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Walter Cole is perhaps the most prominent living Portlander, but many people likely don’t know him by that name. Instead, they know him by his stage name, Darcelle XV. The Oregonian's Beth Nakamura and Brooke Herbert talked about Cole's life and legacy and about their contributions to a recent video and profile. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you get your podcasts [This episode first aired in December, 2019] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A massive new warehouse is coming to Northeast Portland in an area that is already choked with diesel pollution. It also happens to just across a major street from a high school with one of the most diverse student populations in the state. On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with Gosia Wozniacka, environmental justice reporter for The Oregonian and OregonLive. Gosia joined the paper in recent weeks – but you may recognize her byline. She covered immigration and latino affairs for the paper from 2006 to 2010, and has worked for a number of outlets since then. We talked about environmental justice, why she focused on one project in northeast Portland and what it says about the broader effort in Portland to focus on equity and just how far we have to go. Got a story tip for Gosia? You can reach here at gwozniacka@oregonian.com Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
What a week, eh? On this week’s episode of Beat Check, we're replaying a conversation Andrew had with Hillary Borrud and Shane Dixon Kavanugh last Friday. They took to Twitter Spaces to talk about the election, Governor-elect Tina Kotek, the Portland City Council race and the charter reform effort successfully passing. They chatted a few hours before Christine Drazan formally conceded the race to Kotek in a YouTube video. Twitter Spaces are a fun forum where listeners can tune in live and ask questions. It’s recorded on a cell phone instead of our usual digital recording platform. We may do more of these episodes from time-to- time. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Intel’s race to recapture its throne atop the microchip industry continues to hit choppy waters. The tech giant announced layoffs are imminent, and Oregon employees will be included. On the latest episode of Beat Chec, we chat with business and technology reporter Mike Rogoway. We talked about the latest news surrounding Oregon’s largest corporate employer, why the reboot plan led by CEO Pat Gelsinger is still a work in progress that could possibly pay off years from now – and how other chip companies in Oregon and elsewhere are faring much better. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
From its first days publishing as a daily in 1861 until well into the 20th century, The Oregonian existed as a newspaper by white men, for white men. The consequences were profound. Its white supremacist worldviews — excusing lynching, supporting segregation, stigmatizing people of color — helped shape the state today. This is Beat Check with The Oregonian. Last week we heard from editor and vice president of content for the Oregonian and OregonLive, Therese Bottomly. This week we turn to a family that was directly affected by The Oregonian’s racism. This week, investigative reporter Rob Davis takes the mic. In the second half of the show, Rob interviews Zachary Stocks, the executive director of the Oregon Black Pioneers. But first, Rob chats with Vicki Nakashima. Vicki’s dad Ted, wrote a searing piece for The New Republic in 1942 about his experience in a prison camp during World War II. Ted Nakashima was a second-generation Japanese American who was imprisoned without due process, one of 120,000 people nationwide, two thirds of whom were U.S. citizens like Ted. Shortly after his magazine piece, the Oregonian sent a young reporter to an Oregon prison camp. The story downplayed the horrors, saying “a vast majority seemed to consider their detention a vacation.”  On October 6th, Bottomly apologized to Vicki Nakashima for the xenophobic article. Related: See the JAMO Exhibit entitled, "Resilience - A Sensei Sense of Legacy" until Dec. 22nd See the Pittock Mansion's exhibit on Black Oregon from 1840-1970 until Nov. 13. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts to hear new episodes each week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Prompted by the 2020 murder of George Floyd and the nationwide protests that followed, The Oregonian/OregonLive chose to examine this newspaper’s racist history. The first installment of the new series looks at the two white men primarily responsible for The Oregonian throughout its first 60 years as a daily paper: Henry Pittock, the publisher and majority owner, and Harvey Scott, the editor and minority owner. “The Oregonian was a racist newspaper,” said Darrell Millner, an emeritus professor at Portland State University and authority on Black history in Oregon, calling the paper both a reflection of a racist society and a force helping to perpetuate it. The overtly racist words Pittock and Scott printed from 1861 to 1919 made Oregon a more hostile place for people of color to live, excusing lynching, supporting segregation, opposing equal rights. They are still honored throughout Portland today as the namesakes for a mountain, mansion, city park, university building, downtown building and two elementary schools. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, editor Therese Bottomly discusses the series, her apology and the future. Bottomly outlines how the newspaper plans to better engage with communities of color going forward. Learn about some of the modern impacts of the newspaper’s historically racist coverage, which included supporting segregation and advocating for a discriminatory jury system. Read it all here. The Oregonian/OregonLive would like to hear from you. Please share your comments about this project, provide ideas for future stories or tell us about your experience with racism in Oregon. Contact us at equity@oregonian.com or leave a voicemail at 503-221-8055. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
It’s finally time. Ballots will start arriving in mailboxes across Oregon in the coming days and weeks. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with state politics reporter Hillary Borrud, who is covering the unprecedented three-woman governor’s race. We talked about Hillary’s profiles of each candidate, what their final pitches are to voters, why Tina Kotek is trying to distance herself from Governor Kate Brown and much more. Related Reading: -Betsy Johnson profile -Tina Kotek profile -Christine Drazan profile -Campaign finance records smashed -Race is super close, poll says ** Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The pandemic’s effect on our healthcare system is still playing out in real time, and it goes beyond the burnout felt by frontline workers who’ve borne a heavy cost for years now. Hospitals say they are hurting financially, and that will invariably trickle down to affect patients. On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with investigative reporter Jeff Manning. On the first half of the show, we talked about the financial situation at some of Oregon’s largest and smallest hospitals, how it got to this point and what the looming crisis means for patients. On the second half of the show, we talked about the late advertising giant Dan Wieden and his legacy. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts to hear new episodes each week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A good rule of thumb – it’s probably not great when a memo from a state high school soccer official makes headlines. But a letter with sexist language directing high school referees to treat girls soccer players differently than boys sent last month did just that. The memo infuriated coaches across the state. On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with Nik Streng, high school sports coordinator for The Oregonian and OregonLive. We talked about the Oregon School Activities Association’s letter, what it says about the broader inequities in high school sports, what may happen from here – and some of the broader societal issues that have spilled over into youth sports in recent years. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A few months ago, Portland seemed poised to finally change its unusual form of government. But now the reform effort headed to voters is anything but a slam dunk. On the latest episode of Beat Check, Portland City Hall reporter Shane Dixon Kavanaugh talked about what happened to all the positive vibes surrounding the charter reform movement, why one commissioner is leading a charge to present a different proposal next year, and all the nitty gritty details. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
School is back in session – youngsters are already back and college students at Oregon’s public universities return in coming days. Where do things stand with, you know, everything? On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with Sami Edge, higher education reporter for The Oregonian and OregonLive. First off we talked about those younger kids and what we know – and don’t know – about just how far behind they are in achieving key reading and math related milestones, then we talked about the many changes in higher education, why community colleges are struggling and how the state is trying to open doors to tribal members. Related Reading: What we know about learning loss in Oregon Community colleges host expungement events Oregon expands grants for low-income students, people of color Tribal members will have full cost of college covered Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts to get new episodes every Monday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
One of the more interesting stories in Oregon is playing out in Morrow County. It includes a nonprofit internet provider, a handful of local politicians and… Amazon – one of the world’s most powerful companies. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with business and technology reporter Mike Rogoway. We talked about his three part series examining Amazon’s role in Morrow county, the unusual arrangement that put many local politicians and civic leaders on all sides of the decision and boosting carbon emissions – and how Oregon’s decades old program to give local governments the ability to hand out massive property tax breaks has transformed into a windfall for some of our nation’s most prominent companies. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts to get the latest episodes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Thousands of wind turbines soar toward the sky along the Columbia River gorge. Earlier this year, a blade came cascading down. No one was hurt, but the failure was more than just a one-off. As America increasingly moves to wind, solar and other renewable energies, who maintains that infrastructure and keeps it safe – and who holds the industry accountable is a big unanswered question. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with investigative reporter Ted Sickinger. We talked about when he first caught wind of this story, why Oregonians should care, what has gone wrong out at Biglow Canyon in the gorge and much more. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
There’s something of a beer explosion going on in the Portland area. And I don't mean an over carbonated beer explosion – I'm talking about new and exciting breweries and taprooms opening left and right.  On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with our beer writer and newsletter editor, Andre Meunier. We talked about this latest beer boom, what it means, some of his recent beer travels to Eugene and Bend and much more Related: Bend's best patios Eugene's hot spots Grand Fir Brewery to open Entre Compas Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Seemingly out of the blue, an obscure Oregon government agency was suddenly in the limelight for big issues and big drama. Never heard of the Office of Public Defense Services? You’re probably not alone. But it’s an agency with an important mission and many of its issues aren’t new. On the latest episode of Beat Check, investigative reporter Noelle Crombie discusses the dustup between the top official at that agency and the state’s chief justice, why Oregon has so many people waiting for a public defender, and much more. A programming note – we recorded this interview before Stephen Singer was fired by a new 9-member state commission. He likened the state’s chief justice to an autocrat like Vladimir Putin during his last meeting as leader. But the larger issues are all still relevant. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Numbers – data – are vital to our understanding of our society. But they don’t make sense in a vacuum. That’s where reporters – and journalism come into play On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with investigative editor Brad Schmidt. We talked about the past year of data-driven journalism Schmidt and others spearheaded – including detailed and illuminating stories on the use of roundup in parks, the number of marijuana stores per capita across the state and so many other topics. We also talked about another initiative designed to quiz readers on their knowledge of the news. Related reading: Data Points News Quiz Our journalism needs your support. Please become a subscriber today at OregonLive.com/subscribe  Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you get your podcasts to listen to new episodes every Monday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Another weekend in the books, another heat advisory for the Portland metro area. Census figures estimate that 78% of Portland metro residents have air conditioning, but that means 22% don’t. And those people are still suffering. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with breaking news reporter Austin De Dios, who covers public safety issues and diversity, equity and inclusion issues for the Oregonian and OregonLive. We talked about his recent reporting trip to a mobile home park, why people are still thinking about last year’s deadly heat dome, which killed nearly 100 people across the state, how things have improved a bit this year in terms of government outreach but why there’s so much work to be done. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Last week was a momentous one for President Biden – a major bill moved through Congress that directed billions of dollars toward intel and other chip manufacturers. So why is Intel stock plummeting? On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we connect with Mike Rogoway, who covers business and technology for the Oregonian and OregonLive. We talked about the CHIPS Act passing with bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress, what it may mean for Intel, why the company’s stock is in free fall and much more. On the second half of the show we discussed the latest state audit of the Employment Department. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
World records fell. American records fell. Legends grew bigger or were born in Eugene at the new Hayward Field. So how exactly did Eugene fare, and what was the reception locally and from TV sets and computer screens around the world? On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chatted with sports editor Joel Odom about the World Athletics Championships in Eugene. We talked about Sydney McLaughlin and Noah Lyles, the big takeaways from the meet, what it looked like inside and outside the stadium and much more. Coverage on OregonLive Listen to Beat Check anywhere you get your podcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A single block of NE Portland has, for years, been a microcosm for all the issues Portland and other cities face: homelessness, drug use, sex trafficking and rampant crime from homicides to property crime. It has seen the killings of four people in just eight months. People who live in and around the area are looking for answers, but no one seems to have any. This week on Beat Check with The Oregonian, you’ll hear from Savannah Eadens, a breaking news reporter with the Oregonian, who spent months reporting on the intricacies of Portland’s deadliest block. Savannah's stories: Portland’s deadliest block: ‘People are getting murdered here on a regular basis. Why?’ Mayor Ted Wheeler calls for special patrol of Portland’s deadliest block Support local journalism and read stories like Savannah's by subscribing to The Oregonian/Oregon live at oregonlive.com/podsupport Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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