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I had the wonderful opportunity to speak to Church Mutual  ( www.churchmutual.com ) for Disability Awareness Month. They currently sponsor 2 Paralympic athletes, 1 a skier who uses a wheelchair and the other a track sprinter who is autistic. Last year Church Mutual focused on disabled with mobility challenges. This year they wanted to highlight the rapidly growing segment of diversity called neurodiversity to give deeper understanding of individuals classified by the ADA laws as having a cognitive disability like autism. While there are many other named and unnamed conditions among the neurodistinct than autism, it was the focus because of their sponsoring an autistic Paralympian and because I am autistic and able to speak to it from lived experience.In the endless ways something can go wrong Zoom messed up when I turned my camera back on for the live show. It of course worked perfectly for the prior 15 minutes as were were doing a tech check. Thinking it was my camera I tried making some quick adjustments on it and changing some of the lighting. Better, but still looked like a ghost. Looking at the recording made by the camera it was actually working perfectly. Bummer that is not what Zoom was displaying. In the spirit of "the show must go on" I shared by deck which displayed perfectly and my ghost image was now just a distracting little box on the side.This episode is the audio track of the presentation. I start with facts about disabilities and how odd it is that a white wheelchair and person on a blue background is the symbol of "handicap" in the USA as 25% of Americans have a disability and only 1% of Americans use wheelchairs. We then touched on invisible disabilities and that cognitive disabilities are the largest group in America's disabled population. Finally we dove into neurodiversity where we focused in on autism.Thank you to DisabilityIn ( disabilityin.org ) for introducing me to this amazing company. It was a pleasure to speak to them and help support the amazing job they are doing in diversity.
I think you will enjoy this one as it delivers a huge amount of information is a very short time. Learning nuggets are short recording which deliver an impactful statement or point on a specific topic. This set was recorded for Uptimize in 2018 as video clips. I pulled the audio track to create this episode. As I mention in the introduction I was still struggling with the correct terminology to use. In this recording I mostly use the term neurodiverse incorrectly as a noun meaning non-neurotypical. Some of my Australian friends finally convinced me that neurodistinct is an adverb and refers to the make-up of a group. Since then I coined the term Neurodistinct to mean non-neurotypical and now use neurodiverse properly as an adverb.When you hear neurodiverse in this recording just think neurodistinct and you will then be up to date with my terminology.For those of you who want to understand neurodiversity terminology better take a look at my blog post Neurodiversity Refined: https://www.timgoldstein.com/blog/neurodiversityrefined You can also download my Neurodiversity Explained infographic from the post.
This episode is Tim Goldstein's pre-panel presentation for the Neurodiversity in Tech session at DisabilityIn's virtual conference in January 2021. The panel was just me and Brent Amundson VP HR at Dell Computers. While I can only share this part I think you will still find it interesting and get a lot from it.Disabilityin.orgDisability:IN is the leading nonprofit resource for business disability inclusion worldwide. Our network of over 250 corporations expands opportunities for people with disabilities across enterprises. Our central office and 25 Affiliates serve as the collective voice to effect change for people with disabilities in business.Apologies for the sound quality of the presentation. It is the audio track off the Zoom recording. Amazing how much it flattens by voice compared to the intro and outro sections. All the more reason people need to learn to control the sound of their voice so their authentic message gets through. Thank to Roger Love and his vocal training method for changing my voice and relationships.
I have known Emma for a few years now. She is truly a special person. I love talking with Emma as I always leave with new insight and approaches. Emma is one of those unique people who understands the autistic mind and the world we live. She brings her understanding of the autistic adult's challenges combine with her vast experience in the education world to know the effects both positive and negative the various approaches used with children can create when they become adults.I hope you enjoy listening to Emma as much as I do. 2020 has been hard on all of us. Emma is one of the special people in my life that has helped me get through. Thank you Emma for just being the caring, kind, amazing person you are.Contact Emma:essentialeducationgroup.comwww.emmapinnock.co.ukLinkedInemma@essentialeducationgroup.comAbout Emma:As an educator Emma has had a rich and varied career. She has been a teacher for 14 years, working in a range of environments such as PRU’s, Hospital schools, Special schools and Mainstream education.  Emma has also been in a range of senior management roles for 8 years and in her most recent role, as the Head of a specialist provision, focused on the needs and education of children with autism.Emma’s passion to support SEND has derived from her personal Journey.  This has led to her belief in people’s abilities to overcome barriers and difficulties. Emma is solution focused, strategic and has the ability to develop vision for schools, organisations and families. Emma has both personal and professional experience of living with special educational needs which uniquely impacts her ability and insights. She strives to encourage people to see past their comfort zones, to be solution focused despite the difficulties and to stretch themselves past the norm. As a teacher, trainer, coach, team member and much more; Emma seeks to inspire people and organisations to make room for neuro-diverse people to uniquely take their place.Thank you Per for the editing help I needed to get back to publishing episodes.
I have known Emma for a few years now. She is truly a special person. I love talking with Emma as I always leave with new insight and approaches. Emma is one of those unique people who understands the autistic mind and the world we live. She brings her understanding of the autistic adult's challenges combine with her vast experience in the education world to know the effects both positive and negative the various approaches used with children can create when they become adults.I hope you enjoy listening to Emma as much as I do. 2020 has been hard on all of us. Emma is one of the special people in my life that has helped me get through. Thank you Emma for just being the caring, kind, amazing person you are.Contact Emma:essentialeducationgroup.comwww.emmapinnock.co.ukLinkedInemma@essentialeducationgroup.comAbout Emma:As an educator Emma has had a rich and varied career. She has been a teacher for 14 years, working in a range of environments such as PRU’s, Hospital schools, Special schools and Mainstream education.  Emma has also been in a range of senior management roles for 8 years and in her most recent role, as the Head of a specialist provision, focused on the needs and education of children with autism.Emma’s passion to support SEND has derived from her personal Journey.  This has led to her belief in people’s abilities to overcome barriers and difficulties. Emma is solution focused, strategic and has the ability to develop vision for schools, organisations and families. Emma has both personal and professional experience of living with special educational needs which uniquely impacts her ability and insights. She strives to encourage people to see past their comfort zones, to be solution focused despite the difficulties and to stretch themselves past the norm. As a teacher, trainer, coach, team member and much more; Emma seeks to inspire people and organisations to make room for neuro-diverse people to uniquely take their place.Thank you Per for the editing help I needed to get back to publishing episodes.
It has been far too many month since I have posted an episode. There has been a huge amount going on in my life above and beyond all the changes the COVID pandemic has caused. Like many autistics I can easily get overstimulated and drained in the course of a normal day. Between COVID and joining Google through an acquisition and the changes it brings I get overstimulated and drained by the end of the work day. Unfortunately it leaves me fried for the day and no personal work happens that evening. Weekends have been mostly dedicated to hiding from the computer and trying to avoid anything that is draining. So nothing happens on weekends either other than Tim going over the top on his special interest as is his norm.Hoping this will be the first step in getting back to at least an episode every two weeks. We will see how fast I can get to this goal.Thanks for listening and please share with a friend who could benefit.
We continue our chat with John Richmond as he tells us about more adventures and insight with his autistic son.John Richmond is a proud husband and father of three kids, a boy and two girls. His son was diagnosed on the autism spectrum just after his fifth birthday. John holds a master’s degree in Business Administration and is currently a PhD candidate. In addition to his books, John has also published several academic research articles and has a deep passion for his career in higher education. He and his family reside in North Texas on a ten-acre farmJohn and I had a great chat. I really enjoyed hearing how John has been able to recognize the unique and uniquely effective strategies his son has developed.Contact John from his website or on LinkedIn:https://johndrichmond.comLinkedInThe clippers that made hair cuts a trauma free event!Calming Clippers on Amazon
In case you were wondering "Where is Tim", I'm back. Long story which of course involves autism. More later, now onto our guest, John Richmond!John Richmond is a proud husband and father of three kids, a boy and two girls. His son was diagnosed on the autism spectrum just after his fifth birthday. John holds a master’s degree in Business Administration and is currently a PhD candidate. In addition to his books, John has also published several academic research articles and has a deep passion for his career in higher education. He and his family reside in North Texas on a ten-acre farmJohn and I had a great chat. I really enjoyed hearing how John has been able to recognize the unique and uniquely effective strategies his son has developed.Contact John from his website or on LinkedIn:https://johndrichmond.comLinkedInThe clippers that made hair cuts a trauma free event!Calming Clippers on Amazon
This is the third and final segment of a good long chat Dr Dave and I had.Dr Dave has a unique perspective on Autism in the Workplace. Dr Dave, like myself, was not diagnosed until later in adult life. This gave him the aspie experience of lots of jobs and careers and how thinking differently is frequently not accepted. Dr Dave is also the parent of autistic children, giving him hands on experience with the childhood side of autism. Finally, Dr Dave is the Executive Director of Vanderbilt's Frist Center on Autism and Innovations, where he gets to talk with people on all side of the employment challenge.The Frist Center is a multi-discipline approach with a mission of: Engineering technologies and transforming the workplace – inspired by neurodiversity, at the Vanderbilt University School of Engineering brings engineers, business scholars, and disabilities researchers together with experts in neuroscience and education to understand, maximize, and promote neurodiverse talent.Details to reach the Frist Center or Dr Dave directly.Vanderbilt's Frist Center for Autism and InnovationDr Dave: david.d.caudel@vanderbilt.edu
This is the second segment of a good long chat Dr Dave and I had.Dr Dave has a unique perspective on Autism in the Workplace. Dr Dave, like myself, was not diagnosed until later in adult life. This gave him the aspie experience of lots of jobs and careers and how thinking differently is frequently not accepted. Dr Dave is also the parent of autistic children, giving him hands on experience with the childhood side of autism. Finally, Dr Dave is the Executive Director of Vanderbilt's Frist Center on Autism and Innovations, where he gets to talk with people on all side of the employment challenge.The Frist Center is a multi-discipline approach with a mission of: Engineering technologies and transforming the workplace – inspired by neurodiversity, at the Vanderbilt University School of Engineering brings engineers, business scholars, and disabilities researchers together with experts in neuroscience and education to understand, maximize, and promote neurodiverse talent.Details to reach the Frist Center or Dr Dave directly.Vanderbilt's Frist Center for Autism and InnovationDr Dave: david.d.caudel@vanderbilt.edu
Dr Dave has a unique perspective on Autism in the Workplace. Dr Dave, like myself, was not diagnosed until later in adult life. This gave him the aspie experience of lots of jobs and careers and how thinking differently is frequently not accepted. Dr Dave is also the parent of autistic children, giving him hands on experience with the childhood side of autism. Finally, Dr Dave is the Executive Director of Vanderbilt's Frist Center on Autism and Innovations, where he gets to talk with people on all side of the employment challenge.The Frist Center is a multi-discipline approach with a mission of: Engineering technologies and transforming the workplace – inspired by neurodiversity, at the Vanderbilt University School of Engineering brings engineers, business scholars, and disabilities researchers together with experts in neuroscience and education to understand, maximize, and promote neurodiverse talent.Details to reach the Frist Center or Dr Dave directly.Vanderbilt's Frist Center for Autism and InnovationDr Dave: david.d.caudel@vanderbilt.edu
For the third year in a row I was invited to guest lecture a class at Cornell University. My topic was challenges autistic people face in interviews. It is such a rich topic, unfortunately for many on the spectrum a job interview is a way to decide you "are not a good fit" which in the USA is HR speak for, your not like us and it makes us uncomfortable so we will illegally discount you from consideration, but give a totally safe non-descriptive answer.You can download the presentation deck that goes with this talk here:Presentation Deck, Tim presents at Cornell Oct 2019For free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
Chris Turner is a consultant in Australia that helps companies to become more diverse by adding neurodiverse staff. His slogan is "Neurodiversity Inclusion Made Simple". While Chris deals with all humans regardless of where in the Neuro Cloud™ they fall.This episode and 2 more came from a catch up call we had scheduled. I had just gotten a cool podcast recorder I was itching to use. Chris agreed to recording us and I edited the recording to create 3 great podcasts. This is the final segment.You can find out more about Chris and his state of the art concepts and approaches check out his site at: ProjectEnterpriseCoaching.comFor free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
Shelly and I had such a good time chatting we kept the recorder running and produced Shelly Dival continued.Like many of us that grew up on farms, Shelly has a huge range of skills and has had a number of careers. In her now long running career as a building designer. In Australia architect has a specific meaning, but in the USA we would probably call her an architect.When her grandson was diagnosed with autism Shelly jumped in to learn all she could about it and how to apply her skill as a building designer to create better spaces for the autistic and others of the neurodiverse bend. As the recipient of a Churchill Fellowship Shelly was able to travel the world to learn what is being done in other countries to create living spaces for the autistic. This has given her an amazing understanding of the various approached and techniques used to create just the right environment for comfort and usability.You can learn more about Shelly, her design philosophy, and download her summary report of all the things she learned about different designs and approaches at her website https://enablingspaces.com.auEmail: shelly.dival@enablingspaces.com.auLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/shellydivalFacebook: @autismfriendlyPhone: +61 0433 510 416
Like many of us that grew up on farms, Shelly has a huge range of skills and has had a number of careers. In her now long running career as a building designer. In Australia architect has a specific meaning, but in the USA we would probably call her an architect.When her grandson was diagnosed with autism Shelly jumped in to learn all she could about it and how to apply her skill as a building designer to create better spaces for the autistic and others of the neurodiverse bend. As the recipient of a Churchill Fellowship Shelly was able to travel the world to learn what is being done in other countries to create living spaces for the autistic. This has given her an amazing understanding of the various approached and techniques used to create just the right environment for comfort and usability.You can learn more about Shelly, her design philosophy, and download her summary report of all the things she learned about different designs and approaches at her website https://enablingspaces.com.auEmail: shelly.dival@enablingspaces.com.auLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/shellydivalFacebook: @autismfriendlyPhone: +61 0433 510 416
Chris Turner is a consultant in Australia that helps companies to become more diverse by adding neurodiverse staff. His slogan is "Neurodiversity Inclusion Made Simple". While Chris deals with all humans regardless of where in the Neuro Cloud™ they fall.This episode and 2 more came from a catch up call we had scheduled. I had just gotten a cool podcast recorder I was itching to use. Chris agreed to recording us and I edited the recording to create 3 great podcasts. This is the first.You can find out more about Chris and his state of the art concepts and approaches check out his site at: ProjectEnterpriseCoaching.comFor free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
Chris Turner is a consultant in Australia that helps companies to become more diverse by adding neurodiverse staff. His slogan is "Neurodiversity Inclusion Made Simple". While Chris deals with all humans regardless of where in the Neuro Cloud™ they fall.This episode and 2 more came from a catch up call we had scheduled. I had just gotten a cool podcast recorder I was itching to use. Chris agreed to recording us and I edited the recording to create 3 great podcasts. This is the second.You can find out more about Chris and his state of the art concepts and approaches check out his site at: ProjectEnterpriseCoaching.comFor free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
Carol has a unique background and a unique understanding of what it is like to be neurodiverse. Drawing on her background as a life coach, group facilitator, divorce mediator, improvisational comic, and actress, Carol’s expertise is in helping people find the confidence they seek to live life to the fullest.In 2011, Carol founded Social Dynamix, a totally unique, interactive style of learning that combines improvisation, psychodrama, and social pragmatics to help individuals gain confidence and overcome social anxiety.I had a wonderful conversation with Carol and look forward to having her back on the podcast. Always love talking with people who "get it".You can reach Carol on the Social Dynamix website at:socialdynamix.netFor free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
A very special and unusual episode of Life in the Neurotypical Universe. Autism at Work expert and fellow Aspie (inside term for person with Asperger's) Kari Kelly of atypicalworkplace.com and I were hosted by Looker in Santa Cruz, CA for a panel discussion on neurodiversity and autism in the workplace.This episode is a recording of the panel discussion and audience interaction.For free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
Russ Garner is a Director of Professional Services for a rapidly growing software as a services company. Russ has worked for a range of IT companies and as a consultant for one of the biggest consulting companies. His experience includes working with everything from small IT departments to executives and technology workers at some of the worlds biggest companies.In this episode Russ share some of his experience and learning from working with neurodiverse and neurotypical individuals in the technology space. He gives us great insight into both what he has learned from it and even shares areas he wishes he had handled better. Russ surprised Tim with a reveal which explains some of his ability to relate with the neurodiverse, autistic, and functionally autistic type people who are so common in the arena of high tech. Russ also shares some great tips for managers which work whether they have neurodiverse staff or not. For free resources and to learn more visit me at TimGoldstein.comAs always, if you know someone who you think Tim should interview please let us know. Also love to hear your comments, suggestions, and great ideas. Email us at podcast@TimGoldstein.com
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