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Postmodern Realities Podcast

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Hosted by Melanie Cogdill the Managing Editor at Christian Research Institute, Postmodern Realities is a podcast from the Christian Research Institute and the CHRISTIAN RESEARCH JOURNAL. Each podcast features in-depth conversations with our JOURNAL authors.
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A 2015 Pew study found that 25 percent of those identifying as Christians believe in reincarnation. For some, the idea of reincarnation offers comfort and guidance. And many times, the pop-culture view of reincarnation, while popular in American circles, does not fit the Hindu and Buddhist religions where the doctrine originated. According to these religions, you do not choose your next lifetime. Karma determines it. That is, the combination of your good and bad actions produces good or bad results (or karma) in this and every lifetime—until you escape the cycle and dissolve into nirvana. Any religious belief may be held on the basis of blind faith, irrespective of any evidence or reasons for that belief. Such beliefs are often called dogmas (although that is not what the word originally meant). Is it mere dogma to oppose karma? Is reincarnation compatible with Christian teaching?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Dr. Doug Groothuis about his online-exclusive article, “The Reincarnation of Reincarnation”. https://www.equip.org/article/the-reincarnation-of-reincarnation/ Also discussed Dr. Groothuis online-exclusive article “Channeling: Revelations Of Deception” . https://www.equip.org/article/channeling-revelations-of-deception/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 122 Shamelessly Wrong Shamelessly Wrong: Book Review of Shameless: A Sexual Reformation Nadia Bolz-WeberDeveloping an Agile Apologetic Episode 004: Agile Apologetics Learning From an Apostle: Christianity in the Marketplace of Ideas (Acts 17:16-34) Why Buddhism is Not True: Review of Why Buddhism Is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and EnlightenmentJean-Paul Satre And The Resurgence Of ExistentialismFrancis Schaeffer: Pastor, Evangelist, Apologist, Prophet The Christian Apologist’s Moral Compass Steve Jobs, Jesus, and the Problem of EvilAnd many more, Dr. Groothuis has written articles for us for over 30 years.Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
First time visitors to an Anglican Church, especially a parish of the high church tradition, are often bewildered. Worship abounds in written prayers, vestments, acolytes, a robed choir, candles, hymns accompanied by an organ. People cross themselves, kneel for certain prayers, stand for others. Communion wine is just that, wine served from a common cup. If it happens to be a feast day, there may be incense. To the uninitiated all these elements may feel positively arcane and certainly alien. People from non-liturgical traditions often find it difficult to categorize Anglican worship. The liturgy looks Roman Catholic, but the preaching sounds Reformed. While the early stages of the English Reformation reflected stricter liturgical proscriptions (incense, for example, would not have been used), thereby disassociating the English Church from Roman eucharistic doctrine, an ethos gradually emerged, articulated in Article 34, called the Normative Principle of Worship (NPW). The rites and ceremonies of the Church are to be “normed” or measured by the Scriptures rather than “regulated” by them. The Church is free to retain or establish whatever does not conflict with Scripture so long as it is done decently and in order.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Matthew M. Kennedy about his online-exclusive Viewpoint article, “The Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative Principle”. https://www.equip.org/article/the-prayers-rose-like-incense-anglican-worship-and-the-normative-principle/ We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic: Episode 116 Why Christians Should Observe the Christian CalendarWhy Christians Should Observe the Christian CalendarIn Search Of The Sacred: Evangelicals on a Quest and Why it MattersEpisode 046: In Search of the Sacred: Evangelicals on a Quest and Why It MattersPraying with All the SaintsAsh Wednesday, Lent, and EasterDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
[This review contains SPOILERS for the film that tells the story of the Austrian hero Franz Jägerstätter who died during World War II.]A Hidden Life, the three-hour film by acclaimed director Terrence Malick is based on the true life story of an Austrian farmer living in the final years of World War II. In it we see the main character, Franz Jägerstätter, a farmer and family man living a modest life in the mountains of Austria, knock again and again at the door of martyrdom. Malick’s latest film shows us the steep price of Franz’s devout Christian faith and his faithfulness to the end of his life taken by Hitler’s Nazi regime. The film shows Jägerstätter’s journey to martyrdom as he pays the ultimate price for his deeply held conviction that Hitler’s world view and the war was immoral and was in opposition to his Christian faith.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Philip Tallon about his online-exclusive movie review, “The Marathon of Martyrdom: A Review of A Hidden Life”. https://www.equip.org/article/the-marathon-of-martyrdom-a-review-of-a-hidden-life/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker Episode 154: The Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerThe Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerFred Rogers and Mr. Rogers Neighborhood: Episode 150: The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”Steven Spielberg Movies: Episode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanClear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanTolkien Review:Episode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienAlfred Hitchcock films:Episode 100: A. Hitchcock FilmsThe Coen Brother’s Films:Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence“O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of ExistenceThe Films of Quentin Tarantino:Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino“Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantino’s Premodern TheologyDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
It’s been 42 years in the making, but finally The Rise of Skywalker, the final film in the nine-film epic space opera saga called Star Wars, debuted in Dec. 2019. In this podcast episode, the topics discussed include: The reasons behind fans embracing the film and film reviewers critiques of it. The view of God in the Star Wars films, how The Rise of Skywalker affects the theology of the series, and how the meaning of Star Wars changed over the nine films. This spoiler-filled podcast episode is a conversation with Journal author Phil Tallon about his film review of The Rise of Skywalker directed by J.J. Abrams entitled, “The Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of Skywalker”. https://www.equip.org/article/the-dead-wont-stop-talking-a-review-of-the-rise-of-skywalker/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring related topics:Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones” https://www.equip.org/pmr-podcast/episode-054-last-jedi-star-wars-movie-era-nones/The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones” https://www.equip.org/article/last-jedi-star-wars-movie-era-nones/Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview” https://www.equip.org/pmr-podcast/episode-027-evaluating-star-wars-worldview/May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview https://www.equip.org/article/may-force-bewitch-evaluating-star-wars-worldview/Philip Tallon podcasts and articles: Fred Rogers and Mr. Rogers Neighborhood: Episode 150: The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”Steven Spielberg Movies: Episode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanClear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanTolkien Review:Episode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienAlfred Hitchcock films:Episode 100: A. Hitchcock FilmsThe Coen Brother’s Films:Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence“O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of ExistenceThe Films of Quentin Tarantino:Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino“Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantino’s Premodern TheologyOther related media articles:Episode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Film Review: The Church without Claws? A Figurative Reading of the Film Black PantherEpisode 063: Black Panther Film Review with Eric RedmondEpisode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Episode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
The path to emotionalism has been a process of elimination, striking down various authorities along the history of ideas.The history of ideas can be roughly summed up by three main epochs: pre-modernism, modernism, and postmodernism in the mid-late 20th Century. While postmodern ideas may have been commonplace in academia, they still represented a fringe-group of thought experiments. The average person still mostly acted as if there were absolute truths and knowable facts about the world and morality. Fast forward to 2016 when the Oxford Dictionary named “post-truth” word of the year. The seeds that were sown from ivory towers years ago finally tumbled down the hill and blossomed into YouTube videos, Twitter and Facebook rants. According to emotionalism, ultimate truth can be sensed by emotions and expressed in emotional language; truth claims can be gauged by the strength of one’s emotions. If the implicit belief is that the strength of one’s emotions determines the truth of a claim, then what is the logical extension of a person not only trying to convince themselves, but others? More emotions. Louder emotions. ALL CAPS EMOTIONS.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Hillary Morgan Ferrer about her online exclusive feature article , “If I Feel It, It’s True: Combating the Rise of Emotionalism.” https://www.equip.org/article/if-i-feel-it-its-true-combating-the-rise-of-emotionalism/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring related to this topic: Episode 042: When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on Campus When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on Campus Reasons of the Heart: Emotions in Apologetics Communicating Truth through Humor, Ridicule, and Emotions Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
“Have you ever thought what it’s like to be wanderers in the Fourth Dimension? Have you? To be exiles?” So asked William Hartnell’s mysterious Doctor back in An Unearthly Child (1963), the very first episode of the long-running British, BBC produced science-fiction TV series, Doctor Who. He is a Time Lord travelling the universe in the TARDIS, a bigger-on-the-inside time machine disguised as a Police Box, fighting monsters with the help of his human companions. Complete with its own convention (the Feb. 2020 convention in Los Angeles is sold out) and other events, Doctor Who has inspired devoted fans worldwide who pour over every detail of each episode (now more than 850 episodes) of the time-travelling doctor. But there’s a tension running through the show’s more than 50-year run, one that goes to the heart of the character of the Doctor. The Doctor is both scientist and messiah, a rationalist trying to grapple with the realities of evil in the universe, and romantic who brings about the fairy-tale ending of everyone living happily ever after.”This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Caleb Woodbridge about his online-exclusive television series review , “The Romantic Rationalism of BBC’s Doctor Who“. https://www.equip.org/article/the-romantic-rationalism-of-bbcs-doctor-who/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic:Episode 148-In Defense of Pop CultureDitching Netflix? Engaging Pop Culture in the Age of Binge-WatchingEpisode 149 What Joker Gets Right About Human DepravityGetting What We Deserve: What Joker Gets Right about Human Depravity: A Film Review of Joker (2019) starring Joaquin PhoenixEpisode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”The Wisdom of Pixar Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the Medium Prometheus: Finding God in Outer SpaceUnpacking Anime’s Thematic and Spiritual DepthThe Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherPostmodern Realities Episode 132: The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherEpisode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Episode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Fighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 017: Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book Antihero Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book AntiheroEpisode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More Human Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanEpisode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienEpisode 100: A. Hitchcock Films“Caught Looking: Hitchcock’s Films in the Age of Instagram.” Episode 001: The Films of Quentin TarantinoEpisode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanEpisode 012: Jesus Films Jesus Films: Who Does Hollywood Say That I Am? Episode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” An Apologetic of Horror The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized FilmDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
More than 85 million people in the U.S. are avid watchers of the Hallmark Channel’s Christmas films. Complete with its own mobile App, Hallmark Christmas film fans can partake year-round in the romantic, true-love plots. Not just on the Hallmark Channel, but other on-demand viewing channels like Netflix have also gotten into the Christmas film game. All the films have the same plot, the same kiss, the same quaint small town, the same fake snow falling gently onto the shiny hair of the protagonist, the same easy “trouble” resolved in less than one scene, the cookie baking that magically cleans itself up, and the dead mother that the child remembers with fondness rather than gut-wrenching grief. What is a Christian to make of this phenomenon? And, more pressingly, should Christians themselves indulge in the occasional Hallmark movie or even a Hallmark Christmas movie binge?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about here viewpoint article, “Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?”. https://www.equip.org/article/am-i-a-bad-christian-for-watching-hallmark-christmas-movies/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis Episode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisThe Theological Legacy of Rachel Held EvansEpisode 125 The Theological Legacy of Rachel Held EvansDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood is being marketed primarily on the strength of the cultural similarity between Mr. Rogers, America’s most wholesome neighbor, and Tom Hanks, the lovable actor sometimes called “America’s dad.” It’s a good casting choice, but it might mislead viewers into thinking that Hanks will be as much at the center of the film as he is in Cast Away or Forrest Gump.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Philip Tallon on his online-exclusive film review “The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood“. https://www.equip.org/article/the-eternal-importance-of-being-awkwardly-earnest-a-review-of-a-beautiful-day-in-the-neighborhood/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/article/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Steven Spielberg Movies: Episode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanClear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanTolkien Review:Episode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienAlfred Hitchcock films:Episode 100: A. Hitchcock FilmsThe Coen Brother’s Films:Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence“O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of ExistenceThe Films of Quentin Tarantino:Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino“Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantino’s Premodern TheologyOther related media articles:Episode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Film Review: The Church without Claws? A Figurative Reading of the Film Black PantherEpisode 063: Black Panther Film Review with Eric RedmondEpisode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Episode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”Episode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanFighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 012: Jesus Films Jesus Films: Who Does Hollywood Say That I Am? Episode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherPostmodern Realities Episode 132: The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherAn Apologetic of Horror The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the MediumA Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized FilmSci-Fi, Free Will, and the Problem of Evil Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
is Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Correy Latta forthcoming online-exclusive movie review article, “What Joker Gets Right About Human Depravity”. https://www.equip.org/article/getting-what-we-deserve-what-joker-gets-right-about-human-depravity-a-film-review-of-joker-2019-starring-joaquin-phoenix/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/To partner with us and help us to continue to create free online exclusive content, we are offering a special promotion Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic:Episode 148-In Defense of Pop CultureEpisode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”The Wisdom of Pixar Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the Medium Prometheus: Finding God in Outer SpaceUnpacking Anime’s Thematic and Spiritual DepthThe Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherPostmodern Realities Episode 132: The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherEpisode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Episode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Fighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 017: Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book Antihero Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book AntiheroEpisode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More Human Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanEpisode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienEpisode 100: A. Hitchcock Films“Caught Looking: Hitchcock’s Films in the Age of Instagram.” Episode 001: The Films of Quentin TarantinoEpisode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanEpisode 012: Jesus Films Jesus Films: Who Does Hollywood Say That I Am? Episode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” An Apologetic of Horror The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized FilmDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Several Christian voices have recently been questioning the value of engaging with pop culture, and particularly the kind of entertainment gluttony encouraged by the convenience of services like Netflix or Amazon Prime. They posit that excessive consumption of pop culture by Christians is worse for our souls, minds, and hearts. So are those Christians who believe that engaging popular culture is valuable mistaken? Are Christians who engage with pop culture distracting themselves from more spiritually important things, and from forms of rest and recreation that are qualitatively better than streaming a television series or watching a movie? In the age of binge-watching, how shall Christians then stream? Should we even stream?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Caleb Woodbridge about his forthcoming online-exclusive viewpoint article, “Ditching Netflix? Engaging Pop Culture in the Age of Binge-Watching”.https://www.equip.org/article/ditching-netflix-engaging-pop-culture-in-the-age-of-binge-watching/ Check back for the forthcoming articles here and our article archive page.We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic:Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”The Wisdom of Pixar Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the Medium Prometheus: Finding God in Outer SpaceUnpacking Anime’s Thematic and Spiritual DepthThe Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherPostmodern Realities Episode 132: The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherEpisode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Episode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Fighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 017: Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book Antihero Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book AntiheroEpisode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More Human Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanEpisode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienEpisode 100: A. Hitchcock Films“Caught Looking: Hitchcock’s Films in the Age of Instagram.” Episode 001: The Films of Quentin TarantinoEpisode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanEpisode 012: Jesus Films Jesus Films: Who Does Hollywood Say That I Am? Episode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” An Apologetic of Horror The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized FilmDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
This episode is a conversation about the book Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino Khalaf who invite the LGBTQ community to see marriage in a new enchanting light—that of an unorthodox, unbiblical, LGBTQ-affirming “Christianity”. The book makes the case that queer “Christian” marriage is a healthy option for partnered gays and lesbians, and that, in many cases, it is a more functional version of its counterpart—heterosexual marriage. Its forward is written by the late Rachel Held Evans.The second part of the episode is a discussion of Evans’s legacy in second annual Evolving Faith Conference which was held Oct. 2019 in Denver. It has been only a few short months since the untimely and tragic and death in May 2019 of writer Rachel Held Evans, founder and co-creator of the Evolving Faith Conference. Almost 3,000 spiritual seekers gathered in Denver for the annual conference. In Evans’s stead, Sarah Bessey and Jeff Chu guided the assembly through the continued deconstruction of this historic, orthodox Christian faith and into the initial stages of its radical reconstruction. More than 20 theologically progressive leaders spoke, sang, and led workshops. The familiar voices of Barbara Brown Taylor, Nadia Bolz-Weber, and Jen Hatmaker rang out alongside the movement’s up and coming generation—Kaitlin Curtice, transgendered author Austen Hartke, Amena Brown, Cece Jones-Davis, and many others. Woven throughout the conference were themes of wilderness and inclusion.This Postmodern Realities episode (https://www.equip.org/pmr-podcast/) is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her forthcoming articles, “Losing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith Conference” https://www.equip.org/article/losing-faith-a-look-at-the-2019-evolving-faith-conference/and “A Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage, by David and Constantino Khalaf. https://www.equip.org/article/a-helper-like-me-a-review-of-modern-kinship-a-queer-guide-to-christian-marriage-by-david-and-constantino-khalaf/Check back for the forthcoming articles here and our article archive page. https://www.equip.org/article/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis Episode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisThe Theological Legacy of Rachel Held EvansEpisode 125 The Theological Legacy of Rachel Held EvansDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
The new Magnolia Pictures documentary Hail Satan?, directed by avant-garde documentarian Penny Lane, is a thought-provoking darkly comedic study of an upstart faction of Satanists known as The Satanic Temple (TST). Cofounded by Lucien Greaves and Malcom Jarry in 2013, TST has been a growing, mischievous, and yet whimsical presence in public life. The group has earned a reputation as diehard political activists, that takes the art of trolling to a whole new level. The discussion covers what Satanists believe, how Satanists are misunderstood, and how TST differs from other branches of Satanism. In addition to an deep dive review of the film, there is also a discussion of occcultism as a pervasive influence marked by the pursuit of hidden knowledge or power through divination (fortune-telling), spiritism (spirit-contact), and magic. Occultism poses a special threat to the church because it doesn’t operate like mainline religion. Instead, it spreads like a fog, able to infiltrate most every cult, religion, and church. It’s a countercultural phenomenon that can reorient good ideas and faithful practices into tools of occultism. It’s too dangerous and too prevalent to ignore. But we can combat occultism first by recognizing its appeal (the promise of secret knowledge, power, and autonomy), and the signs of its influence, including wide-spread beliefs such as self-deification, depersonalization of God, and magickal thinking. Then, appreciating the different ways occultism leads practitioners astray from biblical faith and practice, we can respond with tactful discernment and devotion to God, demystifying the allure of occultism.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author John D. Ferrer about his online-exclusive “Infiltrated: Recognizing and Responding to Occultism in Your Church”https://www.equip.org/article/infiltrated-recognizing-and-responding-to-occultism-in-your-church/and movie review of, “Satanic Lessons on Religious Freedom: A review of Hail Satan?“.https://www.equip.org/article/satanic-lessons-on-religious-freedom/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 131 Sabrina The Teenage Anti-Christ Sabrina The Teenage Anti-Christ, Reviews the First Two Seasons of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina on Netflix.Satanism: A Taste for the Dark Side Modern Witchcraft: It May Not Be What You Think Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
The stereotype of old people as crusty, cantankerous complainers who have nothing better to do than remind young whippersnappers of how much better things used to be, tends to be supported by experiences we have with many of the elderly we meet. So its surprising when an old man or woman who does not fit this stereotype. As we age, how can we can be the kind of people who bear the burdens of old age well and continue to be productive people well into his or her later years? Ciceros On Old Age is a short book with reflections on old age are not flashy or exciting and may strike some as boring similar, ironically and sadly, to the way some find reflections of the elderly generally boring. But those reflections are hard to discount, for their overall advice seems rather commonsensical, needing little defense. This episode is a conversation with Stephen Mizell about Ciceros work On Old Age. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Stephen Mizell about his online exclusive article On Being an Old Apologist: Reflections on Ciceros On Old Age. https://www.equip.org/article/on-being-an-old-apologist-reflections-on-ciceros-on-old-age/ We would also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. Other articles related to this topic: Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Slaughter House Five as a Tool for Christian Self-Examination Episode 061: Slaughterhouse Five as a Tool for Christian Self Examination Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
Many Christians think of sports as having little to no value. They see the time, money, devotion, and energy that many put into sports as time, money, devotion, and energy that could be better used for the sake of the kingdom of God. But can we think about sports, and be involved in them, in ways that build the kingdom? Yes! To do this, however, will require that we approach sports in ways that are often countercultural. Not only can we approach sports with a kingdom mindset, we must do so. The cultural influence of sports at all levels, including elite sports, is felt across the world. Anyone interested in doing cultural apologetics would do well to consider how to think about and participate in the world of sport, as a Christian. Many cultural apologists spend considerable time and effort understanding other influential aspects of culture, including movies, television, books, and politics. But sports are also a reflection of our culture, and an influence upon it, for better and for worse. Many cultural issues arise in sports, and are discussed by well known athletes who use their platforms to do so. Whether it is equal pay for equal work, issues related to race and justice, politics, sexual ethics, abortion and many others numerous professional athletes make their views known via social media and other outlets, influencing the culture. Christians should not ignore this. There is great potential for sports to contribute to human flourishing, as Christians understand it. Sports can build good character, including specifically Christian virtues like faith, hope, love, and humility. Even those who have little interest in sports would do well to develop a Christian understanding of sports at their best, as well as a thoughtful and helpful critique of the ways in which the actual world of sports falls short of the Christian ideal. Followers of Christ can bring light into the dark corners of the sporting world, and they can celebrate the parts of that world that are already shining examples of what human beings can do as they seek to glorify God in this realm of life. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Michael W. Austin about his online exclusive article Taking the Long View: A Christian Approach to Youth Sports. We would also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. Other articles related to this topic: Prayers, Football, and Missions: Lessons from Tebowmania Thoughts on Jason Collins, Homosexuality, and Athletics
Todays world is a laboratory for experimenting with all types of new media, and we are all creating our own ways of adopting technologies as they develop. It is not dramatic to say that these digital technologies and especially the ones we use on our computers, smartphones, and tablets we use every day, summed in the simple word app, are changing what it means to function as humans. Apps on our electronic devices have certainly made communication faster and access to information easier but we are bombarded by this information and notifications about more information almost every waking moment or at least every moment we look at and interact with our devices. However, the Christian walk requires stopping and asking ourselves, What does this do to my soul? Because we are still learning how these apps are changing our culture for better and worse, it is up to us to evaluate our own interactions with new technologies and examine what is leading us to be more alive and able to live our callings, or what is pulling us away from the very things that make us human. The Christian life by its very nature requires stillness, contemplation, thought, and study. A life dominated by digital interaction does not foster the pursuit of spiritual disciplines or face to face community in the local church. This episode is a conversation about technology and why Christians should consider the practice of taking digital sabbaths or intentional time away from our devices. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Rachel Ollivant about her article in the 42:2 Journal Seeking Spiritual Solace in a Daze of Digital Distraction https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/loving-god-and-others-in-the-midst-of-suffering/. Subscribe in Fall 2019 and recieve this as your first issue. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/ When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Related articles and podcasts: Episode 074: Authentic Community in the Age of Social Media The Virtualization of Culture and the Need for an Embodied Christian Alternative The Graven Images of Social Media Episode 009: The Graven Images of Social Media Episode 098 Virtual Violence, Video Game Addiction, and the Kingdom of God Can God Fit in This Machine? Video Games and Christians Episode 077: Video Gaming, Kids and Addiction Episode 128 Summer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to Fortnite Summer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to Fortnite An Ethic of Instagram What Price Cyberspace? Understanding Social Media Is It Impossible to Redeem Electronic Media? The New Dark Ages: How Electronic Media Are Pulling Us Back to Barbarism Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
Those familiar with the street preaching type of Hebrew Israelites have usually seen their 12 Tribes of Israel Chart. Hebrew Israelites are usually black, Hispanic, and Native Americans who claim they are the true biological descendants of Jacob from their paternal line. Hebrew Israelites of the street proselytizing variety usually trace their theological roots back to a small, New York City based school, initially called the Israelite School of Torah. The school, launched in 1969, was at one time located at 1 West 125th Street in Harlem. Christian urban apologists have dubbed adherents to this vein of Hebrew Israelism as 1 Westers. The 1 West camps (rough equivalent to denominations) have many theological distinctives. One is the aforementioned 12 Tribes Chart, and another is their 18 Nations Chart. 1 West Hebrew Israelites often carry a laminated poster of this breakdown (their word for an interpretation) with them as they proclaim their message in city centers across the United States and abroad. This 18 Nations Chart features a total of 17 non elect nations considered to be Gentile heathens who cannot be redeemed based on their ethnicity. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Vocab Malone about his online exclusive feature article Why Do 1 West Hebrew Israelites Call Whites Edomites And Chinese Moabites ? https://www.equip.org/article/why-do-1west-hebrew-israelites-call-whites-edomites-and-chinese-moabites/ When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Related articles and podcasts: Hank Unplugged Episode Black Hebrew Israelites with Vocab Malone The Origin and Insufficiency of the Black Hebrew Israelite Movement Postmodern Realities Episode 056: Spirituality in Modern Hip Hop: The Theology of Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper Spirituality in Modern Hip Hop: The Theology of Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
Despite certain elements of the accounts of King David in the Hebrew Bible appearing to be legendary, there are several intriguing sources that strongly suggest that David existed and founded a dynasty and that Davids kingdom was more than a myth. Textual sources written from the perspective of the enemies of Israel and Judah mention the house of David, a clear reference to David as a dynastic founder. While direct, physical evidence ie David was here is lacking, archaeological data from key sites points towards the activity of a king or strong central authority. Additionally, David established his kingdom precisely during a power vacuum in the ancient Near East region. Thus, the overall picture paints David as a historical figure, and biblical accounts of his kingdom are plausible. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Mark D.Janzen about his online exclusive feature article The Firm Foundations of the House of David: A Defense of King Davids Historicity. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic Making a Case for the Historicity of Moses Episode 119 The Historicity of Moses Historical Artifacts and Biblical Sources: Determining What Is True Christians and Archaeology Bible Reliability: M A P S to Guide You through Bible Reliability Biblical Archaeology: Factual Evidence to Support the Historicity of the Bible Biblical History: The Faulty Criticism of Biblical Historicity Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
Of all the public conversions from conservative evangelical too progressive, Jen Hatmakers is one of the most culturally appealing. Her trademark breezy, well timed humor penetrates to the heart of the overwhelmed American woman she gathers into her tribe and admonishes to keep up the hard work, which will, by her gritty love, save the world. This is Hatmakers gospel as you model your life on Jesus and love as inclusively as He did, you will heal yourself, your family, and the world. This gospel is delivered in a package of can do, no nonsense American pragmatism. Hatmaker rose to prominence in May 2013 with a viral blog post hilariously decrying the trials of the exasperating end of the school year. This led to an HGTV home remodeling show and her New York Times bestseller For the Love Fighting for Grace in a World of Impossible Standards Thomas Nelson, 2015. She joined the conference circuit and endeared herself to mainstream feminine evangelicalism with her insightful, funny, and unobjectionable Bible teaching. She was well positioned, then, to rock the evangelical world with her apparent about face embrace of the LGBT agenda in an interview with Jonathan Merritt in 2016. After the interview, Lifeway pulled her books and social media drew up for battle. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her Volume 42:2 feature article The Theological Mess in the Moxie of Jen Hatmaker. https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/loving-god-and-others-in-the-midst-of-suffering/ Also see a special blog post by Anne Kennedy The Unhindered Leadership of Jen Hatmaker https://www.equip.org/article/the-unhindered-leadership-of-jen-hatmaker/ Subscribe in Fall 2019 and receive this as your first issue.https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/ When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Other articles and podcasts featuring this author Have You Considered Trying Harder The Theology of Rachel Hollis Episode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder The Theology of Rachel Hollis The Theological Legacy of Rachel Held Evans Episode 125 The Theological Legacy of Rachel Held Evans Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
Steven Spielbergs made five movies featuring aliens: Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., A.I., The War of the Worlds, and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. But the really important alien movies are Spielbergs first two: Close Encounters and E.T. Like Spielbergs other early films, Jaws and Raiders of the Lost Ark, these movies refined a B movie genre into critically acclaimed gourmet popcorn. Close Encounters and E.T. raised the bar for cinematic science fiction. They also did something unusual, which few alien movies that followed, including Spielbergs own, have attempted: the early alien movies function as moral metaphors. The encounters with aliens imaginatively exercise our hearts and minds, and may help to exorcise our worldly wisdom. These movies are good for the soul and more people should watch them or rewatch them. Two of the best reasons for art criticism is to get people to watch the good stuff and to help them see why its good. This may seem a bit obvious, but the most important things in life are usually obvious. People need to be reminded more than they need to be taught. Aristotle said that all philosophy begins in wonder. American philosopher Martha Nussbaum has said that compassion is the basic social emotion. Close Encounters and E.T. remind us of the value of wonder and compassion. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Philip Talon about his online exclusive feature article ClearSkies, Hurt Hearts, Cannot Lose: Why Spielbergs Aliens Help Make us More Human. https://www.equip.org/article/clearskies-hurt-hearts-cant-lose-why-spielbergs-aliens-help-make-us-more-human/ We would also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/ When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Other articles and podcasts featuring this author Tolkien Review: Episode 123 Tolkiens First Fellowship Tolkiens First Fellowship A film review of Tolkien Alfred Hitchcock films: Episode 100: A. Hitchcock Films The Coen Brothers Films: Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence The Films of Quentin Tarantino: Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantinos Premodern Theology Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
NBCs The Good Place television series has had three hilarious yet thought provoking seasons its final and fourth season begins Sept 26 2019 which tell a riveting story while examining crucial philosophical questions such as what it means to live a good life and whether we have any moral obligations to our fellow man. Along the way, viewers have been exposed to the ideas of several major figures of Western philosophy such as Aristotle, Kant, Kierkegaard, Hume, Mill, and Sartre, as well as a few contemporary thinkers such as Todd May, the Clemson University philosopher who serves as one of the shows consultants. In addition to its value as a fun pedagogical tool, The Good Place has turned out to be a rich resource for apologetics many elements of the storyline and character dialogue can be used in conversations about human nature, objective morality, and why the exclusion of God results in a failure to make sense of things in an intellectually satisfying way. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Melissa Cain Travis about her online exclusive review Using NBCs The Good Place in Conversational Apologetics. https://www.equip.org/article/using-nbcs-the-good-place-in-conversational-apologetics/ We would also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/ When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast. Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/ Other articles and podcasts featuring this author Hank Unplugged Women in Apologetics with Melissa Cain-Travis The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflixs I Am Mother Postmodern Realities Episode 132 The Artistic Pro Life Theme in Netflixs I Am Mother A Grand Cosmic Resonance Postmodern Realities Episode 062: How the Structure and Comprehensibility of the Universe Reveal a Mindful Maker Motherhood and the Life of the Mind Postmodern Realities Episode 002: Motherhood and the Life of the Mind Postmodern Realities Episode 095 Virtue, Human Nature, and the Quest for Happiness Virtue, Human Nature, and the Quest for Happiness What the Size of the Cosmos Does not Say about Mankind A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De Christianized Film Do not miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content. Itunes Spreaker Google Podcasts Player FM Podbean Also available on the following Smart Speakers. Ask them to play Postmodern Realities podcast. Alexa (Amazon) Google Assistant Siri (Apple)
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