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United Methodist Women: response

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response, an award-winning publication, is the official magazine of United Methodist Women and is published by the national office. Each issue will touch your heart, stir your soul, and challenge your mind. Topics and issues cover spiritual growth, mission outreach and reports on our local, national and international work. The response podcast features audio versions of some of the articles from each issue.
29 Episodes
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In 1888, five women were elected delegates to General Conference, including active members of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society and Woman’s Home Missionary Society. The conference spent most of the first day debating whether these five women qualified as a “layman” who were eligible for election. The conference decided that the women would be seated in the balcony, able to observe the conference sessions but unable to speak or vote.A lot has changed since then, and in 2019 women constituted 36 percent of the voting members for General Conference. Yet women constitute almost 60 percent of church membership. We certainly have more work to do.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
En 1888 (mil ochocientos ochenta y ocho), cinco mujeres fueron elegidas delegadas a la Conferencia General, incluyendo mujeres activas que pertenecían a la Sociedad Misionera Extranjera de la Mujer y a la Sociedad Misionera Local de la Mujer. La conferencia pasó la mayor parte del primer día debatiendo si estas cinco mujeres calificaban como "laicas" elegibles y decidió que estas delegadas se sentarían en el balcón, pudiendo observar las sesiones de la conferencia, pero sin vos ni voto.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
In 2019, United Methodist Women celebrated its 150th anniversary. If the past 150 years have taught us anything, it’s that women organized for mission are essential for the church to be the church God calls it to be. God is still looking for women committed to improving lives of women, children, youth and neighbors finding hard times and being pushed aside. As United Methodist delegates from around the world prepare to meet this May at General Conference, God is calling women to organize for mission for such a time as this.The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church requires every local church, district, conference and jurisdiction to have an organization of United Methodist Women. It also requires a national organization to, among other duties, interpret United Methodist Women’s role in fulfilling the church’s mission; recommend programs and policies; develop mission theology; provide resources; secure funds; support regional missionaries, national mission institutions and deaconesses and home missioners; and express the concerns of women organized for mission (¶1903). One way in which United Methodist Women fulfills its Purpose is by bringing petitions to the General Conference that prioritize women, children and youth.In 2020 United Methodist Women will be bringing four new pieces of legislation to be included in the church’s Book of Resolutions, on observing Children’s Sabbath, protecting the girl child, protecting voting rights, and the status of women and realizing full human rights. The current titles of the legislation are “Children’s Sabbath,” “The Girl Child,” “The Status of Women,” and “Voting Rights Protections in the United States.” You can read the complete text at www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/gc2020.All delegates and legislation at General Conference are first assigned to committees before coming before the full conference. At the 2020 General Conference, 862 delegates will be assigned to 14 committees, with likely more than 1,000 petitions divided among the committees. Petitions that pass in committee come to the full body for a vote. As the May conference gets underway, United Methodist Women will keep members updated on the status of its legislation on its website and social media, and you’ll be able to track legislation at www.umcgc.org.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
After decades of conflict and over 3,500 deaths, the Troubles, the name given to the conflict in Northern Ireland between Protestant Loyalist and Catholic Nationalist groups, made a major move toward peace in 1998 with the Good Friday Agreement. Weapons from both sides were turned in and destroyed, and the two sides started trying to live together peacefully.The East Belfast Mission was established as a registered charity in 1985 and ever since has been on the front line, or, more literally, the dividing line between communities, working to facilitate reconciliation between the two sides of the conflict and support marginalized neighbors. That work continues today through a state-of-the-art facility known as Skainos, a Greek word for tent in the community, completed in October 2012.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
One hundred and forty million Americans are poor. That is 43.5 percent of the U.S. population. Their income is less than twice the poverty level. As reported in The Nation, nearly 40 percent of Americans couldn’t afford an unexpected $400 expense.The Poor People’s Campaign, a national faith partner of United Methodist Women, works to address systemic injustices that push people into poverty and keep them there.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Gratitude is in vogue at the moment. Writers across the spiritual spectrum write about it in books, blogs and memes. They point out the importance of receiving life and calling as a gift. Gratitude changes us. It changes how we approach our serving, advocating, sisterhood and giving.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2019 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
지금 감사의 바람이 불고 있습니다. 영적, 정신적 분야의 글을 쓰는 작가들은 책, 블로그, 밈(memes)에 이에 대해 적고 있습니다. 그들은 삶을 받아들이고 선물이라 부르는 것의 중요성을 지적합니다. 감사는 우리를 변화시킵니다. 감사는 우리가 섬기고, 옹호 활동을 하며, 자매애를 맺고, 헌금하는 것에 대한 접근 방식을 변화시킵니다.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2019 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
La gratitud está de moda en este momento. Escritores de todo el espectro espiritual escriben sobre este tema en libros, blogs y memes. Señalan la importancia de recibir la vida y reconocerla como un regalo. La gratitud nos cambia. Cambia la forma en que enfocamos nuestro servicio, nuestra abogacía, nuestras relaciones con nuestras hermanas y la manera en que ofrendamos.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2019 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
General Conference 2020

General Conference 2020

2019-11-0600:04:19

Every four years The United Methodist Church holds its General Conference, the top policymaking body for the denomination. From May 5-15, 2020, 862 delegates from around the world will gather in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to set denominational policy, revise church law, approve budgets for churchwide programs and adopt resolutions on current moral, social, public policy and economic issues. Delegates to General Conference, equal clergy and lay, are elected at their annual conferences. The delegate count for each conference is based on the number of clergy and professing lay members of the conference in a formula laid out by The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church.The previous full session of General Conference was held in May 2016 in Portland, Oregon. A special session of General Conference was held in 2019 focusing on the denomination’s policies and practices regarding LGBT+ clergy and marriages. General Conference is the only body that can speak for The United Methodist Church.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2019 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
When the police arrived at the tangle of small shacks that compose Kimberly Jugadora’s neighborhood in Manila, they were all wearing masks. Her father and brother were working on a motorcycle in the small street in front of their home when the heavily armed men ordered them to lay face down. Her mother went outside to see what was happening. Soon the police placed both her mother and father on the backs of motorcycles and drove off. Jugadora ran after them, but she wasn’t able to keep up. She could only watch in horror as they disappeared into the chaos of the Philippine capital. Over the next several hours, Jugadora repeatedly called her mother’s cell phone with no result. She went to several police stations, but everyone she talked with claimed they knew nothing. Finally, she got word that her mother’s body had been spotted under a nearby bridge and her father’s body had been dumped in the cemetery. Before she could get there herself, the bodies had been transported to a local funeral home. Jugadora and her siblings spent several days coming up with the money to retrieve the bodies so they could properly mourn and bury their parents.Jugadora today keeps a photo of her parents—Rogelio Buena and Jenny Royo—on a small altar in their simple home. Her 6-year-old daughter, Clarisa, will go to the altar when she misses her grandparents and place her fingertips on their photo. When she comes home from school, Clarisa will talk to the photo, telling her grandparents about her day, asking them about theirs. Jugadora says Clarisa worries about whether they have enough food in heaven. “I assure her that God is taking good care of them. She asks me when they’re coming back. I tell her they aren’t, but that we will one day go to be with them. If I didn’t believe that, I would go crazy,” she said.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
United Methodist Women, the needs of immigrants and refugees today call us to pray, act, serve and advocate with care for “the least of these,” with Jesus’ love for children deeply etched in our hearts. It is a critical time for outreach in our own communities, for support of our national mission institutions, for vigils, phone calls and legislative visits and educational forums on family separation at our borders, ending the school-to-prison pipeline, making sure mothers and children have access to health care and making the environment safe. Just as our foremothers did, let us help people, especially women and children, who come to the United States to find welcome and a place to call home. - - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
- - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Gift of Education

Gift of Education

2019-09-0400:07:13

A United Methodist Women A Call to Prayer and Self-Denial grant helped University for Girls build an online platform, website and mobile app to help the young women stay connected to one another and the world. “I think it’s important for young women to have opportunities to mobilize, learn and improve themselves,” said Zhao, who plans to go back to her village and teach music. An, who is studying forestry, is happy to be in school not just for education she receives but for the connections she makes. “I’ve joined a lot of groups. I’m very happy to be part of the University for Girls program,” she said. “Many of the students in the program are also from rural village families, they are kind and happy. We help one another, support one another. It is very good.- - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Creative Support

Creative Support

2019-09-0400:08:14

In addition to United Methodist Women’s historic and ongoing work for racial justice, The United Methodist Church’s strong stance against gun violence can be read in Resolution 3428, “Our Call to End Gun Violence,” in The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church 2016, in which congregations are encouraged to, among other actions, make preventing gun violence part of their conversations and prayers, to attend vigils, to prohibit guns from church property, to support universal background checks and arms treaties and bans on high capacity ammunition and automatic weapons, to assist people affected by gun violence and to join with other denominations and faiths that have experienced gun violence. - - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
What if each of us connected our own stories with our unnamed predecessors as we tell the story? Just as we see ourselves in the unnamed women in the Bible, we can see ourselves in the unnamed women in our history. We stand on their shoulders as we press on in our own ways of working together: loving, serving, speaking up for women, children and youth and generous giving. Like them we can invite others to journey with us and to respond to the call of God in this time turning faith, hope and love into action on behalf of women, children and youth around the world.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
¿Qué pasaría si cada una de nosotras relatara sus propias historias conectando con las de nuestras antecesoras sin nombre? Así como nos vemos nosotras mismas en las mujeres anónimas de la Biblia, también podemos vernos como las mujeres sin nombre de nuestra historia. Nos apoyamos en la experiencia de nuestras antecesoras mientras seguimos adelante con nuestras propias formas de trabajar juntas al: amar, servir, defender a las mujeres, la niñez y la juventud, y contribuir generosamente. Como lo hicieron en el pasado, podemos invitar a otras mujeres a hacer el recorrido juntas y responder al llamado de Dios en este momento al convertir la fe, la esperanza y el amor en acción en nombre de las mujeres, la niñez y la juventud de todo el mundo.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
만약 우리가 이야기를 할 때 각자의 이야기를 이름 없는 전임자들과 연결시킨다면 어떨까요? 성경에 나오는 이름 없는 여성들 속에서 우리 자신을 보는 것처럼, 우리 역사 속 이름 없는 여성들에게서 우리 자신을 볼 수 있습니다. 함께 일하는 우리의 방식, 즉 여성, 어린이, 청소년을 위해 사랑하고, 봉사하며, 연설하고, 아낌없이 기부하는 방식으로 매진할 때, 우리는 그들의 도움을 받습니다. 그들처럼 우리는 다른 사람에게 우리의 여정에 함께 하자고 그리고 하나님의 부르심에 응답하여 전세계의 여성, 어린이, 청소년들을 위해 믿음, 소망, 사랑을 행동으로 옮기자고 청할 수 있습니다.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
When an artillery shell fell on her home in northern Sri Lanka in 2009, Sathiyaruban Tharskika’s world changed. Her husband was killed in the explosion. She and her two children were injured. A decade later, she still walks with a limp on a badly scarred leg. Pieces of ordnance remain embedded in her skull; doctors say it’s too dangerous to try to remove them.As the sole breadwinner for herself and her two children, Tharskika found a job at a cooperative restaurant, but what she earns isn’t enough to pay the school fees for both her children. So she sent her daughter off to a boarding school run by a Sri Lankan charity; education there is free for war orphans. Her son remains with her.“We’re not living well, but we’re surviving,” she said. It’s a common refrain from war widows in Sri Lanka’s conflict-torn north. “If I had more income I could ensure that my kids get a good education and then a good job. That’s all I care about.”- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Despite much adversity and marginalization, the Portuguese Methodist Women’s Federation is making a substantial difference in the lives of the people that come to know them. Its members have touched each generation with their hard work and giving spirit. It is strengthening individuals, training women to be leaders and inspiring their communities so the next generation of women will be brave, well-prepared and generous.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
As I look at United Methodist Women’s history, I have been noticing some common threads that tell us something about our DNA. May the needs of our day, the persistence of our sisters in prayer, presence and power and the call of God move us into the next 150 years of mission service.- - -This episode originally appeared in the May/June 2019 issue of response magazine.Visit UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
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