DiscoverThe Slang Podcast - Learn British English Now
The Slang Podcast - Learn British English Now

The Slang Podcast - Learn British English Now

Author: The Slang Podcast

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An exploration of British slang for English learners, native speakers and anyone in between. Giving you a chance to hear, understand the origins and meanings of new slang and to use it immediately!
36 Episodes
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While living in Italy I have noticed the vast range of adjectives that can be used to describe positive or cool things. Having a lack of knowledge of these in Italian is something that makes me really stand out as a language learner. So today I want to share a great word to describe something in a positive way. Wavy. W-A-V-Y. A simple definition of the word wavy means for something to be cool and mellow. The word began to be used and recognised within American rap in the early 2000s in New York City. Rapper Max B released acclaimed mixtapes like Wave Gods in which he used the terms the wave and wavy and they became hip-hop lexicon. In his self-made slang, Max B’s wave and wavy evoke a calm attitude of positivity and creative energy. Referring to the noun wave, describing a moving billow of water.After using this positive adjective with mellow connotations other rappers such as Kanye West soon followed this trend and now it is commonly used in the UK. It is often used to describe clothing, music, an event or a person for example "wow that party was so wavy!" meaning the party was really good.It can also be as a comparative "I am wavier than you" meaning i'm cooler than you.Or a superlative "that coat is the waviest" meaning that coat is the coolest.Do remember it can also refer to someone being under the influence of drugs or alcohol. "I drank to much wine last night, I was so waved" so be careful how you use it.So start using it today! Look around you and think about what is wavy? I guarantee if you ask a British friend to help you buy some wavy clothes you wont be disappointed. That’s our word of the day. You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Let’s catch up soon to explore our next slang word.
Recently one of my students are I were joking with each other about our accents, he was mocking me for my poor accent while speaking Italian, especially when rolling my Rs. I told him that I wasn't offended for this comment as firstly is it true and secondly because his comment was only banter. At this moment he turned to me and looked very confused, this word was brand new for him, as it might be for you. So we are going to clear it up today. Banter is both a noun and verb about talking, both spelt B-A-N-T-E-R.It simply means a playful and friendly exchange of teasing comments for example as a noun we can say "there was good banter at the party" meaning there was fun conversation. Or as a verb "the men bantered with each other" the men joked with each other. It’s traced back to the 17th century in Ireland, where in Gaelic, the word bean BEAN meant woman, so that "banter" means "talk of women." However when used today it is not focused on gender but general remarks between anyone. Nowadays banter can be shortened to "bants" B-A-N-T-S and refers to the clever art of using word play including irony or sarcasm in order to make fun of and joke with friends. Banter is used globally, but often associated with London. You can engage in banter with family friends and even fun-natured colleagues. So start using it today! Start having banter with your friends and family, but make sure not to insult them, it’s a very thin line! That’s our word of the day. You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Let’s catch up soon to explore our next slang word.
I was telling my class about my close friend from England who called me yesterday. She was very upset because her coat got nicked on the subway.When i told them, they responded with little sympathy. One commented "I'm sure she can fix it", however this was not true as the coat was gone. So today we will be clarifying the slang term for "nick". In formal British English, nick is a noun and a verb meaning a small cut and this is what my student was thinking of earlier when advising my friend to get her coat fixed. However this word nick is very tricky, as it is used for many things in both formal and British slang. In slang nick N-I-C-K is a verb meaning to steal. For example "Susie’s phone got nicked at the party!" meaning Susie’s phone was stolen at the party. The verb "nick" can be traced back to the late 16th century meaning trick or cheat. The first found reference of the word was in 1576 by the English dramatist George Whetstone where he says "I never nicked his pay" meaning I never stole his pay.The reasoning behind this word is unclear, however it has been suggested it relates to the name Nicholas, as in the 1940s the name nick was often used to refer to the devil or satan, giving it negative connotations. However in slang nick has a second meaning: Prison.For example "he got taken to the nick" meaning he was sent to jail. This use can be traced back to Australia and the word can be found in a book of Sydney slang from 1882. Today we can use it like this: "We cant see Kelly this weekend as she is in the nick" meaning my friend Kelly is in prison so I can’t see her.So if you hear nick on the street in the UK remember, it could mean to cut, to steal or just prison. So start using it today! Make sure you don’t go to the nick because you have nicked something!That’s our word of the day. You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Let’s catch up soon to explore our next slang word.
Ok so today we will be looking at a word that I use all the time! This word is fancy. If you are an English language learner you most probably have heard this word before however I encounter students daily who do not fully understand how and when to use this word so let's clear it up today!Fancy F-A-N-C-Y is a verb with many meanings used all the time in the UK, especially in the south.You may recognise fancy as an adjective from the Iggy Azelea song I am so fancy meaning to be elaborate or beautiful. But today we will be exploring it when used as a verb. The first way you can use fancy is formally, to express to want to have or do something, for example "Do you fancy a drink this evening?" meaning "would you like a drink this evening?"It can also be used with the ing form such as "I didn't fancy swimming in that river" meaning I didn't want to swim there.We find many questions in the uk using fancy intertwined with slang referring to want. For example:- "Fancy a Cuppa?" meaning "Would you like a cup of tea?"- "Fancy a fag?", meaning "Would you like a cigarette?"- "Fancy some grub" meaning "Do you want some food?"So let’s look at the next meaning, In Uk slang fancy means to be sexually attracted to someone, for example "Wow all the boys really fancy Emily!" meaning all the boys found Emily very attractive. Furthermore someone can can fancy themselves, however this has negative connotations and refers to someone who thinks they are very attractive or important. For example "Claire really fancies himself, doesn't she?". Meaning Claire thinks she is very important when other may not agree. The last way we can use the verb fancy is to imagine or think that something is so. For example "He fancies himself as a bit of a singer." meaning he imagines himself as a singer, not that he actually is one.So there we go! One word 5 different meanings!So whether you fancy a cup of tea, another person, or your self as fluent in slang good luck!That's our episode of the day, you can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Let’s catch up soon to explore our next slang word.
One of my students recently moved to England. His dream was to meet a lovely english woman and settle down. I wished him luck and warned him to watch of for ghosting! He responded by saying that he was fully aware of the rumors that England was a haunted place. I quickly corrected him, telling him that this was not the type of ghosting I was referring to. So let’s look at this word today! No matter how you use it, ghosting G-H-O-S-T-I-N-G never really means anything good.In formal English ghosting is a verb with two meanings, the first is when an apparition of a dead person appears to the living, this is what my student was thinking of.The second formal use of ghosting is to move smoothly and effortlessly. For example "they ghosted up the river" meaning they moved smoothly up the river.But today we will be looking at the frequently used slang meaning of this word. In slang the verb to ghost signifies ending a personal relationship with someone suddenly and without explanation by withdrawing from all communication.Awful right? But it gets worse, as well as stopping communication with a partner, a "ghoster" usually ignores the partner’s attempts to reach out or communicate. Another way of saying this is English is "stonewalling" or giving someone the "silent treatment".The act of "ghosting", has become popular because of the explosion of the dating app culture over the last few years. It usually refers to all contact face-to face and online.There's no clear origin for this word but it seems to have come about around 2012 during the rise of dating apps.It can be used as so: "I didn’t really enjoy our second date so I just ghosted him", meaning "I didn’t like the date so I have decided to not message or respond to any messages from him".Or "I didn't want to ghost her, so we ended up having ‘the talk’", meaning I didn’t want to cut off all communication suddenly so I decided to talk to her.So that’s our word of the day! If you are looking for love in an English speaking country please remember avoid ghosting whether you are the target or perpetrator!You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Let’s catch up soon to explore our next slang word.
Things don’t seem easy these days, whether you're setting up an online bank account, learning how to work i-teach platform to teach your students, or finding the right ingredients in the supermarket to make your boyfriend's favorite cake.I hope things feel easier soon, and to prepare you for when they are I have a few phrases to teach you today.Imagine it is summer 2019 and you want to go to the beach, well hop in your car, drive for twenty 20 minutes and Bob’s your uncle you are there! No no I am not talking about your literal uncle at the beach."Bob's your uncle" is a phrase commonly used in United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means "and there it is" or "and there you have it.".However a recent article from the New York Magazine asked ten different Brits what the expression means and got ten different answers, ranging from "anything's possible" to "there you are".Simply translated we could say that this phrase means that the activity you have done or want to do is simply and easy. Typically someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached. The meaning is similar to that of the French expression "et voilà!" or the American phrase "easy as pie". This expression was first coined in 1887. The origins are uncertain, but a common theory is that the expression arose after Conservative Prime Minister Robert Cecil known as Bob appointed his nephew Arthur Balfour as Chief Secretary for Ireland in 1887, an act of favoritism which was apparently both surprising and unpopular. Whatever other qualifications Balfour might have had, "Bob's your uncle" was seen as the main one. So "Bob's your uncle" is another way of saying "your success is guaranteed."Remember your pronunciation when you use this phrase as it is contracted, we don’t say Bob's your uncle, but it is more fluid such as bobsyauncle. A phrase with the same meaning is ‘Fanny’s your aunt’. When used together it means complete or the whole lot. If Bob's your uncle and Fanny's your aunt you've got a full set of relatives and you are complete. Today we can use it like this: - Where is the post office ?- Go straight on until you reach the park, take the first right, and Bob’s your uncle - you're there!That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
Have you ever suffered from FOMO or JOMO? If you've no idea what I'm talking about, then it could be argued that you're in fact already a victim of them without knowing!So FOMO, F-O-M-O what is it? This relatively new acronym stands for the expression fear of missing out, used to describe that feeling of anxiety which many people experience when they discover that other people have had fun together, spent time together or done just about anything which they were not a part of.We've all experienced FOMO, or the "fear of missing out," but what about JOMO? JOMO describes the exact opposite to FOMO, JOMO is the acronym for joy of missing out.Essentially it is a feeling of pleasure you get from spending time doing what you want and not worrying about what other people are doing or saying. If you're more than content to stay in and watch a film and curl up on the sofa, that's the joy of missing out. Both terms are the latest examples of the way electronic communication, and especially online discourse, have raised the use of acronyms in everyday language. Although mainly found online we can still use them in everyday speech.Such as;- "I can’t believe I can’t go the the party, I have such FOMO"- "I am so happy I am not going to that party, I have JOMO this evening"That’s the end of our episode so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! Are you experiencing JOMO or FOMO? Let us know! Let us know! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
So you have planned three holidays, booked time off work and are totally ready to lay on a beach sipping pina coladas under the sun. This I am sure were many of your summer plans, unfortunately they have been put on hold due to the recent pandemic.How do you feel now? Angry? Disappointed? Salty? Yes Salty! Let me explain myself, in formal english Salty S-A-L-T-Y is an adjective meaning tasting or containing salt, Of course, you may have assumed that it was in relation to food. For example:- "damn you over salted this chicken."- "these chips are really too salty"In slang we can also say a person is salty. No I do not mean one should go around licking their friends and commenting on their taste.In slang salty is an adjective of emotion. Feeling salty is akin to feeling upset or angry. It can be over something minor, like getting teased or sometimes over something larger like your holiday plans being cancelled.So where does it come from and why do we use it? In fact the term salty comes from US slang and was first attested in 1938. It has the same meaning as today, to be angry and irritated.Surprisingly it stemmed from referring to sailors, who were tough and aggressive. In naval terms, the salty guys were the ones who have been on ship for a long time such as sailors and marines. During this time at sea, the ocean waves would knock them around, they would work very hard and while at the top of the ship, the salty sea and air would permeate their clothes and skin, they would feel rough and exhausted and salty.Now many of us are not sailors battling against the harsh sea, yet we still use salty to describe our emotions. As such "Man, I can’t believe James didn’t want to date you. Are you sad or just salty?" or "Why are you so damn salty today?" That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! So what makes you salty? Let us know! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
My friend Kelly used to work at an Italian Pizzeria in Canterbury. She worked with many Italian chefs and would compliment them on the daily pasta specials looking ‘sick’.Their response was usually one of embarrassment or anger, thinking she had insulted their cooking. A basic cardinal sin in Italy. This led to an awkward work environment to say the least, until so explained ‘sick’ was not an insult at all but in fact a compliment! Sick S-I-C-K in formal English means to not be in good health. If you are sick you should stay at home and get lots of rest!However, as we know slang likes to make every formal word very confusing, just like back slang. If you can’t remember what that is go back and check out episode 3 on our website.So in slang sick is an adjective describing something that is cool or excellent. To describe something being sick is to give a compliment. For example:- Whoa, your new car is sick!This word stems from the US and its early uses have been traced to jazz slang popular in the 1920s onwards. It began to find popularly and was frequently used in the UK from the early 2000s. So if someone from the UK comments that you look sick, don’t worry, you don’t need to rush home and check your temperature. You look great!That’s the end of our episode so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website the https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page http://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
Today we will be exploring idiomatic phrases that I would say are rare gems of slang. Before we start, I want to give you some context.You and your friend have decided to go for a day at the beach, you have been planning this trip for a long time, you have organised everything and finally the morning comes. Just as you are about to set off your friend, who should be driving informs you that his driving license expired one month ago!Now what would we say about this friend, that he is stupid? dumb? Oh no we can be much more creative than that!How about using some idiomatic phrases?We could say that this person is a few two sandwiches short of a picnic. This phrase is used to indicate in a humorous way that you think someone is very stupid or is behaving very strangely. Basically meaning they are almost complete but not fully. 'A few sandwiches short of a picnic' is fairly recent. The first citation of it was documented in a BBC's Christmas Special in December 1987.This pejorative phrase meaning not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity can appear in many different forms and variations .There are many phrases of the form 'an X short of a Y'. These all mean the same thing, that is, the person being spoken of is stupid. The 'short of' insult began in Australia and New Zealand in the mid 19th century. I have found it can be traced back to 1852 when Colonel Godfrey Mundy wrote:- "Let no man having, a shingle short try this country."Basically meaning that he did not want anyone stupid to come and live in his country.Many of these phrases have been adapted while always including having something loose or missing for example we could say something is A few crumbs short of a biscuit or A few cards short of a full deck. So the next time you want to call someone stupid try to be a bit more creative about it! Remember the form 'an X short of a Y'. That’s the end of our episode so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you!If you can think of any great Slang insults we would love to hear them.You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
As I have been trapped inside for a while now, I have been "face timing" many of my close friends who are far away, as I am sure you have all been doing. While speaking to my closest friend Ella I commented:- "woah! Your face looks absolutely beat!"You may think this comment is strange as in formal beat BEAT the word beat has negative and strong connotations. In formal English beat has many meanings as a verb. Firstly beat can mean to defeat someone in a game or other competitive situation. Used as so:- "France beat Portugal in 2000 in a great football match"It could also mean to strike someone or something repeatedly and violently. As a noun it is the main accent or rhythmic unit in music or poetry. Finally beat can be used as an adjective meaning completely exhausted. For example:- "I'm beat—I need an hour or so to rest"However when I commented on the appearance of my friends face I was not referring to any of these meanings. The slang term beat B-E-A-T isn’t as aggressive as it sounds. In slang “Beat” can be used as a verb or adjective, and surprisingly it is about beauty and makeup. The verb to beat refers to the application of one's makeup. As an adjective beat means someone either applied their makeup well, or just applied a lot of it. For example:- " You face looks beat! Where are you going out tonight?"The term is popular among makeup enthusiasts and the gay community. You can find many examples of ‘beat’ being used in the fantastic ball culture documentary Paris Is Burning created in 1991.So to clarify when I commented that Ella’s Face was beat I was telling her that her makeup looked beautiful and very professional. So if your feeling bored at home, get your makeup out and beat your face!That’s the end of our episode, remember to tune in for our next episode to see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website http://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
Before we get started I wanted to say a few words about the current global situation.In desperate times we feel panicked and scared for many reasons. I want to thank everyone who is helping us during this crisis, especially doctors and nurses tirelessly working against this pandemic.All we can do is wait, be kind to each other and most importantly stay inside. It's safe to say we are all shook. Shook S-H-O-O-K is a slang term that can be used as an adjective meaning shocked, surprised, or startled. The inner monologue for feeling shook is thinking:- ‘Whoa, what just happened?’In formal English shook is the past participle of the verb to shake. To shake is to move backwards and forwards or up and down in quick, short movements, or to make something or someone do this. Many things can shake your body and your voice usually, because you are frightened or nervous. For example: - ‘Her voice shook as she talked about the person who attacked her.’There is a perfect Idiom reflecting the word shook which you may all know as shaking like a leaf. If you say that someone is shaking like a leaf, you mean that their body is shaking a lot, for instance because they are very cold or frightened. If someone says I was shaking like a leaf before the test, it means they were very nervous.My guess would be that S-H-O-O-K came from the old phrase “shook up” that was used in the 19th century. Shook up meant to be excited in those times and was revived in 1957 by Elvis Presley. So in slang Shook describes feelings ranging from discombobulation and fear to rage and elation, kind of like "all shaken up." We could use it like this:- ‘How you feeling about the current social and economical climate?’- ‘To be honest Im shook’. That’s the end of our episode, remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
This weekend I have been lazy, I have gone shopping, tidied my flat and spent some time with my chum... Louisa what are you talking about now? What are your chums?Chums C-H-U-M-S, is a tricky slang word, we can use it as a noun, a verb or an adjective. So let’s see how now! As a noun Chum simply means a close friend. The origin of “chum” in this sense is strictly used in speech. The phrase Chum first appeared in the late 17th century and was derived from “chamber fellow” meaning roommate. It was used in schools and colleges around Britain simply referring to the person who you shared a room with, however by extension it started to denote, a close friend and/or constant companion. Nowadays as a noun a chum is a friend or a pal. For example you and your best chums might spend the weekend camping together. The informal word chum is more common in Britain than the US. In Scotland another kind of chum couldn't be more different from a friend. There chum means a chopped up fish parts used as bait on a fishing boat. So be careful how and when you use it.As a verb to chum someone means to hang out with, escort or to accompany someone somewhere. As a verb it is often used in Scottish slang, especially by people from Glasgow or Edinburgh.It could be said:- "Will you chum me to the station?"Meaning will you come with me to the station. Or it could be used like this:- "Jake will you chum me up to my house?"Meaning William will you accompany me up to my house?Finally as an adjective we have chummy C-H-U-M-M-Y meaning companionable, sociable, intimate. As in:- "Susan and I are great friends, we are really chummy". So start using it today! Do you have lots of chums who are very chummy?That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
While telling my Italian friends about my good friend Ollie from Glasgow I said "he is a good bloke". Bloke? what nationality is that? No it is not a nationality! So what is my friend Ollie? Bloke B-L-O-K-E is an extremely common term denoting a man. It is a noun used in reference to an ordinary man, with a similar meaning to "average joe" in America. Bloke is a slang term for a common man found used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.The earliest known usage is from the early 19th century, when it was recorded as a London slang term. The word's origin is unknown, although many theories exist regarding its etymology… It has been claimed that the word's roots arise from the Hindi word loke L-O-K-E, meaning a man. In England bloke was originally found within the language of criminals meaning a man who was not a criminal and usually of high social standing. Criminals themselves would use the term to distinguish themselves from high class ‘blokes’ for example:- "I stole the bloke's watch right off em."The earliest found written use of bloke was in 1829 in the court papers of the Old Bailey, The Central Criminal Court of England and Wales. During the trial of 17-year-old John Daly who was charged with housebreaking, where the owner of the house is referred to as a bloke. Nowadays in the UK bloke is viewed as an average man, however this understanding is slightly different in Australia. In Australia, a bloke is a staple masculine archetype closely associated with the country's identity and pride. The ideal "Aussie bloke" has been portrayed in important works of art and associated with famous Australian men throughout history. In Australia The phrase "He's a good bloke" is frequently used and it literally means "he's a good man". That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website http://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
You are listening to our fourth and final episode specialising on slang and money!Ok on to our next slang term for money… a pony. I can hear you asking me- Louisa why are we now talking about a baby horse? Spelt the same P-O-N-Y pony actually means 25 pounds.The word has been traced back from the late 18th century in London and has a vast range of suggestions for its etymology. By some it has been suggested that in the 18th century £25 was the typical price paid for a small horse, although historians have contested this is not accurate and far too much money.Others have suggested that an Indian twenty-five rupee banknote featured a pony, therefore this image was also connection to the cash amount. A final claim is that pony might derive from the Latin words 'legem pone', which means, 'payment of money, cash down' which begins on the March 25, a quarter day in the old financial calendar, when payments and debts came due.Our last slang term for money and again animal related we have a monkey M-O-N-K-E-Y, no not the animal but actually meaning 500 pounds. While this London centric slang is entirely British, it actually stems from 19th century India. The term was coined by British soldiers returning from India where the 500 rupee note of that era had a picture of a monkey on it. They used the term monkey for 500 rupees and on returning to England the saying was converted to sterling to mean £500.That’s the end of our money series so remember to tune in for our next episode to see what new slang we have in store for you!You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
You are listening to our third episode specialising on slang and money!Today we are starting by looking at the most common and widely used slang terms. I was in a bar recently with my Italian friend, i bought some drinks and she asked me how much i owed her.I replied ‘only a fiver’ my friend looked at me with such confused on her face and replied ‘five what?!’.This is when I released we have never spoken about one of slang terms I use most frequently. A fiver F-I-V-E-R simply means a five pound note.This slang term is used everywhere in the UK, especially down south. You will hear it in pubs, supermarkets and even in restaurants.Luckily we can also use a tenner T-E-N-N-E-R for a ten pound note. A fiver and a tenner have been used in slang since the mid 1800s. There is no clear reason for these slang terms but they are used daily in the UK, for example- ‘how much was your t shirt?’- ‘I gave him a tenner for the T-Shirt."A five pound note is also sometimes referred to as a bluey for the obvious reason that they used to be the colour blue. In cockney rhyming slang five pounds can also be referred to as a deep sea diver, rhythming with fiver, however this is not a common slang term. Just a fun one! So next time you are in an english pub and someone says the pint is a fiver, do not raise your hand in the air and try to high five them! Just hand over a five pound note.That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you!You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
In our most recent episodes we are discussing slang words for money! Something key when travelling to a different country or even speaking a new language! Today we will be examining slang words for the British Pound Coin.The most common slang word used for a pound is a quid, a word I use frequently to the confusion of my Italian friends. A quid is equal to 100 pence, and it is generally believed to come from the Latin phrase “quid pro quo,” which translates into "something for something," or an equal exchange for goods or services. It is always used in the singular, so one speaks of 'ten quid' or 'fifty quid', never of 'quids'. This is pretty widely used throughout the country, but a rather old term. What is a newer one I hear you ask? Well its the word nicker N-I-C-K-E-R, this term has much stronger London associations and dates from early this century. Not pluralised for a number of pounds, eg:- "It cost me twenty nicker"Its origins stem for the word N-I-C-K, a word we explored some episodes ago. If you have forgotten go back and check it out! As we found out then 'Nick' has a wide variety of meanings based on cheating, snatching, and stealing. Maybe, a one pound coin was viewed as an item of currency worth nicking and became known as a nicker.Last and maybe my favourite slang word for 1 pound is a squid S-Q-U-I-D, yes as in the eight armed sea creature. Not normally pluralised, still expressed as 'squid', not squids, e.g., 'Fifty squid'. The most likely origin of this slang expression is from a joke in 1960-70s about a shark who meets his friend the whale one day, and says:- "I'm glad I bumped into you - here's that squid I owe you.."So having a squid, quid or a nicker is usually always a good thing, especially if you are on your way to the pub!Next episode we will be exploring more ways to discuss money in slang, so don’t miss it!That’s our episode of the day, let’s catch up soon to talk more about slang terms for money. You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
Today we will be talking about money, something universal….however us brits have found many words and phrases to use when talking about it.While the origins of these slang terms are many and various, certainly a lot of English money slang is rooted in various London communities, many sectors such as with street traders and gangs developed their own specific slang, which has produce some strange interpretations commonly used today.....so we are going to explore them now! Our first word for money is Bread B-R-E-A-D. In formal English this refers to the food but within slang it represents money. This term stems from cockney rhyming slang and metaphoric use of 'bread'. Bread or bread and honey rhymes with = money. Bread also has associations with money, in a metaphorical sense as it can traced back to the Bible. Bread in the sense of money is also linked with the expression 'earning a crust', which alludes to having enough money to pay for one's daily bread.Closely linked to this phrase, another word for money is dough D-O-U-G-H which appears to be based on "bread". Both words have been popular slang for money since the 1930s. They could be used like this:- "Do you have any dough? Or do we need to go to a bank?"- "Its ok I have some bread for a pint at the pub"Ok moving on to our next word for money which is Moolah M-O-O-L-A-H. If you have a lot of moolah, you're rich, you have plenty of cash. The word "Moolah" has an Indian origin. Moolah, in Hindi, means the root cause of something. This this slang word has many implications for the way we view money, that it is the root of all!Last but not least we have Wedge W-E-D-G-E. In formal english a wedge is a triangular shaped tool, used to split open an object. Its connotations with money arise from when coins could be split into quarters so exact weights could be measured. The shape of these sections was a wedge. Nowadays "a wedge" is a pay-packet amount of money or the amount someone earns.So there we go! Many ways to say money...Next time you are with an english speaker and they ask you for a wedge, some bread or a bit of moolah you know what they are talking about!Tune in to our next episode to find out how we can refer to a pound coin in slang, and trust me there are many ways.That’s our episode of the day, you can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
Today we will be exploring more social media slang, in particular how do we identify the sea of people on social media, from trolls to baes...what are they and what do they mean?! Now is your chance to find out so lets get started...So in formal English a Troll T-R-O-L-L is a character from fairytales, usually an ugly creature depicted as either a giant or a dwarf. However online it means something much different or perhaps even worse.In Internet slang, a troll is a person who who deliberately starts arguments or says offensive things online, for the troll's amusement or a specific gain. Both the noun and the verb forms of "troll" are associated with Internet discourse. However, the word has also been used more widely. Media attention in recent years has equated trolling with online harassment. In a sentence we could use the verb like this: - "Someone left a nasty comment on my facebook post"- "Ignore them, they are just trolling you.’ They are horrible people so watch out for them when you are online! Trolls usually post or respond to comments in a way that will annoy or anger the most people possible. There’s a saying online:- "Don’t feed the trolls."This means you shouldn’t interact with someone who is “trolling,” since it will only encourage them. You usually find trolls hanging out on forums, but they can be anywhere online, from your Facebook, to the comments section on a news article.Ok number two, someone who is not as bad as a troll but still seen in a negative light, a lurker spelt L-U-R-K-E-R. This is someone who visits a forum, blog or website often, but doesn’t leave any comments. The word stems from formal english as "to lurk" means to hide just out of sight. A lurker could also be one who never messages on group chats but simply reads. I must admit during busy work times I find myself doing the same on many group chats. The word could be used as so:- "On my new blog I really want my lurkers to comment, so I’m going to have a competition!"Ok last but not least we have bae B-A-E a term of affection for a romantic partner, thought to have come from "baby" or "babe". In fact "bae", is an acronym that stands for "before anyone else".You will find this word all over social media, especially if you are following a very cringey couple. Ironically and quite unromantically bae in Danish means poop and to worsen things it means "bye" in Icelandic.That's our episode of the day, you can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.
Today we will be exploring more social media slang! The internet is super important when learning a new language as social media is something that allows you to connect with people from all over the world.So let’s have a look now at how to navigate the rabbit hole that is social media abbreviations. As most online slang words are acronyms, they will be our focus for today.To start with we have AMA meaning ‘ask me anything’. The AMA was first made popular on the sharing forum and community, Reddit. Short for “Ask Me Anything,” an AMA is when someone, usually well-known or from an interesting background, goes online and answers questions posed by the community. I would suggest writing on another's or creating your own AMA as it is the perfect way to practice English!Ok our next is acronym is IRL meaning ‘in real life’ When you’re talking about something that exists offline, you can use IRL. For example: My screen name is PerfectChef because I’m a chef IRL. If you have been chatting to someone online you may want to take a risk and actually meet them IRL!To finish off this episode I want to tell you two ways of saying goodbye in internet slang! The first is GTG meaning got to go, showing the person you are talking to you are in a bit of a rush and will not be online from now on.The second is to show you will be gone for a bit but will be back soon BRB, meaning be right back, and that’s what we will be! That’s our episode of today. Next episode we will be looking at more social media slang especially for how we address people online, so make sure you give it a listen!You can find us on our website the https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!
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Comments (2)

HadiHakhamanesh

nice ❤❤❤❤❤

Jun 27th
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mehdi tila

❤️❤️❤️

Nov 14th
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