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Her Spirit Podcast

Author: Her Spirit

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BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson host series 2 of the Her Spirit podcasts. Our mission to inspire women everywhere to live a healthier, happier life. In these podcasts you will hear from phenomenal women in the world of sport and business everything else as well, talking about the desires, vulnerabilities and spirited ways.We know that 50% of the UK population is on a constant diet and only 1 in 10 women in the UK are losing 5% of their body fat and keep it off, women are twice as likely to be diagnosed with anxiety and 42% of women are not active enough to get a health benefit. These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.orgDownload the Her Spirit App https://herspirit.co.uk/gettheappfree/
43 Episodes
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In this 36th episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to former British number 1 professional tennis player and TV presenter Annabel Croft.Despite her potential and being amongst the world's top 25 players, Croft retired from professional tennis at the age of only twenty-one, tired of the relentless travel and feeling she no longer enjoyed playing.Since retiring as a Tennis player in 1988, Annabel  moved into the Television world starting with Survivor on Channel 4 and Treasure Hunt. Since then she has worked on numerous light entertainment shows and documentaries and had a blast.  Her focus in more recent times has been covering the Women’s and Mens Tennis Tour on Eurosport, Sky TV and BBC. Watching and working on Live Sport and interviewing the top players all over the globe . It's her dream job and one she is passionate about.  Nutrition is a huge part of health and Wellbeing and having been quite a “chubby teenager” she has learned what works for her to stay fit and healthy. Annabel love's good food and thinks it’s one of the real pleasures of life. . Annabel talks to Annie and Louise about the importance of being active and eating well. These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. Medichecks offers an easy and affordable way to check your health from the comfort of your own home with their simple and personal at-home blood tests. From hormones and nutrition, to cholesterol and diabetes, there is something for everyone. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to http://herspirit.co.uk
In this 35th episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Olympic Gold Medalist and conservationist Crista Cullen.Crista is an accomplished athlete, achieving both Gold and Bronze medals in three Olympic appearances, culminating in 197 international caps and a three time World All-Star team member.  She has a strong belief in the power of teamwork – built through the highs and lows of a 15-year international hockey career.Having grown up in rural Kenya, Crista spent her teenage years at boarding school in England, where she found a sense of belonging through sport. Over the next decade she progressed through the ranks of elite hockey. From the lows of failure to qualify for the Athens 2004 Olympics, to the highs of Olympic gold in Rio 2016. At the Olympics in 2016 Cullen notched her 58th international goal in the final against Netherlands, arguably her most important strike to date. It helped GB to a 3-3 draw with a gold medal following from the shootout win.Throughout her athletic career Crista maintained her role in the corporate world – creating a sense of balance and perspective that was central to her sporting performance. One that embedded in Crista a deep belief in the crucial role of culture, community and teamwork.A belief in cultures that empower, not enforce. A belief in communities that embrace diversity and constantly seek alternative perspectives. A belief in teams that create genuine alignment around shared values.Crista is now using the lessons learned from her personal journey to help other teams, organisations and individuals with their journeys.She recently set up her own charity Tofauti, her deep understanding of the challenges facing Africa’s animal and human populations – the place she grew up and the place she still calls home.Team Tofauti is now small but growing. Diverse in our backgrounds, experiences and skill sets. United in our goal. To come together to make a difference for Africa’s wildlife and communities.Crista talks to Annie and Louise about adjusting to life at boarding school in the UK, her journey over 15 years playing hockey and her zest for people and excellence.To find out more about Crista's charity go to  www.tofauti.org.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. Medichecks offers an easy and affordable way to check your health from the comfort of your own home with their simple and personal at-home blood tests. From hormones and nutrition, to cholesterol and diabetes, there is something for everyone. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to http://herspirit.co.uk
In this 34th episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to marathon swimmer Alice Dearing. She is our youngest guest to date at 23-year-old from hails from Birmingham.Alice is one of Great Britain's top female marathon swimmers, having represented Great Britain at numerous international competitions, including three World Championships. She placed 11th in the Mixed 5km Open Water event in Gwangju in 2019, after finishing 17th in the Women's 10km race. Dearing previously competed at the World Championships in Budapest in 2017, where she achieved a top-25 finish in the individual 10km event and helped achieve a placing of fifth against a talented international field in the Mixed 5km Team Relay. Between those Worlds appearances, Dearing placed 12th over 10km at the 2018 European Championships. In 2016, she was crowned World Junior Open Water champion in Hoorn, the Netherlands, which cemented her position on the world marathon swimming stage.Her senior international bow came at the 2015 World Championships in Kazan, when Dearing raced the 5km distance.Next summer Alice Dearing,  who is Britain’s best open-water swimmer, intends to flip 125 years of history on its head in Tokyo – the small matter of a global pandemic permitting. And, as becomes clear over a thought-provoking and nuanced conversation, that is only the start of her ambitions.“Being a poster girl for black swimming is exciting, because genuinely I love the sport and I want to see as many people doing it as possible,” Dearing says. “But it’s also terrifying because there’s a lot of pressure. I have rationalised it – if not me, then who? And I want this to happen as soon as possible, to break that barrier.”It is not the only one Dearing intends to shatter. Last year she became the lead ambassador for the Black Swimming Association, a charity that encourages black people to swim, and she illustrates the scale of the challenge by citing shocking figures from Sport England, which show that 95% of black adults and 80% of black children in England do not swim – while only 1% of registered competitive swimmers with Swim England identify as black or mixed race.Alice talks about her family background and how she got into swimming and her Olympic ambitions and desire for cultural change.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. Medichecks offers an easy and affordable way to check your health from the comfort of your own home with their simple and personal at-home blood tests. From hormones and nutrition, to cholesterol and diabetes, there is something for everyone. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to http://herspirit.co.uk
In this 33rd episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to journalist and mental health campaigner Bryony Gordon.Bryony’s bestselling memoirs "The Wrong Knickers: A Decade of Chaos", "You Got This", "Mad Girl", and "Eat, Drink, Run" have deservedly earned Bryony critical acclaim – and a multitude of loyal readers worldwide. Uncompromising in her truthfulness, Bryony challenges the stigma that surrounds addiction and demonstrates a determination that whatever life throws at you it is to be lived and cherished.In Bryony’s new book ‘The Glorious Rock Bottom’, she recounts the traumatic consequences of her personal addiction journey, and her experience in treatment as well as in recovery. The abundance of integrity, dignity and humanity Bryony brings to her writing invites the reader to relate to her own experiences and, in so doing, may help others to open up about their own difficulties with a view to seeking treatment and support for themselves or their loved ones.She recalls waking up drunk and drugged lying on damp grass, a man's head between her thighs. That man was not her husband - he and their daughter Edie were half a mile away sleeping in the grounds of the country estate they were staying at to celebrate her friend's birthday.Gordon was 37 and when the man, who had given her cocaine, phoned up the following week asking if she was still up for a threesome, she realised she didn’t know herself, or what she had said or done, while intoxicated that nightShe has charted the journey through alcoholism and subsequent recovery in her no-holds-barred new book, Glorious Rock Bottom. Her husband [financial journalist Harry Wilson] knows all of it. I've always been very honest with him about what happened when I was drinking. We've worked through that.As her career soared, her mental health plummeted, she continued to drink and do drugs, even though she had become an ambassador for mental health. During her regular binges she'd black out - not be able to remember the next day what she'd said or done.Had she continued drinking, she believes it would have killed her. "It doesn't bear thinking about what would have happened if I hadn't got sober," she says now. "I don't drink any more but I'm still an alcoholic.”She talks to Annie and Louise about this journey and how she felt the worst mother possible. A staunch campaigner for mental health and now feels lucky to be alive.Her ground breaking interview with Prince William raised the awareness around her mental health work. She enjoys being active and has run and how 'Running Made Me Realise That Anything Is Possible' These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. Medichecks offers an easy and affordable way to check your health from the comfort of your own home with their simple and personal at-home blood tests. From hormones and nutrition, to cholesterol and diabetes, there is something for everyone. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to http://herspirit.co.uk
In this 32nd episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to actor Maxine Peake.Maxine has appeared as Twinkle in Dinnerladies and Veronica Ball in Shameless, barrister Martha Costello in the BBC legal drama Silk, and Grace Middleton in the BBC drama series The Village, and starred in the Black Mirror episode "Metalhead". She has also played the title role in Hamlet.Maxine went to college in Salford when she was 16 and it was all-singing, all-dancing, and everyone had their sweatpants on and their jazz shoes and I was like, 'What? I've got to change into my what gear? Dance gear?'. I knew I wanted to act but I didn't want to be your typical actor, I suppose." said Peake.Sport was something Peake always enjoyed and played Rugby League for Wigan for several years, before she left and spent more time in the acting world and eventually being accepted at RADA.Her teachers at Rada told Maxine to go on a diet, but it was Victoria Wood, creator and co-star on her first major TV series, the BBC sitcom Dinnerladies, who finally persuaded her to shift an impressive five stone. "Victoria did it in a better way than they did at drama school," she says. "I was told by one teacher, 'If you don't lay off the chips you'll never play Juliet' and I was kind of, 'Juliet? She's a wimp anyway'. Victoria said, 'Look, you're big, you're northern, it's going to be funny roles... it's going to be really difficult for you'. Beryl Burton was one of Britain's greatest cyclists, but did not get the recognition she deserved. Maxine Peake has tried to rectify that by writing a stage play about Burton while juggling TV shows, films and preparations for playing Hamlet on stage.In 1967, Beryl Burton was competing in a 12-hour time trial when she came to overtake the leading men's cyclist Mike McNamara. McNamara was on his way to setting a new men's record of 276 miles in 12 hours. On her way past him, Burton took pity and offered him a liquorice allsort."Poor Mac," she later wrote. "His glory, richly deserved, was going to be overshadowed by a woman."Burton covered 277 miles that day. It would be two years before a man beat that distance. Despite advances in design and fitness, no woman has done so yet.Maxine also loves two wheels and is an avid cyclist and loves the freedom and friendship it brings. Lockdown has also got Peake running and am sure will go on to do a triathlon in 2021 with Annie and Louise. Her #BestYearYet tips for every woman are great and you can find them at www.herspirit.co.uk and by listening to this podcast.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. Medichecks offers an easy and affordable way to check your health from the comfort of your own home with their simple and personal at-home blood tests. From hormones and nutrition, to cholesterol and diabetes, there is something for everyone. Visit Medichecks.com to find out more.For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to www.herspirit.co.uk
In this 31st episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to endurance runner Susie Chan.Susie has taken on races of all distances from 1 mile to 100 miles. It's been 10 years since I started running. It's something I love. You'll find me frequently on the running scene, especially ultra marathon.Races have included running the Marathon des Sables more times than any other UK female, breaking a 12 hour treadmill World Record in 2016 and enjoying running in some of the hottest places on earth.As well as the long races you'll find Susie at local races, half marathons and marathons including finishing all of the World Marathon Majors.Lucky enough to be named and “the number 1 runner to follow on Instagram” by Runners World, and the Evening Standard, she has been on the cover of Runners World, Women's running and featured in Athletics Weekly and other publications.Susie overcame Thyroid Cancer in 2017 and she talks to Louise and Annie about her battle. After Marathon des Sables she had a terrible cough. After a course of antibiotics it shifted. Presuming it was likely to be inhaled sand in her lungs, she thought nothing more. Fast forward to Chicago Marathon, and her cough had returned, this time far, far worse. Susie passed out at the finish line (six start medal still around her neck) this time, worried about it being something worse, she called the doctors. Doctors found a large tumour in her neck, and quite a shock to Susie.  It was mighty impressive too, over 5cm. She lost half her thyroid with it. A histology report told us the lump as cancer.Her #BestYearYet tips for every woman are great and you can find them at www.herspirit.co.uk and by listening to this podcast.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this 30th episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to double Paralympic champion Libby Clegg MBE.Libby took up athletics aged 9, joining Macclesfield Harriers AC. She originally tried middle distance running and cross country before starting sprinting.Libby is a Scottish Paralympic sprinter who has represented both Scotland and Great Britain at international events. She represented Great Britain in the T12 100m and 200m at the 2008 Summer Paralympics, winning a silver medal in the T12 100m race. She won Gold in Rio at the 2016 Paralympic Games in 100m T11 where she broke the world record and T11 200m, beating the previous Paralympic record in the process, thus making her a double Paralympic champion.She has a deteriorating eye condition known as Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy disease giving her only slight peripheral vision in her left eye and is registered blind. Libby runs with the aid of guide runner Chris Clarke.In October 2018, Clegg announced she was expecting her first child with fiancé Dan Powell in March 2019. In April 2019 Clegg gave birth to a son, Edward, via emergency C-Section.She has had physical injuries and has been affected by mental health issues. Her guide dog, a black retriever/Labrador cross, is named Hatti.In 2020 Libby took part in Dancing on Ice "It's been a learning process". On the track I run with a guide runner and we're attached all the time. It's like learning a different vocabulary to communicate. Myself and my [ice skating] partner Mark Hanretty use touch and verbal communication. I'm not as bad as I thought I was going to be, but it's not as easy as it looks. It's very technical. Libby finished third on Dancing on Ice, which is a phenomenal result.Libby talks openly about the loss of her eye sight, life as a mum and many new obstacles in 2020 that very few women have had to overcome.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this twenty seventh episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to GP and Menopause Specialist Dr Louise Newson.Louise is a GP and menopause specialist and has an Advanced Menopause Specialist certificate with FSRH and the BMS. She feels passionately about improving education about the perimenopause and menopause and also improving awareness of safe prescribing of HRT to healthcare professionals. She has written many articles and editorials and in 2019 launched her first book, Menopause Manual with Haynes Publishing, which went on to be an Amazon bestseller.Louise has lectured extensively at numerous meetings (including the RCGP annual meeting) on this topic and has been a director for Primary Care Women’s Health Forum and an editor for the British Journal of Family Medicine. Louise has worked regularly with West Midlands Police and many other large organisations to provide advice regarding menopause in the workplace and has contributed to menopause related articles in different newspapers and magazines and been on numerous radio and TV programmes. Louise has also set up a not-for-profit company – Newson Health Research and Education – and is involved in research with colleagues in Warwick University, London School of Tropical Medicine and also Kings College London. In addition, she is working closely with HIV charities including Sophia Forum to help menopausal women living with HIV.Find out more about The Menopause Charity at www.themenopausecharity.orgThese podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this twenty sixth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to sports phycologist Dr Josephine Perry.Josephine has a background in communications and behaviour change having worked for many years in journalism, marketing, public relations and crisis communications across private corporations and government. She has a MSc in Communications, a MSc in Psychology and a MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology. She also has a PhD in Political Communications. She is a Chartered member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and a member of the Association of Applied Sports Psychologists (AASP). She is registered with the Health Care Professions Council. She writes features for sports magazines and websites and is regularly quoted in the media on how athletes and other performers can use applied sports psychology to enhance their performance.With a long background in communications she first started learning about performance psychology after competing in Ironman Melbourne in 2013. It was a really windy day with huge waves. For someone used to swimming in a 20 metre London gym pool this was way out of her comfort zone. She heard the commentator mention the waves. He said “you can’t control the conditions. What you can control is the way you choose to react to them.” A light bulb moment. She realized it was her choice if she was scared or not and had to choose not to be. It became the fastest Ironman she’s raced and set off a full career change, from a conversion course to learn all the basics of Psychology to the MSc in Sports and Exercise Psychology.She loves the idea that psychology isn’t just used to help those with mental health problems get better but can be used by those already doing well to function even better. She is passionate about how it can be used positively to improve performance; whether as a professional athlete, working in business or as an amateur, competing in a sport you love.Alongside the MSc she also spent some time working at UK Sport to learn how elite sport is run in the UK. This was an invaluable way to understand the pressures on athletes, the support they get and the machinery of the elite UK Olympic and Paralympic systems. Sport at this level is no longer a fun hobby. It is strategic and it is business.Her approach uses a mix of humanistic and cognitive behavioural psychology and will teach you strategies so you feel more comfortable and in control when entering potentially stressful situations and ensure you are able to perform to your maximum potential.Her Spirit are supporting the Better Health Every Mind Matters campaign, that provides expert advice and practical tips to help you look after your mental health and wellbeing. This World Mental Health Day (10th October), answer 5 quick questions to get your free Mind Plan. It has tips to help you deal with stress and anxiety, improve your sleep, boost your mood and feel more in control.For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this twenty fifth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to four time winter Olympian Chemmy Alcott.With a career high ranking of 8th in the World, 7 x British National Overall Champion and the only British female skier to ever win a run in a World Cup, Chemmy Alcott is widely regarded as one of Britain’s greatest ever skiers.In a time where competing at a Winter Olympics was unusual for a British athlete, Chemmy defied the odds and pioneered a skiing movement that has inspired a generation. Resulting in not just skiers, but British Winter Sport athletes as a whole seeing the Winter Olympics as a realistic and achievable goal.Since retiring from competing on the world stage after The Sochi Olympics in 2014, Chemmy has immersed herself in the world of TV & media, where she now presents for the BBC on Ski Sunday and commentates on the World Cup Ski Series for Eurosport amongst being a guest on many other show. Furthermore, she competed in ITV Dancing on Ice in 2012, where she finished 5th.In addition to her TV commitments and hosting events and despite retiring, Chemmy continues to constantly push her body to the limit, competing in multiple physical challenges including the World’s Toughest Ski Race in Greenland, the 100-mile road race in London and climbing Mt Kilimanjaro, raising over £800,000 for charity in the process.Charity work is very important to Chemmy, where she acts as an active ambassador for Right to Play, Ski4Cancer, SnowCamp and United Learning. She has visited multiple under-developed countries such as Rwanda and Tanzania, raising money for areas of conflict resolution and also to promote sport and play to educate ‘over one million children in some of the world’s poorest communities.’Chemmy is an inspiration to all, having broken 49 bones in her life including her neck aged 11. She is no stranger to adversity and remains committed to inspiring the next generation and educating people from all over the world through sport. Most notably, she created the ‘X-Elle’ scheme, which aims to develop girl’s confidence through sport. Part of her passion involves travelling the world, visiting countries such as Dubai and New Zealand, in addition to her travel across the UK, telling her story and inspiring others. From school pupils to businesses, she helps give them the confidence to create big dreams and do everything humanly possible to achieve them.In 2018, Chemmy became a well-loved BBC Winter Olympic Sport Commentator. She was enthusiastic, empathetic and gave a unique insight into the games that only someone who has been through the experience as an athlete could give.Currently Chemmy is presenting BBC Ski Sunday, and looking after her two young boys.We all put things off but its a great time to get active. For ideas to get you started, visit https://www.nhs.uk/better-health/get-active/ and come and join the Her Spirit community and download the Her Spirit app.For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this twenty fourth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Dr Nikki Kanani MBE.Dr Nikki Kanani is a GP in south-east London and is Medical Director of Primary Care for NHS England and NHS Improvement. Prior to joining NHS England she was Chief Clinical Officer of NHS Bexley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). Nikki has held a range of positions within healthcare to support the development of innovative models of care, highly engaged clinical, patient and public leadership and is passionate about supporting primary care, improving service provision and population wellbeing.She is a member of The King’s Fund General Advisory Council and holds a MSc in health care commissioning. With her sister she co-founded STEMMsisters, a social enterprise supporting young people to study science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine. She has two young children (8 and 12 years) Running has been her savour during the height of COVID19, and she took the time most days to run 5K with her two kids. It was her "me time" with her family during such challenging times.We all put things off. But the Great British Week of Sport is a great time to get active. For ideas to get you started, visit https://www.nhs.uk/better-health/get-active/ and come and join the Her Spirit community.For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to https://herspirit.co.uk and we hope you have found her Your Best Year Yet tips helpful.
In this twenty third episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Mel C.The start of Melanie’s career really needs no explanation at all, as it is rather well documented…After the iconic 1996 debut single ‘Wannabe’ topped the charts in 37 countries, Spice Girls’ debut album ’Spice’ went on to sell more than 31 million copies worldwide, becoming the best-selling album of all time by a female group. The girls went on to sell more than 85 million records, releasing three studio albums, 13 singles and winning a host of awards including a BRIT for Outstanding Contribution to British Music.Her struggles with depression and eating disorders are well-documented. They began in the midst of the Spice Girls' mind-boggling run of chart and media dominance in the late 90s. The band sold 31 million records, scored nine number one singles and upended music industry conventions about the viability of girl bands.Merseyside-born Chisholm was the best dancer and strongest singer, but she was caricatured in the tabloid press as "the plain one at the back, who doesn't really do much".She didn't recognise the person who was being portrayed in the media, amplifying her feelings of inadequacy. Her road to recovery began with therapy for clinical depression in the early 2000s. The arrival of her daughter in 2009 also marked a turning point."Being a mum was so liberating because for the first time in my adult life, it wasn't all about me," she says. "It made me not only realise I had a huge responsibility to her but I have a huge responsibility to myself. In being her teacher, I had to treat myself better."Melanie talks openly about her struggles in life and how she is still work in progress. Her 5 tips to live "Your Best Year Yet" are very relatable for every woman.Melanie is a lover of sport hence the name "Sporty Spice" and her aspirations to qualify as a GB age group triathlete.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit and "Your Best Year Yet" go to www.herspirit.co.uk 
In this twenty third episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Claire Danson.Triathlete Claire Danson, won the 30-34 age category at the European Championships in June 2019, she was paralysed following a cycling accident at the end of August 2019. Danson is the sister of England and Great Britain hockey player Alex Danson.Claire was involved in a collision with a tractor while riding her bike. She suffered two punctured lungs, broke a finger, both wrists, the head of my humerus and both shoulders.She also fractured all the bones in her neck, including a break to one, and had multiple fractures and breaks to every one of my ribs. Unfortunately, she suffered a complete sever to her spinal cord at T9, which means that she is paralysed from her belly button downwards. Claire's ask is for you to remember that she is still exactly the same person. She still has crazy hair and a mad laugh, she is still the clumsiest person you have ever met and she will still tell the most long winded yet entertaining stories. Her request is to please treat her as the same old Claire. Nothing has changed there.Her sister Alex says Claire is the most resilient, hard working and inspiring person you will ever meet.This podcast is so inspirational for anyone and her passion for life and laughing is phenomenal.**This podcast was recorded on the 1 year anniversary of Claire's accident.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. 
In this twenty second episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Olympic cyclist, commentator and public speaker Jo Rowsell Jo began competitive cycling relatively late – aged 16 – having been talent spotted at school aged 15. She wasn’t a cyclist at all previously and having been talent spotted was faced with a steep learning curve into the world of cycling skills and tactics. Perseverance lead to junior National Titles and representing Great Britain at the junior World Championships in only my second year of racing.Jo grew up in London but after finishing my A Levels relocated to Manchester to be a full time cyclist and within 9 months won my first World Title in the women’s Team Pursuit. A series of setbacks throughout 2010 put her place on Team GB at a home Olympic Games in jeopardy as she subsequently suffered a bad year in 2011, but she battled back to become World Champion, World Record holder and Olympic Champion in 2012.In 2013, Rowsell broke her collarbone at the London cycling festival but, five weeks later, after an operation and training on the Wattbike with a pillow on the bars, she won the Women's Pursuit on the track at the International Belgian Open.After the London Olympics Jo focussed more on individual events and in 2014 completed the World Championships and Commonwealth Games double with gold medals at both events in the Individual Pursuit that year. Jo made Team GB again in 2016 for the Rio Olympics but this time she went in as the underdogs having not won the World Title that year. However the team blew the competition away to take a gold medal again and 3 new World Records in the process. In March 2017, Jo announced that she was retiring from the sport. "The decision to step away has been the hardest I've ever had to make," she said. "I believe I have more to offer the world." Jo has suffered with alopecia, resulting in hair loss, since she was 10 years old which has brought with it many challenges to overcome as she grew up. She talks openly to Annie and Louise about this and how sport helped to normalise it.She gives some great motivational tips about being active and motivating yourself and others.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. 
In this twenty first episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Professor Greg Whyte. Greg Whyte was awarded an OBE in 2014 for his services to Sport, Sport Science & Charity, and was voted as one of the Top 10 Science Communicators in the UK by the British Science Council. Greg is an Olympian in modern pentathlon, and is a European and World Championship medalist. He is an expert in the field of sports and exercise science. Graduating from Brunel University, he furthered his studies with an MSc in human performance in the USA and completed his PhD at St. Georges Hospital Medical School, London. Greg is currently a Professor of Applied Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moore’s University and Director of Performance at the Centre for Health and Human Performance at 76 Harley Street, London. Greg's former roles include Director of Research for the British Olympic Association and Director of Science & Research for the English Institute of Sport. And currently sits on the Her Spirit advisory board.Greg is the preeminent authority on Exercise Physiology and Sports and Exercise Performance in the UK. An internationally recognised expert in the field, Greg has extensive professional experience assessing, treating and improving the performance of patients, sporting enthusiasts and athletes ranging from cancer sufferers to celebrities attempting their first mountain summit to Gold medal seeking Olympians.Greg is well-known for his involvement in Comic Relief, since 2006 Greg has applied his sports science work to assist various celebrities in completing some of the toughest challenges. Greg has trained, motivated and successfully coached 23 Sport & Comic Relief Challenges including: the comedian David Walliams to swim across the English Channel the Gibraltar Straits and the length of the Thames; James Cracknell to run, cycle and swim to Africa; a team of 9 celebrities including Cheryl Cole, Chris Moyles and Gary Barlow to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro; Eddie Izzard to run a remarkable 43 marathons in 50 days; Christine Bleakley to waterski across the English Channel; Dermot O’Leary, Oly Murrs and others to cross the driest desert in Africa; John Bishop to complete 'Bishops Week of Hell’ that involved John cycle, row and run from Paris to London; and Davina McCall in her 'Beyond Breaking Point' 506 mile ultra-triathlon. Greg supported Jo Brand on her 'Hell of a Walk' from Hull to Liverpool and Radio 1's Greg James on his 5 triathlons in 5 cities in 5 days.In 2019 Greg trained Claudia Winkleman and Tess Daly for a 24 hour Danceathon and raised over £700,000 for Comic Relief. 10 years on since Greg took the original 9 nine celebrities to Kilimanjaro, he found another 9 celebrities to attempt the challenge the list included Dani Dyer, Osi Umenyiora, Dan Walker, Alexander Armstrong, Shirley Ballas, Ed Balls, Jade Thirlwall and Leigh-Anne Pinnock and Anita Rani. Greg and the celebrities completed the challenge overcoming some obstacles with the main one being altitude sickness.As a result of his work, Greg has helped raise over £45million for charity. His book 'Bump it Up' was released on the 25th August 2016 and is a great read for every woman.We love his approach to life and that "nothing good comes easy and "doing more today than you did yesterday" is a great way to approach being active.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. 
In this twentieth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to professional boxer and England footballer Stacey Copeland.Stacey is deeply passionate about making a difference to others and uses her love of sport to have a positive impact wherever she can. Her community and charity work, activism around progress for women in sport and gender equality and involvement in encouraging sport for all has led to much recognition both within and beyond sport.Boxing plays a big role in Stacey’s family, her dad was a professional boxer and her granddad has run the family gym for over 40 years. From a young age she learnt the basics in the gym, attended boxing shows, and grew to love the atmosphere and everything about the sport. She always wanted to be a part of it, however at that time, there were no opportunities within boxing for females. As a youngster, Stacey also loved football and after joining a local team her sports career truly took off. She played for Doncaster Belles in the Premier League, England U18s, and eventually went on a football scholarship to America graduating with a degree in Sociology. After graduation Stacey played in the women’s semi-pro league in Dallas, and finished her football career in Stockholm, Sweden for Vasalunds FC.  Returning home from Sweden, injuries meant Stacey could no longer play football at elite level but she was not ready to give up competitive sport. Having always boxed for fitness, and having a real passion for the sport Stacey decided aged 29 to finally pursue her first sporting dreams of becoming a competitive boxer. Stacey  was very much aware that this was ‘old’ to be taking up a new sport, especially such a tough and male dominated sport, but she was determined to give it everything. She began training, lost 5kg for her first fight, and won; the nerves before that first fight were like nothing Stacey had ever experienced before! The feeling when her hand was raised at the end was the best feeling ever, and that was it, Stacey was hooked! She reached the ABA national final in her first year but had to pull out due to illness, however she recovered and went onto win two ABA national titles, as well as four Boxcup tournaments in Europe. In 2013 Stacey attended an emerging talent camp at GB boxing, and the experience made her want to take boxing to the next level. The following year she competed in her first international contest winning a tough contest against a New Zealand opponent and following this, Stacey was selected to represent England at the European Boxing Championships.  To box in the welterweight category she had to drop a further 6kg, so began a strict diet and training programme. Stacey arrived at the European Championships with less than 20 bouts experience and was in awe of the whole experience; however, trusting her coaches and team mates advice she gave her all in each fight. She reached the final beating the Italian champion, the Russian number one seed, and the Irish national champion along the way and although she did not win the final, Stacey was delighted to come away from her first major competition with a silver medal. It just shows that no matter what obstacles are in your way, whether it be age, injuries, or anything else, if you work really hard and give everything then you can achieve amazing things! We love her Brene Brown quote "We can choose courage or we can choose comfort, but we can't have both. Not at the same time.” and that we are all in the same storm but not the same boat.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit
In this eighteenth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to four time Olympian Donna Fraser.Donna started her career in athletics by winning six consecutive English Schools 200m titles and a European Junior 400m gold medal. With the support of Croydon Harriers AC, she went professional in 1996.Donna’s athletics career spans back over a decade and has an amazing story to share on and off the track. She made a smooth transition in the Senior Athletics arena where she went on to compete for her country on numerous occasions and earned recognition as a serious World Class athlete when she came 4th at the Syndey 2000 Olympic Games, breaking the 50 second barrier for the first time.Donna Fraser had one of her best years in 2005, where she achieved a fine 200/m400m double at the AAA Championships and was the first athlete to do so since 1945. In 2002, 2005 and 2007 she helped Britain to 4x400m relay bronze in the World Championships and became the BBC Athlete of the Year in 2005.In 2009 Donna Fraser was forced to retire from the world of athletics due to her being diagnosed with breast cancer; in that same year, she made a life-changing decision to undertake a mastectomy. With the 2012 Olympic Games being held in London, Donna Fraser’s passion to inspire others, drove her to return to the track in 2012.She achieved the qualifying time to compete at the Olympic trials, which was a personal goal she had set following her breast cancer ordeal.After 19 years at EDF Energy, Donna returned to her passions in 2017, taking on a new role with UK Athletics as their Equality, Diversity & Engagement Lead and for the organising committee of the 2017 IAAF World Athletics Championships and World Para Athletics Championships in London.Donna is the current Vice President of UK Athletics. She is tasked with overseeing the success of the UK’s current athletes and creating the pathway for the potential world champions of tomorrow.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit go to www.herspirit.co.uk and sign up and download the Her Spirit app. 
In this nineteenth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to TV presenter Julia Bradbury.Credited with revamping Sunday night primetime television on BBC One’s Countryfile, and dubbed “Lady of the Lakes” following her many walking series, Julia Bradbury is one of the small screen’s most popular and versatile presenters.Outside her television life and following her dedication to environmental causes, she is an ambassador for Keep Britain Tidy, The National Trust and a champion for Ordnance Survey. Julia is also proud to be the first female President of The Camping and Caravanning Club. Following her involvement with the BBC programme Famous, Rich and Homeless, she has now become a staunch supporter of the Big Issue and the plight of homelessness. She talks about her love of the outdoors, walking and her passion for sustainable tourism. She champions the need to reduce plastic and raising the awareness of plastic pollution. As a mum of three she shares the importance of being active and how walking is a special thing, most of us have a special memory, or sense of play. Julia is co-founder of The Outdoor Guide with her sister Gina, a free online resource for all things connected to the outdoors.  www.theoutdoorguide.co.ukThese podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit go to www.herspirit.co.uk 
In this eighteenth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Claudia Hammond is an award-winning broadcaster, author and psychology lecturer. In her work she shares the ways that psychological and medical research can help us in our everyday lives, whether through radio, TV, podcasts, public events or books.Claudia is the presenter of several podcasts and radio shows including All in the Mind on BBC Radio 4 which covers psychology, neuroscience & mental health and the weekly global health show Health Check on BBC World Service.She is Visiting Professor of the Public Understanding of Psychology at the University of Sussex. Claudia gives talks on psychology around the world and often chairs public events on psychology, medicine and science. She writes a regular column on medical myths for BBC Future.Her latest book, The Art of Rest, examining the science behind our struggles to rest and relax, is published by Canongate. She is also the author of Mind Over Money, Time Warped and Emotional Rollercoaster.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit go to www.herspirit.co.uk and sign up and download the Her Spirit app. 
In this seventeenth episode of the season of the Her Spirit podcast BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin and BBC Triathlon presenter Annie Emmerson talk to Dame Kelly  Holmes, Double Olympic Games Gold Medallist.Double Olympic Champion Col. Dame Kelly Holmes MBE (mil) is one of the UK’s most popular athletes, respected throughout the world as a role model and an inspiration.Setting and still holding the British records in the 800m and 1000m, Kelly is an Olympic, Commonwealth and European champion that has achieved seven Gold, eight Silver and four Bronze medals throughout her career. This includes her double win in the 800m and 1500m at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, becoming the first Briton in over 80 years to do so. After her Olympic success, she won BBC Sports Personality of the Year, European Athlete of the Year and was honoured with a Damehood from the Queen.Kelly was raised by her mum on a council estate in Kent. She attended the local secondary school where, due to the belief and support of her PE teacher, she pursued her talent at running. Ferried to race meetings up and down the country by her family, she knows the importance of having a supportive team.At 18, Kelly left professional running to pursue her first dream, to be in the British army. She became an HGV driver and then a Physical Training Instructor, before being awarded an MBE for services to the British Army in 1998. In 2018, Kelly was appointed Honorary Colonel of the Royal Armoured Corps, marking her return to the army. The accolade was approved by Her Majesty the Queen, making it the first time an individual has been appointed Honorary Colonel to a regular unit.Kelly could never shift the dream of Olympic gold that she had since a child, but it was a very tough journey there. Her running career was overshadowed with repeated injury and disappointment. Recurring physical injuries contributed to periods of clinical depression and self-harm that continued to affect her just one year before her Olympic double win.Soon after this win, Kelly set up the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust. The charity helps guide disadvantaged young people, getting their lives back on track by using world class athletes to engage, enable and empower, attitudes they need to fulfil a positive life. She encourages the same philosophy that she lives by, nothing is impossible.These podcasts have been made possible through the support of Medichecks www.medichecks.com and Sport England www.sportengland.org. For more information on Her Spirit go to www.herspirit.co.uk and sign up and download the Her Spirit app. It's FREE till the end of June 2020.
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