five adults in the U.S. reported being worried, anxious, or depressed on a regular basis. Among teenagers, about 12% reported anxiety or depression. And that was before a global pandemic hit. What impact is the pandemic having on mental health? What factors raise the risk of problems? What helps? Then you’ll hear from Carole Campbell Swiecicki at Dee Norton Child Advocacy Center (CAC) in South Carolina about the mental health impact of the pandemic on her CAC’s clients, her staff, and the CAC’s multidisciplinary team partners.Topics in this episode:Prevalence of mental health issues in the U.S. (1:52)Impact of COVID-19 on mental health (4:29)Innovation and the future (26:45)Health care workers and first responders (36:48)What families are facing (40:36)Essential vs. non-essential workers (44:19)Impact on kids, and how we can help them (49:27)Going back to work (1:01:15)Links:Rabah Kamal is a senior policy analyst at the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) which is not related to any health insurance organizationsKFF’s “The Implications of COVID-19 for Mental Health and Substance Use”The National Survey of Children’s HealthBowling Alone by Robert D. PutnamWorld Health OrganizationCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Coping with StressCarole Campbell Swiecicki, Ph.D., is executive director of Dee Norton Child Advocacy Center and a clinical assistant professor at the Medical University of South CarolinaMaslow’s hierarchy of needsVideo diaries appeared in a CBS News story in May 2020National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: COVID-19 Behavioral Health Resources; Mental Health and Coping links for individuals; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) COVID-19 resourcesOur own COVID-19 resource page is publicly availableFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Before anyone had ever heard of COVID-19, professors at Central Michigan University and Montclair State University were examining whether forensic interviewers could use telehealth technology to connect with children in remote or rural service areas in cases where child abuse was suspected. It was interesting research but not particularly urgent, because whatever their findings, most forensic interviews would still be conducted face-to-face. Then the pandemic hit.Forensic interviews are conducted by specially trained individuals who must talk to children about abuse allegations in ways that are unbiased, fact-finding, legally sound, and not traumatizing. With communities across the country shutting down, we needed to know: Are teleforensic interviews as accurate and effective as face-to-face interviews? And are children OK with them? We talked to professors Debra Poole and Jason Dickinson to find out what they’ve learned.Topics in this episode:Why research teleforensic interviewing? (1:43)The reaction (before the pandemic) (6:46)A matter of equity; and, what the study found (9:48)Unanswered questions (17:50)Interviewer discomfort (25:03)Building psychological safety (33:12)What additional training will interviewers need? (38:40)What’s next to study? (44:50)Our next episode (49:00)Links:Jason Dickinson, Ph.D., acting chairperson, Social Work and Child Advocacy, Montclair State University (New Jersey)Debra Poole, Ph.D., experimental faculty, Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University Martine Powell, Ph.D., professor, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University (Brisbane, Australia)National Science FoundationCrimson Barocca, LCSW-C, forensic interview program supervisor, Baltimore Child Advocacy Center (Baltimore, Maryland)Leyla Sandler, MSW, LICSW, forensic services director, Safe Shores, the D.C. Children’s Advocacy CenterTF-CBT, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral TherapyMister RogersNicole Lytle, Ph.D., assistant professor, Social Work and Child Advocacy, Montclair State University“Montclair Researchers Aid Child Witnesses With Tele-Forensic Interviewing,” Patch, March 27, 2020Additional information on teleforensic interviewing at Children’s Advocacy Centers can be found on the COVID-19 resource page on NCA's website.For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And you can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/OneinTenPodcast. Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Today’s episode is a bit of bonus content for you. Adverse childhood experiences—also known as ACEs—can have lifelong effects. But does that mean we should screen everyone for ACEs? Recently, we spoke to Dr. David Finkelhor, from the Crimes Against Children Research Center and the University of New Hampshire, about the change in rates of abuse and neglect over time. If you listened to that episode, “Bad News Is a Story; Good News Is a Statistic,” what you didn’t hear was the conversation we had about the idea of universal screening for ACEs. Would such screening actually help? If not, what would? We spoke for just a few minutes on the topic, but we think you’ll find it interesting.Topics in this episode:When screening works best (1:28)Our under-resourced behavioral health system (7:23)Our next episode (11:01)Links:David Finkelhor, Ph.D., sociology professor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center, and co-director of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire“Bad News Is a Story, Good News Is a Statistic” Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org. And visit One in Ten on Facebook at facebook.com/OneinTenPodcastSupport the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Research shows that about 75% of physical abuse starts as physical discipline gone terribly awry. We have years of data showing spanking is ineffective—and in fact, harmful to kids. But often the topic is treated as a third rail by many child abuse professionals: avoided and ignored.We spoke to Stacie LeBlanc, CEO of The UP Institute and a champion of no-hit zones. Why is it so difficult for child abuse professionals to discuss spanking with parents? How do we get past the culture wars on this topic? And how can we open a respectful conversation that moves beyond “Well, I turned out fine”? How can no-hit zones help?This episode was recorded over Zoom, and there are some minor sound quality issues.Topics in this episode:·         Concerns for kids during the pandemic (1:17)·         Connection between spanking and physical abuse (2:53)·         The research (4:15)·         Poyvictimization and adverse childhood experiences (6:03)·         A common problem that’s hard to talk about (8:05)·         Handling parents’ objections (13:17)·         A respectful approach (21:00)·         Banning spanking, changing social norms (2:48)·         How to start a no-hit zone (26:23)·         Our next episode (34:06)Links:Stacie LeBlanc, CEO of The UP InstituteNo Hit Zone ToolkitThe No Hit Zone concept was created in 2005 by Dr. Lolita McDavid at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, OhioElizabeth Gershoff, Ph.D.Painless ParentingNational No Hit Zone CommitteeStop SpankingU.S. Alliance to End the Hitting of Children has a list of organizations with policy statements on this topicAmerican Academy of Pediatrics, put out a policy statement in November 2018Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children has a map of global progress on the issue For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Child protection professionals have tough jobs on any day. Add in a pandemic, and you’re piling stress on top of stress. We talked to Françoise Mathieu, executive director of TEND, an academy in Canada offering resources and training to address the needs of workers in high-stress, trauma-exposed workplaces like Children’s Advocacy Centers and their partner agencies. Françoise is a globally recognized expert on addressing burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious trauma in these high-stress workplaces. Naturally, she’s a great person to talk to about how to cope with the added stress and fear of a pandemic while working in fields that already have their share of these issues on the best of days. What’s a healthy response? Why should we stop saying, “Well, when things go back to normal …”? How do we deal with the ever-present feeling that we’re not doing enough? And how do we care for ourselves and our colleagues while keeping our distance? This interview was recorded on Zoom, and there are minor fluctuations in sound quality.Topics in this episode:·         Reacting to the pandemic: denial first (1:28)·         Feeling guilty that you’re not doing enough (8:23)·         Grief and the new normal (19:11)·         Caring for yourself and others (31:34)·         A sense of moral injury (38:40)·         Healthy habits to get you through the crisis (43:21)·         Free resources (50:50)·         Our next episode (53:58)Links:Françoise Mathieu, executive director of TEND“This Is a Marathon, Not a Sprint: Strategies to Address Wear & Tear in Helping Professionals During COVID-19”Black swan theory NCACFive Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri FinkLinda Cordisco Steele“Leaders Are People Too: Staying Well During COVID-19,” interview with Dr. Patricia Fisher Karen HangartnerTEND’s COVID-19 resources.“Feet on the Floor.” The Three Minute Breathing Space. Staying Well During COVID-19.Secondary Traumatic Stress Consortium COVID-19 ResourcesNCA’s COVID-19 response pageStephen Covey’s Circles of Concern and Influence (video)For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Prof. David Finkelhor joined us to discuss a recent one-year uptick in rates of child sexual abuse in the U.S.—and the longer-term reduction in rates of abuse and neglect (down more than 60% since 1992). What might have caused the uptick? And why are we so quick to spot bad news when the bigger news of a substantial decrease gets so little attention? Does child abuse prevention education in schools work? And what do we need to do to keep driving rates of abuse down?Topics in this episode:·         An uptick in child sexual abuse? Should we be concerned? (1:34)·         Rates of abuse and neglect in the U.S. have gone down more than 60% since 1992 (4:49)·         Could our success make people take the issue less seriously? (13:34)·         Prevention education (18:20)·         Interesting research questions (23:40)·         Learning from COVID-19 responses and innovation (26:44)·         Our next episode—if you like the podcast, please share it! (31:15)Links:David Finkelhor, Ph.D., sociology professor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center, and co-director of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New HampshireChildren’s Bureau (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)National Child Abuse and Neglect Data SystemMinnesota Student SurveyNational Crime Victimization Survey (U.S. Department of Justice)Steven Pinker’s Better Angels of Our Nature and Enlightenment NowErin’s LawNCA’s COVID-19 resources page is publicly available and includes telemental health resources For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Prosecutor Mat Heck is our guest today. Amid a pandemic, public health experts are urging us to stay home and stay away from each other to avoid spreading the deadly virus. At National Children’s Alliance, our entire staff is teleworking—and in fact, you’ll hear that this interview was conducted over the internet. Our criminal justice system, however, is built around in‑person interactions. Now, virtually overnight, many aspects of the system had to start operating remotely. What still needs to be done in person, and how do we proceed when public health and public safety are at odds?As the elected prosecutor for Montgomery County, Ohio, Mat is dealing with this issue directly. How has the pandemic impacted his work? How can victim advocates and forensic interviewers at Children’s Advocacy Centers do their jobs under these difficult conditions? Should we expect a rise in child abuse and other crimes? And how is Mat helping his own staff deal with the added stress of a pandemic on top of an already difficult job? Topics in this episode:·         The challenge for law enforcement and prosecutors ·         Essential vs. nonessential work·         Victim advocacy during a pandemic·         Making sure children are protected: Children’s Advocacy Centers and the forensic interview·         Child protective services checking in on families·         Will we see a rise in crimes like domestic violence and child abuse?·         Helping our workforce deal with the added stress·         Our next episode: Dr. David Finkelhor and changes in rates of child abuse and neglect over timeLinks:NCA’s coronavirus resource page for CACs, partners, and caregiversMat Heck, Jr., is the elected prosecutor for Montgomery County, OhioVictim/Witness Division and Child Abuse Bureau of the Montgomery County Prosecutor’s OfficeCARE House Child Advocacy CenterWebinar on CAC triage plans: COVID-19 and CACsMontgomery County Children Services For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Two guests join us to discuss the overwhelming number of images of child sexual abuse online. First, we spoke to Lieutenant Veto Mentzell with the Harford County (Md.) Sheriff’s Office. How has technology changed producing and distributing these images? What’s the impact on survivors? Who are these predators in our midst? We discussed the role of Internet Crimes Against Children Task Forces and how well-intentioned efforts to update legislation can criminalize children’s behavior.Then, you’ll hear from Emily Cashman Kirstein at Thorn, a nonprofit that builds technology to defend children from abuse. What do we need tech companies to do—or do more of—to protect children? Why are we failing to keep up with the growth of abusive materials online? We talked about the threat posed by end-to-end encryption and what Thorn is doing on the issue of self-generated content.Topics (Veto Mentzell):Who produces and shares abusive imagery? (2:14)Technology now is a common part of abuse cases (5:53)Self-produced images: the risk for kids (9:58)The impact on kids and families—and investigators (14:04)What policy makers need to know (22:24)The best advice for Children’s Advocacy Centers (31:37)Topics (Emily Cashman Kirstein):An audacious goal: eradicating child abuse from the internet (34:21)The prevalence of this material and what’s driving the growth (35:51)The role of nonprofits and of policy makers (42:46)Holding tech companies accountable (48:45)Encryption, digital privacy, and child protection (51:15)What else is promising? (55:48)Links:New York Times articles “The Internet Is Overrun with Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong?,” “How Laws Against Child Sexual Abuse Imagery Can Make It Harder to Detect,” and “Tech Companies Detect a Surge in Online Videos of Child Sexual Abuse”Harford County Child Advocacy CenterInternet Crimes Against Children Task Force and the Maryland ICAC“Digital Safety” episode of Public Health MattersThe State Chapter is Maryland Children’s AllianceThorn’s TED Talk: “How we can eliminate child sexual abuse material from the internet”National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)SaferTelegraph article: “Tech companies should pay for child abuse epidemic ‘like oil spills’, ex-Government child safety Czar says”Safety by Design, AustraliaFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Episode 204, “Mending the Tears of Violence.”  Adversity and violence are common in kid's lives. The cumulative burden creates a lifelong vulnerability to physical and psychological issues. So how do we help kids thrive? What strengths are most important in overcoming adversity? Sherry Hamby, research professor of psychology at the University of the South, discussed trauma's cumulative impact and how teachers, parents, and child advocates can help kids.Topics:Adversity and violence in children's lives (1:39)Poly-victimization and the dose response (6:58)Resilience (12:06)Poly-strengths (16:11)Symptom relief is not well-being (20:16)The most important strengths (22:46)Teacher engagement; how to help kids (35:09)How to help kids (39:34))Our next episode (47:13)Links:Sherry Hamby, Ph.D.,  Life Paths Research Center director and ResilienceCon founderACE studyDavid Finkelhor, Heather A. TurnerNational Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence “Polyvictimization: Children’s Exposure to Multiple Types of Violence, Crime, and Abuse”Juvenile Victimization QuestionnaireAnn S. Masten, Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development“Sense of Purpose—The Most Important Strength?”“From Poly-Victimization to Poly-Strengths: Understanding the Web of Violence Can Transform Research on Youth Violence and Illuminate the Path to Prevention and Resilience” “Poly-victimization, Trauma, and Resilience: Exploring Strengths That Promote Thriving After Adversity” (article in press at interview time)“Health-related quality of life among adolescents as a function of victimization, other adversities, and strengths”MMPI“Developmental Stage of Onset, Poly-Victimization, and Persistence of Childhood Victimization: Impact on Adult Well-Being in a Rural Community–Based Study” Two-by-Ten James PennebakerFor more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Episode 203, “The Child-Trafficking-to-Adult-Prostitution Pipeline.”  Multiple states and jurisdictions are considering full decriminalization of adult prostitution. On the surface, it seems like a way to help an exploited population. But the potential for harm is real—especially for children. January is National Human Trafficking Prevention Month, and we spoke to Yasmin Vafa of Rights4Girls about the connections between child sexual abuse and sex trafficking and the adult sex trade. What are supporters of full decriminalization missing? And what would a truly survivor-focused approach look like?Topics in this episode:·         The sexual-abuse-to-prison pipeline, a domestic crisis (1:30)·         No such thing as a child prostitute (4:27)·         State statutes; child sex trafficking is a form of child abuse (6:15)·         The connection between sex trafficking and the rest of the sex trade (9:30)·         Defeating a full decriminalization bill in Washington, D.C. (17:40)·         Other states considering decriminalization (20:43)·         Advice to child advocates (24:11)Links:Yasmin Vafa, co-founder and executive director of Rights4Girls (originally known as Human Rights Project for Girls)“The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story”The No Such Thing Campaign featured Withelma “T” Ortiz Walker Pettigrew, whose viral petition helped persuade the Associated Press to stop using terms such as “child prostitute.”Human trafficking state laws National Center for Homeless Education (U.S. Department of Education) resources on trafficking and the commercial sexual exploitation of children U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children, Youth and Families “Guidance to States and Services on Addressing Human Trafficking of Children and Youth in the United States”“Vermont bill would decriminalize adult prostitution,” January 12, 2020, Associated PressCurrent status of H.569, “An act relating to prostitution,” in the Vermont General AssemblyThe equality model or Swedish model (partial decriminalization)National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). If you suspect an incident of child sex trafficking, call the NCMEC hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678). Don’t ask, “what if I’m wrong?” Ask, “what if I’m right?” For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensalliance.org.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Episode 202, “The Hidden Cost of Resilience.” The ability to bounce back from trauma is a good thing. But, increasingly, research is uncovering signs that all may not be well with the kids who look like they’re doing just fine. We spoke to Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King about resilience—and its hidden costs. How can we help kids and families cope with trauma? What factors put children at higher risk? And what does the latest research tell us about the long-term health issues that even the most resilient children may face?Topics in this episode:·         What is resilience? (1:25)·         Factors that help people be resilient (2:59)·         Abuse disrupts social connections (9:01)·         Racism, homophobia, and other compounding factors (12:25)·         The hidden cost of resilience (17:25)·         Talking to caregivers (25:20)·         Racism’s impacts, and the role of caregivers (28:54)·         Resources (33:13)·         Our next episode (36:58)Links:Ernestine Briggs-King, Ph.D., Duke University School of Medicine, and the Center for Child & Family HealthMothers Against Drunk DrivingRobert Pynoos, MD, UCLAGene Brody, Ph.D. “UGA Research Uncovers Cost of Resiliency in Kids,” by April Reese Sorrow, May 20, 2013, University of Georgia Columns.“Is Resilience Only Skin Deep? Rural African Americans' Preadolescent Socioeconomic Status-Related Risk and Competence and Age 19 Psychological Adjustment and Allostatic Load,” by Gene H. Brody Tianyi Yu, et al, July 1, 2013, Psychological Science, Vol. 24(7): 1285-1293.“Family Support Buffers the Physiological Effects of Racial Discrimination,” by Gene Brody, March 1, 2016, Association for Psychological Science Observer. “The Hidden Cost of Resilience,” by Leonora Desar, June 6, 2013, Psychology Today.Professor Ann S. Masten, University of Minnesota, author of Ordinary Magic: Resilience in DevelopmentThis New Yorker article, “How People Learn to Become Resilient,” talks about the work of Norman Garmezy and Emmy Werner.Sir Michael RutterNational Child Traumatic Stress Network For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at nationalchildrensallianSupport the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
Episode 201, “Gender Bias and the Myth of Parental Alienation.” Everyone’s heard of the vengeful ex-wife who accuses her ex-husband of child abuse just to get back at him during a divorce. There’s even a scientific-sounding term for it: parental alienation. But is parental alienation real? And are judges taking allegations of abuse seriously enough? We spoke to Professor Joan Meier from George Washington University Law School who has some, frankly, startling data on the subject. How does alleging abuse affect custody decisions? Is there scientific proof that alienation exists? And what can we do to persuade the courts to do a better job of investigating abuse?Topics in this episode:·         Realizing children aren’t being protected.·         Junk science: parental alienation syndrome.·         The myth of the vengeful ex-wife.·         Women are not considered as credible as men.·         What the research really show?·         What should the courts be doing?·         Reaction by judges·         What can we do about it?Links:Joan S. Meier, professor of clinical law at George Washington University Law SchoolThe study referred to in this episode, “Child Custody Outcomes in Cases Involving Parental Alienation and Abuse Allegations,” and other research by Professor Meier are available on the law school’s website“‘A gendered trap’: When mothers allege child abuse by fathers, the others often lose custody, study shows,” is a Washington Post article about the study.Domestic Violence Legal Empowerment and Appeals Project (DV LEAP) provides pro bono appellate representation in compelling domestic violence cases and trains attorneys and courts around the countryDV LEAP’s Legal Resource Library include briefs and court opinions, training materials, publications, links to domestic violence organizations, case digests, and custody resources Learn more about the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers and National Children’s Alliance on our website, read our annual report, and visit us on Facebook.Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)
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