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Shade

Author: Lou Mensah

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Award winning arts podcast.

Artist stories from concept to community, in the diaspora and beyond.

"Best show to teach you about art" The Guardian.

Executive produced and hosted by Lou Mensah.


Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast.





Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

87 Episodes
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Matthew Krishanu (b.1980, Bradford, UK) paints atmospheric, pared-back compositions including scenes from the artist’s life, particularly his childhood years in Bangladesh growing up with his brother, and their parents—a British Christian missionary and an Indian theologian. In the paintings, seemingly familiar narratives are alluded to but destabilised. The viewer’s own projections are called upon to fulfil the interpretive loop, raising questions about childhood, religion, race, power, and the legacies of empire.The Bough Breaks is showing at Camden Art Centre until June 23. Krishanu's forthcoming solo exhibition will show at Tanya Leighton L.A., in the autumn.Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 11 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast WebsiteShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEdit & Mix by Mae-Li EvansEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Legacy Russell is Executive Director & Chief Curator of the experimental arts institution The Kitchen, one of New York's oldest non-profit spaces. She is writer, curator and author of the critically acclaimed Glitch Feminism: A Manifesto. I am delighted to have Legacy join me to talk about Black Meme, which is due to be published on May 7th. Black Meme focuses on the history and production of the ‘Meme’ – tracing through Black visual culture from its first appearance in the early 20th century all the way through to present times. It is a critical dissection of race, class, and gender as performed online and offline and emphasizes the central role that Black contributions have played in the development of digital culture.  On the ‘Meme’, Legacy says:’ I want to talk about the economy and engine of this and perhaps push further a discussion about how we can hold ourselves accountable to how this material is produced and circulated.” Black Meme is available to purchase online and in stores from May 7th. Here is a link to Legacy's talk on The New Bend exhibition, as mentioned in Lou's intro. Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 10 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEditing and mixing by Tess DavidsonEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ibrahim Mahama is an installation artist who works with textiles, material production and found objects to create large-scale public interventions. He initially garnered widespread attention for his open-air installations made of stitched-together jute sacks that were draped on or over architectural structures, such as libraries, an airport, and a museum, in the cities of Accra and Kumasi, where he is based. His practise involves a collaborative process of sourcing, collecting, reproducing and installing the often-textile based materials he works with. His pieces speak to ideas around historical memories, traditional belief systems, local economies and the democratisation of art. Ibrahim’s works have been shown in various group and solo shows, including The Norval Foundation in Cape Town, The White Cube in London and Hong Kong and has been a part of the Ghana Pavilion for 2019 Venice Biennale, among many others. In this episode, Ibrahim and I discuss his new large-scale public commission at the Barbican, the process behind creating this work and his hopes for its reception.Ibrahim Mahama Purple Hibiscus runs at the Lakeside Terrace at the Barbican from April 10 - 18 August 2024 and is free to the public.Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 10 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEditing and mixing by Tess DavidsonEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Michael Ohajuru is a London-based art historian who returns to the podcast to discuss the John Blanke project, a large gathering of artists and historians who have come together to re-imagine John Blanke, the black trumpeter to the courts of Henry 7th and Henry 8th and the first person of African descent in British history that we have both a visual and written record of. The participating artists include Keith Piper, Wole Lagunju, Phoebe Boswell, Paul Dash and Larry Achiampong. David Olusoga Professor of Public History at the University of Manchester says of the project:"The John Blanke Project redefines historical exploration by merging practical scholarship with innovation and critical imagination. Anchored in social justice, it reveals the overlooked narratives of Black Tudor England, enriching our grasp of diversity and British identity. By blending art and history, it encourages a deeper, empathetic engagement with our shared past, advocating for a more inclusive and equitable understanding of history."Thanks for listening to this independent podcast. You can support this work by reviewing and sharing the podcast or becoming a Shade Art Review subscriber.Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 10 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEditing and mixing by Tess DavidsonEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Joy Gregory (b. 1959. Bicester, UK). Born in the UK to Jamaican parents, Joy Gregory’s work explores the impact of colonialism on global perceptions of beauty, memory, botany, health and traditional knowledge. As a photographer, Gregory has worked over decades in various media, including video, digital and analogue photography, film installation, Victorian print processes and more recently textiles; exploring photography as technology and as mode of artistic expression. She is interested in understanding how individuals and communities remember and interpret their history, particularly in relation to their connection to the land.Joy & Lou discuss the themes of process and practice as they have developed throughout the artist’s four decade career. In June, Art on the Underground will unveil a new series of Joy’s artworks at Heathrow Terminal 4 Underground station - envisaging Heathrow as a portal of entry and exit. I spoke with Joy in February, as she embarked on her partnership with Hillingdon-based charity Refugees in Effective and Active Partnership (REAP) facilitating a series of photographic workshops with asylum seekers living in hotels in the Heathrow area, as well as a community group for Afghan women in Hayes and Harlington. These workshops will inform the creation of her artwork for Heathrow Terminal 4, giving space to the stories of newly arrived Londoners, displaced people whose realities are increasingly maligned and misrepresented. The work will offer an indelible trace of the cultures, languages and hopes which coalesce in London. In the Autumn of 2025, Whitechapel Gallery will stage Joy’s first monographic exhibition, surveying a four-decade practice.Thanks for listening to this independent podcast. You can support this work by reviewing and sharing the podcast or becoming a Shade Art Review subscriber (follow the link below for details).Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 10 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEditing and mixing by Tess DavidsonEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
This evening, 21 March '24 6 - 8pm GMT: Artist Talk - Tiona Nekkia McClodden at White Cube Bermondsey, London. Tiona will discuss the impetus of her solo exhibition ‘A MERCY | DUMMY’, which spans two discrete bodies of works produced alongside each other. McClodden will explore the impulse to present two bodies of works together for the first time in her career through a choreographed sharing of her collection of archival research, music, video, and texts. Reserve a spot here. MERCY | DUMMY runs until 24 March.Tiona Nekkia McClodden (b.1981, Blytheville, Arkansas) spent her formative years throughout the American South. Trained as a filmmaker, McClodden worked largely within the punk and club scene in Atlanta before moving to Philadelphia in 2006 and expanding her practice to include painting, sculpture, photography and installation.Recent solo exhibitions include Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland (2023); Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland (2023); The Shed, New York (2022); 52 Walker, New York (2022); The Triple Deities, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2021); and Company Gallery, New York (2019). Selected group exhibitions include Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York (2023–24); El Museo del Barrio in New York (2022–23), touring to Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona (2023) and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida (2023–24); ICA Los Angeles, California (2022); Prospect 5, New Orleans, Louisiana (2021–22); Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania (2021); New Museum, New York (2021); Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (2019); and the Whitney Biennial, New York (2019). Other presentations of her work have been on view at MOCA, Los Angeles, California (2017); MCA Chicago, Illinois (2017); and MoMA PS1, New York (2016). In recent years, McClodden has won prestigious grants and fellowships, including the Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant (2022), Princeton Arts Fellowship (2021–23); the Bucksbaum Award, Whitney Museum of American Art (2019); Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts (2019); the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (2017); and the Pew Fellowship (2016), while running Conceptual Fade, a project gallery and library she founded in 2020 that hosts micro-exhibitions and publications centred on Black art and conceptual practice.Work by McClodden is in the permanent collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; MoMA, New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania; and Rennie Museum, Canada.Read Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Series 10 | 20% discount codeShade Podcast InstagramShade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonEditing and mixing by Tess DavidsonEditorial support from Anne Kimunguyi Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Cynthia Lawrence John

Cynthia Lawrence John

2023-12-2113:18

Welcome to the final episode in my seven part, end of year series! Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual, I am joined by friends to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them.Cynthia is a costume designer, whose work you will have seen in successful British films, like the recent Rye Lane directed by Raine Allen-Miller. Cynthia's currently showing work at Somerset House in London as part of the exhibition Missing Thread, which charts the shifting landscape of Black British culture and the unique contribution it's made to Britain's design history. Our friendship began in the early 2000s, when we worked together in my capacity as a photographer.It was Cynthia's generosity of ideas and her unique approach to design that inspired me and makes her one of the most revered costume designers today. Cynthia and I sneaked in a super quick, ten minute conversation whilst she was on set last week. She shares her musical influences and talks about how music is the foundation of her design for all of her characters.Please share and review this independent Black art show. Thank you!ENJOY!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramMissing Thread Exhibition Somerset HouseCynthia Lawrence John AgentCynthia Lawrence John InstagramThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Rashod Taylor

Rashod Taylor

2023-12-2021:21

Welcome to the penultimate episode in this Christmas series of conversations. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual, I am joined by friends artists to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them. Rashod Taylor is a Missouri-based photographer whose photographs are a window into the Black American experience. His work uses portraiture to address themes of family, race, culture, and legacy. Rashod is most recognised for his Little Black Boy series, an ongoing project featuring his son, which earned him an Arnold Newman Prize. His work is actively collected by the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston and has been featured in publications including National Geographic, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Forbes, and many more. His photographs embody a communing of influences from the past, present, and future, he says ”I tell the story of my family history and my story, in my son's story.” Our conversation begins with Rashod telling us about the influence of negro spiritual songs on his work.ENJOY! Please share and review this independent show. Thank you!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramRashod Taylor WebsiteRashod Taylor InstagramThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Tyrone Isaac Stuart

Tyrone Isaac Stuart

2023-12-1926:56

Welcome to this seven part, end of year series - new episodes are released each weekday between Dec 13-21. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual. I am joined by friends (artists, dancers, musicians) to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them.Tyrone is a concept driven artist whose skills originate from Jazz and Hip-Hop Theatre. Working as a performer across dance and music, his practice has grown to become a mixture of Krump, contemporary dance, visual art & Jazz music. He performs in Julian Knxx's latest exhibition Chorus in Rememory of Flight, currently running at the Barbican. "There's already a musical language that is embedded in the ideas of that work because of the way Julian is working with choirs, and then I can try and translate that into movement. I have a good relationship with Julian and there's a lot of trust. So in some ways, we've established a chorus."He recently released his debut LP, S!ck - and was called ”one to watch" by Giles Peterson this year. Commissions include a full length theatre work for the Barbican 'An Earnest Life', a duet for Dance Umbrella, Beyond Words & an international Solo work for Hayley Matthews Ensemble. He is a Steve Reid Innovation Award 2019-2020 recipient, and a 2020 Artist in Residence at Clarence Mews Space, 2021 East London Ideas Fund Awardee & 2022 Peter Whittingham Jazz recipient and a 2023 Take Five jazz awardees.ENJOY! Please share and review this independent show. Thank you!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramTyrone S!ck LPTyrone x Julian Knxx at The BarbicanTyrone InstagramThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Welcome to this seven part, end of year series! New episodes released each weekday between Dec 13-21. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual. I am joined by friends (artists, dancers, musicians) to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them. Today I am joined by Jose Campos, who is also known by his artist name, Studio Lenca.Jose considers himself to be an artist that doesn’t belong anywhere apart from the world he creates.He says that “I have a deep longing to connect with the land of my ancestors. It’s a longing that I don’t realise is always there until it gets fulfilled.” Jose was forcibly displaced as a consequence of El Salvador’s civil war, he one of the first wave of child migrants moving to the USA. Travelling illegally with his mother, the family lived as ‘illegal aliens’, cleaning houses with no fixed address. His paintings depict regal figures that seek to decentralise the collective idea of Salvadoran identity.The work playfully references a combination of biographical anecdotes, personal reflections and folkloric iconography.ENJOY!Please share and review this independent show. Thank you!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramStudio Lenca @ TKE Studios in Margate.Studio Lenca website.Representation Carl Freedman Gallery.This series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Helene Love-Allotey

Helene Love-Allotey

2023-12-1533:25

Welcome to my seven part end of year series! New episodes will be released each weekday between Dec 13-21. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual, I am joined by friends (artists, dancers, musicians and in today's episode an art specialist) to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them. Get ready to be inspired!Helene is Head of Sale and a specialist in Modern and Contemporary African art at Bonhams. She travels to Ghana regularly and specializes on art from that region. Her expertise also extends to 20th century Africa. Our conversation reveals just how knowledgeable Helene also is on African music and she recommends some excellent tunes from the continent that inspire her. We start our conversation hearing about a moment where she was talking with her SOAS tutor eight years ago, which led her on the journey to her current role at Bonhams. Stay tuned until the end to hear Helene's fantastic music recommendations!Please share this series and review! Thank you!ENJOY! Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramAfrican Art History InstagramBonhamsThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Axel Kacoutié

Axel Kacoutié

2023-12-1421:18

Welcome to my seven part end of year series! New episodes will be released each weekday between Dec 13-21. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual, I am joined by friends (artists, dancers, musicians) to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them. Get ready to be inspired!Today I am delighted to introduce my friend, Axel Kacoutié - the multi-award-winning creator who's been crafting sound, music, and words to challenge the familiar and revive a magic in the mundane. Previously the Creative Director of Sound at The Guardian, their work has featured on the BBC, Spotify and in physical spaces like the Barbican, Tate Modern & Sundance Film Festival. They’ve received British Podcast Awards, ARIAs, Third Coast awards and many, many more. Some of you may know Axel from our work together Black Balloons for Tate Modern, Interludes podcast series on art and healing and Wandering where we walk with creatives through art spaces. We start by hearing Axel talk about their work A Mother Tongue which is a personal essay reflecting on language, created for the BBC. They also mention Gatekeeper where Axel discovers a new sense of self in the cosmologies, concepts and realities of queer and indigenous folks. In this piece we hear Axel say "Somewhere between the narrow entry of Who I am and What I seem to be, lies a vast and nameless place.” It is this vast and nameless place that Axel and I visit in todays conversation.ENJOY! Please review & share!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramGatekeeper by Axel KacoutiéA Mother Tongue by Axel KacoutiéV & A East The Music is Black Film sound designed by Axel KacoutiéAxel Kacoutié InstagramThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian JacksonMixing by Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Brian Jackson

Brian Jackson

2023-12-1323:47

WELCOME TO SERIES NINE!This is my end of year series! New episodes will be released each weekday, between Dec 13-21. Inspired by the Black radical tradition of the harmony between the lyrical and visual. I am joined by friends (artists, dancers, photographers, musicians) to explore the musical influences that inspire their work. We also look to the people, real and imagined, familial and ancestral who guide them. Get ready to be inspired!Today I am delighted to introduce a special episode, with my friend the musician Brian Jackson. You may know Brian's work from his partnership with Gil Scott-Heron, together they made ten albums over an eight year period, including Pieces of a Man and Winter in America.Time and time again that music has found its way onto over 100 cuts like Common's The People (from We Almost Lost Detroit) and Kendrick Lamar's Poe Mans Dreams (from Peace Go With You, Brother). Brian is still building with artists as diverse as Adrian Younge and Ali Shaheed Muhammad (Midnight Hour, A Tribe Called Quest) to the vocalist Gregory Porter.I started by asking Brian about Langston Hughes, and how his legacy brought he and Gil together, where they followed in the footsteps of not only Langston Hughes but also Thurgood Marshall, Kwame Nkrumah and Oscar Brown Jr. Brian says in our conversation:”It [Lincoln] just seemed like a logical place for me to continue my journey into Afrocentricity.” "Gil used to call our songs, our albums, survival kits on wax. And, you know, that's just another way of looking at the Griot tradition. Because, it was his responsibility to heal the community. It's spiritual work.""I'm gonna tell you Lou, before it's all over, I'm gonna do a Christmas album. What you think about that?!"Please share and review this independent show. Thank you!ENJOY!Follow us:Shade Podcast Spotify Playlist (updated daily)Shade Art Review Shade Art Review Christmas offer codeShade Podcast InstagramBrian Jackson InstagramBrian Jackson NYTimesPieces of a Man PodcastThis is Brian Jackson Jazz Is DeadThis series was produced and hosted by Lou MensahMusic King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by today's guest Brian JacksonMixing Tess Davidson Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Welcome to Wandering. A four part series of immersive podcast gallery walks, brought to you by Shade Podcast and Axel Kacoutié.Today we meet the artist Harold Offeh at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London as he prepares to present work in their forthcoming exhibition, Soulscapes.Opening on Feb 14th 2024, Soulscapes is a major exhibition of landscape art. Featuring more than 30 contemporary works, it will span painting, photography, film, tapestry and collage from leading artists including Harold Offeh, Hurvin Anderson, Phoebe Boswell, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Kimathi Donkor, Isaac Julien, Marcia Michael, Mónica de Miranda and Alberta Whittle, as well as some of the most important emerging voices working today.Soulscapes will explore our connection with the world around us through the eyes of artists from the African Diaspora. Discover more episodes in this series as we meet Zakia Sewell, Nabihah Iqbal and Kayo Chingyoni, as they enjoy artworks in the National Portrait Gallery, Sir John Soane's Museum and Graves Gallery. Sponsored by Bloomberg Connects, the arts and culture app. The free app offers access to more than 250 cultural organizations through a single download, with new guides being added every week. To explore the Dulwich Picture Gallery guide, and many more, download the app today from the App Store or Google Play. Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Welcome to Wandering. A four part series of immersive podcast gallery walks, brought to you by Shade Podcast and Axel Kacoutié.Today we meet writer, editor and broadcaster, Kayo Chingonyi at the Graves Gallery in Sheffield, as he meditates on process and practice and what Patrick Caulfield's, The Hermit reveals to him.Artworks Discussed in this listen: The Hermit, (1966) - Patrick CaulfieldFountains Fell, Yorkshire Dales, 3 August 2008, (2016) - Simon RobertsDiscover more episodes in this series as we meet Zakia Sewell, Nabihah Iqbal and Harold Offeh as they enjoy artworks in the National Portrait Gallery, Sir John Soane's Museum and Dulwich Picture Gallery. Listen today on the Bloomberg Connects app or search for Shade Podcast wherever you download your podcasts.Sponsored by Bloomberg Connects, the arts and culture app. The free app offers access to more than 250 cultural organizations through a single download, with new guides being added every week. To explore the Graves Gallery guide, and many more, download the app today from the App Store or Google Play. Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Today we meet musician, producer, broadcaster and DJ Nabihah Iqbal at Sir John Soane's Museum in London as she explores the many trinkets and secrets, hidden in the open.Wandering is brought to you by Shade Podcast and Axel Kacoutié.Discover more episodes in this series as we meet Zakia Sewell, Kayo Chingonyi and Harold Offeh as they discover artworks in the National Portrait Gallery, Graves Gallery and Dulwich Picture Gallery. Listen today on the Bloomberg Connects app or search for Shade Podcast wherever you download your podcasts.Sponsored by Bloomberg Connects, the arts and culture app. The free app offers access to more than 250 cultural organizations through a single download, with new guides being added every week. To explore the Sir John Soane's Museum guide, and many more, download the app today from the App Store or Google Play. Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Broadcaster, DJ and writer Zakia Sewell walks with us in the National Portrait Gallery in London. Zakia reflects on how memory and legacy influence our way of seeing, and how our contemporary eyes judge the face of history. We ask, to what extent is a portrait a mirror? We view a photographic portrait of Sarah Forbes Bonetta (1843-80)Room 23, Floor 2. Historian and essayist; Trustee of the National Portrait Gallery, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) and explorer once a Governor of Jamaica, Edward John Eyre (1815-1901). Room 23, Floor 2.  Subscribe to Shade Podcast to listen to future episodes of Wandering featuring our guests Nabihah Iqbal, Kayo Chingonyi and Harold Offeh as they discover artworks in the Sir John Soane's Museum, Graves Gallery and Dulwich Picture Gallery.Wandering is brought to you by Shade Podcast and Axel Kacoutié.Sponsored by Bloomberg Connects, the arts and culture app. The free app offers access to more than 250 cultural organizations through a single download, with new guides being added every week. To explore the National Portrait Gallery guide, and many more, download the app today from the App Store or Google Play. Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Today my guest is the Director Eddie Hutton-Mills. Eddie co-directed Kanaval: A Peoples History of Haiti in Six Chapters with Leah Gordon. Eddie Hutton-Mills is an award winning documentary filmmaker, who has made films for all the major UK & US broadcasters including the BBC, ITV and Channel 4. He’s also made biographicalfeature films about Naomi Campbell and Diane Abbott. His passion is for making films about subjects that need confronting like Fighting The Power: Britain After George Floyd. He is currently directing a film for the prestigious BBC Storyville strand.Eddie and I discuss Kanaval in this episode. A visually arresting feature documentary, set in the present but which tells the rich story of Haiti’s past, that follows a number of carnival performers in the lead-up to, and during, the annual Jacmel Mardi Gras. The performers relate their own personal histories as well as the stories of their carnival characters, which represent moments and people from the distant, and not so distant, Haitian past. Interwoven with the interviews, testimonies and observational footage is archive material, drawn from a wide variety of sources to enhance our understanding of Haitian history and culture from the time of the indigenous Taino through to the present day. This is not the carnival of sequins and sound systems found elsewhere in the Caribbean, but a celebration of rebellion and resistance resonating through the centuries.The documentary was nominated for Best Debut Director and Best Cinematography in the British Independent Film Awards and Best Documentary at the London film awards, in 2022.Watch Kanaval on BBCiPlayerThank you for listening and for supporting Shade - the award winning independent art show highlighting the work of Black art practitioners via Patreon or Ko-fiSee you next time!Shade Podcast is hosted and produced by Lou MensahMusic generously composed for Shade by Brian JacksonShade InstagramShade website Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
An exploration of race and politics via the dancefloor.Today my guest is the photographer and filmmaker Jermaine Francis. Jermaine and I discuss his recent film Lost in Music: A Post Industrial Dreamscape - an exploration of race and politics within a dancefloor context. This work was recently presented alongside a discussion with the writer Nathalie Olah and photographer Edward "Eddie" Otchere at Camden Arts Centre.His practice works within documentary & portraiture, in the format of personal driven photo projects & editorials, exploring the issues that arise from our interaction in the everyday environment. He has published two books, Something That Seems So Familiar and Rhythms from the Metroplex. Jermaine's work can be found in publications such as i-D, 10 Magazine and the Wall Street Journal, and in exhibitions at GaleriePCP in Paris and Saatchi Gallery.I loved talking with Jermaine and I hope that you enjoy his words on his rich creative life as much as I did.Thank you for listening and for supporting Shade - the award winning independent art show highlighting the work of Black art practitioners via Patreon and Ko-fiSee you next time!Shade Podcast is hosted and produced by Lou MensahMusic generously composed for Shade by Brian JacksonShade InstagramShade websiteJermaine Francis instagram Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Snapshots: Caribbean Cinema Up Close at The Barbican.Today my guest is Patrice Robinson who talks about Snapshots: Caribbean Cinema Up Close, at The Barbican, her debut curatorial season. With interest in communities, community access to film and the intimacies of the human experience, Patrice is a film programmer and writer working in the intersection of audiences and cinema.We discuss Patrice's late entry into film following a change in career, and how the Independent Cinema Office’s FEDS Scheme led to her permanent position at The Barbican. She also shares how her time at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival informed Snapshots, and why she focused on films that shared themes of connection - to the land, oneself and family.Snapshots offers a rare insight into the flourishing Caribbean film culture. Exploring individual and shared cultural identities, Snapshots: Caribbean Cinema Up Close runs from 17-31 May, and kicks off with the UK premiere of the brand new restoration of Kavery Kaul’s One Hand Don’t Clap, her upbeat archive documentary which explores the importance of Calypso music and the community around it. The season continues with Currents, a programme of seven shorts by Caribbean filmmakers which explore universal themes of (familial and self) acceptance, overcoming adversity, justice and pride from a uniquely Caribbean perspective.The season closes with writer/director José María Cabral’s Parsley, based on the real story of the Parsley Massacre, a mass killing of Haitians living inthe Dominican Republic north western frontier October 1937. Parsley tells the story of a heavily pregnant Haitian woman left alone in the wilderness near the Dominican border, trying to escape the attack.Snapshots: Caribbean Cinema Up Close - The BarbicanWed 17 - Wed 31 May 2023Shade Podcast is written, hosted and produced by Lou MensahMusic generously composed for Shade by Brian JacksonThank you for listening and for supporting Shade - an independent art show highlighting the work of Black art practitioners via Patreon and Ko-fiSee you next time!Shade InstagramShade websitePatrice Robinson website Help support the work that goes into creating Shade Podcast. https://plus.acast.com/s/shadepodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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