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The Greater Good

Author: WMPG

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The Greater Good is a podcast devoted to complex and emerging issues in law, business, and policy.

The Greater Good is produced by the University of Maine Graduate and Professional Center, a consortium of the University of Maine School of Law, The University of Maine Graduate School of Business and the Graduate Programs of the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service.
24 Episodes
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Amidst the flurry of efforts to keep small businesses open and their workers employed, how have Maine startups been navigating the Covid-19 pandemic? To answer this question, we invited two entrepreneurs and a business professor with deep roots in Maine’s startup community to discuss today’s startup landscape and share their perspectives on the last seven months. We talk about changing customer needs, pivots, access to capital, hiring talent, and how people are emerging from the first waves of the pandemic with new ideas and businesses. Featured guests are Brian Rahill (CourseStorm), Patrick Breeding (Marin Skincare), and Prof. Jason Harkins (Associate Dean of the University of Maine Business School + Co-managing Director of Scratchpad Accelerator). (Note: With our recording studio on the University of Southern Maine campus closed, we are posting episodes using the “live” audio from our new Covid-19-focused webinar series, the Greater Good Webinar/Podcast Series. This episode used the “live” audio from our October 7th webinar.) ***Connect with UsWebsite: umainecenter.org/greatergoodTwitter: @greatergoodpod
Media headlines are often centered around large urban areas, but rural communities are facing unique challenges in combating the pandemic. To discuss these challenges, three main healthcare and public health experts with a longstanding interest in revisioning Maine’s public health and rural health systems join us on the podcast. We discuss the rural health challenges before the pandemic hit, what is happening now in rural healthcare and rural economies, and where we can go from here to create a brighter future. (Note: With our recording studio on the University of Southern Maine campus closed, we are posting episodes using the “live” audio from our new Covid-19-focused webinar series, the Greater Good Webinar/Podcast Series.)***Connect with UsWebsite: umainecenter.org/greatergoodTwitter: @greatergoodpodProduced by the University of Maine Graduate and Professional Center, with help from WMPG
Welcome to the Greater Good Webinar/Podcast Series! With our recording studio on the USM campus closed, we will be posting episodes using the “live” audio from our new Covid-19-focused webinar series. In this episode, we chat with leaders at L.L. Bean about how they successfully pivoted manufacturing and operations capabilities to protect and support employees, healthcare workers, and Maine residents at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our guests shared their experiences making face coverings, procuring PPE by leveraging their supply chain, and boxing food for Good Shepherd Food Bank. Discussion topics included the decision-making process, the manufacturing transition, corporate social responsibility, and the impacts to employee morale.
Part two of our conversation with Dr. Jennifer Monti focuses on how we can increase the speed of medical innovation, better serve rural populations, invest in public health, and the importance of building partnerships between medical professionals, universities, and the private sector to solve critical problems in healthcare. Dr. Monti asserts that the best medical ideas can come from anyone and anywhere: patients, medical professionals, and even complete strangers. Dr. Monti is a general cardiologist most interested in the intersection of medicine, public health, and entrepreneurship. She developed the Innovation Cohort at Maine Medical Center in response to her experience as an inventor and entrepreneur moving an idea from scribbled drawing to working prototype, company formation, fundraising, and clinical trials. She firmly believes good ideas come from every corner of an organization, and that Portland, Maine should be the easiest place in America to learn to invent and to be an inventor. She received a degree in biochemistry with honors from Harvard College, as well as degrees in medicine and public health from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Jenn's favorite lunch spot is LB Kitchen, her favorite place for dinner is home with her kids, and her favorite local business is Print Bookstore on Congress St. in the East End. She is a huge college basketball fan and is still upset that the Big East fell apart.
The American healthcare system has an urgent need to develop innovative ways to care for patients and communities. Workers in every corner of a health system- from administrators to physicians to custodial staff - have unique and important insights. The Innovation Cohort at MaineHealth is designed to turn these insights into transformative medical care.Join us for a conversation about healthcare innovation and collaboration with Dr. Jennifer Monti. Dr. Monti is a general cardiologist most interested in the intersection of medicine, public health, and entrepreneurship. She developed the Innovation Cohort at Maine Medical Center in response to her experience as an inventor and entrepreneur moving an idea from scribbled drawing to working prototype, company formation, fundraising, and clinical trials. She firmly believes good ideas come from every corner of an organization, and that Portland, Maine should be the easiest place in America to learn to invent and to be an inventor. She received a degree in biochemistry with honors from Harvard College, as well as degrees in medicine and public health from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Jenn's favorite lunch spot is LB Kitchen, her favorite place for dinner is home with her kids, and her favorite local business is Print Bookstore on Congress St. in the East End. She is a huge college basketball fan and is still upset that the Big East fell apart.
What is leadership? How is it developed? How is it defined? We've assembled an expert panel of business professors and leaders to discuss modern leadership styles and philosophies, how different generations of workers view leadership, and what this means for the workforce of the future. Our guests are Professors Richard Bilodeau and Emily Newell of the University of Southern Maine’s School of Business; and Becky McKinnell of iBec Creative.Professor Richard Bilodeau teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in entrepreneurship, creative strategies, design thinking, business sustainability, and marketing at the University of Southern Maine. In addition to his teaching, Professor Bilodeau oversees USM’s Center for Entrepreneurship, and serves on the advisor groups for the Honors Program, Food Studies Program, MEIF Entrepreneurship Training Program and Ci2 Lab. He also has an active consulting practice, working with a wide range of businesses, from small retail and coffee shops in Maine to industry leaders like The Weather Channel, ESPN, Nielsen, and Deloitte.Professor Emily Newell is an Assistant Professor of Sport Management at USM and a former intercollegiate athletics professional. Her research centers around the intersection of intercollegiate sport and higher education, with a focus on international students, minority students, first generation students, and academically at-risk students. Prior to joining USM, Emily was a faculty member at Georgia Southern University.Becky McKinnell, founded her award-winning digital agency iBec Creative the day after graduating from the University of Southern Maine in 2006. Becky has since been recognized as one of Businessweek’s Top 25 Entrepreneurs 25 and Under, was named U.S. Small Business Administration Young Entrepreneur of the Year, and received the Stevie Women in Business Award, among numerous industry recognitions for her company’s work. In addition to iBec, Becky is a founding partner of ikno intranet, a social intranet software designed for companies between 50 and 500 employees that need an easy and intuitive way to communicate online. And most recently, Becky launched a necklace and handbag line inspired by salt air, Wildwood Oyster Co.
Part two of our conversation about affordable housing andcommunity economic development focuses on the factors that create vibrant, successfulcommunities in urban and rural areas alike, using Maine as a case study. We alsodiscuss how law can be a contributor to effective development efforts. Our guests areGreg Payne of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition and Avesta Housing; ProfessorPeter Pitegoff of the University of Maine School of Law; and Nina Ciffolillo, theEconomic Justice Fellow for the Class of 2021 at the University of Maine School of Law.Greg Payne is the Director of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition and aDevelopment Officer at Avesta Housing. Greg has nearly two decades of experience inissues related to housing and homelessness, including work at the Atlanta Task Forcefor the Homeless and the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless. Greg joinedAvesta Housing in 2007 as a Development Officer. In addition to his responsibilities formanaging all aspects of multifamily rental projects from concept to completion, Gregserves as Director of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition, a diverse association ofmore than 125 private and public sector organizations committed to ensuring that allMainers are adequately and affordably housed. He is currently the Chair of the Board ofDirectors of the National Low Income Housing Coalition and serves on the Board ofGenesis Community Loan Fund.Peter Pitegoff is Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law, where hewas Dean from 2005 to 2015. He has taught, worked, and written extensively in theareas of community economic development, labor and industrial organization,corporation and nonprofit law, employee ownership, and legal ethics. Pitegoff served forten years on the board of directors of Coastal Enterprises, Inc., a national leader incommunity development finance. Prior to his academic career, he was legal counsel forthe ICA Group, a Boston firm that assists worker-owned enterprises and relatedeconomic development initiatives nationwide.Nina Ciffolillo is a second year law student at the University of Maine School of Law.She graduated from McGill University with a degree in English and Environment andmoved to Maine in 2016, where she worked for two seasons on a vegetable farm. Shebegan at Maine Law in 2018 and is the Economic Justice Fellow for the Class of 2021.Last summer, in connection with her fellowship, she worked in affordable housingdevelopment and policy at Avesta Housing. She plans to use her law degree to combateconomic and environmental injustice.
We kick off Season 2 of The Greater Good with a conversation about affordable housing and community economic development. We start by defining both of these terms and then delve into their history in the U.S., the current housing shortage, proposed law and policy changes, and the link to environmental sustainability. Our guests are Greg Payne of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition and Avesta Housing; Professor Peter Pitegoff of the University of Maine School of Law; and Nina Ciffolillo, the Economic Justice Fellow for the Class of 2021 at the University of Maine School of Law.Greg Payne is the Director of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition and a Development Officer at Avesta Housing. Greg has nearly two decades of experience in issues related to housing and homelessness, including work at the Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless and the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless. Greg joined Avesta Housing in 2007 as a Development Officer. In addition to his responsibilities for managing all aspects of multifamily rental projects from concept to completion, Greg serves as Director of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition, a diverse association of more than 125 private and public sector organizations committed to ensuring that all Mainers are adequately and affordably housed. He is currently the Chair of the Board of Directors of the National Low Income Housing Coalition and serves on the Board of Genesis Community Loan Fund.Peter Pitegoff is Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law, where he was Dean from 2005 to 2015. He has taught, worked, and written extensively in the areas of community economic development, labor and industrial organization, corporation and nonprofit law, employee ownership, and legal ethics. Pitegoff served for ten years on the board of directors of Coastal Enterprises, Inc., a national leader in community development finance. Prior to his academic career, he was legal counsel for the ICA Group, a Boston firm that assists worker-owned enterprises and related economic development initiatives nationwide.Nina Ciffolillo is a second year law student at the University of Maine School of Law. She graduated from McGill University with a degree in English and Environment and moved to Maine in 2016, where she worked for two seasons on a vegetable farm. She began at Maine Law in 2018 and is the Economic Justice Fellow for the Class of 2021. Last summer, in connection with her fellowship, she worked in affordable housing development and policy at Avesta Housing. She plans to use her law degree to combat economic and environmental injustice.
Part two of our conversation about regulatory compliance focuses on the gray areas of compliance. We discuss the challenges of sharing data, navigating compliance pitfalls when doing business internationally, and how new regulations can have unexpected outcomes for small businesses. We wrap up with a discussion of the rapidly growing job market for compliance professionals.Andrew Kaufman joined the University of Maine School of Law faculty in 2016, after more than 40 years in private practice as a corporate and transactional attorney. At Maine Law, Andy teaches advanced courses in corporate law and business associations, commercial law, and transactional practice, as well as the law school's course in risk management and compliance. In addition, he is the Director of the Compliance Certificate Program that the law school offers to compliance professionals in the business community. Andy received his bachelor's degree from Yale in 1971 and his law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1974.Ross Hickey is the Assistant Provost for Research Integrity at the University of Southern Maine and the Director of MeRTEC (“MER-tech”), the Maine Regulatory Training and Ethics Center at USM. Ross has built a nationally-recognized research compliance office that serves not only USM, but institutions throughout the state of Maine. Ross is contacted on a regular basis to provide technical assistance to other institutions on regulatory compliance matters. Ross is a graduate of the University of Maine School of Law.
Whether we realize it or not, the field of regulatory compliance impacts almost every aspect of our lives. From the food we eat to the shampoo we use to the clothing we wear, everything we touch is impacted by a variety of laws and regulations that make up the surprisingly dynamic field of compliance. Our discussion today focuses on how compliance is more than following rules. Done well, compliance uses creativity, critical thinking and foresight to empower employees, build good businesses and ethical cultures as well as strong brands that serve their customers. We also discuss how organizations like Wells Fargo and Theranos have suffered the long term impacts of NOT having strong regulatory compliance functions.Andrew Kaufman joined the University of Maine School of Law faculty in 2016, after more than 40 years in private practice as a corporate and transactional attorney. At Maine Law, Andy teaches advanced courses in corporate law and business associations, commercial law, and transactional practice, as well as the law school's course in risk management and compliance. In addition, he is the Director of the Compliance Certificate Program that the law school offers to compliance professionals in the business community. Andy received his bachelor's degree from Yale in 1971 and his law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1974.Ross Hickey is the Assistant Provost for Research Integrity at the University of Southern Maine and the Director of MeRTEC (“MER-tech”), the Maine Regulatory Training and Ethics Center at USM. Ross has built a nationally-recognized research compliance office that serves not only USM, but institutions throughout the state of Maine. Ross is contacted on a regular basis to provide technical assistance to other institutions on regulatory compliance matters. Ross is a graduate of the University of Maine School of Law.
Join us as we continue our conversation about juvenile justice in America. We discuss traditional detention center environments, newer, more progressive models and the often surprising costs--and outcomes--of each. What are the differences between adult and youth incarceration models? What does bias look like in the world of juvenile justice? How do we reduce recidivism rates and what are some alternatives to youth incarceration? We also talk about Maine Law's innovative Center for Juvenile Policy and Law and Juvenile Justice Clinic.Christopher Northrop is a clinical professor at the University of Maine School of Law, where he launched their Juvenile Justice Clinic in 2006. Prior to joining Maine Law, Professor Northrop spent many years in private practice concentrating on juvenile defense and juvenile justice policy work. He has been involved with the National Juvenile Defense Center (NJDC) since its inception, and has served as a consultant for NJDC assessments of statewide juvenile defender systems throughout the country, including the 2019 assessments of Kansas and New Hampshire. Chris is one of the founders of the New England Juvenile Defender Center and a member of the NJDC’s Senior Leadership Council.Jill Ward leads the Maine Center for Juvenile Policy and Law (MCJPAL) at the University of Maine School of Law which works with clinic students, faculty and system stakeholders to advance policies and practices to reduce harm and to increase positive outcomes for current and former system-involved Maine youth. She is currently serving as one of three co-chairs of a statewide juvenile justice task force looking a broad system reform. Additionally, Jill works with national organizations on juvenile justice reform, including the Youth First Initiative and the Campaign for Youth Justice. Prior to returning to Maine in 2007, Jill served as the first Policy Director for the Girl Scouts of the USA and Director of Juvenile Justice and Youth Development at the Children’s Defense Fund in Washington D.C., where she co-chaired the National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition. She also has more than 7 years Capitol Hill experience serving as a legislative aide to former U.S. Senators George Mitchell and Paul Sarbanes. Jill is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Georgetown University Law Center.Jonathan Ruterbories is a second-year law student and President of the Maine Juvenile Law Society at the University of Maine School of Law. Prior to attending Maine Law, Jonathan attended Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri where he first became interested in issues of juvenile policy after working with system involved youth. He currently works as a volunteer at Long Creek Youth Development Center focused on improving reintegration outcomes for incarcerated youth and will be serving as the Cushman D. Anthony Fellow at Maine Law’s Juvenile Justice Clinic this upcoming summer. In this role, he will be working on juvenile policy projects and carrying a caseload consisting mostly of juvenile clients under the guidance of Professor Northrop.
Juvenile Justice and the treatment of children who come in conflict with the law has been making national and local news. How best do we work with these children to serve both the children and the communities they live in? In this episode, we explore some of the historical perspectives of juvenile justice, different models for addressing youth in crisis, youth incarceration and incarceration alternatives. We also discuss how modern science about youth brain development is influencing law and policy and the critical resources and factors that help produce positive outcomes for youth in crisis. Our guests include Professor Christopher Northrop, Jill Ward and Jonathan Ruterbories from the University of Maine School of Law.Christopher Northrop is a clinical professor at the University of Maine School of Law, where he launched their Juvenile Justice Clinic in 2006. Prior to joining Maine Law, Professor Northrop spent many years in private practice concentrating on juvenile defense and juvenile justice policy work. He has been involved with the National Juvenile Defense Center (NJDC) since its inception, and has served as a consultant for NJDC assessments of statewide juvenile defender systems throughout the country, including the 2019 assessments of Kansas and New Hampshire. Chris is one of the founders of the New England Juvenile Defender Center and a member of the NJDC’s Senior Leadership Council.Jill Ward leads the Maine Center for Juvenile Policy and Law (MCJPAL) at the University of Maine School of Law which works with clinic students, faculty and system stakeholders to advance policies and practices to reduce harm and to increase positive outcomes for current and former system-involved Maine youth. She is currently serving as one of three co-chairs of a statewide juvenile justice task force looking a broad system reform. Additionally, Jill works with national organizations on juvenile justice reform, including the Youth First Initiative and the Campaign for Youth Justice. Prior to returning to Maine in 2007, Jill served as the first Policy Director for the Girl Scouts of the USA and Director of Juvenile Justice and Youth Development at the Children’s Defense Fund in Washington D.C., where she co-chaired the National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition. She also has more than 7 years Capitol Hill experience serving as a legislative aide to former U.S. Senators George Mitchell and Paul Sarbanes. Jill is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Georgetown University Law Center.Jonathan Ruterbories is a second-year law student and President of the Maine Juvenile Law Society at the University of Maine School of Law. Prior to attending Maine Law, Jonathan attended Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri where he first became interested in issues of juvenile policy after working with system involved youth. He currently works as a volunteer at Long Creek Youth Development Center focused on improving reintegration outcomes for incarcerated youth and will be serving as the Cushman D. Anthony Fellow at Maine Law’s Juvenile Justice Clinic this upcoming summer. In this role, he will be working on juvenile policy projects and carrying a caseload consisting mostly of juvenile clients under the guidance of Professor Northrop.
Join us as we continue our discussion with Drs. Heidi Parker and Emily Newell, professors of sport management at the University of Southern Maine. Today we discuss access to sport, diversity and inclusion, how sport has served as a platform for free speech, societal change and more. We also discuss career opportunities and the business of sport.Dr. Heidi Parker is a Sport Management faculty member with the University of Southern Maine School of Business. Her research centers on sport consumer behavior specifically focusing on factors that influence fan attitudes and perceptions. She has published in a variety of journals and presented her research at a number of academic conferences. Prior to coming to USM, Dr. Parker was a faculty member at Syracuse University.Dr. Emily Newell is an Assistant Professor of Sport Management at USM and a former intercollegiate athletics professional. Her research centers around the intersection of intercollegiate sport and higher education, with a focus on international students, minority students, first generation students, and academically at-risk students. Prior to joining USM, Emily was a faculty member at Georgia Southern University.
What makes a fan a fan? How are enduring rivalries born? How does sport impact communities and individuals? This podcast episode explores the role that sport plays in American culture and its ability to build community, connection and belonging. We also discuss the importance of play, growth and development of children in youth sports and how sports are changing for high school and college-aged students. Dr. Heidi Parker is a Sport Management faculty member with the University of Southern Maine School of Business. Her research centers on sport consumer behavior specifically focusing on factors that influence fan attitudes and perceptions. She has published in a variety of journals and presented her research at a number of academic conferences. Prior to coming to USM, Dr. Parker was a faculty member at Syracuse University.Dr. Emily Newell is an Assistant Professor of Sport Management at USM and a former intercollegiate athletics professional. Her research centers around the intersection of intercollegiate sport and higher education, with a focus on international students, minority students, first generation students, academically at-risk students. Prior to joining USM, Emily was a faculty member at Georgia Southern University.
The Arctic is at the forefront of climate change, experiencing rapid environmental shifts that are having very real and meaningful impacts on native populations and landscapes. Join us for part two of our cross-disciplinary discussion with scholars from the University of Maine School of Law, the University of Maine and the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service about how Arctic populations and global economies are responding to these climate change threats and opportunities as well as how laws and policies are keeping up (or not).
The long term impacts of climate change are frequently discussed, but it is equally important to understand how a changing climate is impacting Arctic landscapes, populations, laws, policies and economies TODAY. Rapidly melting ice is generating new shipping lanes, mining opportunities, fisheries and more. We explore the importance of a collaborative, cross-disciplinary approach to understanding and solving problems, and how that can help us better predict the impacts of climate change on future generations.Dr. Paul Andrew Mayewski is an internationally acclaimed glaciologist, climate scientist and polar explorer who has forged a career through accomplishments at the cutting edge of science. He is Director/Professor of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine. His exploration and science credentials include: leader of more than 55 expeditions to the remotest polar and high altitude reaches of the planet; more than 450 scientific publications; major scientific discoveries such as: abrupt climate change in the atmosphere and documentation of human source pollution; numerous awards and hundreds of prominent appearances in the media such as: multiple CBS 60 Minutes shows, NOVA films, National Public Radio, and the 2014 Emmy Award winning “Years of Living Dangerously."Dr. Firooza Pavri is Director of the Muskie School of Public Service and Professor of Geography. She is originally from India and prior to joining USM, she lived in the Midwest and received her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Toledo and Ohio State University respectively. Dr. Pavri teaches and conducts research in the area of environmental geography, with a focus on society-environment interactions, natural resource conservation & policy, sustainable development, and geospatial technologies, including remote sensing. Charles H. Norchi is the Benjamin Thompson Professor of Law, and director of the Center for Oceans & Coastal Law and Graduate Law Programs and the University of Maine School of Law. He teaches International Law, Oceans Law and Policy, International Human Rights, and Maritime Law. His current research includes public international law; law of the sea; the intersections of law, science, and policy; the Arctic; and Afghanistan.
Part two of our conversation with Professor Anna Welch and Emily Arvizu focuses on how the current state of immigration in the United States impacts ALL Americans. We also talk about the education of and demand for immigration lawyers, the University of Maine School of Law Refugee and Human Rights clinic and the important work the school and its students are doing in regards to detention issues, asylum cases and working with non-citizens as they work through the immigration and asylum seeking processes.
Seeking Asylum in 2019

Seeking Asylum in 2019

2019-10-0828:28

Join us for a discussion with Maine Law Professor Anna Welch and student attorney Emily Arvizu about the global issues impacting our current immigration system. We explore the reasons asylum seekers are fleeing their home countries, how the process of seeking asylum has changed over time, the history of detention as well as the conditions of current detention centers in Laredo, Texas and Strafford, New Hampshire.
Although the MBA is over 100 years old, the world of business is wildly different than it was a century ago. Join us as we explore how MBA programs are evolving, what today’s employers are looking for, and how things like big data and innovation are changing the degree. Michael Weber, Dean of the University of Maine Graduate School of Business talks about the relevance of the MBA in Maine and beyond.J. Michael Weber is the Dean of the Graduate School of Business at the University of Maine. He has a 25 year career in academia, with significant experience in graduate business program development and growth. He has successfully facilitated the national and international rankings of graduate programs, by the U.S. News and World Report and CEO Magazine. Dr. Weber has been actively engaged in consulting throughout his career, providing business and marketing services to a wide variety of firms/organizations, government institutions, and even started several of his own entrepreneurial ventures. He has traveled extensively in South America and Europe in conjunction with consulting activities for international and domestic organizations. He received his B.S. from the University of Florida, an MBA from the University of West Florida, and a Ph.D. in Business from Louisiana State University.
Our third conversation with Drs. Ziller and Jonk explores the status of the rural health in Maine, US communities and how that compares to rural communities in other countries. We also discuss the different people and professions who are working to solve these challenges today and how we are educating public health and policy professionals for the future. Our guests are Drs. Erica Ziller and Yvonne Jonk. Dr. Ziller is the Chair and Assistant Professor of Public Health at the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service where she teaches courses on health policy and the U.S healthcare system. She is also the Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center, and has directed numerous studies on rural health access, coverage and health reform. Dr. Ziller has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Rural Health, and has won national awards for her contributions to this field. Dr. Jonk is an Associate Research Professor of Public Health at the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service, and is the Deputy Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center. She specializes in rural health, access to health care and health insurance coverage. She is currently researching the differences in newly admitted rural and urban nursing home residents, elder abuse, and the use of health services by the aged.
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