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How Can Audio Branding Help Your Podcast or Company? According to Harvard Business Review (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_trademark#cite_note-4) , Audio Branding is “the strategic use of sound … in positively differentiating a product or service, enhancing recall, creating preference, building trust, and even increasing sales.” So ultimately, think of it as a brand or podcast's emotional short hand - the quickest way to your listener's heart. How do you want them to feel when they hear you? And how does it help your podcast or company to reach your audience FASTER and on a deeper level? I go into a lot more detail on my blog here (and in the audio of this podcast!): https://voiceoversandvocals.com/blog/audio-branding/audiobrandingtips/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/blog/audio-branding/audiobrandingtips/) And here's that information on "earcons" that I mention - https://voiceoversandvocals.com/blog/commercial/advertising-at-cannes-you-bet/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/blog/commercial/advertising-at-cannes-you-bet/) - talks about the Taco Bell promotion in London in more detail.  If you'd like some help figuring out your audio brand, this worksheet might help! Basically though:  • Sound touches us immediately. It goes right to our hearts. People buy based on emotions and then justify it with logic, so touching your listeners’ emotions makes it much more likely they’ll remember you. Be intentional with how you want them to feel when they see and hear your brand. • The world is full of visual distraction, especially now. Sound cuts through the noise. It reaches us on a deeply personal level. If you want to be noticed, you need to be heard. • Music is a universal language. The instruments and tonal structure may change, but essentially, you can communicate emotion to a global audience without needing to know the language they speak. That means that if you invest in an effective audio brand, you can reach your intended audience on an emotional level, FAST—anywhere they might be listening. It doesn’t matter what your native language is if people can relate to the sound. Sometimes it's hard to know where to start. But figuring out an audio brand to match your visual brand, isn't as difficult as you think. I've created a worksheet that will give you a hand with this and you can download it at https://voiceoversandvocals.com/resources/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/resources/) , if you're interested. And I hope you stay safe and healthy! Take care of yourself, ok? Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)  And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
In the second part of my interview with Corey Dissin, we discussed the three elements to every spot and how to build a successful audio brand for audio talent. Corey and I also talked about: How a voice talent is not a voice talent (yes, that caught me off guard, too!) The difference between the types of voices that would be used in, for example, a horror movie trailer versus those that would be used in a Disney movie trailer The demand for audio content and how podcasting has risen in popularity What Rudy Gaskins meant when he said, “Branding is both a noun and a verb.” How, for most voice talent, there’s more to the brand than just their voice The only difference between social media, broadcast television, a movie theater, the radio, and a streaming service How reading copy is a skill for voice talent—not their profession Why some people need to fire themselves Some of the topics Corey covers in his Go Get It podcast and One More Round podcast How social media is like being Pete Rose and George Foreman The importance of making 99 enemies in sales The long shelf life of podcasts and other aspects that make podcasting so powerful  What Corey has been up to lately and the feedback he’s gotten so far You can find more on Corey Dissin at https://coreydissin.com/one-more-round (https://coreydissin.com/one-more-round/) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)  And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
Corey Dissin was only 19 when he first got into the world of audio and sound. He started answering phones as a volunteer with Paul Turner Productions (now Propulsion Media Labs). His volunteering later morphed into an internship, at which point he met Paul. The two formed a friendship, and later Paul began allowing Corey to sit in and watch him record voiceover sessions and produce commercials. At the end of the day, Paul would let Corey stay around in the studio and “play,” and that was how Corey began to learn how to produce audio. Paul later hired Corey, and through that work, Corey not only sharpened his production skills, but he also learned marketing. Today, Corey is a marketing coach, hosts two podcasts, and is the Vice President of Propulsion Media Labs. He is also “the undisputed heavyweight champion of content.” In the first part of our interview, we discussed a bit more about his beginnings with Paul Turner Productions. We also talked about:  How Propulsion Media Labs offers turnkey video and audio production services for a large variety of businesses, serving as a secret weapon for many of its customers Corey’s role in the sales process of recruiting talent while working with Paul Turner How Corey got involved in the voiceover end of things with Paul Turner Productions How Propulsion Media Labs sets itself apart from the competition Why Corey fired himself ten years ago How to choose the right voice for a project How Corey’s knowledge about the key marketing aspects of growing a voiceover business morphed into the coaching he does today Corey’s signature phrase, “Go get it!” Corey’s belief that “It’s not what you do it with. It’s what you do with it.” The one skill that most voiceover talent, producers, graphic designers, freelancers, and solopreneurs overlook  How businesses are missing out by not utilizing social media to its maximum potential To learn more about Corey Dissin, you can visit https://coreydissin.com/one-more-round (https://coreydissin.com/one-more-round/) . You can also find out more about Propulsion Media Labs at http://www.promedialabs.com (http://www.promedialabs.com) .  This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)  And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
Here’s the second part of my fascinating interview with Steve Keller. In it, we dove into how brands can harness the power of archetypes as well as what Steve calls the three pillars of return on sonic investment. We also discussed: Music’s impact on our perception of meaning How music soundscapes and noise affect the healthcare industry How consumers’ experience of products often differentiates brands more than the products themselves might Psychophysics—how our perception of reality is a combination of sensory inputs Using sound to affect other senses Carl Jung’s utilization of archetypes in psychology Both the science and art of sound—that they’re not at two opposite ends of a spectrum, but rather they’re two sides of the same coin The importance of brands being intentional and making educated choices around sound The problem of brands failing to make decisions based on the importance of sound, even though they understand the important role sound plays How critical it is to devote time and energy to audio branding in addition to visual branding   Steve’s desire to inspire younger people to move even further with the current knowledge and research around audio branding For more information about Steve Keller, check out https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevekeller1/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevekeller1/) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! Support the show (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/resources/) (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/resources/)
For Steve Keller, audio branding seamlessly blends together the three overarching passions in his life: music, psychology, and marketing. Steve had a passion for music from a young age but never considered it as a career. He became fascinated with and obtained his college degree in psychology. During what some may consider a “gap year” before he had planned to pursue a master’s degree and Ph.D., Steve decided to go in a different direction and ultimately found himself producing music in Nashville, Tenessee. While there, he discovered his passion for marketing and advertising. In 2005, all three passions came together as he began to delve into the world of audio branding. Steve now works for Studio Resonate, Pandora’s in-house consultancy for advertisers. In the first part of our conversation, we discussed Steve’s three passions and some of the research he has done, as well as: Starting the audio consultancy iV ( http://www.ivaudiobranding.com (http://www.ivaudiobranding.com) ) How Steve and iV began developing the sonic identity for Pandora Measuring KPIs and return on sonic investments The importance of developing the sonic piece of brand recognition at the beginning of the branding process, not at the end Understanding the entire ecosystem of a brand How audio influences buyer behavior Steve’s work with Studio Resonate Cross-modal hacking to influence consumers’ perception of flavor not only with taste but also with sound (this part blew my mind!) How sound affects our body’s release of dopamine and oxytocin How biases influence our decision-making processes You can find more information about Steve Keller at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevekeller1/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevekeller1/) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
Here’s the second part of my interview with storyteller Dave Bricker. We talked about the four elements of a story, the difference between anecdotes and stories, and how to add value to people’s lives through storytelling. In our conversation, we also covered: Whether people are hardwired to want to hear depressing stories or happy stories The difference between happy endings and transformation and how that affects how stories connect with people A much more effective alternative to scare tactics in advertising Why children love reading storybooks over and over...and over…and over... Where most advertising falls short and how to improve How the most powerful stories speak to our innate drive to seek safety and survival How authentic conflict brings depth to a story How, in advertising, money must serve not as an outcome, but rather as a tool Using audio to prime an audience Different types of coaches and which audiences they’re best suited for You can find more information on Dave on his website at www.storysailing.com (http://www.storysailing.com) or on any of his social media channels:  LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbricker/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbricker/) Twitter https://twitter.com/daveBricker (https://twitter.com/daveBricker) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DaveBrickerSpeaker/ (https://www.facebook.com/DaveBrickerSpeaker/) This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Dave Bricker discovered his love for "StorySailing” while spending 15 years living aboard sailboats. In 1983, after his first year of college, David got a job working with the Christo Surrounded Islands project. During that time, he realized something was missing in his life. After finishing college, he headed off to the Bahamas to begin his 15-year sailing adventure, which included a transatlantic sailing trip in 1991. Dave has authored 11 books, and his company, Remarkable Stories, Inc. (https://storysailing.com/) , https://storysailing.com/, teaches the art of business transformation through storytelling.  In the first part of my conversation with Dave, we explored how story and sound intersect, as well as:  How his idea of storytelling for business started Heading off to the Bahamas with a small sailboat, $30, and a locker full of food and dreams How storytelling ties together music, writing, speaking, graphic design, and code The importance of storytelling about people, outcomes, and value instead of prices, processes, ingredients, and data Speaking techniques to draw people in Girls tied to railroad tracks, dream sequences, the country, and 1940s clubs (yes, you read that right! 😉) Whether our response to music is learned or innate—culture or predisposition Playing music with a Dutch jazz singer in the Azores How improvisation ties into storytelling A big mistake people make when giving professional speeches and how to avoid it How professionals can improve their speaking by getting involved with Toastmasters (http://www.toastmasters.org) - http://www.toastmasters.org How we as humans are hunter-gatherers at heart and are always scanning for threats You can find more information on Dave on his website at www.storysailing.com (http://www.storysailing.com) .  You can also find him on his social media channels:  LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbricker/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbricker/) Twitter https://twitter.com/daveBricker (https://twitter.com/daveBricker) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DaveBrickerSpeaker/ (https://www.facebook.com/DaveBrickerSpeaker/) This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
In the second part of my interview with Morry Zelcovitch, we got a bit more philosophical.  His work and research has led him to some very insightful observations about how he now deals with things in a healthier (brain chemistry-wise) manner - and how he might be able to help others do the same. So we started with a bit of science about how we hear things, the filter all sound goes through before we interpret it, and how this kind of research can help people dealing with PTSD, OCD and other issues. It's another very interesting discussion and I think you'll enjoy the hopeful nature of it. To recap, in this second part of our interview, we discussed: How vibration is interpreted into sound in our brains in a very subjective way How you get a cleaner, better effect with high quality headphones What he's working on now Testing the audio to help people with PTSD, OCD, etc. How the brain prefers things that are "uninterrupted". How life has become a very different experience for him How different his life is now How his work has made him feel like a super hero The evolution of discovery Designing products around the end user - and how everyone's experiences will be different How attitude changes everything You can find out more about Morry's approach to "brainwave entrainment" at www.themorrymethod.com (https://themorrymethod.com/) . His more professionally oriented website is at www.activemindsglobal.com (https://www.activemindsglobal.com/) . And his newest product is at www.quantummindmethod.com (https://quantummindmethod.com/) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Morry Zelcovitch has had a lot of challenges in his life including depression and addiction. In his search for something to help him with his difficulties, he came across something called "binauaral beats" and that led him into the brainwave entrainment field (a term he coined himself).  Essentially, he's programming his brain to operate in a healthier way, through the use of sound. Exploring this continues to be his life's work. But like any self-improvement option, it works (or doesn't work) for each person differently.  We talk a lot about this in our interview. I found it truly fascinating to discuss how sound - or vibration interpreted by our eardrums - may be able to heal us from the inside out. In this first part of our interview, we discussed: His background in "brainwave entrainment" (how he trained himself) His search to find a way to live How he started researching the science of brain chemistry He came across something that might work for him - something that would modify his neural chemistry How music can heal through its "steady pulse" and pattern Using a stimulus - sound and light - to influence his brainwaves so that he could feel better without drugs Unfortunately, binauaral beats didn't work for him How he needed to create his own methodology His opinion about some flawed science - the reason he wasn't really helped by binauaral beats How binauaral beats are supposed to work The differences (and names) of various brainwave states How our brains are designed to work Why brainwave entrainment is so important You can find out more about Morry's approach to "brainwave entrainment" at www.themorrymethod.com (https://themorrymethod.com/) . His more professionally oriented website is at www.activemindsglobal.com (https://www.activemindsglobal.com/) . And his newest product is at www.quantummindmethod.com (https://quantummindmethod.com/) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Here's the second part of my interview with Creative Director, Monte Bowden   We talked about his philosophies on directing voice talent and trusting his editors, discovering a brand "voice", consistency in branding, and his thoughts on creating a deeper connection with those who his clients hope to serve. We also spoke about things like: How he gives direction to the voice talent he works with, helping them find the "why" Consistency in branding - both in the tone of that brand and in the voice talent used How other ads have used INconsistency to create interest and engagement Authenticity and how it plays a part in advertising and fundraising How movie trailers seem to be getting more compelling His love of work that's "cinematic" What he's working on right now How a client of his is helping people to understand transparency in healthcare and leading in that field Working with a children's hospital and telling their caring stories How social media might play a role in hiring voice talent - and whether or not it should Monte actually interviews ME for a little bit. ;) (He asks some excellent questions!) You can find more information on Monte and Amperage on their website at https://facebook.com/AmperageMarketing (https://facebook.com/AmperageMarketing) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Monte Bowden knows a thing or two about advertising and marketing. He studied Communications in college and then worked in a TV News station for years, rising in the ranks from intern to news director.  He also served as an adjunct professor in communications at his alma-mater.  Monte joined AMPERAGE as a communications strategist, leading PR efforts for agency clients. And with his well-rounded background in storytelling, video production and management, Monte has worked in a variety of roles there.  He currently serves as a Creative Director - and is someone I've had the absolute pleasure of working with for many years now. In the first part of our conversation, we spoke about a lot of different things, such as: How he developed his love of sound, starting with radio - and how it influenced the college he chose How radio led to working at a TV news station, learning a lot about video, writing, producing and managing How he started working with Amperage (hint: it had to do with a chance meeting in a grocery store!) The differences and similarities between working in TV News and working at an Ad Agency The use of wireless mics in the newsroom - and how that transformed the storytelling How storytelling factors in to his work now Emotional decision making How sound might best be used in fundraising and in advertising to draw someone in How everything works together - sound effects, good scripts and SILENCE Where music fits in (and how it should be thought of early in the process rather than later!) A case study about how he and his team came up with an ad for a hospital How technology would change the development of a commercial like this The story behind the NBC three note "audio branded" tone How sound can be described in writing - and how much more effective that can make it Designing sound for advertising You can find more information on Monte and Amperage on their website at https://facebook.com/AmperageMarketing (https://facebook.com/AmperageMarketing) . This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
This is the second part of my discussion with Josuël Rogers, a coach who uses music - specifically Hip Hop - to help his students and clients develop self-awareness and confidence.  We talked about how music influences our moods (making a playlist for yourself can really help!), how personal sound can be and the power of words (among other things). You can find him at Hip Hop Culture Coaching ( https://www.hiphopculturecoaching.com (https://www.hiphopculturecoaching.com) ), if you'd like to learn more about the services he offers and the information he has to share. In the second part of our conversation, we talked about: Foley in film and the making of weather sounds How your mind associates a type of sound with the weather How the "filter" of a microphone changes sound Hearing your own voice from a third-person's perspective Randomness and how that influences what we hear How the same song can represent different moods for different people How personal sound is How we fixate on sounds we're more familiar with (a drummer focuses on the drums in music, for instance) The best kept secret about making playlists to help us experience the world in the way we want to Repetition is key - words matter ("impossible" puts a block on things immediately, etc.) Everything around you is a word How a hockey coach learned to better coach his team through Neuro Linguistic Programming Your brain not registering negatives What he's working on right now - coaching More information about his podcast Where his podcast can be found: podcast.hiphopculturecoaching.com (http://podcast.hiphopculturecoaching.com/) - and on Apple, Spotify, etc. You can find more information on Josuël by locating him on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/josuelrogers/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/josuelrogers/) , on Instagram and Facebook as JosuelRogers & HipHopCultureCoaching, and you can find out about his own podcast by looking up The HipHop Minded Professionalon any podcasting app you have available. This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
This is the first part of my discussion with Josuël Rogers, a coach who uses music - specifically Hip Hop - to help his students and clients develop self-awareness and confidence. We talked about how music influences our moods and what got him into the Hip Hop culture in the first place (among other things). You can find him at Hip Hop Culture Coaching ( https://www.hiphopculturecoaching.com (https://www.hiphopculturecoaching.com) ), if you'd like to learn more about the services he offers and the information he has to share. In this first part of our conversation, we talked about: His introduction to Hip Hop music and its culture and why it drew him in as a teen (hint: think rebellion! :) ) How he uses the philosophy, the mindset and the sounds behind it to influence moods. How building a playlist of music like a DJ can make your day better An article he wrote about music influencing how people see the emotions on other people's faces. ( https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/my-motivation-mood-headphones-josu%C3%ABl-rogers-/ (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/my-motivation-mood-headphones-josu%C3%ABl-rogers-/) ) How a smile is contagious - and audible in your voice Neuro Linguistic Programming - how the words you use influence yourself and the person you're speaking to How he applies it in his own coaching How he builds his workshops for students The tone of your voice and connecting with others in both voice over and music The tempo of music and whether or not faster means "happier" or something else How music can change the "feel" of a scene in a film (I also spoke about this extensively with John McClain in our interview, if that subject interests you - (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/blog/casinos/interview-with-john-mcclain-part-1/) ) You can find more information on Josuël by locating him on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/josuelrogers/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/josuelrogers/) , on Instagram and Facebook as JosuelRogers & HipHopCultureCoaching, and you can find out about his own podcast by looking up The HipHop Minded Professional on any podcasting app you have available. This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
We create lots of pieces of media that include sound as an element.  But what about actual, physical, spaces? This is where architecture and sound vibrations, meet.  There are actually buildings crafted specifically to allow us to hear tones that feel uplifting or inspiring to us.  Shea Trahan ( https://www.sheatrahan.com/ (https://www.sheatrahan.com/) ), an architect intrigued by how sound works through his chosen instrument of creation, studied this in detail.  He talks about Resonance – sound as “sympathetic vibration” – and relates that to buildings that seem to exist to amplify this.  Then he adds information about Reverberation – how long a sound lingers once the source sound has stopped. The combination in a building, makes it the idea place for a concert. But this application could also be used for health care. Sonic therapy is useful for the treatment of PTSD, depression, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Imagine how useful a space could be if it had built in healing resonances and reverberations.  And I'll talk more about sound for health care in future episodes.  For now, have a look at his TEDx presentation, and see what you think: https://youtu.be/R-BMF4e-1bg (https://youtu.be/R-BMF4e-1bg) Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
John McClain knows a thing or two about sound.  For one thing, he's the owner and lead sound designer/mixer at The Dog and Pony Show in Las Vegas, Nevada ( https://www.ladyluckvoiceovers.com/ (https://www.ladyluckvoiceovers.com/) - another fantastic voice talent in Vegas) and another course on Sound for Film at UNLV. The second part of our discussion covered a bunch more topics like: Voice actors and editors need to pay attention to the tempo of a script How sound that's inconsistent or simply not good, can make a person turn away without knowing why Information on a book John uses in his course called The Sonic Boom ( https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Boom-Sound-Transforms-Think/dp/0544570162 (https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Boom-Sound-Transforms-Think/dp/0544570162) ) How sound allows you to time travel When he first became conscious of sound and began to love it How architecture has its own sound Some information on his latest sound design projects More information on his podcast, VO Inertia ( https://anchor.fm/voinertia (https://anchor.fm/voinertia) ) Dog and Pony Show can be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/DogandPonyStudios/ (https://www.facebook.com/DogandPonyStudios/) and on Twitter at @DnPSound This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
John McClain knows a thing or two about sound.  For one thing, he's the owner and lead sound designer/mixer at The Dog and Pony Show in Las Vegas, Nevada ( https://www.ladyluckvoiceovers.com/ (https://www.ladyluckvoiceovers.com/) - another fantastic voice talent in Vegas) and another course on Sound for Film at UNLV. The first part of our discussion was a fascinating trip through a bunch of topics, such as: What he teaches students who take his Sound for Film course How music can completely change the tone of a piece of film Why sound needs to be paid attention to How evolution has shaped our understanding of sound How voice talent can use silence to their advantage Why marketers and advertisers are starting to pay attention to good sound design Some examples of sound design - such as casino "win tunes" for machines The laws about manipulation using sound in casino gaming (there actually are some!) What music notes are used more often for the sound in casino games and why How it's the wild west in advertising when it comes to sound How to use compelling sound in advertising John's podcast, VO Inertia can be found at https://anchor.fm/voinertia (https://anchor.fm/voinertia) Dog and Pony Show can be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/DogandPonyStudios/ (https://www.facebook.com/DogandPonyStudios/) and on Twitter at @DnPSound This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Sound has a very powerful effect on our behavior and it can be used to great affect in a variety of different settings. Here's a link to the "piano stairs" experiment I mention in the podcast: (https://youtu.be/2lXh2n0aPyw) This is the article from 2015 within the APS (The Association for Psychological Science) called Background Music Influences Buying Behavior - (https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/minds-business/background-music-influences-buyer-behavior.html) I'm sure you all know about Pandora: (https://www.pandora.com/) And here's a link to Steve Keller's very interesting TEDx talk on the subject. (https://youtu.be/yvnxQ2fQg10) He's written an extensive white paper about using music and sounds within the healthcare industry and I'll be exploring that in a lot more detail in future episodes. Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
What can you expect from this podcast? I explain what the podcast is about, what episode it would be best to start with, and how to get in touch with me, if you'd like to do that.
Kattie Laur has a background in broadcast radio so it naturally seemed to follow that she would become interested in podcasts.  She's putting that passion to good use as a podcast producer and gives us some tips on what makes a great show, why she feels podcasts are an important medium and how they're the wave of the advertising future.  In this second part of our interview, she talks about: * what a podcast needs to do to keep her listening to their intro over and over * how she decided to create sound breaks to switch between thoughts within a podcast * how different cultures experience your audio differently (context is everything!) * the differences between podcasts she's paid to produce ("learned passion") vs. her passion projects * what she can do for people when she's producing podcasts * how many different hats she wears, doing what she does * some more information about how she's highlighting female-fronted podcasts in her blog * how podcasting is still a bit of a male-dominated industry - so she feels more people should hear women's voices in podcasts * why podcasts appeal to people so much * how advertisers are catching on to the potential in podcasts Her website is at: (https://www.kattielaur.com) She has some really helpful information in her blogs, too! She’s written about the 5 key things you need to think about before starting a podcast: (https://www.kattielaur.com/blog/how-to-start-a-podcast-5-key-things) And she's started a blog series that highlights women podcasters and their shows: (https://www.kattielaur.com/blog/podcasts-by-women-to-stop-sleeping-on-vol-1)   Her ethical travel podcast is called Alpaca My Bags: (https://audioboom.com/channels/4984382) (and is in all the major podcast outlets) And you can find and follow her on Twitter: @podkatt This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Kattie Laur has a background in broadcast radio so it naturally seemed to follow that she would become interested in podcasts.  She's putting that passion to good use as a podcast producer and gives us some tips on what makes a great show, why she feels podcasts are an important medium and how they're the wave of the advertising future.  In this first part of our interview, she talks about: * her beginnings in studying broadcasting * her interesting relationship with the CBC * how she got into podcasting * how she decided she could produce podcasts for a living * what kinds of clients she works with * what fires her up about producing podcasts * why she feels the concept is way more important than the equipment you use. * how audio branding plays a role in the production of podcasts Her website is at: (https://www.kattielaur.com) She has some really helpful information in her blogs, too! She’s written about the 5 key things you need to think about before starting a podcast: (https://www.kattielaur.com/blog/how-to-start-a-podcast-5-key-things) And she's started a blog series that highlights women podcasters and their shows: (https://www.kattielaur.com/blog/podcasts-by-women-to-stop-sleeping-on-vol-1)   Her ethical travel podcast is called Alpaca My Bags: (https://audioboom.com/channels/4984382) (and is in all the major podcast outlets) And you can find and follow her on Twitter: @podkatt This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco ( (http://www.humbertofranco.com/) ). Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast?  If so, here's the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453)   And if you like what you hear (and read!) - please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much! 
Comments (2)

Brigid Reale

Great episode, Jodi! This is something I never realized I've been "caught" by everywhere in life.

Jun 30th
Reply (1)
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