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Postmodern Realities Podcast

Author: Hank Hanegraaff

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Hosted by Melanie Cogdill the Managing Editor at the Christian Research Institute, Postmodern Realities is a podcast from the Christian Research Institute and the CHRISTIAN RESEARCH JOURNAL. Each podcast features in-depth conversations with our JOURNAL authors.
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Words have meaning, but culture can impact word meaning and connotation. In an increasingly post-truth and relativistic society, words can mean anything we feel like they should mean, with seemingly no consequence and virtual acceptance of whatever meaning we choose.Today, caution is needed concerning how hijacking a word’s definition can marginalize others, especially faith communities, recognizing that we, as Christians, play a significant role in how words are used and perceived. Christians should evaluate post-truth terms and compare them with what those words meant in a Judeo-Christian-influenced semantic universe; use discernment; accurately discuss distortions, faithfully working toward an authentic biblical mission; use opportunities to advance biblical influence; and pray that God gives us wisdom about the true meaning and value of the Logos.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with D.K. Matthews, author of the cover article of the Volume 43, No. 1 issue of the Christian Research Journal, “Seduced? The Crisis of Word and the Fragmentation of Civilization.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/Subscribe to the Journal here.Buy this single issue here.When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Hank Unplugged podcast featuring this author:Hank Unplugged: The Word Crisis that Threatens to Undo Western Civilization with D.K. Matthews Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Long-time Christian Research Journal author Dr. Douglas Groothuis writes, “I am getting older, and I lament the recent loss of so many Christian leaders who have shaped my thinking. I also am disturbed by so many recent deconversions of well-known Christians. So, I need to write about what I have not written much. Autobiography can be an apologetic for what matters most—the Christian message and way of being. My narrative relates my conversion and intellectual development.” Join us for this conversation about Doug’s spiritual journey and accompanying article.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Doug Groothuis about his online-exclusive article, “Autobiography as Apologetic”. https://www.equip.org/article/autobiography-as-apologetic/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 157: The Reincarnation of ReincarnationThe Reincarnation of ReincarnationEpisode 122 Shamelessly Wrong Shamelessly Wrong: Book Review of Shameless: A Sexual Reformation Nadia Bolz-WeberEpisode 004: Agile Apologetics Developing an Agile Apologetic Channeling: Revelations Of DeceptionLearning From an Apostle: Christianity in the Marketplace of Ideas (Acts 17:16-34) Why Buddhism is Not True: Review of Why Buddhism Is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and EnlightenmentJean-Paul Satre And The Resurgence Of ExistentialismFrancis Schaeffer: Pastor, Evangelist, Apologist, Prophet The Christian Apologist’s Moral Compass Steve Jobs, Jesus, and the Problem of EvilAnd many more, Dr. Groothuis has written articles for us for over 30 years.Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this episode, guest Anne Kennedy author of articles for the Christian Research Journal on Rachel Hollis, Glennon Doyle and Jen Hatmaker tells listeners why they are in the news again.Please see the following articles Anne has written, Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis, Gods, https://www.equip.org/article/have-you-considered-trying-harder-the-theology-of-rachel-hollis/Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of Untamed by Glennon Doyle ,https://www.equip.org/article/gods-gold-and-cheetahs-the-theological-vision-of-untamed/ and “The Theological Mess in the Moxie of Jen Hatmaker”, https://www.equip.org/article/the-theological-mess-in-the-moxie-of-jen-hatmaker/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/To partner with us and help us to continue to create free online exclusive content, we are offering a special promotion Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 191 Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedGods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis
What is Christian worship? Does the substance, sufficiency, and effect of worship hinge upon the emotions of the participants? God’s presence in Christian worship does not hinge on subjective experience. God is the author of beauty and yet earthly beauty fades. The human soul yearns for eternal beauty. Ancient forms of worship, often eschewed as dead ceremonies by moderns, employ the beauty of earthly things to draw the soul to contemplate eternal verities. Scripture provides the model. The earthly temple was beautiful, and His heavenly temple is unspeakably and unfathomably so. In both instances, visible beauty bespeaks the majesty of the invisible God who gave His creatures physical senses. Hymns, written prayers, vestments, candles, incense, stained-glass windows, architecture, pulpit, and table — these visibly display the invisible truth that when the church gathers, heaven and earth meet. The senses — smell, taste, touch, sight, hearing — are all drawn heavenward and become instruments by which the worshiper gives glory to God. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Matt Kennedy about his article in the 43:1 issue, “The Beauty of Worship: Aesthetics and Truth.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 184 Unity in the Body of ChristEpisode 156 The Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleThe Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Glennon Doyle stepped into the spotlight in 2012, like so many, with a single post on her blog, Momastery, entitled “Don’t Carpe Diem.” In a single witty, incisive missive she wrote what every mother thinks silently to herself as she muscles a full cart of children through Target only to be interrupted by well-meaning grandmotherly types who declare, among other things, “I hope you’re enjoying every moment.” You can’t seize the day, she says, that way lies madness. Therein arises Doyle’s undeniable appeal. Tragically, as her first book Carry On, Warrior hit the market Doyle’s husband confessed to serial adultery over the whole course of their marriage. Desperate to rescue her own life, and, she admits in Untamed, her own plot line, she winched her disintegrating marriage back together, leading to her second bestseller, Love Warrior, the story of marital reconciliation no matter the cost, of dealing head on with the heartbreak of betrayal. But in the very first week of the launch of Love Warrior, Doyle saw Abby Wambach across a crowded room and fell in love. Doyle went home, broke up with her husband, and a year later she and Wambach were married. Untamed is that story—how she finally let go of all that “society” taught her to value, how she “burnt it all down” and found her true self. Many Christians have never heard of Doyle, preferring to focus their Christian discipleship within the spiritual confines of the church community rather than the internet. But in a time when Christian identity, like all identity, is up to the individual to craft and shape according to preference and desire, Doyle’s writing is ringing true for those even inside the church.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her online-exclusive article, “Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of Untamed.” https://www.equip.org/article/gods-gold-and-cheetahs-the-theological-vision-of-untamed/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In May 2020 FX and Hulu released the documentary AKA Jane Roe promoting the deathbed confession of Norma McCorvey, the woman publicly known as the Jane Roe of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 legal decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States allows abortion to be legal. McCorvey allegedly confided to documentarian Nick Sweeney that her pro-life work, spanning more than two decades, was a lie. In her own words, “I took their money, and they put me out in front of the cameras and told me what to say, and that’s what I’d say.” The story as reported casts a pall over her much-celebrated conversion to the pro-life community while affirming cynical views held by abortion supporters concerning the character of those who fight legal abortion. As far as the ethics of abortion, does McCorvey’s judgment on abortion really matter?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Jay Watts about his online-exclusive article, “Assessing the Confession of Norma McCorvey in AKA Jane Roe”. https://www.equip.org/article/assessing-the-confession-of-norma-mccorvey-in-aka-jane-roe/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 163 Merely Human: The Problem of Recognizing Chimpanzees as PersonsMerely Human: The Problem of Recognizing Chimpanzees as PersonsEpisode 134 Are Laws Restricting Abortion Forced Organ Donation? A Review of Beyond RoeAre Laws Restricting Abortion Forced Organ Donation? A Review of Beyond RoeEpisode 117-Unplanned: An Imperfect but Brave Film Unplanned: An Imperfect but Brave FilmEpisode 042: When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on Campus When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on CampusEpisode 032: On Chimeras and What It Means to Be Human On Chimeras and What It Means to Be Human Episode 013: Death with Dignity and the Imago DeiDeath with Dignity and the Imago Dei Episode 007: Rape and Sexual Violence on the College CampusRape and Sexual Violence on Campus
A meritocracy insists that a person’s sense of identity and value is grounded in his or her own performance or action. For Christians, however, being is a divine gift. Thus, identity and value are determined by divine action, not by personal effort. If we rest in this divine action, we can withdraw from competing identities and from the perpetual and exhausting demands of ambition. But meritocratic values And their attendant anxiety have spread, in part, because the notion of vocation has all but disappeared from public consciousness. How might we recapture a sense of vocation? T. S. Eliot offers a case in point. His play, The Confidential Clerk, depicts a young man who must choose one of two paths: meritocratic success or vocation. God’s calling on our lives may not align with what society tells us is successful. However, we are responsible to be only what God has called us to be, whether that is a person leading a large business or a musician playing at a local nursing home. Our vocation should lead us to a deeper relationship with our Creator. If we are in Him, we will never be second-rate.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Stephen Mitchell about his article in the 43:1 Journal “Second-Rate Musician:Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot’s The Confidential Clerk “. https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 135-Questing for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadQuesting for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadEpisode 111 Humanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionHumanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionEpisode 092 Literary Apologetics: Flannery O’ConnorEpisode 045: Alexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand InquisitorAlexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand Inquisitor Rejoicing over Owls: Thoreau and the Gift of Being The Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for Life Reading My Favorite Atheists: Ivan, Raskolnikov, and Kirilov Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Having burst into popularity on the millennial and younger social media platform TikTok, the phrase “OK Boomer,” whose true origins are lost in the murk of the back pages of the internet, is used by many millennials (those born between about 1981 and 1996) to dismiss their parents’ generation of baby boomers (those born between about 1946 and 1964) as out of touch and self-centered. And, in a sign that its use has expanded beyond mere internet meme-dom and into the public sphere, one New Zealand member of Parliament responded to another member’s heckling with a dismissive “OK, Boomer.” In 2020 in our particular historical moment, when we find ourselves confronted by a global pandemic from a virus that has proven especially dangerous for the sick and elderly, questions about intergenerational conflict have special weight. Discussion about what sort of containment measures are sufficient and whether it is ethical to risk the lives of the elderly for the sake of the economy have become issues of public debate. However, the Bible calls us to reject this conflict and calls Christians to a beautiful vision of an intergenerational, interdependent, remembering community. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Kyle Keating about his article in the 43:1 Journal, entitled, “OK, Boomer: Time to Declare a Truce in the Generational Wars.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 133 The Disorientation of DeconversionAm I Just Not Chosen? The Disorientation of DeconversionEpisode 074: Authentic Community in the Age of Social MediaCream or Sugar? Fostering Authentic Community in the Expanding Age of Social Media
COVID-19 has been incredibly costly — it has cost millions of people their jobs, thousands of people their lives, and has changed the shape of our lives in countless ways. In the midst of all the anxiety and uncertainty, it can be difficult to stay hopeful. However, if Christians really believe that God works all things together for good for those who love Him (Rom. 8:28), we should expect God to provide us opportunities to grow in our relationship to Him. One of the clearest good things that has arisen out of COVID-19 is the amount of time families spend together. Time, however, is beneficial only when put to good use. This episode is a conversation with JOURNAL author Drew Dixon about five ways Christians can promote spiritual health and disciple in their family during this pandemic.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Drew Dixon about his online-exclusive article, “Five Ways to Disciple Your Family During the Pandemic.”https://www.equip.org/article/five-ways-to-disciple-your-family-during-the-quarantine/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 128 Summer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to FortniteSummer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to FortniteEpisode 098 Virtual Violence, Video Game Addiction, and the Kingdom of GodVirtual Violence, Video Game Addiction, and the Kingdom of GodEpisode 066: Comic Cons, Geek Culture, and the Mission of ChristComic Cons, Geek Culture and the Mission of Christ Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 shelter-in-place series, JOURNAL Author J. Warner Wallace gives a word of encouragement to Christian students in Gen Z and their parents about how to think biblically about their new normal as students and their grief and lament over missed milestones in their academic and social lives. We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and podcasts featuring this authorHank Unplugged: Cold-Case Christianity with J. Warner WallacePostmodern Realities: Episode 102 What Cops Can Teach Christians about the Critical Use of LanguageWhat Cops Can Teach Christians about the Critical Use of Language
More than 50 years ago, Star Trek began its journey when it premiered as a television program in 1966. Since then it has spawned several motion pictures, most recently Star Trek Beyond (2016), as well as a number of television series. Star Trek as a franchise became a cultural phenomenon, making its way into popular culture with phrases such as “beam me up”, conventions for fans, and recognizable characters such as Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock. Created by Gene Roddenberry (1921–1991), the longevity of Star Trek speaks not only to its popularity but its willingness to address controversial topics. The series Star Trek: The Next Generation featured Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard, a captain of the starship Enterprise, and that cast was featured in four motion pictures released from 1994–2002. Eighteen years after their final film, CBS All Access premiered a 10-part, streaming series in 2020 titled Star Trek: Picard.This podcast contains **SPOILERS**This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Robert Velarde about his online-exclusive TV review, “Star Trek: Picard and Transhumanism — Where No One Has Gone Before“. https://www.equip.org/article/star-trek-picard-and-transhumanism-where-no-one-has-gone-before/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic: Episode 179 Rick and Morty: Scientism, Self-Centeredness, and the Search for MeaningRick and Morty: Scientism, Self-Centeredness, and the Search for MeaningEpisode 148-In Defense of Pop CultureDitching Netflix? Engaging Pop Culture in the Age of Binge-WatchingEpisode 149 What Joker Gets Right About Human DepravityGetting What We Deserve: What Joker Gets Right about Human Depravity: A Film Review of Joker (2019) starring Joaquin PhoenixEpisode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”The Wisdom of Pixar Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the Medium Prometheus: Finding God in Outer SpaceEpisode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Episode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Fighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 017: Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book Antihero Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book AntiheroEpisode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More Human Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanEpisode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienEpisode 100: A. Hitchcock Films“Caught Looking: Hitchcock’s Films in the Age of Instagram.” Episode 001: The Films of Quentin TarantinoEpisode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanEpisode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized Film Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 shelter-in-place series, JOURNAL Author Matt Kennedy gives a word of encouragement to Christians about unity in the church when beliefs about how churches should handle worship during the pandemic are so varied and why Christians need to worship in person together. We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 156 The Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleThe Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In Dr. Clay Jones’s new book, Immortal: How the Fear of Death Drives Us and What We Can Do About It (Harvest House, 2020), he writes about how all people cope with the fear of their own death. In the fourth chapter of Immortal, Jones examines what he calls atheist “mortality mitigation projects.” By that, he means the ways that atheists try to turn death into something good or, at least, not so bad. This episode’s conversation examines a mortality mitigation project that has seen quite a revival of late in atheist circles—“death is nothing to us.” It is a mortality mitigating strategy that one tells oneself that death is no big deal. In fact, death is nothing. But death is indeed something.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Clay Jones about his online-exclusive article, “Epicurus, Sam Harris, and Bart Ehrman Are Wrong: Death Is Something” https://www.equip.org/article/epicurus-sam-harris-and-bart-ehrman-are-wrong-death-is-something/To partner with us and help us to continue to create free online exclusive content, we are offering a special promotion of Clay Jones new book Immortal: How the Fear of Death Drives Us and What We Can Do About It for your partnering gift, click here to learn more. https://www.equip.org/product/cri-resource-immortal-how-the-fear-of-death-drives-us-and-what-we-can-do-about-it/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Hank Unplugged: Why God Permits Evil with Clay JonesPostmodern Realities: Episode 114 Why Did God Let that Child Die?Why Did God Let That Child Die?Postmodern Realities: Episode 068: Something Made: The Role of Form in ApologeticsSomething Made : The Role of Form in Apologetics Postmodern Realities: Episode 030: Evangelizing the Cultural Christian Evangelizing the Cultural ChristianKilling the Canaanites: A Response to the New Atheism’s “Divine Genocide” Claims Other articles and podcast related to this topic:Episode 013: Death with Dignity and the Imago DeiDeath with Dignity and the Imago DeiThe Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for LifeLoving God in the Midst of Suffering with Douglas GroothuisCan Suffering Bring You Closer to Christ? With Jean-Claude Larchet and Nicole RoccasRendezvous with Death: C. S. Lewis on Mortality and the AfterlifeDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 shelter-in-place series, JOURNAL Author Nicole Howe gives a word of encouragement to Christians about what it means to lament during the quarantine lockdown. We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
“Public Shame to the Rescue” blazed the headline of a prominent website barely a week into the American version of the worldwide coronavirus shutdown. “What could be more effective than a little public shaming?” the author asked in the first paragraph, going on to try to document the rise of shame on social media as a tool for curbing undesirable behavior. If there was an ever a moment to pause and consider the use of such a powerful phenomenon as shame, this is it. Into the breach steps self-styled shame expert Brené Brown, distinguished for her academic research of that fearsome subject, counselor to today’s most prominent self-help and progressive, pop-theological female voices like Jen Hatmaker and to celebrity admirers like Oprah Winfrey and Gwyneth Paltrow. Brown’s podcast, Unlocking Us premiered right at the beginning of the 2020 quarantine.Brené Brown is the one to whom the most prominent voices of today turn, not only for functional models for coping with shame, but for the deeper counsels of what to believe about the self, and the self in relationship to others. She is the font, the source, and the sociological justification of a self-oriented worldview increasingly adopted by so many, including Christian women. But she is celebrated in her own right, not just as a counselor to this moment’s influencers. But is her teaching on shame biblical?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her online-exclusive “But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené Brown”. https://www.equip.org/article/but-what-if-it-is-me-the-work-and-worldview-of-brene-brown/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 shelter-in-place series, JOURNAL Author Michael W. Austin gives a word of encouragement to Christians about what it means to develop spiritual disciplines during the quarantine.We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 052: The Benedict OptionIs The Benedict Option a Live Option?Episode 144 Taking the Long View: A Christian Approach to Youth SportsTaking the Long View: A Christian Approach to Youth SportsEpisode 035: All Sins Are Not the SameAll Sins Are Not the SameEpisode 016: Anti-Intellectualism in the ChurchAnti-Intellectualism in the ChurchEpisode 005: Wealth and Stewardship: Key Biblical PrinciplesWealth and Stewardship: Key Biblical PrinciplesDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In America, nothing seems to validate pop culture success and permeation more than a Super Bowl commercial. When the animated television program Rick and Morty accomplished this feat in February 2020 in a commercial for Pringles chips, it reached more than 100 million viewers. Currently, in its fourth season, Rick and Morty first aired on the Cartoon Network in 2013, and in 2019 it was renewed for 70 more episodes guaranteeing it will be on TV for years to come. It’s a fast-paced series that packs a lot of content into an average air time of 22 minutes. Although animation is often pigeonholed as entertainment for kids, Rick and Morty is decidedly adult-oriented with its R rated language and many profane bits sprinkled throughout the show. Featured on Cartoon Network’s [Adult Swim] programming block, Rick and Morty garners its most viewers in the 18-34-year-old range. Given its popularity and its nihilistic world view, Christian apologists need to understand the show, its appeal, and how to reach Millennials who are its devoted fans. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Robert Velarde about his online-exclusive article, “Rick and Morty: Scientism, Self-Centeredness, and the Search for Meaning https://www.equip.org/article/rick-and-morty-scientism-self-centeredness-and-the-search-for-meaning/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/​Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts related to this topic:Episode 148-In Defense of Pop CultureDitching Netflix? Engaging Pop Culture in the Age of Binge-WatchingEpisode 149 What Joker Gets Right About Human DepravityGetting What We Deserve: What Joker Gets Right about Human Depravity: A Film Review of Joker (2019) starring Joaquin PhoenixEpisode 037: Choose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We WatchChoose Your Own Enchantment: Freedom and Conscience in What We Watch Episode 075: Film Nostalgia & Heaven Looking for Heaven at the Movies: What our Fondness for Nostalgic Films Says about Us.”The Wisdom of Pixar Television as the New Literature: Understanding and Evaluating the Medium Prometheus: Finding God in Outer SpaceUnpacking Anime’s Thematic and Spiritual DepthThe Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherPostmodern Realities Episode 132: The Artistic Pro-Life Theme in Netflix’s I Am MotherEpisode 87: Westworld & A.I.“HBO’s Westworld and the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.”The Gospel According to LostBreaking Bad’s Addicting Defense of Moral Realism Episode 039: The Gospel According to Marvel The Gospel According to MarvelEpisode 024: Dr. Strange (film review with spoilers)Fighting Scientism with the Occult in Doctor StrangeEpisode 017: Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book Antihero Suicide Squad, Deadpool, and the Rise of the Comic Book AntiheroEpisode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More Human Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanEpisode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienEpisode 100: A. Hitchcock Films“Caught Looking: Hitchcock’s Films in the Age of Instagram.” Episode 001: The Films of Quentin TarantinoEpisode 067: Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One Spielberg’s Nostalgia for Reality in Ready Player One.”Episode 054: The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”The Last Jedi: A Star Wars Movie for the Era of “the Nones”Episode 027: “Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview”May the Force Bewitch You: Evaluating the Star Wars Worldview Episode 041: The Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanThe Gracious Heroism of Wonder WomanEpisode 012: Jesus Films Jesus Films: Who Does Hollywood Say That I Am? Episode 079: Theology of Morgan Freeman “The Story of Morgan Freeman (Not God).” An Apologetic of Horror The Matrix: Unloaded Revelations A Wrinkle in Time: Drawing Apologetic Value from a De-Christianized FilmDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 quarantine series, JOURNAL Author ANNE KENNEDY gives a word of encouragement to Christians about what it means to worship together in person as the body of Christ.We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Once upon a time, Veggie Tales was an entertaining effort in animation to teach children about virtue and faith. It may have been a bit fluffy and superficial, but since the mid-1990s, a more pernicious, heretical version of Veggie Tales has sprung up. PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) ran a billboard campaign in 1999, claiming that Jesus was a vegetarian. PETA imposed a vegan agenda on the Scriptures. After all, PETA’s founder Ingrid Newkirk wasn’t exactly affirming the image of God and human uniqueness when she claimed, “A rat is a pig is a boy is a dog.” In this and most other attempts to elevate animals, the result is a diminished human status. They must increase, and we must decrease.With growing fervor and more resolute political activism, some Christians and various denominations have taken up the banner of “prescriptive Christian vegetarianism.” That is, Christians are duty-bound (“prescriptive”) to adopt a plant-based diet and avoid eating meat of any kind (“vegetarianism”). Of course, some “vegetarians” might eat fish, eggs, or dairy products. However, the stricter “veganism” rejects meat of any kind. Invoking theological reasons for veganism has become a moral and spiritual cause. These Christians seek to “respectfully encourage healthy, God-honoring plant-based nutrition.” Some also hold to the view that eating meat dishonors God since viewing humans as the “crown of creation” is to denigrate animals. This misguided vegan compassion isn’t Christian at all. It actually borrows from pagan beliefs, which often advocate reincarnation or similar views that blur the animal-human distinction. And to turn personal dietary preferences or even convictions into duties for all defies the spirit of Scripture.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Paul Copan about his online-exclusive article, “Veggie Tales Gone Rogue: PETA, Veganism, and the Christian Faith (A Summary of Themes from What Would Jesus Really Eat?)” https://www.equip.org/article/veggie-tales-gone-rogue-peta-veganism-and-the-christian-faith-a-summary-of-themes-from-what-would-jesus-really-eatWe’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/To partner with us and help us to continue to create free online exclusive content, we are offering a special promotion for your partnering gift:CRI Resource: What Would Jesus REALLY Eat?: The Biblical Case for Eating MeatOther articles related to this topic:Does the Book of Isaiah Idealize Vegetarianism?Thought for FoodThy (Animal) Kingdom Come, Our Will Be DonePETA or Just PET?Is “Animal Rights” a Biblical Concern?Other articles featuring this author:Interpreting the Law of Moses: Relative, Normative, or Something In-Between? A Review of The Lost World of the Torah, by John H. Walton and J. Harvey Walton“Jesus-Shaped” Cultures: How Faithful Christians Have Transformed SocietiesWas Israel Commanded to Commit Genocide? Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 quarantine series, JOURNAL Author CLAY JONES gives a word of encouragement to Christians about what it means to live in a fallen world and how we are to have hope.We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Hank Unplugged: Why God Permits Evil with Clay JonesPostmodern Realities: Episode 114 Why Did God Let that Child Die?Why Did God Let That Child Die?Postmodern Realities: Episode 068: Something Made: The Role of Form in ApologeticsSomething Made : The Role of Form in Apologetics Postmodern Realities: Episode 030: Evangelizing the Cultural Christian Evangelizing the Cultural ChristianKilling the Canaanites: A Response to the New Atheism’s “Divine Genocide” Claims Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
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