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Our Fall 2022 guest editor, RoseMary Diaz, talks with Craftsmanship Quarterly's managing editor, Laurie Weed, about growing up "half-Indian" in Northern New Mexico; the surprising controversy around "art" vs. "craft;" and the story behind the stories of our first issue focused on Native American craft. You'll find all the Fall 2022 offerings on "Native American Craft: The Southwest" at Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. All stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site are currently available free of charge and free of advertising.Written by CRAFTSMANSHIP EDITORSIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by LAURIE WEED & ROSEMARY DIAZProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The Value of Time

The Value of Time

2022-11-0207:28

When an American made, quartz watch costs up to $1,500, and its counterparts from other countries, including Switzerland, range from $50 to more than $50,000, what’s the difference between them?"The Value of Time" originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by TODD OPPENHEIMERIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by CHRIS EGUSAProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The Clay Conjurer

The Clay Conjurer

2022-10-1340:01

Felipe Ortega was known for his controversial opinions on culture, as well as his expertise with an unusual form of pottery. He devoted his life to bucking tradition, in more ways than one.Editor’s Note: This story has been updated from the original version, which was first published in our Spring 2015 issue. This update contains historical and culturally-based corrections, along with new reporting. "The Clay Conjurer" originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by DEBORAH BUSEMEYERIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by JILL SCOTT MOMADAYProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The Puppeteer

The Puppeteer

2022-09-2720:09

Michael Montenegro is driven to put the products of his imagination into tangible, active forms. After he builds them—often in life-size form, with a rag-tag collage of materials—he becomes them, lives inside them, then delivers them to us with a zany vigor."The Puppeteer" originally appeared in the Summer 2015 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by LORI ROTENBERKIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by GÖRAN NORQUISTProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Pandemic, political strife, poverty, war. In times of extreme upheaval—global or personal—can the act of art-making ease suffering and strengthen resilience?"Shrine and the Art of Resilience" originally appeared in the Summer 2022 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by MELINDA MISURACAIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by LINDSAY SCHERBARTHProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
A New Renaissance Man

A New Renaissance Man

2022-08-3114:10

Meet Jack Mauch, the newest member of our growing family of “Craftsmanship’s Young Turks.” At age 32, Mauch is already creating breathtaking examples of craftsmanship in everything from furniture-making to ceramics and metalwork."A New Renaissance Man" originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by NATALIE JONESIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by NATALIE JONESProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Throughout history, wine had always been aged in clay vessels. That’s just how it was done. But when French vintners discovered the marvels of aging wine in oak barrels, it was a total game changer. The flavors oak brought out in the wine set off a revolution throughout the winemaking world. Now—for fun, for distinctly different flavors, and to save some fine old trees—a few wineries are giving clay a second chance, Roman style."The Revival of Nero's Wine" originally appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by TIMOTHY TEICHGRAEBERIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by CHRIS EGUSAProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Food Shift

Food Shift

2022-08-0230:33

California, where much of our nation's food is produced, is facing a historic drought — again. It’s become a familiar refrain, year after year, and the growing climate crisis is only expected to make things worse. Our food system has to change, and a few forward-thinking farmers are adopting some ancient, low-water agricultural techniques for the modern age.  In an era of chronic drought, could desert crops become the new sustainable dinner?"Food Shift" originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly,  a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by CHRISTOPHER D. COOKIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by MITCH GREENBERGProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Tomorrow's Library

Tomorrow's Library

2022-07-1920:21

In a simple, residential neighborhood in San Francisco sits a former church for Christian Scientists. The building's white exterior and massive  columns give it a stately, antiquated look. But behind its doors sit stacks of servers, which contain billions upon billions of web pages, media, and other delights. This is the Internet Archive. In today’s episode: what happens when an eccentric tech entrepreneur decides to devote himself to preserving every scrap of information that gets put online and make it accessible to all."Tomorrow's Library" originally appeared in the Spring 2017 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by TIM REDMONDIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by AVANTHIKA SRINIVASANProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
A Woodworker’s Tale

A Woodworker’s Tale

2022-07-0513:00

In today’s automated world, why bother toiling with hand tools and sawdust? In his new book, Gary Rogowski—a master furniture maker in Portland, Oregon—ruminates about lessons he’s learned “at the bench,” and the quest for mastery and creative focus, no matter what your calling."A Woodworker's Tale" originally appeared in the Winter 2018 issue of Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by GARY ROGOWSKIIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by GARY ROGOWSKIProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The California Mirage

The California Mirage

2022-06-2120:12

The blind spots in the American West’s approach to managing water are on full display in Ventura County, a coastal region of Central California that holds the most lucrative farmland in the state."The California Mirage" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by CRAWFORD COATESIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by CHRIS EGUSAProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Now that the tequila craze has crested, the latest Latin liquor to capture the world’s alcoholic imagination is tequila’s grandfather: mezcal. But an explosion of authentic mezcal is impossible—for reasons our correspondent discovers when she goes to Oaxaca to learn how this hyper-local spirit can be sustained."Mezcal's Dance with Extinction" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos,  audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by GRACE RUBENSTEINIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by GRACE RUBENSTEINProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
It’s 2015, and in the health and wellness world, the Kale Craze is in full swing — people are eating, roasting, blending, and juicing it. But one molecular biologist in Marin County stumbles upon evidence that this queen of greens might be hiding toxic levels of certain heavy metals. And it’s even worse in organic varieties. Could kale be behind the mysterious symptoms in his patients? EDITOR’S NOTE: Several updates were published in our Fall 2015 issue, exploring how thallium functions, its prodigious history in scientific literature, and how people should now think about eating kale and other vegetables. These are collected in an article entitled “The Vegetable Detective, Take Two.“"The Vegetable Detective" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos,  audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by TODD OPPENHEIMERIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by GÖRAN NORQUISTProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Craftsmanship's founding editor Todd Oppenheimer sits down with Paul and Elizabeth Kaiser, a husband-and-wife farming team who have been at the forefront of a promising approach to growing food called regenerative agriculture. Hear about the success of the movement they helped start; some mind boggling results from recent testing on their soil and produce; and how they harness Mother Nature to make their land more productive than any human technology ever could.This episode is part of the series of “Artisan Interviews” produced by Craftsmanship Quarterly, in which we bring you conversations with the artisans behind the stories, and with those who write about them.You can visit the Kaisers' website at www.singingfrogsfarm.com. And, you can read our original 2015 article on the Kaisers titled, "The Drought Fighter."Written by CRAFTSMANSHIP EDITORSIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by TODD OPPENHEIMER WITH PAUL AND ELIZABETH KAISERProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONSCover image by MICHAEL WOOLSEY PHOTOGRAPHY
The Glass Builder

The Glass Builder

2022-04-1926:06

Ann Morhauser started with nothing but debt in a tiny glassware studio in Watsonville, a coastal community in central California. Now her work is in stores across the country—and in the Smithsonian. What is her secret to artisanal success?"The Glass Builder" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos,  audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by PEGGY TOWNSENDIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by AVANTHIKA SRINIVASANProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Not only is wool unusually cozy and durable, but its creators (the  sheep) can help regenerate the world’s drying, fire-prone landscapes. The good news: a wool revival seems to be underway."The Hidden Powers of a Sheep" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by JUDITH D. SCHWARTZIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by CHRIS EGUSAProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
Martha's Vineyard has long been seen as a summer retreat for the East  Coast elite. The island’s reality, however, is a far more complex  environment that has welcomed and inspired generations of Black  Americans, including an artist and doll maker named Janice Frame."A Black Artist’s Haven on a (mostly) White Vineyard" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly,  a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and   the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos,  audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of  charge and free of advertising.Written by SKIP FINLEYIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by JOSHUA SIROTIAKProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The Toolbelt Masters

The Toolbelt Masters

2022-03-1528:14

With gumption, insight, and brilliant use of social media, a few guys in Virginia built an operation that makes what could be the world’s finest  toolbelts."The Toolbelt Masters" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and   the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by LORRAINE SANDERSIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by AVANTHIKA SRINIVASANProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
The New Sign Painters

The New Sign Painters

2022-03-0226:31

The commercial signs of yesteryear, which were all painted by hand, offer a kind of beauty, personality, and longevity that today’s industrial signs have been unable to duplicate. While exploring what’s left of the old sign-painting traditions, we stumbled upon small but lively seeds of revival."The New Sign Painters" originally appeared in Craftsmanship Quarterly, a multimedia, online magazine about artisans, innovators, and  the architecture of excellence. You'll find many more stories, videos, audio recordings, and other resources on our site — all free of charge and free of advertising.Written by LAURA FRASERIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by GÖRAN NORQUISTProduced by CHRIS EGUSAMusic by MIKE SNOWDEN / BLUE DOT SESSIONS
James and Deborah Fallows spent four years crisscrossing the United States in a small plane, visiting dozens of small towns. The stories they found were surprising—and entirely contrary to the narrative we've all read about in the news. They saw  communities engaged in a vigorous process of economic renewal—a stunning portrait, in sum, of an America reinventing itself, literally from the ground up. They published their findings in “Our Towns: a 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America,” (Penguin Random House, 2018) and produced an HBO documentary of the same name in 2021. They also founded Our Towns Civic Foundation, a nonprofit initiative that continues their work.Because their story overlaps so forcefully with the theme of our Winter 2022 issue, “Reviving Our Abandoned Small Towns”, we snagged Jim and Deb for a sit-down interview with Todd Oppenheimer, founder and executive director of The Craftsmanship Initiative.This episode is part of the series of “Artisan Interviews,” produced by Craftsmanship Quarterly, in which we bring you conversations with the artisans behind the stories, and with those who write about them.Written by CRAFTSMANSHIP EDITORSIntroduction by CHRIS EGUSANarrated by TODD OPPENHEIMER WITH JAMES & DEBORAH FALLOWSProduced by CHRIS EGUSA
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