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United Methodist Women: response

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response, an award-winning publication, is the official magazine of United Methodist Women and is published by the national office. Each issue will touch your heart, stir your soul, and challenge your mind. Topics and issues cover spiritual growth, mission outreach and reports on our local, national and international work. The response podcast features audio versions of some of the articles from each issue.
61 Episodes
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The beginning of a new year is often a time of new responsibilities. In this particular year, following our normal patterns has a new level of complexity as we add the responsibility of protecting one another and ourselves from a life-threatening disease. Regarding our spiritual health, it’s a good time to start with the basics.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2021 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
새해의 시작은 새로운 책임이 부과되는 때이기도 합니다. 특별한 상황을 맞이한 올 해, 우리의 일상적인 패턴을 따르는 것은 생명을 위협하는 질병으로부터 서로와 우리 자신을 보호해야 할 책임이 추가됨으로써 새로운 차원의 복잡성을 갖게 됩니다. 한편 우리의 영적 건강에 관해 생각해 보자면, 기본부터 시작하기에 좋은 시기입니다.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2021 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
The Impact of Faith

The Impact of Faith

2021-01-2102:09

United Methodist Women members have many things in common. First and foremost, we are women of faith who desire to put our faith into action. We know the power of faith-filled action. We see it again and again in our mission work. We witness its impact.From time to time we need to step back and acknowledge the impact Christ guides us and enables us to make as United Methodist Women.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2021 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Diane Jackson has been a member of United Methodist Women for more than 50 years. She grew up Presbyterian but joined The United Methodist Church in her early twenties. She became a part of United Methodist Women because her mother and grandmother were active in their church’s women’s group, and she knew it would be a place she could find learning and support. She is currently the president of United Methodist Women at First United Methodist Church in Santa Rosa, California.Jackson, who is also head of the church’s Volunteers in Mission Program, was put into a leadership role right away.“The first Sunday I came to church I asked, ‘Do you have a women’s group?’ And I was directed to a real go-getter lady,” Jackson said. “I went to their Christmas tea, and she asked me if I was new. I said, ‘Yes.’ And she said, ‘We have a position on our board that you can fill.’ I left that first meeting part of the United Methodist Women’s leadership team.” Jackson has also served on district leadership teams and started several young women’s circles.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2021 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
United Methodist Women is a bold, diverse and dynamic community of Christian women working together to grow spiritually, live out their faith and make a difference in their communities and world, especially on behalf of women, children and youth. Together members focus on social justice issues and actions to make a collective positive impact. In recent years, the organization has named four focuses. For the 2021-2024 quadrennium, United Methodist Women will have two mission priorities: climate justice and criminalization of communities of color and mass incarceration, with particular focus on the Just Energy for All and Interrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline campaigns.- - -This episode originally appeared in the January/February 2021 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
어린 시절, 할머니는 저에게 다음과 같이 기도하라고 가르치셨습니다. “전능하신 하나님, 저희에게 베풀어주신 모든 은혜에 감사드립니다.” 조부모님 댁에서 저녁 식사를 하기 전에 우리가 드린 감사의 기도였습니다. 저는 그것을 "할머니의 감사 기도"라고 불렀습니다. 이 기도는 이번 시즌에 저에게 특별한 울림을 줍니다. 우리 가운데 많은 사람들이 슬픔을 겪고 있습니다. 우리는 가족을 잃었습니다. 우리는 함께 축하하거나 슬퍼하고 싶을 때 사랑하는 사람들과 물리적으로 거리를 두어야 했습니다. 많은 사람들이 일자리를 잃었으며, 질병을 앓고 있습니다. 인근 시설 중 일부가 문을 닫았습니다. 우리는 계획을 포기해야 했습니다. 이와 같이 우리가 겪고 있는 어려움들을 나열하자면 끝이 없습니다.
Cuando era niña, mi abuela me enseñó a orar: "Padre nuestro, danos corazones agradecidos por todas tus misericordias". Era nuestra oración antes de la cena en casa de mis abuelos. La llamé "la oración de la abuela". Esta oración tiene una repercusión particular para mí en esta temporada. Muchas de nosotras estamos sufriendo pérdidas. Hemos perdido a miembros de la familia. Hemos tenido que distanciarnos físicamente de nuestros seres queridos cuando anhelamos estar celebrando o llorando juntos. Mucha gente ha perdido su trabajo y ha sufrido enfermedades. Algunas de nuestras instituciones vecinales han cerrado. Tuvimos que dejar de lado nuestros planes. La lista continúa.
*This episode of Responsively Yours was recorded by Tara Barnes.*We know God is continuing to bless us, even now. As Christians we believe in Emmanuel—God with us, in good times and in hard times. Without denying the struggle, this Thanksgiving and Christmas season may be exactly the right time to ask for and exercise grateful hearts.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Building Women Leaders

Building Women Leaders

2020-11-1211:26

United Methodist Women is a longtime partner of the World Student Christian Federation, a global association of student Christian groups connecting young leaders around the world to promote positive change. United Methodist Women members’ Mission Giving supports WSCF programs in the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia-Pacific, whose offices in Hong Kong I visited in May 2018.Sunita Suna is the regional executive for the Asia-Pacific region of the World Student Christian Federation. She met me at a subway exit in Hong Kong on a rainy morning and took me to the federation’s busy, packed office on the 18th floor of a nearby skyscraper. Often out marching in solidarity with women, migrants and other marginalized groups or hosting Bible studies or workshops, the office was full during some downtime.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
The work of United Methodist Women members to help women, children and youth has resulted in a wonderful and exciting time for the Navajo Nation. Many who donated also sent messages of encouragement, and many of the masks were sewn by United Methodist Women units or groups, which made them even more special. It’s amazing how one call could reach hundreds, perhaps thousands in this land of the Dine. God is good all the time! We live with hope as we pray for families and strengthened bonds through these challenging days. We are so thankful to our Creator who blesses us always. Hundreds of grateful families have been touched by the donations. Ahe’hee’ (thank you) to United Methodist Women and everyone who contributed for your generosity. May you all be truly blessed and continue to walk in beauty.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
The United Methodist Women Association Cameroon in collaboration with United Methodist Women hosted a workshop in January 2020 under the theme “Preventing Gender-based Violence and Promoting Mainstreaming Through Engagement of State and Nonstate Actors to Take Action Toward Recovery and Justice for Victims.” The training was held in Meme Division, Southwest Region of Cameroon.Participants included indigenous, minority and economically disadvantaged women and women living with HIV/AIDS as well as survivors of gender-based violence and runaway child brides seeking shelter and protection.- - -This episode originally appeared in the November/December 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
*This episode of Responsively Yours was recorded by Tara Barnes.*Ending racism has been a priority for United Methodist Women for a long time. Even with all I’ve learned, during this time I’ve realized that there is still so much I don’t know or that I need to relearn about the history of the United States and the ways that I and other white people are co-opted into a racist system and benefit from it, even without our conscious assent. Some of you may have a similar sense of needing to shift and change very quickly. How can there be so much to learn? How can there still be so much I didn’t see? How can all our efforts at change (in ourselves, our organization, the church and the nation) have fallen so woefully short?- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
최근에 저는 지붕 위의 바이올린(Fiddler on the Roof)이 새로운 무대에서 이디시(Yiddish)어로 공연되는 것을 보았는데, 그것은 1905년 러시아의 아나테프카(Anatevka)에서 유대인들이 모여 살던 작은 마을인 슈테틀(shtetl) 사람들이 직면했던 민족적/종교적 긴장을 충분히 이해할 수 있게 해주었습니다. 주인공이자 다섯 딸의 아버지인 테비에(Tevye)는 자신의 전통에 깊이 뿌리를 두고 있지만, 시대적 변화를 마주하게 됩니다. 그는 “내가 그렇게까지 바뀌어야 한다면, 나는 참지 못하고 분출하게 될거야!”라고 말합니다. 저는 우리 중 많은 사람들이 신종 코로나 바이러스 감염증과 인종 차별이라는 똑같은 전염병의 시기에 이와 같이 느꼈다고 생각합니다.- - -This episode originally appeared in the October/September 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
- - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
In the beginning, when some programs had to be put on hold, Kari Collins was faced with having to lay off some of her staff. But the emergency funding from United Methodist Women, along with a payroll protection assistance from the federal government, allowed her to maintain most of her work force. To keep staff safe, the mission now has a 14-step “Health at Work” plan that includes staggered times in the office, daily sanitizing of workstations and temperature checks.One of the mission’s most crucial programs is Work Camp. The program draws about 2,400 volunteers from churches, schools or service organizations for short- or long-term mission trips for projects such as housing repairs and building accessibility ramps for elderly and low-income families. Because the people stay in cabins, paying the mission room and board, the camp had to be delayed about a month so that a health and safety plan could be put in place. Many volunteers whose trips were canceled sent a donation instead, which was directed to hire local people to tackle the jobs they would have done on the mission. Collins anticipates a “new normal” regarding health guidelines going forward. She also worries about a drop in charitable giving, which Red Bird Mission depends on to survive.“It’s easy to get discouraged,” Collins said. “But all the acts of kindness we’ve witnessed these past few months restore my faith in humanity. At the heart of it, people really do care for one another and take care of one another, especially in the worst of times.”- - -This episode originally appeared in the September/October 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
United Methodist Women members have talked about, learned about and worked to address racist attitudes and institutional racism for a long time. We know that racist personal beliefs, cultural incompetence and prejudice hurt people of color and do not reflect God’s love. Far too often, “Jesus loves the little children, all the children of the world” is something we teach children but not something we try to bring to life through our actions and policies as adults.Our efforts to improve our understanding by reading, listening and participating in workshops are important. Our commitment to allow the Holy Spirit to work in our hearts to address the sin of racism is fundamental, and our work with others to make changes in the church and in our own organization must continue. However, during this time of pandemic, we have seen and heard in excruciating ways that racism and the systems that support it are killing people of color all across our country. We must do more, and we must do it urgently.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
How do you eat a giant pumpkin?You invite the community and take one bite at a time.That’s what Todd Lafrenz, Green Team chair at Douglas Avenue United Methodist Church in Springfield, Illinois, shared about the church’s journey to installing a solar array. It took many meetings, many members and many months, but the solar array was approved by the church. In fact, it was being hammered and drilled into place while United Methodist Women’s Just Energy for All training took place there in December 2019.Caring about our energy use is part of our faith walk as Christians, because the system by which we get our energy is inherently unjust: it harms the poor, people of color, and women and children and benefits corporations that pollute our land, air and water for profit.Over 70 United Methodist Women attendees and partners from all over the United States examined our personal energy use, learned where our energy comes from and lamented our complicity in an unjust system during the training. Through the training, we learned that transitioning our energy economy to one that prioritizes clean and renewable sources like wind and solar that is justice-centered will be a giant undertaking. But it’s not impossible. This transition will happen through steady but bold steps in each of our communities, and those steps can start with each of us.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Through its mission and spiritual growth studies, United Methodist Women has helped children and youth understand the world around them and the work of the church in many regions. Through geographical, spiritual growth and social-issue studies, children have had a chance to expand their worldview and their understanding of God. This year’s spiritual growth studies help children and youth explore and manage their emotions and anxiety. These two studies, Managing Our Emotions and Managing Our Anxiety, help them identify and understand their responses and reactions to what is happening in their lives and to those around them. response asked the writers of the children and youth studies, Trudy Rankin and Faye Wilson, to share their experiences of making understanding and managing emotions and anxieties into two engaging mission studies.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Every month, between 50 and 100 United Methodist Women members volunteer to help with the literacy program or its food and clothing program. Since 2000, between 3,000 and 5,000 United Methodist Women members have volunteered.“Our relationship with United Methodist Women is very open,” said Esparza. “United Methodist Women members are very loving. They are generous, and they are always there for us. They do their best to respond when we inform them of a special need.”Grandstaff explained, “UCC has a very special place for United Methodist Women. It was United Methodist Women that first proposed starting Wesley, one of its locations. And the ties and respect remain very strong.”The centers serve 250 children during the school year and 450 over the summer.“Literacy is a major project for us during the school year as well as during the summer,” Esparza explained. During the summer of 2019, we offered sessions in four schools as well as our three campuses.”The emphasis on the most vulnerable children perfectly fits United Community Centers’ mission. It helps create a brighter future for those for whom it could be most dark.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
Desde hace mucho tiempo, la membresía de Mujeres Metodistas Unidas ha conversado, aprendido y trabajado sobre las actitudes racistas y el racismo institucional. Sabemos que las convicciones personales sobre el racismo, la insensibilidad cultural y los prejuicios hieren a las personas de color y no reflejan el amor de Dios. Con demasiada frecuencia, hay algo que enseñamos a las niñas y a los niños y es que "Jesús ama a las niñas y los niños pequeños, a toda la niñez del mundo", pero esto no es algo que tratamos de hacer realidad en nuestras vidas a través de nuestras acciones y políticas como seres adultos.- - -This episode originally appeared in the July/August 2020 issue of response, the award winning magazine from United Methodist Women.Visit www.UnitedMethodistWomen.org to find out more.
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