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Filmtrepreneur® - The Entrepreneurial Filmmaking Podcast

Filmtrepreneur® - The Entrepreneurial Filmmaking Podcast

Author: Alex Ferrari

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The Filmtrepreneur® - A Entrepreneurial Filmmaking Podcast shows you how to turn your filmmaking into a viable business. We do a deep dive into marketing, branding, growth hacking, micro-budget filmmaking, and creating revenue streams from your indie films. They don't teach you this in film school. Host Alex Ferrari interviews some of the film industry's most successful and prolific filmmakers, industry professionals and Filmtreprenuers. If you want to learn how to make money with your independent films then take a listen. Start thinking like a Filmtrepreneur today!
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Today on the show we have writer/director Daedalus Howell. Daedalus' film Pill Head is the definition of being a Filmtrepreneur. So much, in fact,​ I used his film as a case study in my book Rise of the Filmtrepreneur®: How to Turn Your Indie Film into a Moneymaking Business. The method he used was the "regional cinema model." This mode; is based around developing, producing and distributing a film project targeted to the niche audience of a geograhic area. He essentially made an Art House film for his hometown.Pill Head was entirely a hometown affair — from discounted permits to merchant buy-in and a recent theatrical release through a consortium of local exhibitors (no four-walling!) accompanied by tons of local press.In this interview, we go deep into the regional cinema model, how he creates multiple revenue streams and how he got that group of local theater owners to four wall his film for free. Enjoy my inspirational conversation with Daedalus Howell.
I know the title of this show is bold but in the course of this podcast I will explain what I see happening in the traditional film distribution model. My trip to this year to the American Film Market was extremely educational. I met some amazing people, industry insiders, and tribe members. I did, however, spoke to many film distributors and sales agents and discover a truth that I had suspected for a long time now, traditional film distribution is dying.Film distributors are having as hard of a time trying to generate revenue with their film libraries as filmmakers are getting their films sold. The world is changing. Many filmmakers are producing films for the 90’s and early 2000’s marketplace. Both filmmakers and distributors have little or no understanding of what today’s customer wants or how to get it to them while still making money.In this episode I discuss:• The DVD/Home Video Crash• The Streaming Wars• AVOD• How film distributors are becoming more predatory out of desperation• The world of data/niche driven cinema• Cutting out the middlemen• The Googlfication of the movie industry• Foreign markets• The shortage of talent in the film industry, according to the streaming platforms• Why Netflix paid $200 million for The Irishman• How the indie filmmaker can survive and thrive in the new world of filmmaking• and much moreWarning: This episode will be mind-blowing so please brace yourself. Enjoy!
The day is finally here. My new book Rise of the Filmtrepreneur®: How to Turn Your Indie Film into a Moneymaking Business is finally out. I'm so excited to share this with you, the IFH Tribe. I've been working for months to make this happen. I wanted to give you a sneak peek at the book so in this episode, I'll be releasing the first two chapters of the audiobook for your listening pleasure. These two chapters set the tone for the book. In the episode, I even show you a way to download the entire book for free.Here's a bit of what Rise of the Filmtrepreneur has to offerIt’s harder today than ever before for independent filmmakers to make money with their films. From predatory film distributors ripping them off to huckster film aggregators who prey upon them, the odds are stacked against the indie filmmaker. The old distribution model for making money with indie film is broken and there needs to be a change. The future of independent filmmaking is the entrepreneurial filmmaker or the Filmtrepreneur®. In Rise of the Filmtrepreneur® author and filmmaker Alex Ferrari breaks down how to actually make money with independent film projects and shows filmmakers how to turn their indie films into profitable businesses. This is not all theory, Alex uses multiple real-world case studies to illustrate each part of his method. This book shows you the step by step way to turn your filmmaking passion into a profitable career. If you are making a feature film, series or any kind of video content, The Filmtrepreneur® Method will set you up for success.I really hope you enjoy Rise of the Filmtrepreneur. I truly believe that the only way indie filmmakers will be able to survive the new film economy is by becoming Filmtrepreneurs. My goal for this book is to show filmmakers and creatives that they have to think differently. The old film economy is DEAD. Traditional film distribution is not set up to benefit the indie filmmaker. The cards are stacked against the creative and things need to change.Filmmakers need to take back control of their films and how they generate revenue from them. The day of handing over your film to a predatory film distributor because you believe there is no other choice is over! There is another way and the Filmtrepreneur Method is that way. Let me know what you think of the book. Enjoy and VIVA LA REVOLUTION!
Today's episode is a big one guys. You need to brace yourself. The film economy is going through a major shift. It is as big as when we went from Black and white films to color or adding sound to movies. Movies industry is changing from a product-based business (DVDs, Blu-Rays) to a service-based business (streaming services). Spotify and other music streaming services have devalued music down to basically worthless. What used to cost you $17.99 for one album of 1 or 2 hits and a bunch of songs you didn’t want now cost fractions of a penny from your monthly membership.On Spotify, an artist needs around 337,000 plays to earn $1472 a month (the monthly minimum wage. Amazon Prime pays .6¢ per hour viewed. Streaming platforms are paying less and less and the indie budget seems to be going up and up. This business model is not sustainable.Companies like Disney, Amazon, and Apple have a business model that will ensure their survival in the new film economy. Because their main business is not making movies. They use media as marketing vehicles selling other products and services. Disney’s revenue is broken down like this 42% is Media Networks (licensing ESPN, Disney Channel, FX Networks, etc to cable and streaming platforms. 28% is Parks and resorts. 15% is studio entertainment and 9% is consumer goods and interactive entertainment. Disney generates $36,220,000 a day. Disney+ is a HUGE sign on where the film industry is going. It has 10,000,000 subscribers so far. The direct to consumer model, killing the middle man (DVD manufactures, Cable channels, movie theater chains). The old way is dying and entire sub-industries are trying to hold on for dear life to the status quo. Movies theaters are struggling. At the American Film Market. I heard many distributors tell me the theatrical was not a growth industry anymore. The devaluation of movies and series began with YouTube (the FREE version of Spotify for videos). A generation was raised on getting video content for free whenever they want. Movies and series fell into that well. Then Netflix gave us the ability to watch films and series as part of a small monthly fee. We no longer had to wait for weeks to watch the full seasons of our favorite show and suffer through commercials, we could binge an entire show in a few days, commercial-free. Now with so many streaming services available why would you buy or rent a film if it will be available on a streaming service in a few weeks. The other big problem is the volume of content. Indie films (along with studio films) are being dumped into a marketplace in an ocean of content. It’s basic economics, the more quantity of a product that is on a shelf the shelf, the cheaper it is. It’s supply and demand. How can an indie filmmaker survive in this new film economy?Niche down and focus your work on a specific audience that you can reach or cultivate. Become a filmtrepreneur. Musicians have begun focusing on building themselves as a brand and using their music as advertising to sell ancillary products and get sponsorships. Indie filmmakers can do this as well when focusing on a niche audience. Piracy is a HUGE problem for all media industries, books, music, and movies. Steve Jobs said“You can’t stop piracy, you can only compete with it.”It’s much harder to pirate a t-shirt, course, niche service or sponsorship. You need to think outside the box. The business is changing whether you like it or not. If you do not change the way you think about filmmaking you will not survive. You can sit there and complain. You can sit there and try to hold on to the good ol days. You can sit there and talk about how things should be or you can adjust and pivot your approach to making and selling your films or end up like Blockbuster Video, Toys R Us, Circuit City, Virgin Records, and a many other corporation corpses of companies and people who did not change with the times. I do a deep dive and go farther into this in the podcast and share ways to make your film projects thrive in this new world. I hope this episode opens your eyes to the current marketplace for indie films.
Today’s guests are Oscar® Nominated writer/director Paola di Florio & and producer Peter Rader. They worked on one of my favorite documentaries in recent years called AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda.The film is an unconventional biography about the Hindu Swami who brought yoga and meditation to the West in the 1920s. Paramahansa Yogananda authored the spiritual classic Autobiography of a Yogi,” which has sold millions of copies worldwide and is a go-to book for seekers, philosophers, and yoga enthusiasts today. (Apparently, it was the only book that Steve Jobs had on his iPad.) By personalizing his own quest for enlightenment and sharing his struggles along the path, Yogananda made ancient Vedic teachings accessible to a modern audience, attracting many followers and inspiring the millions who practice yoga today.Filmed over three years with the participation of 30 countries around the world, the documentary examines the world of yoga, modern and ancient, east and west and explores why millions today have turned their attention inwards, bucking the limitations of the material world in pursuit of self-realization.Archival material from the life of Yogananda (who died in 1952) creates a spine for the narrative, but the film stretches the dimensions of a standard biography. The footage includes stylized interviews, metaphoric imagery, and recreations, taking us from holy pilgrimages in India to Harvard’s Divinity School and its cutting-edge physics labs, from the Center for Science and Spirituality at the University of Pennsylvania to the Chopra Center in Carlsbad, California. By evoking the journey of the soul as it pushes its way through the oppression of the human ego and delusion of the material world, the film creates an experiential immersion into the unseen realms. AWAKE is ultimately the story of humanity itself: the universal struggle of all beings to free themselves from suffering and to seek lasting happiness.The story of how they self-distributed the film, to the niche audiences they tapped into, from booking theaters to SVOD is remarkable. They did it all on their own and the film has been viewed by millions. I wanted to bring them on the show to discuss their methods for audience building, social media marketing, release strategy and much more. If you want to the IFH Video Podcast version of this interview go to IFHTV Video Podcast – Building an Audience for Your Indie Film with Paola di Florio & Peter Rader. Enjoy!
I know it's most Filmtrepreneur's dream to have their film screen theatrically around the world. I know I always love seeing my work on the big screen. There's a magical thing about the silver screen but alas that dream was out of reach for most indie filmmakers until now.If you haven't heard of the remarkable "game-changing" company TUGG, you are in for a treat. TUGG is cinema on-demand for indie films. The web-based platform allows you to self distribute your feature film around the country with no money upfront.That's right no upfront costs. You only pay when you have a screening booked.TUGG has created a remarkable way for moviegoers to experience the films they love in a theatrical setting. Through this platform, indie filmmakers are empowered to submit a film, create a screening time and find a nearby movie theater, then spread the word to their local and online community.Once a necessary amount of people commit to attending, the event will be confirmed, and TUGG will reserve the theater, manage to ticket and ensure delivery of the film; allowing the audience to sit back and enjoy the show while the indie filmmaker counts the cash."Every film speaks to a different person, and the most exciting thing about TUGG is that it allows for audiences to find their films and films to find their audiences. We are eager to offer a platform that enables studios, filmmakers and exhibitors to have unprecedented interaction with communities and influencers,"...said co-founders Gonda and Gonzalez. You might ask:"What kind of  movie theaters does TUGG have in its network?"TUGG has access to over 90% of ALL the screens in the United States. Theater chains like:Alamo Drafthouse CinemaAMC TheatresBow Tie CinemasCinemark TheatresGoodrich Quality CinemasRave CinemasRegal CinemasJust listen to this what Alamo Drafthouse CEO/Founder Tim League had to say about TUGG:"As the creators were first showing me TUGG, I had the same sensation I had when I first started using Facebook.  This was a brilliant, well-executed concept that could really change things for our business in a significant way,"In this episode, we speak to Felicia Pride, Director of Independent Film LA at TUGG. She sits down with us and discusses all things TUGG, theatrical distribution, and indie film. Be prepared to have your mind ROCKED!
I've been at a fair share of film festivals in my life and I've submitted to many more than I've been accepted to. With that said I have seen many less than honorable film festival organizers throughout the process or outright film festival scams.Now not all film festivals are run by grifters and con men but you need to be aware of the signs that a film festival you are submitting to may just be in existence to remove you from you hard-earned cash and not to celebrate amazing independent film and filmmakers.I put together a few warning signs you should look out for when submitting to film festivals. Stay safe out there everyone!
Who hasn't heard of the now legendary indie film rags to riches tale of The Blair Witch Project? Every film student from Los Angeles to Mumbai heard the story of how two young film students spent $27,000 (mostly from friends, family and credit cards) to make a little indie horror film that ended up grossing $250 million worldwide.Directors Eduardo Sanchez and Daniel Myrick shot The Blair Witch Project in a new way which would later be called "found footage." Without The Blair Witch Project, there is no Paranormal Activity,no Cloverfield or no The Last Exorcism.Today's guest Eduardo Sanchez goes back to the late 90's and shares his experience on what it was like to be in the center of The Blair Witch Project hurricane. What it was like being on the cover of Time Magazine and how did it feel to be the toast of Hollywood...for a period of time.We also discuss the aftermath, how his career grew post Blair Witch and crazy stories of Hollyweird.Enjoy my conversation with Eduardo Sanchez.
What is "Hybrid Distribution?" Hybrid distribution is the state-of-the-art model more and more filmmakers are using to succeed. It enables them to have unprecedented access to audiences, to maintain overall control of their distribution, and to receive a significantly larger share of revenues.Today on the show we have a legend in the ultra-low-budget​ indie film world, Peter Broderick. He coined the term Hybrid Distribution in his seminal article Declaration of Independence: The Ten Principles of Hybrid Distribution. Peter also wrote a​ very informative article detailing ways filmmakers can deal with the Distribber debacle and protect themselves if a distributor goes bankrupt.Peter Broderick is President of Paradigm Consulting, which helps filmmakers and media companies develop strategies to maximize distribution, audience, and revenues.In addition to advising on sales and marketing, Paradigm Consulting specializes in state-of-the-art distribution techniques—including innovative theatrical service deals, hybrid video strategies (mixing retail and direct sales online), and new approaches to global distribution.Enjoy my eye-opening conversation with Peter Broderick.
Today's guest is a bonafide Youtube Guru. Christopher Sharpe has not only created one but two massive Youtube Channels. His first was with his wife called Hilah's Cooking which has close to 400,000 users and launched books, speaking engagements, Food Network appearances and much more.From there he partnered with actress/yoga instructor Adriene Mishler and launched the Yoga with Adriene channel. Now that channel's user base is 5.5 Million subscribers. If you type "Yoga" into Youtube Adriene comes up for the first 7 videos. CRAZY!Together Chris and Adriene built an online empire. They have a huge membership site, licensed products, a US tour and more. Chris shares the secrets on how he was able to hack the Youtube algorithm and get his video ranked in a MASSIVELY competitive space like YOGA.Chris literally wrote the book on the subject: YouTube: Ultimate YouTube Guide To Building A Channel, Audience And To Start Make.About the Book: Are you ready to launch your own YouTube Channel, develop a devoted fan base and make money while you’re at it? Christopher Sharpe is the producer of multiple YouTube Channels that attract passionate audiences and add thousands of new subscribers per day.In YouTube Black Book, Christopher shares how he launched these channels and shows you how to turn a passion for creating YouTube videos into a profitable business. YouTube Black Book offers you a glimpse behind the scenes. Christopher shares his journey with complete transparency so you can emulate his success and avoid his failures. This book focuses on the big picture strategy of what it really means to create a successful YouTube channel. From setting goals and developing your initial idea to strategies to get more views, YouTube Black Book covers all the bases.Christopher Sharpe is the producer and director of the popular YouTube channel Hilah Cooking and Yoga With Adriene. Get ready to take notes on this epic interview with Christopher Sharpe.
Today on the show we have filmmaker David Willis. Willis is the first producer in the United States to raise over $1 million and make a feature film by using Equity Crowdfunding. Equity Crowdfunding is a new, disruptive method of fundraising in the United States, from a law that went into effect in 2016, opening a whole new avenue for filmmakers to make their ideas reality. And it's working. Movies are getting made this way.Equity Crowdfunding (officially called Regulation Crowdfunding, or Reg CF) can be used to finance almost any new or existing business. Unlike Kickstarter or Indiegogo, Reg CF campaigns do not focus on donations from friends and family, but instead on the hundreds of thousands of interested investors already on approved platforms. Because of this, the average Reg CF campaign is almost twice as likely to be successful and raises more than eleven times the average Kickstarter campaign -- if you do it right.David is running an Equity Crowdfunding Masterclass. No one who has successfully raised money using Equity Crowdfunding has ever given a step-by-step masterclass like this, showing exactly how they did it. He'll teach you how you can also go from zero to over $1M in investments in six months as he did.Check it out: Equity Crowdfunding Masterclass (DISCOUNT CODE: HUSTLE) to get $100 off the class.Enjoy my conversation with Alrik Bursell.
What can I say about Lloyd Kaufman? Director. Writer. Producer. Indie Filmmaker. Innovator. Nice guy. Pain in the ass of mainstream media. I believe all of those statements are true and then some.Lloyd Kaufman is one of the original indie filmmakers going back to the 1970s. The Troma Universe was born in 1974 with a series of highly original, raunchy comedies such as Squeeze Play!, Stuck On You!, Waitress!, and other film titles ending with an exclamation point.In my favorite decade, the '80s is where Lloyd Kaufman really made a name for himself. His 1984 sleeper hit The Toxic Avenger launched his career and his production company Troma Entertainment. Creating his own brand of independent films, Lloyd Kaufman discovered there was a market for his "unique type" of films.The success of The Toxic Avenger was followed by a string of commercial and artistic triumphs in a similar vein, blending fantasy, comedy, badass action, and a bit of eroticism in a style that can only be described as “Tromatic”.These films, including the Class of Nuke ‘Em High trilogy, Sgt. Kabukiman NYPD and Troma’s War were often ignored or scorned by the intelligentsia of the time but spoke to an entire generation (including yours truly) of young people who rejected the pandering, commercial films of the mid-to-late ’80s. Some of his fans include Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Mike Judge, Peter Jackson, and Trey Parker.Always one to help indie filmmakers, Lloyd Kaufman just wrote his most recent book Sell Your Own Damn Movie!, the latest installment of his acclaimed series of books on guerrilla filmmaking that includes Make Your Own Damn Movie: Secrets of a Renegade Director, Direct Your Own Damn Movie! and Produce Your Own Damn Movie!  The books have inspired Kaufman to teach a successful series of Master Classes at colleges and institutions across the country and the world!To say this was an enjoyable and entertaining interview would be an understatement. Enjoy my conversation with the one and only Lloyd Kaufman.
I've been trying to get today's guest on the show for months. Mark Stolaroffis a No-Budget Filmmaking maestro. Here's a bit about our guest.Mark Stolaroff is an independent producer and a founding partner of Antic Pictures, an LA-based production company producing a slate of low-budget, high-quality digital features. He recently finished principal photography on DriverX, his 5th collaboration with award-winning writer/director Henry Barrial.DriverX stars Patrick Fabian (Better Call Saul), Desmin Borges (You're The Worst), Melissa Fumero (Brooklyn Nine-Nine) and many other talented actors.Stolaroff and Barrial's previous feature, The House That Jack Built, which premiered at the 2013 Los Angeles Film Festival, played theatrically in December 2015 and is now currently streaming on Netflix and other digital platforms.Mark produced Barrial's third feature, the micro-budget sci-fi film Pig, which was an official selection at over 35 film festivals worldwide, winning 10 awards, including 7 Best Feature award.Pig was distributed by Kino Lorber in 2014. With Ron Judkins, Stolaroff produced Barrial's second feature, True Love, which was developed in the Sundance Screenwriters Laband was a hit on the festival circuit. Stolaroff also consulted on Meera Menon's Farah Goes Bang, which premiered at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, winning the Nora Ephron Award.Other projects include:The Trouble With Men And WomenPaper ChasersSome BodyManic (starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Don Cheadle, and Zooey Deschanel)Keep The River On Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale...and others.He is currently producing the horror feature Devil's Whisper, directed by Adam Ripp, which will be shooting in June 2016. Stolaroff was formerly a principal of Next Wave Films, a company of The Independent Film Channel that provided finishing funds to exceptional, low budget films; and through its production arm Agenda 2000, financed and executive produced digital features.Included in Next Wave's 13 films are:Christopher Nolan's FollowingJoe Carnahan's  Blood, Guts, Bullets, & OctaneAmir Bar Lev's FighterSundance Grand Jury Prize-Winning Documentary Southern Comfort.In all Next Wave took seven films to Sundance and five to Toronto; nine were released theatrically in the U.S. and two premiered on HBO; nine were shot digitally and six of those were transferred to film. Stolaroff has lectured on low/no budget and digital filmmaking throughout the world and at many of the major film festivals.He has taught film classes at UCLA Extension, the Maine Film Workshop, and The Learning Annex and has written for Scientific American, Filmmaker, Sight & Sound, Film Festival Reporter, and Film Arts Magazine.He has been on countless filmmaking panels over the last two decades, including serving as the Series Moderator for IFP/LA's Digital Filmmaking Series in 2001 and 2002.  He has sat on the juries of several film festivals and was on the Advisory Board of HBO's US Comedy Arts Film Festival. He currently serves on the advisory board of Filmmakers Alliance.Stolaroff founded No Budget Film School in 2005, and in addition to teaching his classes, has lectured at most of the major film schools.Mark has extensive production experience on several low-budget features and shorts, including production managing the Academy Award winning short film My Mother Dreams The Satan's Disciples in New York.His background also includes two years in Investment Banking at Merrill Lynch Capital Markets, and five years as the Managing Director of Curtains Theater, an innovative legitimate theater he founded in Houston.  A native Texan, Stolaroff received his BBA from the prestigious Business Honors Program at the University of Texas and minored in Film Production, directing several 16mm shorts.Like I said, the man has been around the block. Enjoy my conversation with Mark Stolaroff.
You are in for a treat. Today on the show we have my brother from another mother Richard "RB" Botto from Stage32.com. RB is the distinct honor of holding the record for the most appearances on the Indie Film Hustle Podcast. This is the first time RB has graced the Filmtrepreneur Tribe. RB can talk about any subject within the film industry but on this episode, I wanted to discuss a subject we really never dove into before, the business of building a business within the film eco-system.RB breaks down the lessons he brought with him from his former business running RAZOR Magazine. We also dive into the business behind his wildly successful Stage32, the Linkedin for film industries professionals. His audience has grown to over 700,000 members. We can all learn a thing or two from RB. This is a LONG episode but the knowledge bombs are dropping left and right.Enjoy my EPIC conversation with Richard "RB" Botto.
Today on the show we have filmmaker Julian Galea. We discuss his self-distribution​ strategy, how to he got his film Made in Malta seen internationally and how he rocketed up the charts of iTunes with little or no marketing budget. In addition to my interview, Julian has written a remarkable detailed account of what he did with his film Made in Malta.
In this bonus episode, I update filmmakers on the emergency situation going on with the film aggregator Distribber. In last weeks episode, I spoke a bit about what is going on with this company. After that show I kept getting emails, messages, and tweets of filmmakers telling me their horror stories of no one return email, no people picking up calls, nonpayments​ for months and so on. I'm in the same situation with my film This is Meg.
I'm always looking for indie filmmaking models to study. I like to analyze how other filmmakers make successful indie films while doing through a new DIY method, self-distributing their film or achieving critical and fan respect for their work.Well, I found a film that checks all the boxes, For Lovers Only create by the Polish Brothers, Michael and Mark Polish (more on that film later). These filmmakers have been making films, on their terms, for over a decade now.Michael Polish sat down with me for an amazing interview about his filmmaking life, Hollywood and what it means to be an artist.
I'm pissed off guys. I'm tired of getting emails, messages, and calls from filmmakers who have been or are going to get taken advantage of by a traditional film distributor. THIS NEEDS TO STOP! So many filmmakers have been taken advantage of by predatory film distributors over the years that is has become a punchline. It's not funny.These predatory film distributors are destroying the lives of filmmakers. I know filmmakers with families that extended themselves financially to make their films. Then once they sign on the dotted line with a predatory film distributor never heard from them again. This poor filmmaker has little to no recourse. They basically made a non-tax deductible donation to the distributor.It's disgusting and it needs to stop. In this episode, I expose a lot of tricks these predatory film distributors use to con and steal from filmmakers. I also talk about some other options filmmakers have and discuss what a good film distributor looks like. I even call out one of the good guys in the film distributor game.Even self-distribution is not safe. I’ve been a big supporter of the film aggregator Distribber over the years because they were of great help releasing my film This is Meg. But many of the people I worked with there have left the company. The Distribber I promoted for years is not the same company that is in business today. I have been hearing way too many stories about filmmakers not getting paid, can't get anyone to return their calls, and I just need to call this out. I NO LONGER recommend the ANY filmmaker use Distribber to self distribute their film. This is just a taste of what you can expect to hear in this episode. I truly hope this helps filmmakers out there and please spread the word.
Today episode is probably one of the most important shows I have released in some time. On the show is filmmaker Naomi McDougall Jones the writer, actress and producer behind the indie film Bite Me, a subversive romantic comedy about a real-life vampire and the IRS agent who audits them. The filmmakers of Bite Me have decided to take a radical approach to distribute their film: they're doing it themselves. For 3 months, they traveled in an RV around the U.S. and screening the film wherever they can - be it a theater, a bar, or someone's living room. Not only did they tour around the country like carnies they also documented their entire process with a docu-series. EVERY FILMMAKER NEEDS TO WATCH THIS SERIES. It is mandatory for every IFH Tribe member. I've never said this before so take it seriously​. It will save you a ton of pain and suffering. Naomi is so open, raw and honest about her experience. Get ready for one heck of an interview.  Enjoy!
As promised on today's episode I bring you the Filmtrepreneur Workshop I conducted at the 2019 HollyShorts! Film Festival. The workshop was recorded at the world famous Chinese Theater in Hollywood, CA. I go over the basic principles of being a Filmtrepreneur as well as touch on other film industry topics. Enjoy!
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