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Lead Balloon - Public Relations, Marketing and Strategic Communications Stories
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Lead Balloon - Public Relations, Marketing and Strategic Communications Stories

Author: Dusty Weis

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The first podcast to fly with the US Navy Blue Angels, Webby-nominated, honored by Adweek.

You've never heard a marketing podcast like this before.

On Lead Balloon, professional communicators share tales of the do-or-die situations that defined public relations and marketing careers--what went wrong, how unexpected obstacles were overcome, and what was learned in the process.

With immersive storytelling and a wry sense of humor, host Dusty Weis revisits epic PR disasters, intense communications scenarios, professional crises and half-baked marketing campaigns gone awry, and usually finds a reason to chuckle.

Because sometimes, there are important lessons to be learned from someone else's worst day.

And sometimes, it's just more convenient than group therapy. Tune in monthly for new episodes.

Visit podcampmedia.com/leadballoon to learn more.

46 Episodes
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There’s a disturbing new trend making waves in the world of online content creation.  Corporate blogs, mom-and-pop business websites, podcasts… Even stuff that you posted years ago to your personal website or social media. It’s now being examined, sifted through and screened by artificial intelligence bots, which are programmed to search for copyright violations. The practice has become known as “copyright trolling,” and when the bots find copyrighted images, they send a letter or email demanding payment of hundreds or even thousands of dollars to settle the claim, threatening costly litigation if the recipient does not swiftly comply.  And for the unsuspecting, often well-meaning online creators who receive these letters, it can be a disruptive, scary and expensive experience. Working on behalf of copyright holders like the AP and the AFP, companies like PicRights and Higbee & Associates may have outdated copyright laws on their side. But according to our guests in this episode, that doesn't make their practices ethical or moral. Pierre-Nicolas Schwab is a Belgium-based marketer, technologist and business consultant, and the founder of the market research firm Into the Minds. He has blogged about his experience being accosted by PicRights, and exhaustively researched the company and its methods. And Caroline Fox is the principal attorney at CJFox Law in Richmond, Virginia. With an agency background in public relations and social media, she now works as an attorney specializing in copyright, trademarks and advertising / media compliance, and has advised numerous clients who have received demand letters from PicRights. Together, we'll explore how these operations work, what the implications are, and how to protect yourself. Because, if you or your company creates content on the internet, you might be surprised to learn just how vulnerable you are to copyright trolling. Subscribe to the Podcamp Media e-newsletter for regular updates on what we've got cooking. And check out these wacky results from when we asked an A.I. to draw "Evil Robot Copyright Lawyers" for us. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Now with 50% new footage! During Super Bowl LIII in 2019, Bud Light launched a new advertising strategy that was... unconventional, even for them. Instead of frogs or "wazzap" guys or silly superstitions, this campaign focused on attacking Bud Light's rivals for using corn syrup to brew their beers. Stranger still, outside observers noted that the beer giant borrowed other conventions from the world of political mudslinging, twisting facts, doubling down on vague talking points and attempting to build a consensus against Miller Lite and Coors Light. But the brewing barons at Anheuser-Busch didn't count on the little guys... specifically, members of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) who took exception to the attacks and rallied to the defense of MillerCoors. We've remastered this classic Lead Balloon episode to add the perspective of new key players, including: MillerCoors (now called Molson Coors) Chief Communications Officer Adam Collins NCGA CEO Jon Doggett NCGA past president Kevin Ross Additionally, we've refined the original storytelling with NCGA VP of communications Neil Caskey, Brewers Association spokesman Paul Gatza, and friend-of-the-show Kyle Brown. Together, we'll break down the ultimate failures of "the Corn Syrup Wars," untwist the misleading claims made in Bud Light's ads, and detail the long-term ramifications for all the brands involved. Subscribe to the Podcamp Media e-newsletter for regular updates on what we've got cooking. Listen to the NCGA Podcast episode from which our new footage was sourced. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
It's been a busy year here at Podcamp Media. So busy, in fact, that we almost forgot to recognize a pretty significant milestone in Dusty's career. 20 years ago, Dusty got his first job behind a microphone. He was 17-years-old, working an after school gig at his local radio station in Monroe, Wisconsin, when he was afforded the opportunity to voice the overnight shift and eventually ride the news desk. It ignited a passion for storytelling and audio that has guided his career ever since—during his 10 years in the radio business, then his career in public relations and content marketing, and finally in his role as founder of Podcamp Media and host of Lead Balloon. Connecting with and serving an audience has always been a guiding star. So in this this bonus episode, Dusty calls up his first audio boss, Scott Thompson—co-owner of Big Radio in Monroe and afternoon show host—to talk about those formative experiences, lessons, people and memories that set the stage for every step in his career that would come after. Plus, we dig into the archive and pull out a few audio clips from early in Dusty's career, just for giggles. Lead Balloon will be back with new episodes in 2023. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
For the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron, media relations is not a job that just happens on the ground.  Each year, dozens of media reps, influencers and VIPs are invited to take a ride in the back seat of one of the squadron's F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jets. And, in order to help tell the story of the Blue Angels public affairs team, Lead Balloon was invited to be the first podcast to take one of those rides. CLICK HERE if you prefer to watch a video podcast documentary version of this episode. In this episode, Dusty is paired up with Lt. Commander Griffin Stangel, #7 Blue Angels pilot and air show narrator, who is tasked with giving media reps the ride of a lifetime, while at the same time serving as an on-the-record spokesman for the unit. He not only flies the plane, but fields questions and hits talking points with a smile on his face—all while enduring the extreme physical punishment of high-G aviation. The jet rides are a critical part of the Blue Angels media relations strategy, Stangel notes, because, "We can talk about it all day, but unless you're up here experiencing it, you won't truly know what these pilots are putting themselves through."  Stangel also flies members of the Blue Angels public affairs team to capture photos and videos of the squadron in action. As we learned in the last episode, it's a remarkable ordeal to operate a camera in the middle of "the most intense roller coaster" ride in the world. This time, we visit the team at their Pensacola headquarters, and we'll take you through a day-in-the-life as a member of the Blue Angels public affairs team: early morning pre-flight briefing, special breathing techniques to avoid "G-Force Induced Loss-of-Consciousness," strapping in to the fighter jet, and a memorable, adrenaline-soaked flight in an F/A-18 Super Hornet. The Blue Angels are supported by a team of more than 150 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and we meet a number of them, including: #7 Pilot and Narrator, Lt. Commander Griffin Stangel Public Affairs Chief MCC Michael Russell #7 Crew Chief AD2 Cam Tuzon AE2 Dale Pascua Public Affairs Specialist MC2 Cody Hendrix Special thanks as well to Blue Angels Public Affairs Officer Lt. Chelsea Dietlin and Public Affairs Chief MCC Paul Archer for helping coordinate Lead Balloon's embed with the squadron, as well as Jim Schlueter, Paul Guse and Dave Oates. Make sure to check out the epic video version of this podcast! Subscribe to the Podcamp Media e-newsletter for more behind-the-scenes footage. Special music for this episode was performed and recorded by Ty Christian and Brian Koenig of the metal act Lords of the Trident, which is touring this fall in the U.S., Canada and Japan. Additional music by the Revolution, Tiger Gang and Dr. Delight. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron is not only the world’s most well-known group of elite performing aviators.  It’s also—and people forget this—a group of elite public affairs and marketing practitioners.  From the pilots to the technicians turning wrenches on the planes, every Blue Angels team member is trained to uphold the unit's 76 years of tradition and legacy. As a brand management exercise, there is perhaps no other initiative in the world as rigorous and disciplined. And at the heart of this publicity apparatus is a small but extraordinary group of public and media relations practitioners whose duties would literally make most strategic communicators pass out. The Blue Angels public affairs team operates under grueling physical conditions, works brutal hours and is held to meticulous standards befitting one of the most storied aviation units in history, where the stakes are always life and death. They populate social media accounts on behalf of the Blue Angels brand, coordinate ride-alongs with local media and VIPs, and are even called upon to fly photography missions with the squadron, experiencing the same adverse G-forces as the pilots themselves. We wanted to tell the story... of the people who tell the Blue Angels' story, embedding with the Blue Angels Public Affairs team for the first segment in this two-part series. So in this episode, we meet the team as they prepare for and fly at the Chicago Air and Water show, one of more than 60 air shows the Blue Angels headline across North America each year. The Blue Angels are supported by a team of more than 150 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and we meet a number of them, including: Executive Officer, Commander Jon Fay Maintenance Officer, Lt. Commander Brian Abe #7 Pilot and Narrator, Lt. Commander Griffin Stangel Public Affairs Chief MCC Paul Archer Public Affairs Specialist MC1 Cody Deccio Public Affairs Specialist MC1 Bobby Baldock Public Affairs Specialist MC2 Cody Hendrix Special thanks as well to Blue Angels Public Affairs Officer Lt. Chelsea Dietlin for helping coordinate Lead Balloon's embed with the squadron, as well as Jim Schlueter, Paul Guse and Dave Oates. Watch a video preview of next month's epic season finale with the Blue Angels. Subscribe to the Podcamp Media e-newsletter to be notified when we post video of this extraordinary experience. Special music for this episode was performed and recorded by Ty Christian and Brian Koenig of the metal act Lords of the Trident, which is touring this fall in the U.S., Canada and Japan. Additional music by Michael Briguglio, the Revolution and the Realist. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In 1993, the world watched as two bitter rivals shook hands on the South Lawn of the White House, presenting the best hope for peace in the Middle East seen in centuries of bloodshed. Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestine Liberation Organization Chair Yasser Arafat’s signing of the Oslo Accords—and the handshake that followed, cajoled by U.S. President Bill Clinton—comprised an iconic snapshot in history. In the moment, the world was awash in optimism, and Jewish Americans in particular were riveted by what was happening in the Middle East. But in Eastern Europe, Jewish people living in former Soviet states faced a growing threat of persecution, and the problems went largely unreported. And Operation Exodus, an effort by the United Jewish Appeal to repatriate one million Jewish refugees from failing states like Uzbekistan to Israel, would need a brilliant publicity campaign to motivate donors to support its ambitious goals. So the UJA hired Dick Grove, the founder of Ink PR, for the job. And, together with a handpicked team of PR professionals and documentarians, he traveled into the Lion’s Den itself, documenting destitution firsthand in a failed Soviet State and building a massive fundraising publicity campaign for UJA. In this episode, he's joined by Operation Exodus director Ron Friedman to rehash the tale of this extraordinary undertaking. Visit our website for pictures from Dick's trip to Uzbekistan. While you're here, Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Adweek's 2020 "Marketing Podcast of the Year." Webby Award-nominated. Profiled on Forbes.com. On Lead Balloon, professional communicators share tales of the do-or-die situations that defined public relations and marketing careers--what went wrong, how unexpected obstacles were overcome, and what was learned in the process. With immersive storytelling and a wry sense of humor, host Dusty Weis revisits epic PR disasters, intense communications scenarios, professional crises and half-baked marketing campaigns gone awry, and usually finds a reason to chuckle. Because sometimes, there are important lessons to be learned from someone else's worst day. And sometimes, it's just more convenient than group therapy. Tune in monthly for new episodes. Visit podcampmedia.com/leadballoon to learn more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On a busy evening in Boston's financial district in 1995, gunshots ring out. When the smoke clears, a prominent divorce attorney is dead and a police officer is wounded. And Lee Caraher, then the Vice President of Corporate and Consumer Communications for the Sega Corporation, doesn't know it yet... ...but she's about to have a public relations crisis on her hands. Police would eventually uncover evidence that shooter John T. Lin "trained" for his revenge rampage by spending hours playing Virtua Cop, an arcade-style video game that puts a plastic replica pistol directly in the player's hands as they blast bad guys on a screen. And media coverage of the shooting would add fuel to the fire in the growing debate over video game violence that played out in the mid-90s. So in this episode, we rehash the story with Lee and parse the PR takeaways. And, since video games have been blamed for dozens of other heinous acts in the years since the shooting, we'll explore the relationship between violent media and violent behavior with two experts whose opposing views yield some surprising common ground. Clinton "Paperthin" Bader is an Esports commentator in Seoul, South Korea who provides expert play-by-play on professional video game competitions, which is a major form of entertainment in Southeast Asia. And Dr. Myriam Miedzian is a prominent critic of video games who served on President Bill Clinton’s Violence Prevention Task Force and worked on faculty at Rutgers and Barnard. She also wrote a 1991 book called Boys Will Be Boys: Breaking the Link Between Masculinity and Violence. While you're here, Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sexist advertising that objectifies women reached its heyday in the late 1960s and early 1970s. But, in that era, it was very seldom that any company actually faced backlash or consequences for its ad practices. That began to change, however, when National Airlines deployed a racy new ad campaign in which alluring young stewardesses invited travelers to "Fly Me" on their next business trip. National Airlines may have sold more tickets as a result of the ads. But, for a workforce of stewardesses who were fed up with sexist standards and unfair working conditions, the campaign proved to be a tipping point that sent them into the streets to protest, organize, and agitate for the respect they deserved—both in the workplace and in the media. In this episode, Nell McShane Wulfhart—author of The Great Stewardess Rebellion—charts a course through the aviation, advertising and labor history of this story. Plus, we're joined by Philippa Roberts and Jane Cunningham to explore the sexist tropes at play in 1970s advertising, and how sexism is just as pernicious in today's media, even if it's less blatant. Philippa and Jane are co-authors of Brandsplaining: Why Marketing is Still Sexist and How to Fix It, and are also co-founders of the agency PLH, the UK’s leading research consultancy specializing in female audiences. While you're here: Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
As the world’s most valuable automotive manufacturer, electric car giant Tesla is the largest company in the world that operates without any kind of public relations personnel. That means no media relations arm. No crisis comms plan. No PIO.  In fact, the entire PR team was purged just a couple years ago in 2020, and CEO Elon Musk has defended the move, saying the company doesn't believe in "manipulating public opinion." Not only does this reflect a very unsophisticated understanding of what public relations practitioners do, but it also makes Elon Musk the sole public authority authorized to comment on Tesla's wheelings and dealings... and he doesn't exactly have a history of exuding stability. So in this episode, we revisit that history with Forbes Senior Editor Alan Ohnsman and San Diego-based crisis communications consultant David Oates. We discuss how Tesla is now struggling to control its own narrative, what risks it's courting, and how Elon Musk's leadership model might be setting up the company... and its shareholders... for their biggest disaster yet. While you're here: Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The strategy at the heart of the Snapple brand's precipitous rise... and its cataclysmic fall... is simple: Embrace your roots. Celebrate authenticity. It's a lesson that's been served up again and again in the brands and marketing ecosystem. But it never seems to sink in. So in this episode, we'll pop the top on a Snapple double feature. First, Jane Cavalier tells us about pitching Snapple's iconic slogan, "Made From the Best Stuff on Earth," and watching it flop with the company's original owners. And then, Richard Kirshenbaum outlines the genesis of the iconic "Snapple Lady" ad campaign, which catapulted Snapple into a multi-billion dollar brand--that is, until new owners changed course and sunk $1.4 billion in mismanaged brand value. Together, Jane and Richard will parse lessons hard-earned in the hustle of Madison Avenue and retell a tale as old as the Golden Goose itself: "If you've got a good thing going, but you don't understand how it works, for the love of God don't tinker with it." While you're here: Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Well folks, Lead Balloon has been nominated for The Webby Awards, "the Internet's highest honor." And we need your help to bring home the hardware. Click here to Vote for Lead Balloon as Best Creativity and Marketing Podcast. And if you want to learn more or tell your friends about the show, Check Out This News Release. As always, thanks for listening. It means everything. -dw- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On January 3, Pabst Blue Ribbon lit the internet on fire with one obscene tweet: “Not drinking this January? Try eating ass.” The uproar was swift and loud. And PBR deleted the tweets and apologized publicly, even as some writers blamed a “rogue employee” for the tweets. That was NOT the case. The offending Tweeter was actually an established social media manager by the name of Corey Smale, a creative enigma whose free-wheeling, hands-on approach had really resonated with the brand’s fans. So what went wrong for PBR? What safeguards did they have in place? Who’s REALLY to blame for the ass-eating Twitter incident, and what can we learn from it? On this episode, we pick through the wreckage with Kyle Brown, our go-to beer marketing correspondent, and with David Griner, Adweek’s International editor, who scored an exclusive interview with former PBR social media manager Corey Smale. Plus, we examine an interview that Corey gave on the In Defense of Ska Podcast—mere weeks before his dismissal—to learn more about the process that had been established for running PBR's social media. *Please note, this episode is NOT SAFE FOR WORK* While you're here: Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
For Ukrainian ad agencies and freelance creatives, "business-as-usual" stopped on the day that Russian forces launched their unprovoked war three weeks ago. Now, they need your help to pierce the veil of Russian propaganda and fight for their homeland in their own way--by waging a global information war to win the hearts and minds of the world. In this episode, we talk to three Kyiv-based creatives who are organizing this loose coalition of Ukraine's creative community: Viktor Shkurba, Founder and Creative Director of [isdgroup] Oksana Gonchar, Creative Group Head at [isdgroup] Andrii Mishchenko, Kyiv-based freelance creative strategist They discuss how the war has disrupted their lives and their agency's future, how they're fighting back against Russian disinformation, and the imperative for creatives around the world to get involved. Additionally, you can support these causes: Prevent World War 3 Brief: https://preventww3.in.ua/ How to support Ukrainian army: https://bank.gov.ua/ua/about/support-the-armed-forces Ukrainian relatives asking ex us military to donate that protective gear: https://www.gearforukraine.com Project aiming to show Russians all their military loses. Also asking for donations: Russian-crimes.com will start in a few days (carpentry only in Russian: www.Marta-mira.com) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Wendy’s, the burger chain, is infamous for its punchy, no-holds-barred Twitter account.  And social media manager Amy Brown was the creative instigator of that success. Many internet historians even point to her epic 2017 tweet-roast as the viral moment that launched an entire genre of Snarky Brand Twitter. It certainly made her a hero to social media managers the world over. So why, within just a couple of months, did Amy Brown feel like she needed to leave that high-profile dream job at Wendy’s?  Because social media burnout is real. And for professional communicators, who need social media to do their jobs, it can start to seem like there’s no escape from the creeping toxicity, the poorly-defined work hours, and the haunting, ever-present specter of the algorithm.  In this episode, Amy relives the moment she "went viral," and shares some of the lessons she's learned about finding balance in social media use and maintaining her personal well-being in the toxic environment of modern social media. Plus, UC-Davis Social Media Director Sallie Poggi joins us as well with insights into how they’re creating a healthier environment for social media professionals... and why she thinks today's social media managers are tomorrow's CMOs. While you're here: Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Tony Piloseno really likes paint. And as a junior studying marketing at Ohio University, he channeled his passion for a part-time job at a Sherwin-Williams paint store into a wildly successful TikTok channel. His weirdly entertaining videos of mixing paint colors amassed hundreds of thousands of social media followers and tens of millions of views. Inspired by his meteoric success, Tony pitched the concept of a branded TikTok channel to Sherwin-Williams marketing brass, hoping the company would recognize a ripe opportunity to build brand awareness and loyalty with a new generation of future homeowners. Instead, the company fired him for "gross misconduct." But it would turn out to be the best thing that ever happened to the ascendant entrepreneur, and a public relations disaster for Sherwin-Williams. Check out Tonester Paints on TikTok and visit the Tonester Paints website to learn more. Leave us a message on the Lead Balloon Comms Gripe Line Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This month on the show, we talked to Alex Lasry, the Senior Vice President of the Milwaukee Bucks, about the team’s dramatic stand for social justice last year during the NBA Playoffs. It’s a really important story and a great case study for how organizations can and should navigate some of these situations we face as a nation. But Alex has a lot of other irons in the fire, too. And so in this bonus episode, Dusty can't help fanboying a little bit over the really incredible Bucks team. Alex explains why he thinks the City of Milwaukee has a “Quiet Swagger” that will surprise a lot of out-of-towners. And, he explains the comms strategy that he’s deploying in his run for a U.S. Senate seat. Visit podcampmedia.com/news to sign up for our e-newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
With a shot at an NBA title on the line, an entire basketball team refuses to take the court. They won’t even come out of the locker room. It’s a sports marketing nightmare. And just last year, it came true for the management of the Milwaukee Bucks basketball team. Alex Lasry is the Senior Vice President of the Bucks. And even though he was shocked just like the rest of us when the 2020 walk-out happened, he supported the team’s decision whole-heartedly. Because there was an entire summer of reasons why the Milwaukee Bucks didn’t take the court on August 26, 2020. But they crystalized around the police shooting of a black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and the violence and even deaths that followed.  In this episode, Alex explains what went through his mind as a sports marketing professional during the historic events of last summer, and explains how the Bucks' new ownership group has strived to push back against decades of institutional racism in Milwaukee. Plus, CBS Sports Senior Editor Andrew Julian joins us to put the Bucks' wildcat walk-out in the proper historic context. Sign up for the Podcamp Media e-newsletter for updates on our new Milwaukee headquarters Grand Opening in the spring. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Reputation management and social media consultant Molly McPherson showed us in Ep. 25 of Lead Balloon how she herself was "Indestructible" following an on-assignment near-death experience. But these days, her consulting practice, her book, her podcast and her online courses all center on helping brands achieve an indestructible reputation. And, at this moment in time, there's no bigger buzz word in that field than "Cancel Culture." So, in this B-side clip from our Lead Balloon interview, Molly shares some thoughts about "Cancel Culture:" its roots, its real impact, and the key takeaways for organizations in a highly-charged mediascape. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Established by President Jimmy Carter in the late 70’s, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has responded to every major American disaster over the last 40 years. But for all its many successes, FEMA is also an agency that has struggled with its image in the public eye. Its high-profile failures have dominated the conversation in the media and among the public. So when Molly McPherson went to work for FEMA in 2007 as a public affairs specialist, she pitched a bold new approach the put the agency front and center in telling its own story. But it would also put her and her team in the path of danger. And one sweltering day in Houston, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike, that danger caught up to her, changing her career path and her life forever. In this episode, Molly details the story of her close call, and her colleague Mike Moore shares his own personal struggle with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as a result of the time he spent in the trenches of FEMA's disaster recovery efforts. Join the Podcamp Media Email Newsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (3)

truth seeker

133

Dec 30th
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truth seeker

133

Dec 30th
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rory gehman

Great all episodes are great.. https://www.tigerishome.us/

Dec 29th
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