DiscoverPolice Science Dr Podcast, making research accessible to the police practitioner
Police Science Dr Podcast, making research accessible to the police practitioner
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Police Science Dr Podcast, making research accessible to the police practitioner

Author: Dr Susanne Knabe-Nicol, police practitioner

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Police Science Dr makes research easy for police practitioners to apply. Police Research and Investigative Psychology for Investigative Practitioners. Podcast version of the Police Science Dr videos that convert academic research into actionable tips and education for investigative practitioners. Dr Susanne Knabe-Nicol provides a direct link between academics and practitioners in policing.
59 Episodes
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www.PoliceScienceDr.com This week: Psychological vulnerabilities of interviewees; Swearing in written statements; Lie detection in suspect interviewsHow do psychological vulnerabilities affect interviews as a victim, witness or suspect?Which statements are more credible - those with swearing in them or those without?Can a police officer cause a suspect to appear less truthful through how they interview them?If you are already on the email list, you will have received an email about it. If not, simply enter your details in the form at the bottom of the page on www.PoliceScienceDr.com
How can you use offenders' Modus Operandi (MO) to assist in investigations?www.PoliceScienceDr.com 
www.PoliceScienceDr.com How to prevent knife murders - how to deter burglars - how to interpret changes in an offender's MO Subscribe to the Police Science Dr newsletter to get this into your inbox.
www.PoliceScienceDr.com This week, the snippets are about burglary, rape investigations and witness interviews. Subscribe to the Police Science Dr newsletter to get this into your inbox. 
If you are already on the Police Science Dr email list, you will be getting these snippets into your inbox on a weekly basiswww.PoliceScienceDr.com
If you are not an email subscriber yet, go to www.PoliceScienceDr.com and leave your details on the registration form. You will then receive any future Police Science Snippets straight into your inbox and you'll be able to download all previous ones to keep from the 'Read' page on the website.
This is when I went live on Twitter to announce a new service for my email subscribers. It's a hopefully weekly email with relevant bite-sized  bits of research that is relevant to policing delivered into your inbox. If you are not a subscriber yet, simply use the sign-up form on the main www.PoliceScienceDr.com webpage. You will then also get access to the 'Read' page, where you will find the transcripts for each video and the Police Science Snippets, so you could build up your own library.  
www.PoliceScienceDr.com This video is based on an article written by Professor David Canter: https://www.davidcanter.com/wp-conten...It addresses the following questions: why are policing and academia so different? Why are there conflicts between the two? How can police and academics work together better? The premise is that if both sides understand each other better, they can collaborate more effectively. There are good reasons for why the police and academia are the way they are - their objectives and pressures are very different.  Police Science Dr provides general information that stems from published research. However, each investigation needs to be assessed and conducted individually.  The content Police Science Dr provides is not to be taken as specific advice for any one investigation and is intended to enhance investigative skills overall. www.PoliceScienceDr.com is a place that helps police and other investigative practitioners access research that is relevant to them. The free video library covers things such as What is Investigative Psychology? What is Offender Profiling? What is Evidence-Based Policing? What is Geographic Profiling? We also have videos on how to interview suspects, how to interview children forensically, how to read research articles, etc.
 www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list.How to interview children in a forensic context - Ann Stuart interview“Hello, my name is Ann Stuart, and I am a retired police officer from the Metropolitan Police, I served 34 years in the Met Police. And the last 20 of those I worked in child protection. I performed three roles. I was an investigator for a few years then I wrote policy and procedures and then I took over thetraining team, where we delivered specialist child witness interviewing and the specialist child abuseinvestigation development program to obviously officers and detectives who were to investigate child abuse.
 www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list.How long do the effects of hotspots policing last? Simon Williams interviewI'm Simon Williams and I'm currently a senior sergeant with the Western Australian police. Prior to that I was a police officer with West Midlands Police I'm Simon Williams and I'm currently a senior sergeant with the Western Australian police. Prior to that I was a police officer with West Midlands Police for nearly 16 years. I first heard about evidence-based policing when I was running offender management teams in Birmingham. And we partnered with the University of Cambridge to deliver what was then the biggest randomised control trial and policing anywhere in the world called operation Turning Point. So operation Turning Point was a test of deferred prosecution. Of low-level or first-time offenders away from the criminal justice system. And that's what was my introduction into this concept, this thing called evidence-based policing.
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. Can emotional skills predict gang membership?In 2017, it was estimated by the Children’s Commissioner (2017) that over 46,000 children between the ages of 10 and 18 years are involved in gangs in the UK. Even though this problem is increasing in severity with a number of fatal stabbings having taken place in England in the last few years, psychological understanding of gang membership is currently limited (Wood & Alleyne, 2010). In an effort to alleviate this shortcoming, recent research has attempted to shed some light on the emotional risk factors of gang membership by reviewing and summarising existing research (Mallion & Wood, 2018). It is known that emotional processes guide moral reasoning (Dhingra, Debowska, Sharratt, Hyland, & Kola-Palmer, 2015), aid decision making (Modecki, Zimmer-Gembeck, & Guerra, 2017) and support behavioural regulation (Coffman, Melde, & Esbensen, 2015); And we also know that deficits in emotional competence can cause offending behaviour (e.g., Day, 2009; Ward & Nee, 2009). There has been an increasing recognition of the influence that emotional processes can have on other risk factors of offending behaviour, that is social and cognitive factors (Ward, 2017).
What is an RCT?

What is an RCT?

2020-09-1509:30

www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. What is an RCT? You’ve probably heard the term ‘RCT’ a few times, especially in the field of academic research and / or evidence-based policing. Commander Alex Murray used it a lot in his Dr IPIP interview on evidence-based policing. But what is an RCT? In essence, it is the most robust and reliable way of carrying out research that tests something.RCT stands for randomised-controlled trial. Now, you might think the terms ‘random’ and ‘controlled’ might sound as if they don’t really belong together, but it will become more obvious in a bit how they are connected.
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. What is the evidence-based policing matrix? What is the evidence-based policing matrix? And how do you use the EBP matrix?It is an online tool that has been developed to help police decision-makers make sense of the currentresearch that is out there. Hopefully you’ve seen in the ‘What is Evidence-Based Policing’ video what EBP is and why we need it to become more and more a part of policing, and you may also know that it is not always easy to make sense of all the research, or you might not even be able to access any academic works. Watch the ‘How to read academic research?’ video if it might be useful to you. In essence, the evidence-based policing matrix is there to provide you with a single location where relevant policing research on interventions that have been tested is stored, and it also tells you whether the interventions it lists are effective or not. And they are all of at least moderate robustness. Quite neat, isn’t it? And it’s openly available to anyone who’s interested, just go to www.PolicingMatrix.org. It was put together by Drs Cynthia Lum, and Christopher Koper of George Mason University, with the assistance of Dr Cody Telep. It is updated annually with new research that has come out and it tells you a number of things about each study, including whether it worked, didn’t work or had mixed results, or whether it actually had a negative effect, as in backfired.
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. Analysing the future of policing - Nic Pole interview My name's Nick and I'm a principal analyst at the College of Policing, and I suppose people might know me because in policing, when people think of 'analyst', they think of crime analyst or intelligence analyst or performance analyst. But I do a different type of analysis which is futures analysis. Which means I kind of analyse the future to try and inform and support present-day decision-making. So to think about issues that are kind of developing on the horizon. So for the longer-term five or ten years from now and what implications those things might have for, for policing - in the here and now. So how we might better prepare for them. 
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. Commander Alex Murray on Evidence-Based Policing Hello everyone, my name is Alex Murray.I'm a police officer in West Midlands, the West Midlands Police, currently a temporary Assistant Chief Constable [moved on to become a commander in the Metropolitan Police since the interview]. But for a long time within policing I've been interested in 'What Works' and for that you can read 'Evidence-Based Policing'. ....
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. Why do police use force? The first and obvious answer is that they deal with some of the worst members of society you could think of. Just imagine the people that normal individuals would run away from, those are the people that the police have to run towards. Some of those people are often not very nice, rational or reasonable. When the police do use violence, it looks very bad and often makes the headlines, because they’re in uniform and are supposed to protect us. Out of context, however, you should refrain from making a snap judgement on who was at fault there – the officers or the members of the public, until you know the circumstances better. Undoubtedly, there are and have been incidents of police using violence completely without any moral ground whatsoever. In some countries, that is still the norm. I’m speaking about Western police forces here though, which should be bound by modern laws and accountability. In general, only 2% of police-citizen encounters involve violence (MacDonald, J. M., Kaminski, R. J., & Smith, M. R., 2009). Also, most violent police-citizen interaction is predicted by the citizen’s demeanour, not the officer’s (Engel, R. S., Sobol, J. J., & Worden, R. E., 2000). I’m not talking about extreme incidents such as riots, mass demonstrations, terrorist incidents or football games here. I’m talking about 1-on-1 incidents of use of force by police officers and what the factors are that can contribute to it. Police, like any other profession, should aim to be the best they can be.In this video, we’ll talk about research on three factors that can lead to police getting involved in violent incidents: the officer’s heart rate, self-control and carrying weapons....
 www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list. Prof. Kim Rossmo on Geographic Profiling - interview SKN:So, Kim, thank you very much for agreeing to speak with me and I know it’s the middle of the night for you, about half past midnight, 6 o’clock in the morning here for me in the UK. I do really appreciate you taking that time. Would you mind starting by telling our viewers your short definition of what geographic profiling is. Some people will not have heard of it – it is something you swim and bathe in daily, but for some people it’s new. How would you just give them a quick explanation of what it is so they really get it? Kim:Geographic profiling is a criminal investigative methodology that uses the locations of a connected series of crimes to determine the most probable area where the offender responsible for those crimes is based. So, let’s say we have a serial arsonist or a serial robber or a rapist: We analyse the locations where those crimes have occurred, and then, using a specialised software system produce maps that show the most likely areas to find the offender. So you could think of it as an information management strategy or as a suspect prioritisation tool. It helps you find the needle in the haystack. 
www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list.How to avoid false confessionsWhat is a false confession? It’s when someone who is being interrogated, for example by a law enforcement officer, claims responsibility for an offence they have not committed. Intuitively, most people would think that never happens, as the immediate consequence is often a conviction, and let’s face it, that’s usually what criminals and innocents alike try to avoid. So you’d be more than justified to wonder why anyone would ever confess to something they haven’t actually done, when they’re likely to get punished for it? ....
 www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list.Prof. Lawrence Sherman on Evidence-Based Policing My name is Lawrence Sherman. I've been working on an idea called evidence-based policing for over 20 years now and before that with the New York City Police Department, Metropolitan Police in London at Scotland Yard and many other places, to try to find the most effective ways police can identify the greatest risks to public safety and the most effective ways of reducing those risks. The way I have approached this is through experiments as well as 'big data' and increasingly what's called 'digital policing'.
 How to read academic research       I suggested in the last video, the one on evidence-based policing, that you should try and find research about the topic you’re interested in. So, what is academic research, where do you find it and how do you read it? www.PoliceScienceDr.comFull transcripts of each episode complete with key learning points, timestamps and references are available on the site above on the 'Read' page. This page is pass-word protected and you can get access by joining the mailing list.What is academic research?Academic journal articles are the published research results of professional researchers who work at universities or other organisations. Sometimes, they receive funding from somewhere for their time spent on that research. In some cases, it might be worth looking at that funding source, which they have to declare, so that you can decide for yourself if that funding relationship might have affected the researchers’ impartiality and objectivity during the project. For example, I once got really excited about an article which claimed you could reduce behavioural problems in children by giving them omega 3. But then I saw that the
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